32 Burst results for "Jane Lindholm"

"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:19 min | Last month

"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont Public Radio? ? I'm the host. . Jane Lindholm. . On this show you tell us what you're interested in and what your questions are about that thing you're interested in. . And we use your questions to guide what we talk about on the show. . Your curiosity dictates what we explore. . When I was young, , I really wanted to be a marine biologist that's a scientist who studies things that live in the oceans and lots of you are interested in marine biology to we've done episodes about fish about why the sea is salty and other things related to oceans like our jellyfish really made out of Jelly spoiler alert they're not. . But now we're going to focus on one particular type of animal that lives in the oceans that like me a lot of you are fascinated by. . Can you guess what animal we might be discussing? ? Well. . That is the sound of a humpback whale singing. . And, , that sound comes courtesy of the federal government's no of fisheries website. . But we're not going to focus on the way whales communicate today that's going to be a future episode. . So be sure to listen for that one too. . We want today to have a better understanding of what whales are and how they move through the oceans and occasionally through rivers to here's our guide for today's episode. . My name is Nick Pinson. . I'm a paleontologist at the Smithsonian in Washington DC. . Tell me what paleontologist is healing tallest looks for any trace of life that lived a long long time ago, , and they tend to look for fossils which can be bones footprints leaves any kind of trace of life that isn't around now, , but we know existed millions billions of years ago. . One of the challenges and one of the things I like most about being paleontologist is that you don't get all the clues that you'd like to. . So we don't get a full skeleton sometimes you do but mostly not see have to make the best you can do with a little bit of information, , and that's what makes paleontology for me a lot like a detective story. . So neck, , some of the kids listening now might be scratching their heads because they know that this episode is about Wales and you just told us you're a paleontologist. . So you look for signs of life that doesn't exist anymore, , but Wales still exists. . I got into science because I really liked looking for fossils and that led me eventually to looking at Wales because Wales are mammals that live notion and some of them live in the rivers but you're probably more familiar with ones that live in the oceans that are really big that have flippers that have flukes <hes>. . They look from the outside a bit more like a fish than. . A Mammal, , what's really neat about them is that we know that they're mammals and that they're closely related to other hoofed mammals specifically the hoofed mammals that have even toes to toes and those mammals are cows, , pigs, , deer, , camels, , sheep. . That's who whales are most closely related to, , and if you look at the wheel and you look at all of its near cousins that are live today. . Realize that whales look really really different and what explains why they're so different has to do with how they volved, , how they came to be and going back to fossils were really fortunate and being able to find fossil whales tell us how those changes happened. . So I'm lucky enough to be able to work with teams of scientists to go round the world <hes> and look for fossils. . Of Whales and then try to understand how those fit in with what we know about whales today, , and also where they're going because the earth has always changed and it's still changing I want to get to some of the questions that our listeners have sent us. But . just before we do I, , want to pick up on something that you said, , which was that whales are really closely related. . Even toed hoofed animals, , but they look really different. . So if they look really different, , how can to animals be very closely related because you'd think they'd be more closely related to something else that they look like like a shark or a fish right just because something lives in the water or looks like a fish doesn't mean they're all related to each other whales, , sharks and fish the last time they shared a common ancestor was probably <hes> nearly half a billion years ago. . Let's get more precise about. . Wales as related to other mammals, , we have a lot of different ways of knowing how organisms are related to each other. . We can look at their DNA which tells us directly about their relationships in a way. . That's that doesn't connect to how they look as more to do with their genetics. . Right DNA tells us that whales fit in with all these other mammals whales are mammals, , and that's something you would know probably from just looking. . At the fact that they re there, , they have babies drink milk from their MOMS <hes> do have hair. . If you are ever get the opportunity to close enough to whale, , and even if you seem photos of baby, , dolphins have little tiny whiskers on their snout <hes> they lose them pretty quickly. . But those are all telling you about their deeper ancestry and you want to use all the different kinds of evidence available to you whether it's DNA. . That might tell you one story or fossils that tell you a story that maybe sometimes is a bit different and that's why I say that fossils tell something that we wouldn't otherwise. . No. . We can have a a family tree of animals based on DNA and then fossils tell us about this branches of the tree that we wouldn't otherwise know about and for Wales. That's . what tells us that the earliest whales lived on land

Jane Lindholm Vermont scientist
Why Are Whales So Big?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:19 min | Last month

Why Are Whales So Big?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont Public Radio? I'm the host. Jane Lindholm. On this show you tell us what you're interested in and what your questions are about that thing you're interested in. And we use your questions to guide what we talk about on the show. Your curiosity dictates what we explore. When I was young, I really wanted to be a marine biologist that's a scientist who studies things that live in the oceans and lots of you are interested in marine biology to we've done episodes about fish about why the sea is salty and other things related to oceans like our jellyfish really made out of Jelly spoiler alert they're not. But now we're going to focus on one particular type of animal that lives in the oceans that like me a lot of you are fascinated by. Can you guess what animal we might be discussing? Well. That is the sound of a humpback whale singing. And, that sound comes courtesy of the federal government's no of fisheries website. But we're not going to focus on the way whales communicate today that's going to be a future episode. So be sure to listen for that one too. We want today to have a better understanding of what whales are and how they move through the oceans and occasionally through rivers to here's our guide for today's episode. My name is Nick Pinson. I'm a paleontologist at the Smithsonian in Washington DC. Tell me what paleontologist is healing tallest looks for any trace of life that lived a long long time ago, and they tend to look for fossils which can be bones footprints leaves any kind of trace of life that isn't around now, but we know existed millions billions of years ago. One of the challenges and one of the things I like most about being paleontologist is that you don't get all the clues that you'd like to. So we don't get a full skeleton sometimes you do but mostly not see have to make the best you can do with a little bit of information, and that's what makes paleontology for me a lot like a detective story. So neck, some of the kids listening now might be scratching their heads because they know that this episode is about Wales and you just told us you're a paleontologist. So you look for signs of life that doesn't exist anymore, but Wales still exists. I got into science because I really liked looking for fossils and that led me eventually to looking at Wales because Wales are mammals that live notion and some of them live in the rivers but you're probably more familiar with ones that live in the oceans that are really big that have flippers that have flukes They look from the outside a bit more like a fish than. A Mammal, what's really neat about them is that we know that they're mammals and that they're closely related to other hoofed mammals specifically the hoofed mammals that have even toes to toes and those mammals are cows, pigs, deer, camels, sheep. That's who whales are most closely related to, and if you look at the wheel and you look at all of its near cousins that are live today. Realize that whales look really really different and what explains why they're so different has to do with how they volved, how they came to be and going back to fossils were really fortunate and being able to find fossil whales tell us how those changes happened. So I'm lucky enough to be able to work with teams of scientists to go round the world and look for fossils. Of Whales and then try to understand how those fit in with what we know about whales today, and also where they're going because the earth has always changed and it's still changing I want to get to some of the questions that our listeners have sent us. But just before we do I, want to pick up on something that you said, which was that whales are really closely related. Even toed hoofed animals, but they look really different. So if they look really different, how can to animals be very closely related because you'd think they'd be more closely related to something else that they look like like a shark or a fish right just because something lives in the water or looks like a fish doesn't mean they're all related to each other whales, sharks and fish the last time they shared a common ancestor was probably nearly half a billion years ago. Let's get more precise about. Wales as related to other mammals, we have a lot of different ways of knowing how organisms are related to each other. We can look at their DNA which tells us directly about their relationships in a way. That's that doesn't connect to how they look as more to do with their genetics. Right DNA tells us that whales fit in with all these other mammals whales are mammals, and that's something you would know probably from just looking. At the fact that they re there, they have babies drink milk from their MOMS do have hair. If you are ever get the opportunity to close enough to whale, and even if you seem photos of baby, dolphins have little tiny whiskers on their snout they lose them pretty quickly. But those are all telling you about their deeper ancestry and you want to use all the different kinds of evidence available to you whether it's DNA. That might tell you one story or fossils that tell you a story that maybe sometimes is a bit different and that's why I say that fossils tell something that we wouldn't otherwise. No. We can have a a family tree of animals based on DNA and then fossils tell us about this branches of the tree that we wouldn't otherwise know about and for Wales. That's what tells us that the earliest whales lived on land

Wales Scientist Vermont Jane Lindholm Washington Dc Nick Pinson
Why Can't Kids Vote?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:49 min | Last month

Why Can't Kids Vote?

"This is why a podcast for curious kids I'm Jane Lindholm. On this show take questions from kids just like you about anything and it's our to try to find answers. And if there aren't answers to at least give you a better understanding and maybe encourage you to do your own research after all there are a lot of things that are still unknown or not very well understood about the world and you could be the person who helps the rest of US learn about them now or as you grow up. You maybe a kid but don't let that. Stop you from investigating all the things you're curious about and telling US grownups what you learn. In the United States where but why is based? We have a big election coming up election day. This year is officially on November third, but more Americans than usual are voting in advance this year sometimes in person at their town hall or city office, and sometimes by mailing in their ballot, a ballot is the piece of paper. We're adults markdown who they want to vote for people in lots of states are voting for their governors who helped run the states or their Congress people who work in Washington to help run the country. But the position that's getting the most attention is the election for who will be president of the United States for the next four years, and some of you have questions about that and about elections and voting and political parties. So we're going to tackle all of them today. Why don't kids get a vote for president? Why haven't we had girl presidents before far Democrats, Call Democrats and Republicans. Called Republicans, we've done other episodes about how the US form of government is set up, and we've done episodes about what a president is and does all day and why we have one in the United States we will put links to those episodes in our show notes and at our website. But why kids dot Org in case you want to go back and listen to those episodes specifically. But you've been sending US new questions. So today, we're going to talk more about the presidency elections and why it's so important to vote and why you can't do that if you're a kid. The US has a form of government called representative democracy in a representative democracy. All of the eligible voters get to pick a few people who run the government and those people make our laws or change our laws they are supposed to represent or speak for us. Let's talk a little bit about the presidential election which you may have been hearing about in the news whether you live in the United States or not. Our current President Donald Trump has been in office for almost four years, which is what we call one term. He wants to have a second term, and if he wins, that would be his last a president can only be elected to two terms. But he's being challenged by a lot of people the most prominent challenger. The most popular one is a man named Joe. Biden. Joe Biden used to be the vice president when Barack Obama was the president and Biden is hoping that he will win the presidency this year. There are a lot of ways. This year's election looks very different from normal years as most of you probably know pretty well already. The Global Corona virus pandemic means that many of the candidates running for president and for other government offices like senators are governors can't get out and shake hands and kiss babies and try to convince people to vote for them in the same way when they do all that and try to convince people that's called campaigning. So the campaigning looks pretty different this year. Also many states are encouraging voters to fill in their ballots and vote by mail instead of going to a specific place to what's called cast their vote to vote in person on election day. Lots. Of States have made changes to their rules to make sure more people can vote early this year. And there's another thing I want to mention before I introduce our guest and get to your questions. We are putting this episode out on Friday October ninth as it's going out the President Donald Trump has cove in nineteen, the corona virus he announced that he tested positive for Covid nineteen a week earlier, and he was in the hospital for a few days. He says he's feeling much better now but we still don't really know how this might impact his health in the long term. So there are a lot of unknowns and if things are confusing after election day in November, we'll do another episode to help you understand what's happening. So feel free to send us your questions if anything is confusing to you. But for now, let's get to the questions you've already sent. We invited someone to join us who has practiced talking to young people about voting and elections. Hi, I'm Aaron Geiger Smith I'M A reporter and the author of thank you for voting and the thank you for voting young readers edition. We gave Aaron a really big broad question to tackle I a question from Milo and ten years old I live in Los Angeles California and my question is how Does. The government work how does the government work? We could go really detailed and in-depth on various kinds of governments, and we could look at how our country's government works here in the United States where you and I are or how some state governments work or even how our town government works but broadly speaking to to Milo's question and maybe what some other people are thinking, how has government supposed to work? What is government supposed to be doing for us? It is a big question Milo but it's a really good one government is supposed to help our lives all the things that are necessary for us as people to learn and grow and just be in the world. Make those things go a little smoother and be safe so Government involves our police and firefighters and making that run. Its government is setting up all the systems in a way that makes the world functions and then adapting to make sure those systems keep working how they're supposed to, and if something changes, the government should be there to make things better in a way. It's sort of like with the corona virus in what we're going through our state and local and national governments, what they sometimes did and always should have done is adapted and think through what the problems are to try to make citizens be able to continue their lives safely. So it's about keeping a safe and then planning ahead

United States President Trump Joe Biden Donald Trump Jane Lindholm Vice President Milo Congress Aaron Geiger Smith Barack Obama Washington Representative Los Angeles California Covid Reporter
Why Are Some Animals Pets And Others Are Lunch?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Why Are Some Animals Pets And Others Are Lunch?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm on this show we take your questions and find interesting people to answer them This episode though is a little bit different. We are tackling some questions without answers. This episode is a follow up to our cats dogs episodes. So if you haven't listened to those Ya, you might want to go back and listen to them before you listen to this one. In those two episodes, we answered all kinds of questions about our feline and Canine companions but that got us thinking, why do we have pets in the first place? Why are some animals farm animals and some are pets while others are wild and why do we eat animals? We're going to be spending some time thinking about those hard questions including the ones about which animals are okay to eat. So adults you may want to think about whether or not. This is an episode that's right for your kids or listen to it on your own first before you share it with them. Okay. Let's get started a few years ago I. Read a book for adults called some. We love some we hate some we eat why it's so hard to think straight about animals and it kind of blew my mind because it talked about all of these interesting ways we think about animals the same kind of animal a bunny for example, can be a wild animal, a pet animal, an animal that's used for medical testing or an animal we eat for dinner and how we feel about that bunny affects how we treat it. In American culture, we would never eat a dog dogs are pets. Eat A lot of hamburgers. However if you live in India, it's illegal in most parts of the country to kill a cow or to eat any kind of meat that comes from a cow like hamburger or steak. So, our ideas about animals have a lot to do with our religion, our culture, our beliefs, and where we live. We're going to explore some of those ideas today, and our guest is the author of that book. I mentioned how her Herzog is a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University psychology is the study of behavior and the brain. So why we do the things we do and how our behavior our actions are connected to our minds, how studies the relationships between humans and animals. Since. We talked about cats and dogs. In our previous two episodes I wanted how to explain a little bit about our relationship to our pets. Now people often say they are a dog person or I'm a cat person how says he's a dog person but right now he just has a cat people say that they keep pets because they get unconditional love from their pet. Mike Catt does not give me unconditional love. I'd give her unconditional love but she treats me like the guy that like opens the door and lets her out. And does what she wants to do. So what do you think it means that if somebody says their dog person like you did or a cat person given that you have a cat but you don't feel like your cat gives you that much love. But you know, do you have a sense of what it means for somebody to wear that badge of cat person or a dog person? Well there's been a ton of research on that and basically it's been fairly consistent. There's sort of consistent but fairly small differences, dog people and cat people, and so for example, dog people tend to be a little more extroverted. Cat people tend to be a little more introverted. Some studies have shown that cat people tend to be a little more open to new experience new ideas. On the other hand cat people tend to be a little more anxious. But I'm I'm not sure I. Think sometimes you just fall in love with an animal and sometimes it's a cat and sometimes it's a dog and I think people can switch back and forth and for those of you listening if those were new words for you extroverted and introverted extroverted kind of means somebody who's really bubbly and likes to talk to other people in really likes interacting with people and introverted people tend to be quieter maybe you just don't like the excitement never really loud room. You don't WanNa be the center of attention then you might be a more introverted person. Interestingly enough I think that also to some extent applies with two cats and dogs. Cats tend to be more introverted they tend to be Shire. Dogs tend to be more extroverted they They you know they tend to. Give you more in some cases you know sort of psychologically and and. Are More eager eager for social interaction. At least my dogs have always been not my dog. My dog is very introverted and he's not a people pleaser. He's more of a cat dog for yeah. That's interesting because it's very interesting because you do have like dogs and you do have dog like. I've I've I met a cat recently that was very dog doglike. She fell in love with me instantly wouldn't get out of my lap and eat dinner table. Yeah, that sounds very dog like.

Shire Mike Catt Vermont Jane Lindholm Western Carolina University India Professor Of Psychology Herzog
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Vermont Margot Jane Lindholm Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:32 min | 3 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Jane Lindholm Margot Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Circle Round

Circle Round

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Circle Round

"This week's story. The fallen sparrow was adapted by me. Rebecca share it was edited by Virginia Marshall Circle Ranch Executive Producers Catherine Brewer. Our original music and sound design is by Eric Shimon Circle Rounds. Artists is Sabina Hunt. Sabinas made a black and WHITE PICTURE FOR EVERY CIRCLE. Round story pictures that you can call her as a grownup to visit our website. Wbz DOT ORG slash circle round and click on soundtrack and coloring pages. A special thanks to this week's actors. Kimberly SCHRAFFT's molly bloom and Jane Lindholm. Molly Bloom the American public media. Podcasts brings on an boom best. Jane Lindholm hosts but why from Vermont public radio. You can find all three podcasts. Wherever Union grownups listened to circle round the featured instrument in today's story was the Celeste. You can learn more about this member of the percussion family and see a picture on our website. Wbz DOT ORG slash circle round. Never want to miss an episode of circle around ask your grownup to subscribe on Apple. Podcast wherever they get their podcasts and please leave us some stars write us a review or just tell your friends about the show circle randazzo production of Wvu Boston's NPR news station. I'm Rebecca share. Thanks for circling around with us. One of the best things about creating circle around hearing from listeners. Like you circle round fans have been telling us about their favorite circle round stories and we're excited to share some of their voices with you name. Is Chris Fan dissimilated Gabriel? We listened so from Massachusetts. My favorite circle round is unwelcome guests. Because he couldn't put his pocket or go in the car and lots of case. Someone mentioned an episode. You missed no problem. You can find every single circle round story on our website. That's WBZ DOT org slash circle around or wherever you and your grownups get your podcast.

Eric Shimon Circle Virginia Marshall Circle Ranch Jane Lindholm molly bloom Sabinas Sabina Hunt Gabriel Rebecca Catherine Brewer Kimberly SCHRAFFT Executive NPR Wvu Vermont Apple Massachusetts Chris Fan
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Circle Round

Circle Round

05:46 min | 8 months ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Circle Round

"To use the Pumpkin to make high but when she sliced off the top of the Gordon looked inside. Do you know what she saw called kinds indeed. The pumpkin was chock full of sparkling glittering gold coins more money than Zoe had ever seen before and she knew just how she'd spend it. She carded the coins town then. Bought a big load of wood and nails with these supplies. I can replace my falling down cottage with a cozy new one next. She picked up a bunch of soil. Fertilizer and seeds can't to start a lush green garden and quote my own food now remember. Zoe had a twin sister named chloe very wealthy very stingy twin sister named chloe. Who BELIEVED WE ALL GET? What we deserve. And when chloe learned Zoe's sudden prosperity. She definitely didn't think her twin sister deserved it so chloe jumped into one of her many horsedrawn carriages when galloping across the countryside to Zoe. Zoe How did you get this cozy cottage and this abundant garden? You're going to have to explain how you got all this wealth. So zoey told her twin sister the story of how she mended the fallen sparrows wing then received a pumpkin seed as a reward. And when I planted that seed it's sprouted a huge Pumpkin the biggest I've ever seen. When I cut the Pumpkin Open it was full of gold coins. I see CHLOE's greedy mind began to race and just tell me again. How how did that Sparrow break? Its wing well. The winds snapped branch. The apple tree and the bird went tumbling down. Oh you should have seen it sister. The poor creature was barely breathing and tears sprang to my eyes when I saw just had. That's all Khloe heard. She had already sprinted out the door and back to her carriage. The next morning khloe hopped out of bed. Extra early and crept into her spacious yard her gardeners plant at the yard with all kinds of flowers bushes and trees. Khloe tip toe to one of the apple trees and squinted at its branches. Surely one of these branches has a sparrow on it right just then. She heard a loud sharp. That looks just like the bird. Zoe described without missing a beat. Khloe grabs the truck of the apple tree and began to shake. She shook and shook and shook. Until last. One of the branches snapped off the limb came tumbling to the ground bringing with it. The Brown and Grey Sparrow. Khloe squatted down and plucked the bird out of the grass. Oh dear how ever did this happen? You poor little thing. You're lucky you have me to take care of you. Khloe brought the sparrow inside and spent the next two days looking after it but not because she had a kind heart like zoe did. It feels like I've been taking care of this bird for her but no matter it'll be worth it when that reward is mine. All mine when the sparrow finally seemed well enough to fly again. Zoe carried the bird outside and plopped it onto the grass. All right off you go but remember. If it weren't for me you would never fly again. Don't you forget that? Bird the sparrow Kochta. Ted Let out a CHIRP and flapped its wings and flew away. The next week Khloe was inside her house counting her money when she heard a loud chipping sound through the window. What is with these ridiculous birds in my yard? How am I supposed to focus on counting all of my beautiful money if those pesky creatures keep tweeting and Chirping and wait a minute? She dashed outside and looked up at the apple trees. Can you guess who was perched on one of its branches? Yup the Brown and Grey Sparrow. Your back it's about time the sparrow opened its beak and a smooth white. Pumpkin seed dropped to the ground. This pumpkin seed is for you. Khloe consider it a reward for all you've done planted in your garden and see what grows. Oh you bet I will bird. I earned this one. Of course then. The bird beat its wings and sort up to the sky. Khloe ordered her gardeners to plant the Pumpkin seed in the yard very soon much to her delight. What should emerge from the earth but a leafy green pumpkin vine and by the time autumn came the vine sprouted not one enormous Pumpkin? But three I knew that sparrow like me better than my twin sister. It gave me three Pumpkins. Instead of just one Khloe seized the first to Pumpkin and chopped it off the vine. What could be in their gold coins like zoe got.

Zoe Grey Sparrow Khloe chloe apple Sparrow sparrow Kochta Gordon Chirping zoey Ted
Why Is There Smoke In A Fire?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Why Is There Smoke In A Fire?

Jane Lindholm O. M. G.
Music Releases Chemicals in the Brain

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:08 min | 2 years ago

Music Releases Chemicals in the Brain

JIM Doon Doon New York VP Jane Lindholm Jamestown Jacob Lilly Burlington Dopamine Vermont Boston Twelve Years Eight Years
Are Amphibians and Reptiles the Same?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Are Amphibians and Reptiles the Same?

Jane Lindholm
"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"I'm Jane Lindholm. And if you are a regular listener in this space, you might have noticed that this is not the regular Vermont edition theme music that you usually hear at noon today, but why as taking over the airwaves? But why VP ours podcast for curious, kids, we put out a new episode every two weeks and we have listeners all over the world. In fact, we've got questions from kids in more than forty seven states, and I think it's almost forty countries now, but we're not usually on the radio. So we thought we'd change things up today and hope to catch some kids during school vacation. Luckily, the producers of Vermont edition were kind enough to give us the space in case you're unfamiliar with the show, but why is it program where kids ask the questions and drive the direction of each episode and it's producer, melody, debts, job, and my job to find interesting people to offer answers. We have gotten some pretty far out questions over the last. Two years questions like these. My name is show and I live in Brooklyn, New York city United Cigna. We are from their earth. What is the most recent. Prediction of how the big bang happened. Did the big Vang half. And why did the Baig bang happen? And what made it happen? Why did the being being happy? So after Sasha, there you heard five year old Arjun from Regina, Saskatchewan, six year old Maya from Brooklyn, New York and three year old Sylvia in Boston. And you know, they are not the only ones wondering about the origins of space and time. So today we are going to vote the our two kids questions about space. If you have a young one listening, have them sent a question to questions at, but why kids dot org that Email address again is questions at, but why kids dot.

United Cigna Vermont Jane Lindholm Brooklyn New York producer VP Vang half Regina Arjun Sasha Boston Saskatchewan three year Two years five year two weeks six year
Why Do Horses Have Hooves?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:33 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Horses Have Hooves?

VP Jane Lindholm Milk One Hundred Fifty Years Eighty Six Percent Thirty Five Years Seven Years Four Cups
Ants Keep Nature in Balance

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:01 min | 2 years ago

Ants Keep Nature in Balance

"Answer really important part of making systems work. We call them that kind of the leaders of the Brown cycle. Now, this is really important concept for kids understand when you go into a forest, what do you see? You see the tall trees? That's the green cycle that growth that mic -nificant beauty of life. But. Hind all that there's turning over of life back into nutrients so it can become life again. And that's the Brown cycle and insects, especially ants are the ones cleaning up there like the vacuum cleaner nature that is kind of picking up after everybody and turn it back into juicy, nutrients like soup that can be eaten up by plants again and grow bigger and bigger. How do they do that? They chew leaves and then poop them out while yes answer do poop, but it's a little bit more complicated than that. You know,

IAN Brown Brian Fisher Jane Lindholm Brian Fischer Moore Mukalla Arctic California Academy Of Sciences Antarctica Two Inches
"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"Math but no matter what age you are there will be a point where math becomes more about mixing operations that means addition and division in the same problem and those aren't as easy as counting blocks it does take some big thinking to understand so in school like babylonian society that we talked about earlier when we're young a lot of mathematics is dealing with things you can see and count but at some point you make the jump to more abstract ideas like pathet patheticness and his followers did but you know how joseph mazer said he wasn't an expert in fifth grade math i bet a few of you listening now our experts could you help livia can you offer any tips for dealing with challenging math classes ask one of your adults to use a cell phone to record you answering and send your helpful advice to questions but why kids dot org or if you don't have any tips for libya just send us your favorite math joke questions at but why kids dot org is also the address you can use to send us questions on anything else you're wondering about that's it for this episode thanks to joseph mazer the author of many books on math and science for talking mathematics with us today but why is produced by melody bo debt in me jane lindholm at vermont public radio our theme music is by luke reynolds we'll be back in two weeks with the all new episode until then stay curious.

pathet patheticness livia libya jane lindholm luke reynolds joseph mazer vermont two weeks
What Makes Tape Sticky?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

07:14 min | 2 years ago

What Makes Tape Sticky?

Jane Lindholm Massachusetts Adele Visco Luke Reynolds Sweden Patas Chicago Salem Penn Simon Hundred Years Five Years Six Years Two Weeks
How Do We Make Paint?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:29 min | 2 years ago

How Do We Make Paint?

Nick Netto Vermont Jane Lindholm Lake Green Edmonds Washington Pain BO Edison Hickman Blackstone Ireland Addison John Nick Five Years
How the Heart Pumps Blood

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

09:55 min | 2 years ago

How the Heart Pumps Blood

Zane Jane Lindholm Boston Ause Melbourne Australia Luke Reynolds Coolidge Corner Theatre EVE Australia Melbourne Dr. Crossing Bridget Butler Valentine Maryland Maya Mace Johns Hopkins Hospital
Dreams Can Be Weird

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:17 min | 2 years ago

Dreams Can Be Weird

Luke Reynolds Jane Lindholm Vermont Harvard Medical School VP David Kahn Two Weeks
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"He said but i will remind everyone that we have an important rule that we sometimes forget which is that we don't do anything to anybody before we ask them so that he turn to the bad guys and he says that means you have to ask people before being bad guys to them and then he reminds the kids that wanted the bad guys came to stop um and i want you to remember it's just pretend and you can always tell the bad guys to stop and so then they all agreed that was the plan he has another post where he talks about um becoming a bad guy himself where he just like he gets on this ship and he just as like i'm a bad guy i'm so bad i am so bad and that's the accent of pretending bad guys for him so okay so we we need to wrap it up indonesia's well how and why do kids play pretend violates when it's not actual violence the thing that we are uncomfortable with is actual violence right but what they're doing is pretend violent the point of this play is for them to basically develop empathy late which are so worried about is that they're doing bad stuff but what they are actually doing is figuring out how does bad stuff affect other people yet when i do something what happens when someone else does something to me how does that make me feel right then what do we do how do we deal with each other so like working through that what are what are the limits of fun yeah working through that is the entire point of early childhood.

indonesia
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Yeah who don't respect black people in respect laura white people so one kind of bad guy is somebody who doesn't respect other people's differences that's a real kind of bad guy lincoln made your bed major bad maybe the worst on one of them were is there another name for bad guys i dunno rude guys rude get this are you guys oregon guys miserable the eyes i like nine respected guys i don't know so young children under four when their parents asked what's the bad guy or on can you think of any bad guys the kids would answer kind of abstractly lake someone who take something from someone else someone who doesn't follow the rules if the kids know any superhero mythology than they would say one of the bad guys they could think of a few of the kids were hip to that but we had a couple interviews with seven year old in those laid out very differently and i don't know if that stuff is going to make it into the episode in a particular way because when we asked what the bad guy those kids gave us real life examples of bad guys and it's not that i wasn't surprised that they know about what's going on in the world but they talked about um white supremacy they talked about racism and it it definitely didn't have the same innocence that the young kids um answers hat bad so when kids start to be aware of real life bad guys perhaps the rules and limits for their play uh also change so what's okay in a three year old m is different than once again a seven year old and i'm sure that sounds obvious nonionising allowed but.

lincoln oregon seven year three year
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Others and so some of it might be actually leading kids help in the cleanup process if something has happened to your home or if your children are disturbed by events in the news may they could send a card to the students at another school where a terrible thing has happened and so that it lets them feel the empathy but also feel like they are taking some action and taking some action with their peers to be helpful so if it's volunteering if it's in your own community to be able to do that or dr grew which recommended it could be as simple as sending a note to the first responders who just responded to something far away or to the first responders in your community may be go to the fire station with a box of clementines to say thank you for being here for our communities so that it gives kids a chance to feel empowered and and you know maybe to ask the kids themselves your children what they would like to do so that they can feel like they're taking this action with you now helps a helpers yeah exactly yeah uh i always like what mr rogers said as you know in though in emergencies like look for the people who are helping there's always there are always people trying to make it better and i think kids usually start off you know they're costume and roleplaying play thinking about those kind of powerful and and bright costumes like like you know like being a firefighter or a police officer and then maybe they're play gets more nuanced and they start being interested in being being the bad guys but what we found through interviews the parents have conducted with their kids for this upcoming episode of your snacks is that you know some kids tickets fun to play bad guys but then usually they are also interested in being the superheroes or in figuring out how to stop bad guys and we even had one kid who's who's mama's a psychologist talk about how you know what would be the most amazing superpower to stop bad guys what if you could would if.

mr rogers officer
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"It's going to be very different than a nine year old listening to this and in some ways maybe the nine year old would have more fear and so trying to to navigate that was tricky but also felt like to us or our responsibility in being podcasters who are trying to speak honestly and openly to kids is an admirable um very brave thing to do and there's no playbook for it no there is not well except that there are there are really smart people who do this for a living and that's where i feel lucky that i don't have to be the expert i have to call somebody else up and so the center for grieving children can say well this is what we've learned this is what works for children in and so then they talk directly to the kids about in a what what they what we know about death and then how to be good friends two other children who might be grieving an what grief can look like and how different it can be and i thought that was a really powerful part of the episode for me was that grief can look very different for all kinds of people and the idea that kids can still be good friends to people who are experience singh loss was a really powerful part of that episode in giving kids some action that they can take to feel empowered ilya and another action that um i think is worth talking about here um that you guys mentioned in the episode on would be like ways kids can help anything um just because the very act of helping makes us as humans a and especially kids feel better a you know even if it's not changing the scenario or the situation um so i wonder if you could talk a little bit about about some ideas for on helping when in my other work as an news post i've talked to researchers who have worked in trauma zones in in uh after earthquakes and natural disasters and other kinds of traumatic events and they have said that kids teenagers and kids really do feel empowered if they can do something to help whether it's to help their own situation or to help.

ilya singh nine year
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"I mean there is a part of the episode i'm the but why episode about talking to kids about violence in the news that i was listening to and ideas like stopped and i paused at because i didn't know what to do with myself but dr go which says you can say to your child um i'm doing the best i can i'm doing everything i can to keep you safe and to keep our family safe an lake as an adult when you're like it's not enough you know there's i can't i there's a huge amount of the world that i can't keep you save from it was so arresting for me and i i really didn't know what to do as all there to call dr gro israel like wait a second one now you were in that that brings us to making media for kids that touches on these topics boats the commonality between but wind your snacks is you know they are about kids interest in the real world and m night of approaching things from like the sides but you as a really addressing them had on united to do an episode that i'm is about death for kids is it's atarot let's big yeah and and i'm not without some fear on our part sito you don't wanna introduce kids to things that are going to scare them or especially i think we worried more about how parents would react because the questions we got from children about deaths were profound but also just honest and curious in a why do we have to die what happens when you die what does it feel like to die uh you know the kids actually want to hear answers to that and what they don't want to here is an adult saying we don't talk about that or don't worry about it because there they're already thinking about it so they want the adults in their lives to tell them energy give them some answers and to certainly be reassuring but not to paint over the truce you know they want to hear the truth and so that was interesting for us to try to make sure that we were balancing that desire to know the truth with an acknowledgement that young kids especially you know fouryearold listening to this.

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"It's ourselves and we think about kids media lobby read everything we can but this is the first time an occurrence in the news has met up with a podcast theme of ours that i have felt just like unable to to handle alone and without context with him without counting wants bad guys to show up in your feed this february without explaining why were yes so um too that's why ringing this episode and that's why we're talking to the guests were talking to an an we'll be back once weekend gene on the line oh tell us who you are jammed we wanna know an epa value good cut how long do you have my name is james lind home and i am the host and coproducer of but why a podcast for curious kids out of vermont public radio and i also host a daily news show for vpr in vermont i that said news and public affairs and current events and arts and culture show called vermont edition and in addition to that i am the mom of a fouryearold son and a one and a half year old daughter and so i think about kids in kids programming and the news all the time you're part of the kids listen are a podcast grassroots organization yeah our wonderful grassroots podcasts organization will thank you for taking the little time out of your busy news producing day to talk to us about kids in bad guys and media and what what we what do we do how do you how do we do this yeah and the said that we have planned is about kids pretending bad guys which we know is part of how kids grow up the right usually a type of play that happens right right our sons are similar age as we have an almost fouryearold so this may have come up in your personal life yeah it certainly has we've had a lot of imaginative play happening in her house and on the playground lately and it takes so many different forms yeah yeah and it's interesting to see when it i'm.

vermont vermont edition epa james lind
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Be a little bit of fun there might be a moment of smart more seriousness and so we try to do something like that and if you listen to the show you probably noticed that but um it with respect to this episode bad guys which we naturally thought would be really fun to do um because it's kind of funny when kids are like i'm back so vat rate because they're like what ha they're so cute right and they're not lake actually like mean end provides all these chances of teachable learning moments together we thought we could go from the funny exciting parts of it to the actual thinking about right what is a bad guy reign why do they why do they be bad right why do they be bad but but in trying to do this like this is the first time that i think i felt really like out of my depth in trying to do in episode um i don't know if he felt that way enter a little bit yeah i mean we know we talked a little about natural disasters in cracks down hard i felt like when i tried i could do it we talked about how to and how not to use your hands hands right in the problem with these episodes that there were working on that seem universal to preschool themes is that also connected to real adult hard thing yeah so you know one were working on episode about hands and we're talking about how to keep your body safe and how no one should touch you if you don't give them permission lake were talking about the me to movement or when we're talking about things that break and crack we're talking about earthquakes in natural disasters which really happen in the world you know but but as we've encountered each one of them i've it with no background in developmental psychology neither of us went to school for that direct neither of us has a degree m in working with young children we've we've x we have had experiences with thousands of children across the country and now we are pay.

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Her past year um and i don't know if that's because we're paying more attention um or because we're feeling more feelings um or because it really is happening more often any way we just couldn't really sad episode we just couldn't really see episode without really explaining to you guys why we want to do it or or thinking lake super even a little bit harder the about how the episode comes out so we still planned to release it we hope you'll trust us that um we're gonna do it well yeah the the the but but the struggle that were having we we figured we might as well just like have it in an open way we are you so you can kinda hear what we're thinking about it so um you know you obviously don't have those of us want to know what's gordon's lauded said our breads but um but we're just gonna be really open about it we're going to get into right uh we're gonna be talking to jane lynn home who is one of the cohosts of but why a podcast for curious kids out of vermont public radio that's right we're going to be talking to her about how to talk to kids about violence in the news and we're also going to be talking to her about kind of lake adult feelings about the news in relation to kids play and we wanted to have a brief conversation with each other and available to you before we actually sit down and talk with her and after we to jane andrew nye will be talking about a book that i have been trying to read it's called magic capes amazing powers transforming superhero play in the classroom by eric hoffman um and while it's focused on superheroes it's really about heroes and villains um and how to set up play that supports kids when they're naturally curious about the stuff when we were planning our episodes about your snacks for the second season sometimes resale what would mr rogers do with us you know he'd probably talked to somebody that's interested in this he there would probably be some play that's ten general to it there.

gordon jane lynn vermont jane andrew nye eric hoffman mr rogers
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

Ear Snacks

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Ear Snacks

"Hello can you hear me i can the dear snacks now this is your snacks for pairing let andrew an poly hi i how are you i'm okay all right what do you and ngos yourself oh yeah sure uh i'm andrew and i'm poly hand and you are not listening to air snacks no this is your snacks for parents mrs of blue bloop you can tell its air snacks for parents because there's the very little added a note editing this is ear snacks for parents it's a special episode where we are talking just with adults today so if you found this and you are looking for something to listen to as a family or kits to listen to myself we're going to give you just a second to find something else something better find something better find something better little the liberal economic going to stop being let's get you uh you may know us from our pothas go such as yours next yes where we're sort of child like ourselves m because often were acting as a proxy for your kids who are listening but we are also um just two grownup people it's true rosa will sort of um and we have to kids of our own yup we have a son whose almost four and a daughter who is nine months yes we've been thinking about doing a bad guys episode of your snacks for a long time right we start we started planning the second seasonable air snacks la in the summer sell yet we had been planning this episode on bad guys for quite some time um and and we've been working on it and we're supposed to air it last week on valentine's day wednesday two thousand eighteen via uh we thought it would be just like sort of funny to air like a bad guys episode on a day about love anyway um it's not funny anymore no because there was a school shooting in florida um that seems legal one story in a number of stories that are um about tragic events that keep coming up may be more and more frequently than at least we are prepared for it seems like almost nonstop this entire.

rosa andrew valentine florida nine months
Meaning of a Flag

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

10:54 min | 3 years ago

Meaning of a Flag

Alana Myers Taylor Scott Inter Andrew Olympics Vermont Jane Lindholm LIZ Facebook Brecht Hannah Middleton Wisconsin Luke Reynolds Olympia Russia Pyongyang Dale Lien Salala G Vessel Awaji United States
"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"Thermal energy stored in them that helps keep the temperatures constant and those outer layers are still underground so they're sheltered from the weather and air temperature and don't change much their warm not cold because the earth has heat think of the earth a little bit like an onion with lots of different layers the inner core is solid iron surrounded by an outer core that's molten rock called magma very very hot the next layer is called the mantle and it's made of magma and rock finally there's the crust it's thirty five miles thick in some places and three to five miles thick under the ocean all of those layers of rock are heated by that magmud deep inside in fact the rocks get hotter the deeper you go but the crust on the outside closest to the surfaced stays about fifty to sixty degrees fahrenheit all year round in fact some homes and businesses use that constant temperature to provide heating and cooling without being underground they use technology called geothermal heat pumps to heat and cool the buildings using the earth's temperature i hope that helps camden and that's it for this episode but why is produced by melody bo debt and me jane lindholm at vermont public radio our theme music is by luc reynolds if you have a question on anything have an adult record it and send it questions at but why kids dot org you can use a smartphone memo function or if you don't have an adult with a phone like that have them email us your question we'll be back in two weeks with a whole new episode until then stay curious.

jane lindholm luc reynolds camden vermont sixty degrees fahrenheit two weeks
"jane lindholm" Discussed on Circle Round

Circle Round

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on Circle Round

"Tired of by experiences he like i've never done this in my life jill was stoked but also he found americans could be sue bird confusing we had gone tarnished vacation with just as cousin elliott f car week l it was as american boy and um we were watching this dinosaur movie the good dinosaur and there was this little line in their enemies and why things could diner services down pop by bubble don't pop my personal bubble and joe looked at aglianese eastland what's a personal bob home analogy you you know a personal mobile it's a person moblised to space and like joseph was looking at him as if he had no idea what he was talking about greg in saana wanted to help joe learn about personal bubbles so they came up with a plan that totally backfired to find out how subscribed to the longest shortest time and look for the episode called bubble boy also parents right now we are collecting your weird parenting wins send us any stranger creative parenting trick that you would never hear from an expert like using glow sticks to turn back time into a global party or leading siri read your phones contacts to put your baby this week in the car we are making a book out of these winds and you yes you can be in it it's easy to submit your win go to longest shortest time dotcom and click participate then hi i'm jane lindholm and i want to introduce you to but why a podcast for curious kids from vermont public radio on but why you send us questions on anything languages tsang's named betham met dick's ethics politics art imagination and we find interesting people to answer let me give you a little taste of what our show was all about two bumblebees have hearts they do have a heart but it's a long tube and it runs along the top of their back and instead of having veins like we have that hold the blood that flows through our bodies they actually have an open circulatory system so their blood baid's their organs how come babies still hatch fake so the kind of animal that humans are recalled mammals and out of all the mammals with things like humans are cats and dogs and elephants this is only a few that actually lay eggs.

jill joe joseph greg saana jane lindholm betham dick elliott bob vermont tsang
"jane lindholm" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"jane lindholm" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The sun in 1999 soccer world cup broadcast on abc us national team star brandy chastain had the final shootout cac in overtime of the championship game filled with the emotion of the moment chastain pulled off her shirt in celebration revealing her simple black sports bra these days sports bras are big business global sales top seven billion dollars in 2014 there are sports bras as outerwear bras that are glittery patterned have crisscrossing straps to peak out prettily during yoga but the foundational truth remains the best sports brought is the kind that allows girls and women to move the way they want to move without worrying about their anatomy brandy chastain points out sports bras aren't mere clothes the thing there are an essential piece of equipment i couldn't play without likely i wouldn't couldn't play without my first pro the sports bryant may be the unsung hero in the rise of women in sports quietly claiming its place under a tshirt that original jog bra from the 70s is in the permanent collection at the smithsonian it's immortalized in bronze at the university at vermont and it all comes back to two jockstrap sewn together in nineteen 77 for npr news i'm jane lindholm now look at one of the most popular sources of costumes for school plays community theaters and other shows the theatre development fund is best known for running discount ticket booths and new york city but it is also one of the largest renters of costumes reported naomi lewin has the story if you were a little kid who liked to play dress up this place would knock your wicked witch at the west socks off we have a little bit of everything here we have some odd pieces like i see a strawberry i see a bunch of skeletons is half an elephant can't that is odd yellow feathers an elephant had stephen cub rawl is the director of the costume collection at the theatre development fund tdf for short the not for profit is dedicated to making theater more accessible.

world cup brandy chastain bryant vermont jane lindholm naomi lewin director npr new york stephen cub rawl seven billion dollars