19 Episode results for "Jane Goodall"

Explorers & Contenders: Jane Goodall

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:05 min | 11 months ago

Explorers & Contenders: Jane Goodall

"The humans share more than ninety eight percent of the same DNA with chimpanzees. Which is probably why. There's always been a fascination with them to what we know of them is mostly because of one woman whose name has become synonymous with chimps. Jane Goodall Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today's explorer is one of the world's most famous primatology. She's best known for her decades. Long Research. Wild compansy let's talk about. Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born Valerie. Jane Morris Goodall Nineteen thirty four in London. Her Father Mortimer was a businessman and her mother. Margaret was a novelist who wrote under the pen name Van Morris Goodall from a young age. Jane was fascinated with animals when she was four. Jane Hid for hours in a hen house. Just to observe how hens lay eggs as an adolescent. Jane Dreamt of life in Africa where she could study and work with animals. She finally did move there as an adult she said upon arrival that it felt like coming home in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven. Jane moved to Kenya while there. She met Dr Louis Leakey a famous archaeologist and paleontologist who offer Jana job as a secretary in one thousand nine hundred sixty. Dr Leakey's sent Jane to Gomba Stream National Park in Tanzania when I arrived at the gumby streams I felt that at long last. My childhood ambition was being realized always. I had wanted to go out into the field and study animals on that first day when I looked at the wild and rugged mountains where the chimpanzees live. I knew that my task was not going to be easy in Gombe Bay. Without a college degree Jane began her study of wild chimpanzees at the time little was known about chimpanzee behaviour Jane later wrote. It was not permissible. At least not an ethological circle to talk about an animal's mind. Only humans had minds but Jane observed the chimps had unique personalities with capacity to feel and display affection support joy and sorrow. It was obvious watching them that they could be happy inside. And then the communication signals kissing embracing holding hands patting on the back shaking the fist swaggering. Throwing rocks all of these things done in the same context. We do them in the fall of nineteen sixty. Jane witnessed a chimpanzee squatting on a termite mound placing pieces of grass into the mound and raising the grass to his mouth. Chain discovered that the chimp had been using the grass stem as a tool to fish for termites. It had been previously accepted that humans were the only animals capable of making tools when Jane sent her groundbreaking findings to Dr Leaky he wrote. We must now redefine man redefine tools or accept chimpanzees as human over the course of her study at Gombe Bay. Jane also found that chimps have an aggressive side systematically hunting and eating smaller primates Jane even observed Intergroup violence between two groups of chimps in nineteen sixty. Three National Geographic published. An article about Jane through that piece she connected with photographer. Hugo van Loic Hugo. Jane married one year later and eventually had a son named Eric Lewis. Dr Leaky urged Jane to attend the University of Cambridge where she earned a PhD in theology in nineteen sixty five. She became the eighth person in the history of Cambridge to be permitted to pursue a PhD without an undergraduate degree about a decade after they married in nineteen seventy four. Jane and Hugo divorced a year later Jane Mary. Derrick Bryson a member of Tanzania's National Assembly who died in nineteen eighty. Jane used her incredible discoveries to promote conservation to people all over the world appearing on television writing about her research. Even founding a global nonprofit called the Jane Goodall Institute in two thousand and two Jane was named a U. N. messenger of Peace by Secretary General Kofi Annan in two thousand four Prince Charles deemed Jane a dame of the British empire. Today Jane continues to champion Human Rights and conservation through the Jane Goodall Institute. Jane is credited with challenging long held beliefs about chimpanzees. Her discoveries shifted the ways. Humans see observe and think about primates. Well for me. Animals are part of our world and just because we can destroy our world and exterminate species for ourselves. Doesn't mean that we should do it. I don't we have the right to do it. And we can books and see dinosaurs. I don't want my grandchildren to only know chimps and go relieve some giraffes and elephants from books. So you know we all destroying our own future all month we're talking about explorers and contenders on Sundays. Were taking a break from our normal episodes to highlight women. We've previously covered. Who did amazing things in healthcare for more on why we're doing what we're doing? Check out our encyclopedia. Amanda Newsletter Will Manteca Weekly. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia. Monica and you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny. Kaplan before you go I want to tell you about another show. I think you might like. Do you want to know what really made exceptional original ingenious people take a new podcast called personality? We'll delve into the minds of famous historical figures icons answering questions like what Albert Einstein today be diagnosed with. Add host Doctor Gail Saltz psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. We'll be joined by amazing experts on each episode to understand how both nature and nurture iology experiences shaped their character and struggles her sinology episodes launch weekly every Monday. Listen to personality. Spelled P. E. R. S. O. N. O. L. O. G. Y. Wherever you get your podcasts special thanks to lose. Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator oxygen Sunday.

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Morris Goodall Jane Goodall Institute Jane Hid Jane Mary Jenny Kaplan Van Morris Goodall Hugo van Loic Hugo Gombe Bay Dr Leaky Tanzania Dr Louis Leakey Doctor Gail Saltz Albert Einstein Africa Father Mortimer Gomba Stream National Park Kenya Cambridge
Jane Goodall: Conservationist, Scientist, Humanitarian

Squawk Pod

14:15 min | 1 year ago

Jane Goodall: Conservationist, Scientist, Humanitarian

"This CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD Ameritrade our trade offers two different mobile APPs there's TD AMERITRADE mobile. Which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined? Simplicity or thinker. Swim Mobile. which gives you tools as you need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE AMERITRADE DOT com slash member SIPC bringing show musically this squawk pod the daily podcast brought to hugh by the team behind squawk box control to CNBC's essential morning show every day. Get the best stories. Debate and analysis from the biggest names in business and politics today on Squawk pod a timeless interview with conservationist and activist Jane Goodall from Twenty One thousand nine hundred World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. Let's go wrong they think. This is a disconnect between this clever into lay and love and compassion the human caused and Andrew Ross sorkin reflection election on that interview one year later just as this year's global conference gets underway. But it's very rare we're I'm sort of starstruck and I was genuinely starstruck by Jane Goodall that conversation exclusive to this podcast. I'm CNBC producer. Katie Kramer it's Monday January twentieth. Twenty twenty squad begins right after this this. CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD AMERITRADE offers two different mobile APPs there's TD ameritrade mobile which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined. Simplicity or thinker Swim Mobile Noble. which gives you tools? You need for more. Advanced Trades and in-depth analysis visit td Ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one. That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE DOT com slash APPs members ABC. This squad on today's episode. The World Economic Forum in Davos for forty plus years the world's leaders in business and politics had convened in the Swiss Alps for a whirlwind four days of meetings interviews panels and performances Andrew. Have you packed yet for Davos pact. That's actually this. After this project I caught up with Andrew just just before we both boarded a flight commercial to this year's World Economic Forum so Davos is the home of the World Economic Forum which has a long history. This is a group group that started in about nineteen seventy-one so almost fifty years of this global event for people who've never been there before. How would you describe it? What could you expect to see in terms of our our coverage this is the super bowl for business and policy leaders probably the greatest density of CEO's and government leaders in one place all traipsing through the snow together over the course of three or four days and a lot of the business leaders are engaging engaging conversations that are maybe a little bit different than what they're doing from a day to day basis we have a lot of discussions about about capitalism a lot of discussions about environmentalism mm-hmm about poverty around the world What kinds of conversations do you expect to hear? I think the single biggest topic you're going to hear about out this year is the idea of sustainability and. I know that is almost a cliche at this point. And it's a topic that's been addressed before Davos in really started To some degree at Davos however there is going to be a sea change in the way businesses operate and that real cost when when it comes to sustainability. You're looking at companies like Microsoft already that are charging their individual units for their carbon use. And I think you're gonNA see that in a very material way across the board so much of this is actually being led by Europe and some of the disclosure rules. And I think you're GonNa you start to see more and more disclosure around carbon emissions the cost of those emissions what companies are doing on. Es G. and it's just it's the the topic that is being talked about in the boardroom. Is it strange to talk about that. At a at a Swiss ski resort that people have to fly and in some cases take helicopters to get to. What's tell me about that? Disconnect people love to poke fun at Davos and think of it as you know speed dating and over Champagne. And everybody's flying there. I have never been fond of the argument that everybody should swim to Davos or otherwise. They're hypocrites if you really think about how. The dialogue and businesses changed around stakeholders and shareholders and purpose. And all of these things that have taken place place over the last twenty or thirty years they started Indaba. And so you know you can laugh if you want. But I I think that actually really the most meet some of the most meaningful decisions that are happening at the intersection of business and policy are happening there over the years. Joe Becky and Andrew have interviewed the likes of Bano J. P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon His Royal Highness. Prince William the Secretary General Role of NATO and so many more but a consensus favorite for the squawk box behind the scenes team Andrews conversation with conservationist Jane Goodall at last year's event. Here's what Andrew told me about that interview a year later. Can we talk about what might have been my favorite interview that we did last year and that is with eighty five year old soon to be eighty six year old. Jane Goodall Maybe one of my most favorite interviews of my career. Oh that's awesome. I think definitely my most favorite image age. Somebody took a picture of me kissing. Jane's on head. Who took that picture Andrew? I think you did I did. Hey I think you did anyway. it's it's just it's an indelible image. I have long been a great admirer of Jane Goodall. Integrate I've had a great love affair with gorillas and monkeys and The environment and and being able to spend time with her and Talk to her about her own journey and how she sees the world today was really quite something. It was a very charming interaction. Action that you had with her I think that doesn't happen very often. When you're interviewing people especially the CEOS of the business leaders that we talked to in Davos you the other piece of it is? It's very rare and maybe I'm completely jaded but it's very rare. We're sort of starstruck and I was genuinely genuinely starstruck. Buy Jingle Jingle Bells raised about two hundred and fifty million dollars for her foundation for conservation work and environmental concerns and also also education about our planet and about The way we coexist with animals and I thought that message was actually really fascinating leading to bring to a meeting of the global elite. You know I think that what she does. She adds a sense sense of humanity empathy to a conversation among business leaders. That oftentimes missing that piece. Okay this is awesome. Thank you appreciate it. If you want to see that photo Andrew mentioned I wanNA kiss you. I'm telling you I've I'm GONNA catch you. We tweeted it out today with a link to this podcast follow us at squawk. CNBC anyway. The interview you're about to hear took place the same week as the launch of the Jane Goodall Legacy Foundation its purpose is to safeguard Goodell's lifetime work in conservation of animal habitats and the environment pretty fitting for what is sure to be a theme in Davos all those this year and the theme of few squawk pod episodes over the past week sustainability since launch. Jane Goodall Legacy Foundation has supported nearly five thousand projects and protected nearly two thousand acres of habitat around the world. Speaking of world travels. We learned a lot about Jane's life during that Twenty Nineteen Davos interview view including about Mr H. Her traveling companion. A toy stuffed primate brought a little something special to well. Mr H has been my travelling. MM companion for twenty eight years. He's been moved me to sixty four countries. Let includes North Korea he symbolizes the indomitable human spirit here on squawk. This conversation warms our hearts again and again. I hope you love it as much as we do. We have a very special guest. I I have to say selfishly. Actually I am thrilled to have this guest with us. Jane Goodall is here. Thank you for being here. You have now. Launched the Jane Goodall Legacy Foundation. Tell us what that's about. Well you you know. Ever since nineteen eighty six when I realized that the forests for going to numbers were dropping all the problems facing the chimp and soon after that began to understand the plight of so many of the African people living in and around forests who are cripplingly. Poor they don't have good health. Health education facilities and so raising money ended elephant program first of all around the bay area throughout chimp range in Tanzania now in six other African countries whether chimps and giving people better lives in the way they choose and they become partners in conservation. And if you don't have the local people with you this no point in doing it because it's their country and then having you know being still working on getting the funding for this. What's the point if younger generations on be better stewards than we'd be? You raised an enormous amount of money including including from the corporate sponsors. Yes that's that's it. There are thirty four Jane Goodall Institutes around the world. There's eighty countries with our youth program which is kindergarten university and everything in between an all of these groups are choosing projects they choose them to make the world a better place that people animals Envir- how much how much honey you're trying to raise two hundred fifty fifty million. Yes yes okay. I want to make sure we could try to raise more for you right now. Well the point is is that these young people all over the world and we were right across China right across the US and and other parts of the world moving into the Middle East It's not that they can make a difference. They are and why should we care because we have been stealing their future. Here's he is our intellect taking Tamaz. Here's clever businesses. Here's the new technology era and something's gone wrong and what's gone wrong. Pink is this a disconnect between this clever intellect and that's what separates us more than anything from chimpanzees and other animals and love and compassion. The human I have a couple of quick questions. One is a debate here in Davos about capitalism and giving back and I'm curious sort of where you stand on that given the work that you've done all these years well whether it's working people right I think the awesome individuals philanthropists some businesses and they definitely are giving back Sometimes you can hardly differentiate whether they're doing it Sorta greenwashing shing to look good. It's actually the the passion of the CEO but quite honestly as long as they give the money and it's it's not a corrupt business because we have to be careful. I want to take money from some company. That's completely destroying the environment. Two other quick questions kids these days. You like kids to spend time outdoors Unfortunately a lot of kids. I Dunno if it's unfortunate spent time on screens including my own kids. What do you think of that right now? Well do change change we. We do know that the good psychological development is being proved. Children need to be out in the green world And then final question You travel three hundred days a year. We have a lot of people who watched the show. Who who also are road warriors? What what the trick passion mission just doing what you have to do because you care fair enough Jane Goodall? Thank you really appreciate Squawk Pod. God will be right back. We're back. That's the chauffeur today this week. We're bringing you behind. The scenes content and from our rooftop sat in the Swiss Alps the biggest names in business politics and culture are in Davos. And so are we shoes of the most important thing at Davos. I think thinks socks are actually very important. But everybody's looking at each other's shoes all tourney figure out. Can you make boots. Look good with the suit on squawk doc box is hosted by Joe Kernan Becky Quick Andrew. Ross sorkin tune in weekday mornings on. CNBC at six am eastern to get the smartest takes and analysis from our TV. Show right into into your ears. Subscribe Squad wherever you get your podcasts. We'll meet you back here tomorrow. The clear thanks guys this. NBC podcast is brought to you by TD. ameritrade investing isn't one-size-fits-all. Every investor has a unique style. Well that's why. TD AMERITRADE offers two different mobile APPS. There's TD ameritrade mobile which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined. Simplicity or thinker. Swim Swim Mobile. which gives you tools? You need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td Ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one. That's right for you once again. That's T._D. AMERITRADE DOT COM slash APPs member S._I._P._C..

Davos Jane Goodall TD AMERITRADE Andrew Ross sorkin Jane Goodall Legacy Foundation CNBC CEO CNBC Davos Switzerland Jane Jane Goodall Institutes Swiss Alps Katie Kramer Europe ABC Microsoft producer hugh Joe Kernan Becky
A Conversation With Jane Goodall

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:21 min | 6 months ago

A Conversation With Jane Goodall

"From NPR and Wvu are Boston I'm Anthony Brooks, and this is on point when you were a child, what did you want to become our next guest dreamed of living in? Africa, on wild animals and Sunday writing about her adventures and her jeep dream came true Jane Goodall began studying wild chimpanzees in Tanzania sixty years ago. In July nineteen, Sixty Jane Goodall a twenty six year old English girl has embarked on a remarkable invention. At. The request of the British answer biologist Dr Leaky, she has to observe the daily lives of chimpanzees in east, Africa that's from the National Geographic documentary. The hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activists. Jane. Goodall. Is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations. Messenger. Of Peace She's also dame dame of the British Empire and she's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees which came out in Nineteen sixty-nine and reason for hope, a spiritual journey which came out thirty years later, lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gombe Bay and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you. Antony, and it's lovely to be on the program which I've been on the number of times before and yeah, sixty years is pretty amazing. He is gone. Well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing I wondered if you could serve take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary, which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen, sixty, nineteen, sixty or twenty, twenty-six you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged you faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park where it was a game reserve than. The the problem was that on the other side of Lake, Tanganyika just to cross the were. They Belgian. Congo's it was then had erupted. There was violence, and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely fall of fleeing refugees love step Olympus. So it was it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake and get to the Gumby. National Park but once I got there. It will seem rather unreal. It just felt am I really here can this really really be me Climbing up after the tent was erected and looking out over the lake and hearing baboon sparking. Breathing, in the smell of the forest really was magic. I bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects that chimpanzees I mean. It wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? I put the first three weeks. I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities. It was still part of the crumbling British Empire back then. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So he showed me some of the trails and the could was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley and then you wait and you hope that the windows to violent. So you can see trees moving and often it turned out to be baboons or monkeys, but sometimes, it was chimpanzees and once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do. Then, I, would find a tree that was ripe fruit. They're very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees away. As soon as they saw me, we've never seen a white eight before. You. Know they just they're very conservative. And Well I was really worried though Sony money to six months. I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things. One of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and to to animals in general because one who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees I mean, there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's it's not just a skilled scientists observing. There's something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals until all my life by being outside and Magadan waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet. So the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies and I would watch squirrel occasionally there was Fox, and of course, I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals. So when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university nobody else was studying gyms fact virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild and so I just did the same thing and gradually gradually chimpanzees got used to me. and. Was David. GREYBEARD. Beloved David Greybeard who I began to lose his fear and he really helped the others to lose fear because if he lives in a group with them instead of running away they social I suppose they thought well David sitting and he was a leader. So she comes so scary after all Aman gradually the lack of fear turn to aggression that was a pretty nasty. Through four weeks where the chimpanzees three to like Predator, it wanted to go away. But I. Didn't I just sat pretended I was interested in them and interestingly it was specially when it was raining and you know if you're watching people in the pelting rain, you see him take risks though. The road they normally wouldn't an chimps go a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realize I wasn't going and luckily they didn't try and attack me and much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance acceptance and trust and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary, you know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch diseases we can catch this. So it's not today but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I those days absolutely. The Best I knew the chimpanzees so well, I trust them may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical. I WanNa ask you about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools nobody knew that before you did that can describe that discovery and how it made. You feel when you observed it I mean when you sort of figured out what they were doing did you know at that moment that Oh, my God? This is amazing. We didn't realize this before. Now. Remember him being college. I wasn't his son his and it was David Greybeard did David Greybeard and that was walking through the forest to being raining and then I suddenly. So a back shape sitting on a termite mound and I wasn't really close but close enough to see very well through binoculars and I could say him breaking up grass stems pushing them down into the termite mound and picking the insects off with his lips amid sometimes breaking off the leafy twig which had to be trimmed to make it useful as a tool and quite honestly, it didn't surprise me that the. Chimps could do that on the other hand western science that only humans Houston made tools. We were defined as man the toolmaker, and so I knew that this was a very exciting observation I knew that my mentor Louis Leakey would be tremendous excitement and indeed it led to the breakthrough because he was able to approach National Geographic and not only did they provide money for me to carry on the six months ran out but eventually they sent the photographer and filmmaker Hugo Van Loic and it was his film that you know that really took them the behavior of chimps around the world. My guest, this hour Jane Goodall She's an Thala Gist conservationist activist best known for her long-term study of wild chimpanzees in Tanzania. Let's go to Jane. WHO's calling from Orleans Massachusetts go ahead, Jane you're on the air. Thanks for the call. Hi there. Thank you so much. Yeah. My question was how did you toe the line between accurately identifying the emotions you were seeing in these animals without overly anthropomorphized in them? Ric Question. Okay this this thing about anthropomorphized thing I mean. CA- quite honestly you know when I- leaky made me go to Cambridge when I being with Jim. SA- two years and I knew them as individuals I knew their behavior. Yeah. I'd seen. Grooming peacefully resting relaxing playing laughing. Weighing, Ping will not weeping but a being very, very miserable young ones when they weren't allowed to suckle anymore I'd seen anger resentment I'd seen sense of humor and. I was shocked when I got to Cambridge to do a PhD because leaky set was no time to mess about with an undergraduate degree. I was very nervous he can imagine. And be told by many of the professors tied done everything wrong. I shouldn't have given the chimpanzees names. They should have had numbers that was scientific and I couldn't talk about personality I couldn't talk about minds capable of problem solving and I, suck, me couldn't talk about emotions but you see when I was a child I, had this wonderful teacher that was my dog rusty and he told me that in this respect the professors absolutely wrong. We are not the only beings on the planet with personality mine in emotion and lovely because chimps. Oh, like US Biology Michelle Ninety eight point six percent of Deanna and because of Hugo's film. That science graduate was forced away from this reductionist way of thinking and today you can study all those things you can study personality mind and emotion I'm glad you made that point about dogs because someone who's had many dogs love dogs I've always felt like, of course, there's emotion. Of course, there's personality of course there's all that stuff that doesn't just belong to US human beings. We're talking Jane, Goodall about her legacy climate change and conservation coming up later in the hour stay with us I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point. This is on point I'm Anthony Brooks, we're talking about sixty years of research with Jane Goodall ethologist conservationist activist and founder of the Jane. Institute, she's a global conservationist. She's active as well in spreading the word about the importance of tackling climate change, and we're GonNa get to all that as well as your calls. Jane. Goodall I. Just I have to come back to this question about dogs that came up before the break because I've read that that. Dog's not chimps are your favorite animals that true. Absolutely true and you know chimpanzees. So light people don't even think the McDonald's I mean. They'd just it just I know ferry people. So. The explosive development of our intellect that really is the biggest difference. Yeah. Yeah. So your work has expanded from from studying and saving chimps to climate change and and honestly saving the world in that wonderful documentary. The hope you referred to at one point is the Mother Teresa of the environment. Bit of a tough job You say, but how do you think about the the biggest challenge that we're facing right now? Well I think this actually tree major challenges and one is way alleviate poverty. See African village and it's you know it's just huge crippling poverty as lack of good health and education. The degradation of land is populations grow and it was when I flew over the tiny combination apart, which had been part of a huge forest and by nineteen nineteen was the tiny island deforestation all around completely bay hills, and that's when it hit me. We don't help people find ways of living without destroying the environment. Then we come save the chimps so that began the Jane Goodall Institute JJ began of a program which we call to Cari. which is now in six other African countries very successful. I wouldn't go into it. People could look it up. On the web but The people have now become A. Partners in conservation. So one we need to solve poverty to we need to do something about the unsustainable lifestyle of so many millions of people on this planet to Waymo may need. Don't think about. Do I need this thing? I'm buying. And then we also have to think about the fact that seven point two, billion people on the planet today. And, already we're running out natural resources faster than nature can replenish them in some places and in twenty fifty, it's estimated there will be. Nine point seven billion ten, billion people. So these are problems that we we must be thinking about if we want planet, it's their huge problems. I won't ask you about that one you the one that you referred to as maintaining these unsustainable lifestyles and I wanna ask you about that because it seems to me that one of the biggest challenges is how we define progress and governments and lots of people define progress by growth by expanding GDP. So it doesn't work in opposition to what we need to do, and if so how do we deal with that? How do we reverse the thinking around? Expansion isn't necessarily compatible with saving the plan. It's it's compatible with destroying the planet. It doesn't make sense. You can't have unlimited economic development on a planet with finite natural resources and if we don't. Get together wine a new green economy and find a different way of. Thinking about success. What is success right now for the most part, it's you know being successful in business if money getting stuff I'm getting power. And we need to start thinking about success being we need to have a life that we can enjoy a life where we can support our family. Yes. But not go over the top with I mean who needs four houses quite come on health need. WHO NEEDS TO YARDS WHO NEEDS A private plane? A few people actually do but most people don't. So we have to rethink waylon because if we don't, you know we're already on a downward trajectory. That's why began our program for young people, roots and shoots because it's their future and we've been feeling it and thereby wound to be very passionate about these issues. Jangling and ask you about roots and shoots because I'd love to hear more about that program. We've got a lot of callers that want to get in on this conversation with you. So let's go to Lynn who's calling from bridgewater mass go hedlund you're on the air with Jane. Goodall. Thanks for the call. Hello thank you so much and Dr. Goodall. You're such an inspiration to so many and I love to hear from you how you. Went from being an observer to research church. Now, a worldwide activists and what words of advice you have to our young people to get involved and make a difference today. Thanks. You. Know it. It just happened and I think it was the geographic whose articles spreading around the world and People began to be fascinated by the behavior of the chimpanzees. And I don't know how I mean. People he says today that I'm an icon. Will I never planned to be an icon and at first I hid I mean I was so shy. But then after bit on left being was trying to raise awareness, raise money and things like that. I realized that when people came up in the airport and wanted to sell selfie or something I could I could use that opportunity to tell them about roots and shoots to. To say that they could help by joining institute and you asked about what we tell young people what I tell the young people is every single day you live you make some kind of impact on the planet and you have a choice. In this, very, very poor which when you have no choice but you know. The people listening probably can have choice think about what you buy. How Did it did it on the environment in its production did lead the cruelty to animals like the terrible factory farms Is it cheap because child slave labor or budge Wages that don't even enable people to live properly and made those ethical choices when billions people make those ethical choices then we start moving towards different world. Jane Goodall I won't ask you about the current pandemic and how that's affected your your research and and and and what you talk to people about in terms of the challenges we face because among concern concerns the emergence of diseases like covid. Nineteen. And, the link between the destruction of nature and the current pandemic I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about that and how this pandemic has affected the way we need to think about these issues. That the way I think about it, but I'm hoping the silver lining will be that it helps more and more people to think about these issues and you know the people studying the so-called. Diseases Diseases that jump from an animal to a person. that. They. Have predicted pandemic like this we keep getting epidemics we keep getting diseases, we disrespect nature we destroyed for us we crowd animals together, which can lead to new animal diseases. We push animals into closer contact with people. That, you can have a virus or bacteria jumping from one animal to one person may be binds with a cell in the human body may be that leads to a new disease like coke nineteen and it's disrespected of animals. We we pump them, kill them, eat them we sell them in unhygienic a bushmeat markets in Asia, which is where HIV AIDS began we traffic them selling. Them from different parts of the world to the wildlife markets and pet markets in Asia animals from all over the place different species of crowded together in horrible on hygiene conditions, and again, it's a perfect environment virus or bacteria. Indeed. That's could nineteen is thought have begun in in one of these markets in will have in China, and saws began in another of these markets in China. and must began from domestic camels in the Middle East and many many diseases have jumped from animal to person in our. In our absolutely horrendous factory fogs. I WANNA play. A little bit of sound from the National Geographic documentary the hope in this scene, your with former US secretary of state James Baker reflecting on the partnership that you to form. You had lunch with him to discuss your goals and how he might help you. Let's listen to just a little bit of this. I remember during that lunch telling her that I love nature because I was hunter fisherman. But I'm interested in clean water and clean air and improves irving the resource and preserving environment. If. He seemed to think that. I was doing was. Something that was squad while because he telexed to tell those based telex only embassies of the countries I was going to, and he said please help chain. So I'm fascinated in this just because when I think of the work, you do I might not think of someone like James Baker as the first person, you would ally yourself with our get help from but but talk a little bit about that alliance in how he was. Helpful. To you and and into what you were to do the work you're trying to do. Well at that time, I was also tackling the use of chimpanzees in medical research and the terrible conditions, and so I was doing a lot of talking to different people on the hill and I. Think again, you know this this geographic film Jane, the Chimps Beauty, and the beast people were fascinated Michael got messages are so would like to meet you. That's what happened with them James Baker. I didn't initiate that he asked if I would come and have lunch with him. So I was just about to set off to Africa to learn more about the plight of the chimp. So they were gradually disappearing the poorest going on how he helped was this telexes to the embassies. They all help tonight. Manage to do a great deal more because of. The night could otherwise done because it was very little money by the way I tackled him about hunting. What did you say them and how did he respond? We I said you know that I completely disapprove punting them. and. They said well, yes I imagined you. You did and. We didn't pursue too far but I, you know I can't just sit and let people think approve of hunting especially now and especially. so-called sports hunting I mean that is absolutely horrendous today it's really horrendous animals. Becoming, extinct and people go out an rare of the animal and the more close to extinction. It is the more money they paid to go and it. Who can want to kill an elephant giraffe a bath, these beautiful animals, and then glow to them and put the heads on the ball terrible You know speaking of the work you did Around Medical Research and and and saving animals from the chimps in particular for medical research in that documentary. The hope you told there was a very, very powerful story of meeting a chimp named Joe Joe in one of the labs and he was in a cage and you reminded of what it's like for these animals to live in the wild and. The wonderful life they have in the wild and you had an emotional response, a tear trickled down your cheek. Tell us how Joe Joe responded. To that or You know I don't really know why the labs let me in true for them dead and this was the first one I was in a state of shock actually seeing I'm but I knew I had to see with my own eyes to really talk about it anyway this Joe Joe There are eight chimps in one room each in a separate cage. I'm still balls around and thinking about the chimps Oregon be He'd been there twenty years and of course, little tears sip down under my mosque and he reached out regionally. Wiped away the tears. And it was incredibly emotional moment for me and finally with the help of many other organizations chimps being. Being a medical research on chimpanzees as being stopped everywhere. That was It was quite a scene to see Joe's hand reach out and touch your face and wipe that tear away. You had other unlikely allies including several leaders at at the oil company, the oil and Gas Company. CONACO PHILLIPS WHO helped build a new facility for chimpanzees in Brazzaville Congo. So here's Rodney mcallister who was Conoco's a country manager and helped lead the project. The facility it had to be disassembled freighter to the Congo taken out over that miserable excuse for what's left of a road. Assembled in a location as remote and hostile this'll. It was my job and I believed in it and I wanted to see it happen. Jane asks you to do something. You're not a big off and say Nah. PROJECTOR. Hack now. So you and Rodney Macau's to remain friends to this day. How much flack did you catch for partnering with an Oil Company and why do you think it's important to work with people who you may not agree with in in very profound ways Well first off, it wasn't Conaco Phillips back then it's changed back. Then CONACO was the most environmentally friendly oil company probably ever I mean I can't go into toll now but when I I was offered held by them to set up a sanctuary. Social through very carefully and I thought well one. I've really learned about Nicole and what they're doing and how they exploring is having the minimal impact on the environment and secondly I'm flying I'm driving I'm actually paying money for their products. So how hypocritical to say well, you're really trying to do good but you're not all companies are not going to take your money in therefore the chimps will suffer it. It was just hypocritical. And still if you can join a company that's trying to do it right and help them to do better. That's a really good thing to do on the other hand to take money from a company that is really bad company not trying to make any improvement that's not a good thing to do. And what they ended up doing was was truly helpful right I. Mean they created a wonderful reserve for these for these chimpanzees. To a sanctuary, they built these buildings and they had good relationship obviously with the government. So that was really my introduction to the to the president and Minister of Environment. And Education. In Congo Brazzaville, which was incredibly helpful as the has went on Icho left because they didn't try and viable oil there. And so we had a big struggle to keep. Its Sanctuary. We still you know always trying to raise money about two, hundred, seventy chimps their now because of the Bush meat trade mother shot her. To eat. And babies sometimes pinched stolen to be attracted to be sent off overseas. Pet so train into. Medic. taught. Jayne. Good. Old Standby. We gotta take a break. We're going to talk about a lot more. My guest is Jane Goodall. Thala just conservationists activists best known for her long-term Study of. Anthony Brooks this is on point. This is on point I'm Anthony Brooks were talking to Jane Goodall about her legacy and the challenges surrounding climate change and species conservation, and let's go right to our calls Jane. Goodall. We've got a lot of callers who want to get in on this conversation. Juniper is calling from Nashville. Go ahead juniper you're on the air. Thanks for the call. Hi My name is Jennifer I'm eight years old. I was wondering what parts of the world need the mostly search because I want to be that Negro up juniper. Thanks so much for that Jane Did you get that? I hunt she wanted to be a bet on here a question. What part of the world needs the most research because yes, she wants to be a vet when she grows up. Well I, tell you that there isn't a single country where event needed where we need the every single country animals need help animals need to be protected, and sometimes they're veterinarians who'd come and work in sancturies to look after the chimpanzees we have battery help now in in the national parks for the wild chimpanzees because the so few left that we have to make sure to try and keep them healthy. So we can dot them and treat them if necessary a bad wound, for example. juniper thanks so much for that call Jane Goodall. I'm so glad that juniper called eight years old and I have to say in household. The there is cross generational appeal for you. I've been following your work for a long time. My nine year old son knows who you are and is. Really enamored of the of the kind of work that you do. So this seems like a good moment to ask you about roots and shoots and sort of what your messages to young people, but tell us about roots and shoots and and and what it does. Well, it it began in comes in and nineteen hundred one. and. It was when twelve high school students came to see me in my house and they came from eight different schools and they were very concerned about all kinds of different things. Poaching and Cox was the government doing more street children with no homes. A wide range of problems that they felt solving. So I told them to go and get their friends and we had a big meeting and that's when roots and shoots was born, and basically we decided that the main message was every individual makes a difference every day Rian individual as role to play in matters that every group would choose three projects. One to help people wanted help animals when to help the environment because everything in nature is connected and we part of not separated from the natural world big problem today. So Anyway, what began twelve hundred school students is now in sixty five countries and growing fast. and. It's got hundreds of thousands of members I don't remember how many groups are as many groups. We don't know about you know we suddenly found a little group somewhere in the forests of Ecuador between roots and shoots. We found out about the by accident. And they're changing the world that they literally these young people know that rolling up this leads taking action that planting trees, which is very important. Today that cleaning streams doing campaigns about. Single use plastic and today we have members in kindergarten. We. Have members in university and everything in between and they are changing while they are my greatest reason for hope and I hope any child parent listening will try and get involved because changes their lives too. So let's go to Tanya. She's calling from Concord. Mass. Tanya. Jane Goodall. Thanks for the call go ahead. Thank you Anthony. Great hosting and Ms Goodall it's It's a great honor to the listening to you and to be speaking with you I wanted to point out that in terms of for more experimentation on chimps year or so ago I was. At the conference at the Radcliffe Institute? Harvard. And there were researchers from China who were showing slides of their experimentation on chimps. In in trying to find a cure for depression and it involves crisper. Technique modest vacations, and it was very, very sad to see the poor suffering chimp and the corner of its cage just toddling over. It was a terrible sight and. and there was a push to get more US support to to get back into experimentation on chimpanzees precisely because of their. closeness to us and I I just wanted to mention that and hear what you may have to say. Thank you. Thank you Tanya Jane Goodall, to what extent are that kind of research still being conducted on chimps and to what extent are you still concerned about that? Now mostly monkey snow but. The occasional. Jim. In Germany, for example, to patents were just refused who genetically modifying chimpanzee. But. we have to shoot to live at China the huge movement in China to. Protect animals it's it's growing fast many states now bandaging of dogs and after the Kobe. And the government was very quick to ban the a sale, the traffic king, and the eating of wild animals. So it's changing it takes time you know America, for example, until recently was the second largest importer of ivory in the world coming to China then China banned the importation of Ivory And these things just take time but yes, we can try and fight poaching in Africa but we also have to work on the demand because when money is involved when people can get rich by shooting a rhino and selling its horn, they going to go on doing it even if it's illegal. So that's where roots and shoots comes in and we just working working away on reducing the demand for wild animals and cruelty to domestic animals well Tanya. Thank you for that call one more call Alex is calling from Walpole NASA -Chusetts go ahead Alex you're on the air with Jane Goodall thank you for the call. Thank you and I. It's. It's an honor I. Agree with everything that's been said in terms of. How we can help. move or progress in terms of the climate disruption and I just wondered. Jane. what you thought the biggest impediment was to. Progress on climate disruption and also maybe a personal kind of. question about what brings you joy. And All that. Thanks. Okay well festival at one. Very serious impediment is leaders in countries who denied climate change together. Latest in countries who as in the US back. Environmental Protection. Regulations, they try very hard to do that. You know there's me hoping they'll be a groundswell of people not wanting to go back to days pollution when Pepsi, the first time in a big City Bay had the privilege of breathing clean air, which should be a human right But while we have presidents and prime ministers and leaders who are dying to get back to business as usual and open up coal mines, things like that. It's very, very difficult, but we just must not give up. And what brings me joy. Well, it's being out in nature and. It. Doesn't have to be the forest chimpanzees although that's my. Most favorite. But somewhere out to nature preferably alone with a very close friend. And just feeling a part of it. And you know people associated with the natural one of our new see little children there in a beautiful place on our birds in there are butterflies and I saw two year old an all he was doing was playing around on his on his dental cell phone video games and things. This is tragic because it's been proved that. Contact with nature is very important psychological development in children. I. Glad you brought up how much you love being out in nature and in the forest because at one point in that wonderful documentary the hope you describe the feeling that you get as one you get in a Cathedral I love that that analogy. Yes I it's it's really true and there are some places in the forest when the trees kind of art show behead it reminds me of some of those great cathedrals where the such. In know whether you whether you're religious or not. But the atmosphere because so many hundreds of thousands of people have been in there they've been praying make being. Content with what I call a great spiritual power. And that's the same for me in the forest. Let's go to Marcus who's calling from Cambridge Mass Marcus. Go ahead you're on the air. Thanks for the call. On this is good all I've been I've been a fan of your's ever since I was a grubs H, your son grubs age and do the question is. The question is about zoos interaction with apes and zoos like here in Boston, we have the Franklin Park Zoo. And how. My interaction was I'm a painter and do oak via. was a painter and I brought my My pastels and oak came up and watched me paint and other guerrilla actually punched me. In through the glass because I was filming him for how do you feel about? People experiencing a bit of what you do with that kind of. Interaction and is is. Okay. Well, first of all this good soon, bad zunes, but I have to say that during all my years zoos have improved so much and the really good sues have wonderful exhibits not some space good animal groups. Keep pursue understand them and what's really interesting is that during the pandemic when the zoos shutdown. They animals became deeply depressed because for them the visitors of entertainment you know like television, them. And it was fascinating eating to talk to people still working in the zoos, feeding the animals and so on. Say that they were really really impressed. So he says were having to find ways to occupy the men cheer them up. So I know that many many people look into the is a chimp gorilla or elephant or whatever. It happens to be an that gets them and they're they're hooked for life. They understand they looking into the eyes a sentient being. What shouldn't be? Ever elephants dolphins whales. Probably will tube will need to run. You said there are good zoos and bad zoos. What's an example of of a good zoo? Your Favorite Zoo Well In the US, the San Diego Zoo is is is really good. It has wonderful exhibits and it also raises a lot of money for conservation of the animals out in the wild keepers. Get the chance to go and see the animals in the wild, which gives them a much better. Attitude when that looking up to the captive ones. So I think sue's play a big role in in education and in conservation. You celebrated you're eighty sixth birthday in April But in the documentary, the hope you say that the kind of life you're living now is completely crazy. There are times when you thank you cannot go on like this and and I think if I'm recalling correctly, you travel something like three hundred days a year. Dick. Yeah Go ahead. Sorry. To say, Oh, I, was just wondering. How do you find time to relax and unwind and guess what keeps you going three hundred days a year. Well thing is you know being grounded since the beginning of the pandemic luckily was called when I was at home here in a I'm speaking to you from the house where I grew up in Bournemouth England on the south coast. And own my things are here my sister have family here. So My A. It was a good place to be grounded. Are Fund I've had been so much busier during this time dive ever being in my life before with interviews like this and put costumes and skype. Reading books to children on Readiness Shadow man I did which is now out on our website free been reading other books children lots of emails and video messages to all the twenty four. Jane Goodall Institute's the Sankt enable needed cheering up and it's been very tough because the code it I mean Gumby were terrified that it will reach the Chimpanzee National Park and surrounding areas whether gyms because they catch your pieces. You have. You embrace this idea about hope and I want to ask you about this three of your books plus another set to release. Next year have hope in their titles documentary the National Geographic. Entry about you is called the hope what keeps you what makes you hopeful and I'd love to end on this note because there's so much going on right now from the pandemic. To climate degradation, which can really leave a person feeling despair about our planet but you have hope and I'd love to hear what keeps you hopeful. What I did will you hear all the time think globally act locally that's completely the wrong way round because quite honestly. I think everybody who thinks about the state of the planet globally will lose the they just. have any energy to do anything locally they'll be so depressed but of the whole message of roots and shoots if you start actually doing something to make a difference, ben you suck me feel you know while I am making a difference you know that will run the world of the people making a difference. So as I said earlier, the young people are giving me the most home. I'm very passionate about that. Then assists extrordinary intellectual. Ours. You know we're now coming up with ways that we can live in greater harmony was the planet with thinking about ways we can live a lighter ecological footprint every day, which is going to make a difference that makes you feel better. and. Then there's the resilience of nature I described flying over going beans a little tiny island ernest around it by Kooky. Onto any. Hilson. creeped ball. Because people. Puffing. And they realized The. Erosion. Well Jane Goodall let's leave it there on that hopeful note about the resilience of nature. Thank you so much for joining us today it's been such a pleasure philly great. Brian to everybody. Jane Goodall Anthony Brooks. This is on point.

Jane Goodall Jane goodall US Anthony Brooks Jane Goodall Institute Africa Tanzania Jane Goodall Anthony Brooks Jane Goodall Institute JJ National Geographic China Boston Congo founder National Park David Greybeard Gumby National Park
Jane Goodall: We Can Learn From This Pandemic

60-Second Science

02:48 min | 11 months ago

Jane Goodall: We Can Learn From This Pandemic

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky and Corona virus. The hopeful pingers communities individual together a healthy. How the that is Jane Goodall during a teleconference last week? Wednesday April twenty. Second is the fiftieth Earth Day and on Wednesday goodall. We'll take part in day-long programming on the National Geographic Channel. During the teleconference last week she was asked what gives her hope during this pandemic incredible carnage but the people on the front line. The doctors the nurses with King sometimes losing their lives. And of course we shall get through this and the big hope is that this time we will pay attention to the cause of the pandemic which is all this of nature and the animals on the destruction of the environment forcing animals in the close contact with each other and some of them with humans trafficking the Hunting. The killing the wet mall kids. The intensive forms domestic animals and all of that is creating conditions for a virus to jump. Someone's be another. Good Ole was also asked how she hoped the world might change because of the pandemic hope it will change and how it changes of two different things in this particular case. I think company millions of people especially those living in cities have experience for the first time. What it's like to breathe fresh air and sea the stars at night and even see wild animals at close quarters and I think those people will think other people to have seen this as a wake-up call that we've disrespected NATO. We got to start changing the way that we act. And we've got to rethink the way we never. We've got to get away from this consumerism. Imperialism that PUTS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AHEAD OF Environmental Protection which is damaging the future generations of humans and animals Fia whether this will make a fee change fear is that we have so many political leaders around the world right now and I feel that they will want to get back to business as usual as quick as possible and even double it to make up for lost time for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Jane Goodall Ole NATO King sixty seconds
Dr. Jane Goodall  The Legend, The Lessons, The Hope (#421)

The Tim Ferriss Show

1:38:55 hr | 11 months ago

Dr. Jane Goodall The Legend, The Lessons, The Hope (#421)

"Optimal minimal this altitude. I can run flat out and start shaking questions now. It Time cybernetic organism living tissue metal skeleton. This episode is brought to you by express. Vpn I've been using since last summer and I started using it as a full retail paying customer always tested things before considering sponsors and I find it to be a super reliable way to make sure that my data are secure encrypted data are like a pompous but I like to ensure that my data are secure encrypted but to do so without slowing down my internet speed if you ever use public Wifi at say hotel or coffee shop where I often work and as many of my listeners. Do your often sending data over an open network meaning no encryption whatsoever one way to ensure that all of your data are encrypted and cannot be easily read by hackers or script kitties or whoever is by using express VPN and the on boarding process for express VPN. Meaning the sign up flow. The use of the product is one of the best. 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These days as you know with a million messages per minute not enough hours in the day. How'd you really catch people's attention this is? Lincoln can help with Lincoln ads. You can catch the right professionals. The right people at the right time and I'll tell you how I'm using them personally in a minute. Lincoln ads can drive traffic to landing. Pages for instance engagement and for many of you most importantly conversions whether that's registrations for an event downloads of white papers and e books. Were other important metrics me. Personally I'm going to be testing. Lincoln adds to drive sign ups to my free newsletter. Five bullet Friday which I've realized drives just about everything else with precise targeting through Lincoln entrepreneurs startups and SNB's at small medium. Sized businesses can better more cost effectively reached the people who matter to them specifically with more than sixty two million decision makers on Lincoln. You're able to connect with the business leaders or just the target audience who are most relevant to your company and deliver a clear call to action. That's always Ri- focus a lot on my energy obviously headline and call to action linked in ads allows you to cut through the clutter and ensure your messages are getting through to the people you most want to target so huge medium-sized and small. Businesses alike are all making the most out of Lincoln ads entrepreneur. Sola preneurs you name it so try for yourself. Lincoln is offering a free one hundred dollar Lincoln at credit to launch your first campaign simply visit Lincoln Dot com slash T. F. S. as in temporary show again that's Lincoln Dot com slash T. F. S. terms and conditions apply. Hello Boys and girls ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss and welcome to a very special episode of the Tim. Ferriss show I have wanted to interview this incredible guest since day. One of this podcast somewhere between six and eight years ago and she is a living legend. Dr Jane Goodall she was born on April third. Nineteen thirty four and London England at the young age of twenty six. She followed her passion for animals in Africa. Tagami Tanzania where? She began her landmark study of chimpanzees in the wild immersing herself like no one had before in their habitat as a neighbor rather than a distant observer discovery in sixty that chimpanzees not only us but make tools rocked the scientific world and redefine the relationship between humans and animals in one thousand nine hundred seven. She established the Jane Goodall Institute. Jj to advance her work around the world and for generations to come JJ continues. The field research gumby and builds on Dr Goodell's innovative approach to conservation which recognizes the central role that people play in the wellbeing of animals and the environment in nineteen ninety. One she founded roots and shoots a program that empowers young people in nearly sixty countries and since its inception in. Nineteen ninety-one has greatly impacted youth in more than one hundred countries to act as the informed cultivation leaders that the world so urgently needs today. Dr Travels around the world normally three hundred plus days a year although certainly quarantine changes that speaking about the threats facing chimpanzees environmental crises and her reasons for hope and we do talk a lot about our current situation and I spoke to her from her childhood home. In England inner books and speeches she emphasizes the interconnectedness of all living things and the collective power of individual action. Dr Goodell is a U. N. Messenger of peace and dame commander of the British Empire if that is not one of the coolest titles you've ever heard. I don't know what is the next chapter of Dr Goodell's life's work unfolds. A brand new documentary and I highly highly recommend watching it. Jane Goodall the hope premiering on Earth Day April twenty. Second that's this April twenty second at nine eastern eight central on Nat Geo Nat Geo wild and net Geo Mundo. The two hour special takes viewers through the chapters of her amazing journey and the sixty years since her groundbreaking discoveries in Gumby researching wall chimpanzees including her Activism Chretien over nonprofit organization. The Jane Goodall Institute as I mentioned earlier and Roots and shoots the youth program which you can find out more about at roots and shoots dot org along with her current efforts to inspire the next generation. Dr Goodell's work through the Jane Goodall Institute is Advanced. The generous support of their donor family. People like you and me in other words to show your support visit. Jane Goodall Dot Org forward slash. Tim Can find her on social on all social platforms at Jane Goodall Inst- as an institute at Jane Goodall inside I N S T and you can find out more about her youth program and visit them on social on all social platforms at roots and shoots and without further ado. Please enjoy this wide-ranging conversation that I so thoroughly enjoyed myself with Dr Jane Goodall Dr Goodall. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. I'm thrilled to finally connect. I don't use the word hero. Much certainly been a hero and an idol to me for many decades in a previous lifetime. I want to be a marine biologist and I am also very lucky in a sense that I have you in one place because your team has told me you travel and have traveled three hundred plus days a year for the last several decades but my understanding now is that you are in Bournemouth and I thought we would start perhaps close to the beginning and this certainly takes place in England just as context from your childhood. I understand that you grew up during wartime and I would love to hear you describe what that experience was like. Well now. I'm really glad I grew up at time because although it was shocking I mean we will in Bournemouth but some bombs were dropped here. The German fighters used to dump their bombs near the coast if they hadn't managed to hit the target and whistled of in the Middle. So we had the bombs falling. We had sirens air-raid warnings. We had to go into an air raid shelter which is a little tiny cage really supposed to be keeping people safe so families children were issued them and people were killed and damaged and we never knew the bums would fall in London. My uncle was a surgeon so he come back every other weekend with shocking tales of of what had been happening but the reason I say I was glad I grew up then is because I land take nothing for granted. One Square of chocolate was huge. Treat food was rationed closed garage and We had very little money was no television. Only television. Were the news reels. That was just about the war and so books became very very important and I still got my childhood books here with me in the room as I speak to you and so we luckily have. This garden is my grandmother's House and I spent lots and lots of time with my dog. So the really shocking part was hearing about the Holocaust and seeing photographs of the skeletons of the Jews in the camps were opened up. I mean skeletons of living people and that really changed everything. Life started thinking age ten about good and evil so that was my growing up in the wool. As you were growing up I I read a number of stories that seem to In a sense foreshadow much of what would come later but I read stories of your mother finding you observing earthworms in your bed. I read of stories of you hiding and waiting for more than four hours to see a hen laying an egg and the police almost being called. Because you are missing is is that comfort with patients and on some level isolation. Something that you developed yourself. Is that something? You've observed and other family members Would love to hear you comment on that. If you could it was just me. I mean on the family in a loved animals but they didn't observe them a watch them. I didn't have any Any example tour. I was just born that way and having such a supportive mother. I mean UH swims in my bed imaginable. The Earth and the muck and lots of mothers will be horrified and and throw them out of the window which she just required. Lee said You die here and we took them back in the garden amend the Hen House Story. It's one I tell a lot because we went to stay on a farm in the country and I was given. The job of collecting Henson was appropriate from there. Were no animals. Cooped up in tiny prison-like would Animal concentration accounts. They will free roaming in the field and the hens and the NFL but they lay the eggs in these little hen house. Apparently I began asking. Everybody wins the egg. Come out nobody. Distinctly remember seeing hen go into a hen house and I crawled off to her and skulks of fear. She flew out. I can still feel her wings itching. My face and I must have sought in that little four and a half year. Old Brain will know Hen Malayan kids dangerous place so way to that was the time. I waited and waited in this empty house but was rewarded the head and came in and I didn't know the family being read. I was rushing towards the house and that was mom. You can imagine how worried she was having nearly called the police but instead of how dare. You often do bed that again. We should have killed the magic. She sat down to hear this amazing story. And the reason I love it is less the making a little scientist curiosity asking questions. Not Getting the right on to find out feel self making a mistake not giving up and learning patients. A different kind of mother might have crushed that early scientific curiosity and I might not have done or not done. It seemed to really cultivate your not just ability but perseverance with observation and in watching footage of you and we'll we'll certainly get to Africa and other experiences in your biography that you have to have many sensitivities and I could be off base with that but I want to ask you a bit more about your mother because in reading a New York Times profile from Suppose about a year ago there was a one paragraph that caught my eye and it was related to your childhood during wartime and related to your father's brother. Rex who had joined the Air Force and was killed and the sentence that caught. My eye was one day. We were in Bournemouth in the evening and suddenly she. Your mother screamed wrecks and started sobbing hysterically and it was the very moment he was shot down over Egypt. So just for clarity. Is that to say that. She somehow intuited that he had been shot down before receiving news. I'll absolutely I mean nope we didn't know for quite some time under a different. Asians like we were walking on the beach. Normally we have to go up to our little guest house. The quickest way but on this occasion mom decided to take away which she never did. She had a week hot but she took us the long run. I still remember looking up with the Blue Blue Sky. Emceeing an aeroplane quite high and seeing to black things that looked like cigars coming out on each side. Among through me and my assistant to the ground I can still hear the terrible explosion. Am One of those bombs felt right on the path where we would surely have seen if we go short way the normal way. Have you experienced any of that for lack of a better word intuition in your own life in the field or elsewhere or is that something that was unique to your mother? Pretty unique to her. But you know I experience very vividly the presence of my second husband after he guide and it ties in with what other people have seen them felt so in other words. We're going into a different realm here but I don't know what people believe and I'm not quite sure what it all means myself but it's a p people have been asking me what's next big adventure and always say dying because you know when we die the nothing which is fine or something and if there's something what's an adventure to find out you've had you've had more adventures than most and I suppose. This is a good time for those who certainly recognize your name. I think almost everyone will recognize your name. And they'll know that you're considered to be one of the world's foremost experts on chimpanzees but beyond that. I think many people don't know about the early chapters and I'd like to Segue to that because it opens up a number of doors that we can explore. Let's flashback could to March nine thousand nine hundred eighty seven and I believe your passport is missing. Can you explain what has happened? Well we've done a last minute shopping and of course in those days when planes going back and forth that's how long I've lived and it was by boat and we actually I suppose train hustle. Something I can't remember the details and suddenly I found. I didn't have my passport and I remembered we'd been shopping in Peter Jones and so mum rang up shops at they funded. We found somebody to go and collect it who rushed to the dock otherwise I couldn't sailed and all my money would be wasted. So what's the drama with a way to start and that money just just for those? Who aren't familiar W that was painstakingly. Gathered over rather long period of time with various jobs was not. It's not like you had this in a bank account just waiting to be used for whatever purpose for a long period of time school. It was no money for university. I have to have a job. You know we had very little money so I I pulled it a secretarial course which was boring but I got my diploma. I got a job then. Came the letter from a school friend. Inviting me to Kenya so you could save money in London so I went home and got a job a waitress in a hotel around the corner very hard work in those days families coming to spend a week by the seaside. And you've got to look after them for whole week. If you wanted any so the tips the small but hunt made sure they own you. I was saving up for Africa. So it's how I got the money I would love just to spend a moment and we don't have to spend a lot of time on this but discussing Louis Leakey and I've read various accounts of how you connected with him. But I'd like to to hear it directly from you and In perhaps you could describe what it was that he saw in you but that initial contact is and how that came to be is is of great interest to me two could speak to that. I would appreciate it like be staying with my friend for about a couple of months and somebody said to me at a Party. Appeal interested in animals. He released me yours leaky He was curator at that time. A Natural History Museum but of course. He's best known as a a very eminent paleontologist. He'd spent his life with his second wife. Mary Leakey searching for the fossils are stone-age ancestors across Africa and so I was very shy back then but I rang. The museum said I'd love to make an appointment to meet Dr Leaky Voice and I'm leaky what you want. But anyway I was so passionate about animals anyway. Went to see him and he took me all around. He asked me many questions about the stuffed animals. That were there and I think he was impressed. That because I read everything I could about Africa. I on so many of these questions while I mentioned earlier that boring secretarial course. I did two days before I met leaky. His secretary had suddenly quit. He needed a secretary and there. I was never know in this life. So I'm suddenly surrounded by people who can answer all my questions about the mammals and birds reptiles amphibians the insects the plans. It was heaven. Oh you leykis wanted. He see in. May young a feeling that women may better observe us. They were more patient. He also wanted somebody to go and study chimpanzees because of his interest in human evolution. So the fossils of early man that he was uncovering can tell a lot from up fossil about whether the creature walked upright muscle attachments. The wear of the tooth shows roughly. The kind of Diet behavior doesn't plus lies so he reckon there was a apelike human like common ancestor about six million years ago? Just now generally accepted and that he thought Jane Behavior in chimps and humans today is similar or same maybe it came directly from the common ancestor and has been with us through a long separate eagerly journeys in which case he could have a better way of imagining how his early humans used to behave so he wanted a mind uncluttered by the reductionist thinking of the animal behavior. People at the time. It was a very new science. They were anxious to make it a hard science which it shouldn't be and so the fact I hadn't been to college was plus the fact that I was a woman was plus. I was lucky for he. He seems to have picked the winning lottery ticket or at least a a very formidable combination of traits and if we take that mention of patients or his belief that in part women make better observers because of more patients if we flash forward then to you landing in Ghamdi Stream National Park Tanzania from getting the pronunciation correct. I was watching The first net gio maybe not the first but the one of the more recent NAT. Go documentaries about you titled Jane and in that and also in your writing. I believe it took something like five months of constant effort and having chimpanzees flee from your presence to finally be what we might call accepted and I have two questions related to that. The first is what do you think made the difference? Why did they go from fleeing to accepting and second is when you I really had the opportunity to look deeply into a chimpanzees is what did you? What did you see and just as importantly? What did you feel alright? Well the acceptance in the in the movie it sort of look to survey something accepted made. It wasn't like that it was very gradual. It was partly thanks to this one male who began to lose his much ahead of the others. Michael Him David Greybeard subtly white band and because he began to let me get closer and closer I think if I came to group in the forest and he was with that group because they separate into you know separate small groups and sometimes but if he was there than the others were ready to run but he was sitting calmly and I suppose that made them feel well. She can't be so dangerous after all so gradually. I could get closer. And the first time I came close to a group. That didn't run away. I think was one of the proudest moments of my life. You know it made it just in time before the six months money ran out and So go I'd seen David Greybeard use and make tools to fish for termites. Thought to be something only humans capable of. That's what brought the geographic lie to the beginning. Six months off to the study began may agree to gone funding. It was David Greybeard. The first chimpanzee that you were able to get close enough to to sort of connect eye-to-eye with definitely what did you see and feel when you had that opportunity. Well I saw that I was looking is a thinking feeling being and it was not so surprising. You might think because I'd always felt that animals were thinking feeling beings but with the chimpanzee so like US behaviorally and biologically. It's it's almost. It's not like looking at another human is different and I can't explain how it's different but it was a very magical moment. Because he looked back. That was the thing he didn't run. He just sat there and looked back at me. I would love to ask questions about what we might learn. And what perhaps you've learned about human nature or even questions have been raised in your interactions and observations of chimpanzees and mentioned it briefly but it it's hard to overstate just how incredible and shocking and world-shattering for many people was that you observed chimpanzees not just using tools but constructing tools for in this case consuming. Termites mean it. May it made news around the world? You'd many other observations. I believe also that the belief that chimpanzees were purely vegetarians. Also you observed not to be the case with their their consumption of other primates exactly and you noted and I know this was a real in some is a FAUX PAS at the time real personalities. And you might have been accused of anthropomorphic at all of these things but you observe different personalities in different chimpanzees and I thought perhaps we could just start with a story and that is the story of old man and Mark Cassano. If I'm getting the pronunciation right and then I have questions about a few other chimpanzees you personally had quite a bit of interaction with crews on our own land on an island in Lion Country Safari in Florida and old man had been in medical research it being captured from the wild. His mother was shocked and he was called old man. Because an infant shampoos distressed and frightened they have wrinkled faces and they huddle only they do not carry old and he was lucky loose about twelve and for some reason he was known now more used to the lab and he was put on an island with three females two of them for medical research one from searches and Maku Sauna was employed to look after them and he was told. Don't go anywhere near them that bishops. They hate people much stronger than you. They'll kill you so he troops food from his little paddle boat onto the island and began watching them. A baby was born so old man was the father and he felt visas. Such amazing beams. I must have some kind of relationship with them. If I'm to look after them supergun going closer close on one day. He held out a banana in his hand. When when Oldman to beat he said I know how you felt when David Banana from you. When they he went onto the island one day he groomed old man one day they they played an old man. I laughed and they became basically. That was a friendship and then one day mark slipped into being raining fell flat on his face unfortunately frightened this infant. Who is the love of old man's life that will bind us to protect and carry him and share Food Welsh? The mother hearing her scream raced an attacked mark biting his neck. The other two females to support her ran in one big his wrist one becky's leg and Marc will hound awesome. I going to get away from them so much stronger than us. He looked up. He saw old man thundering across the island with a furious colonists base on he thought his time and come to die on come to protect is precious infant but what old man did was to pull those. Three screaming rose females off mock and keep them away while not dragged himself to safety. I met mark when he came out of hospital. He said no questions. Oldman saved my life and so in. I always think if a chimpanzee who's being abused by people can reach out to help a human friend in time of need then surely agree with a greater capacity. Compassion can do the same to the chimpanzees in that time. The thank you for telling that story. And it's I think a useful and beautiful segue into a discussion of some of the other things that you observed and in this case we see compassion on the part of old man and then Perhaps on the other hand you've also observed quite a lot of aggression and violence Within chimpanzee communities of both the I think it was nineteen seventy four to seventy eight. Gumby Chimpanzee War I saw footage of. I think it was the southern troop being violated or at least the The dead bodies of those chimps. I believe in. Please correct me if I'm wrong. That in some cases dominant females will deliberately kill the young of other females to maintain dominance observing that in chimpanzees but also observing the compassion as you have. What has that led you to Believe or infer about human nature. Well it's interesting when I began talking about aggression. Many scientists told me I should play that down because it might indicate that aggression in humans was inherited from a Pasta Ancestors. Which for me was very clearly the case and I thought. I'm not going to be bullied. I never have been by scientific opinion so I continued to talk about it. And it was the time you wouldn't remember. It was nineteen seventy seven. I think and it was a time. When whether aggression is innate inborn or acquired land was was a huge controversy. And that's when I I really talked about it to a scientific community and I I don't know I mean. It seems obvious to me that we've inherited from our common ancestor traits of aggression and also traits of compassion and empathy. To what extent if we take an example a from your personal experience and I I know very little about Frodo but Frodo seems to have been amongst the chimpanzees. You had exposure to one of the more aggressive. But I'd love to hear you speak to this. And how would you explain the variance among chimpanzees? Was it also appear to be a nate? Did did it seem to stems from some type of trauma. How did you think about that? And perhaps Frodo specifically well. They're all different. Some are much more aggressive than others disliked. We off a Rodeo. Once spoiled he was a spoilt Brat is a mother was the highest ranking female. At the time he had to he had one older brother who always came to his defense did fee and so he always got his own way and he was he was a real bully. So it's to a two young ones plane same age as him haves and he came to join them they would stop playing immediately because they knew if he entered the game he suddenly become rough and cause them to be hurt so it wasn't just humans. Feel the systems and specially mean that he targeted with his displays hitting over dragging. I got Western Wall. I was stamped upon. But he was not try really to her. But he was trying to assert his dominance and I guess they don't realize quite how strong they are. I'M GONNA be wanted to kill me. I wouldn't be speaking to you now. That special is the assertion of dominance does is how much of this conscious and I don't know how one would even know but is is that is that a conscious or potentially conscious political maneuver to to get better access to resources and so on or is it really just a conditioned behavior based on as you said being being spoiled and that just being some type of primitive drive that they have and perhaps even we have because Don's brother before him became the top ranking male android had a very different character was reflective He became dominant not to aggression but still being smart some of the males get to the top by share aggression by bullying by swaggering about waving their arms. They remind me so much of some. Human politicians is not true but There are other males who get to the top by skillfully forming alliances and they only tackle high ranking male when the allies said to support them and then there are some who just persist they persist in charging towards groups of superior males who agree me each other startling them so they run away an Indian. This was Goblin Indian. I think the other males so it will he just go on doing us all right miss. Just let him get to the top. We don't care anymore. That's how it seemed. And he penned millions and he was small and he wasn't very blessed to you are I think for many people a messenger of hope and I personally swing quite often more often than I would like. Between having faith in humankind human nature and feeling as though we are perhaps hard coded or through DNA destined to at times revert to our lesser selves lowest selves most aggressive selfish selves. How have you formed your own thinking or I should say what is what is your thinking about human nature and where it has let us and how that relates to perhaps poor decisions and good decisions that we've made that have landed us where we are. Certainly you're in your childhood home Spending more time in England now than you have in decades. I'm also in in lockdown. But how after your many decades of observation of not just chimpanzees but humans. Where do where do you currently stand on thinking about human nature? Well I find sadly there are some people who really cost a very bad light on human beings. We looked down from another planet. And that's I mean you know as I told you earlier I was so shocked about Holocaust on. That's what made me think about human evil. And the way we differ from the chimps is that chimps can be aggressive in chimps can kill. But it's on something that's roused. It's a a strong emotion and they just display an attack but human beings can sit and think and plan deliberate torture mental and physical in cold blood and that I think is where we differ an changes from aggression to evil. And it's the dichotomy I mean. Some people are saintly and patient and good and other people The opposite and unfortunately. Today we have many presidents and prime ministers who seem to be more concerned for their own advance on their own careers. Their own power Their own acquisition of wealth gun for the good of the people who elected them. So we're both and it's going to be a race. Isn't it as to which side will win if they if the greedy materialism of the capitalist materialistic world wyndhams then we're doomed and this is why I spend so much of my time trying to grow program for young people because I would say almost none of the young people who've been through this program which began in ninety-one and is now in six countries and his kindergarten through university in Idaho? I don't know more than two. Who strayed from the part of having good values respect for nature respect for each other? So I want to grow more and more of these young people because they're the future leaping stealing their future for decades and this is the roots and shoots youth program that you're referring to yes roots and shoots dot org also put that in the show notes for everyone of course. Let's let's talk a little bit more about that and As it relates to youth program the the cultivation of minds that are inclined to bend towards the light instead of the darkness or towards good instead of evil. I know there's a very strong words but let's use them for now. If we're looking at the current situation as it relates to SARS Cov two and Cova nineteen and so on Could you speak to? What got us into this fix. And I mean I'm thinking. Of course the wildlife trade it's effects on human health and so on it doesn't need to be specific to that but how we got here how we contributed to it and then also if if you're teaching us how you would how you would educate them so that they don't make the same mistakes. They long last week questions I did. It's a bit of a sloppy question. Sorry about that with the Hocutt nineteen cassettes on everybody's minds right now and the shocking thing is. It's been predicted by science. Decades just like climate change has been predicted and I only wish somehow that been locked down about climate. Change the way that this being locked down over this this this virus because you know we we. We have known for all this time that because we are destroying the environment of some of these animals. There's spending having to spend more time in contact with each other because they've got less habitat and also more time in contact with humans and sometimes that's that involves crop rating but there's also people penetrating deeper and hunting. And then of course selling the meat in the African markets Bushmeat Aman selling me to cross Asia in these terrible what they're known as wet markets and also selling animals for medication for pets. All of this bringing us in close contact so the theory seems to be what the virus in a wild animal and because of this closer contact between animals it jumps into another animal. And that's when in these very bad conditions including factory forms by the way the virus commend jump into a human if there is a similar kind of virus with which this new one combined and that leads to a new A new form which as as is the case with with the Kobe. Nineteen can be rather devastating. Just think if we if we treated climate change like this all those years ago when we were warned about it we might not be in the State Lauren. Now so basically I'm saying is. Our leaders have not listened to science. The big corporations have not listened to science and hundreds of people. Now we're in this materialistic money. Grabbing age you know just want to carry on with business as usual. They don't want to think about not eating. Well the meat they won't or not Favoring the destruction of a piece of habitat to build yet another shopping mall so you know. That's that's what the viruses teaching us. And will we learn from it? We didn't seem to land from the markets were live animals are banned for awhile but then it started up again. China is not talking about making it permanent with a still allowing animals. Wild animals to be sold medicine snaps. A tremendous loophole luckily people in China to close that loophole. To if you have a classroom and as you do now with social media I mean you you are arguably reaching more people now virtually than you might in travel speaking to live audiences. But let's say you had a classroom of ten thousand children or adolescents youth. Who were hanging on your every word. What are the principles truths that you would infuse in your lessons to them? That could possibly help. Avoid some of these problems that we've we've created a or types of thinking. What would the would the curriculum? Look like must've Let me just say that roots and shoots which began in Nineteen Ninety One. Twelve high school students dar-es-salaam incomes in Yep We decided as a meeting the same of our aid. You know coaching in the pox. Illegal dynamite fishing and street children than cruel treatment of animals in the market. I mean they were concerned about what kinds of different things so we decided that the main message this new program that we wanted to start together would be that every single individual matters is role to play and makes a difference every single day with a choice to kind of difference to make right from the beginning because I learned about the Indian connection of things in the rainforest. How every species matters has evolved play? We decided that every group formed would choose between them three projects one to help people wanted to help animals one to help the environment and they would share their projects with each other and so we began listening to them. What did they feel matter? How could we help them? And when he when young people understand the problems and we empower them to take action and listen to their voices. It's quite extraordinary. I mean the my main reason for hope is traveling around the world as I have been. I've met so. Many young people have been positive. Roots and shoots or similar groups. Shining is wanting to tell Dr Jane what they've been doing to make a better world and because they can choose they they they're passionate and they sit down together and they discuss it very democratic. They discuss what what they can do between them on. Bay Sometimes ASK FOR HELP. Maybe a parent may be a teacher And then they will up this leaves and take action whether it's restoring a wetland whether it's installing rubbish bins or organic gardens in the schools whether it's saving up money to help quake victims and because we put them in touch with each other face to face when possible but but truly which is wonderful they are inspiring each other. Yes we do have some curricula because some countries wanted UK wanted a curriculum. Were one hundred. One thousand seven hundred schools now and some of the African countries want curricula. Sometimes it's just you know so yes I do have messages for them and I do talk to them about the role that they can play about the importance of thinking about the consequences of the little choices. You make each day. How people may look different. Sound different the different languages. Different color of skin. But if they've fall and bleed the blogs saying if they wait the tears of the same and kids get it so it's not so much teaching. It's it's sort of the values of developed. They've grown up with the program and we now have a number of adults in quite high places and they have kept their values as they as they read the program and move on into adult life. So we've got teachers and people in government and people in law an alleged just remembering the importance of respect is a key word. Respect the environment respect for animals and of course I tell them about animals in how each one has a personality. A mind emotion. How pigs and rats and octopus are amazingly intelligent and how they can feel pain and fear and despair so it depends on the children on their age kindergarten university. Between between depends what I tell them. But I do as many Gatherings of young people as I possibly can and as you say now I can do it. Virtually and I can talk to them about things that I've learned. I recall a few years ago speaking with a friend of mine who I consider to be a good father a good parent and I asked him what advice he would have for someone like me. Considering having children I have none of my own yet and his advice he had a number of pieces of advice but his first was teach your children to be optimists and it seemed like a precursor or a prerequisite for so many other things. And I'm I'm looking at a time. Article Time magazine Article. That is that you wrote in two thousand two and I just WanNa read one paragraph and then ask you to elaborate or speak to it. So here's here's the paragraph. The greatest danger to our future is apathy. We cannot expect those living in poverty and ignorance to worry about saving the world for those of us able to read this magazine and my side note or listen to this podcast. It Is Different. We can do something to preserve our planet. You may be overcome. However by feelings of helplessness. You're just one person in a world of six billion. How can your actions make a difference? Best you say to leave it to decision makers and so you do nothing. Can we overcome apathy? Yes but only if we have hope and speak to that and also just to how you cultivate. Hope whether that's in yourself or the people you speak to well. I have my reasons. Hope which I'm always sharing with people but The singer people feeling helpless. Could they don't know what to do this message? If our youth programs that every individual makes a difference and it's just you picking up trash pits just you saving more than it wouldn't make the slightest bit of difference but because people are becoming more aware all around the World Ben does not you but thousands millions of people picking up trash saving more and so the message again being think about the consequences of the small choices you make everyday. What do you eat? We did it come from the town. The environment was it cruel to animals like the intensive bombing Is it cheap? Because of child slave labor somewhere make ethical choices and because millions of people making ethical choices way moving in the right direction and all of our young people you know they're influencing their parents and grandparents and I know that because the parents tell me so you know my reconsider hope number one is the youth I've said because they just so inspiring and secondly I say it's very bizarre but what makes us more different from chimps and other animals is explosive development about intellect. I mean look at what's happening now with the social media is one example. You and I talking went far apart way reaching millions of people. I mean. It's quite amazing. Isn't it when you think about it? We sent rockets demise and all that sort of thing so how did this most intellectual creatures destroying its only home so that seems to be this disconnect between the clever Brian and the human says love and compassion and thinking about? How does this help me now? Instead of how does it affect Future Generations? So now we're beginning to use our brains scientists tall to come up with more and more sophisticated. Technology will help us. Lead Beth Living more commonly with the natural world if governments would sponsor clean green energy rather than less succumbing to that ties with the oil and gas industry. We could be more or less off the granted. Many countries today China on India moving in that direction rapidly as well But each one of us can use our brains to think about the the environmental footprint. We thank each day amendment the resilience of Nature I tell people stories about areas that were totally destroyed. Rivers Lakes Lake. Mary was so polluted that it caught fire was polluted analogous fish swimming in it. Because people can animals on the brink of extinction of being given another jobs just have to say the habitats the up to change the mindset of those companies that want to destroy a forest to make money out of the wood or destroy forest to get minerals out of the ground to make more money but then we got to solve property because as you quoted Enya. If you'll really poor what what can. What can you do except cut the last three down of desperate to grow food to feed your family? Cheap is junk food because you doing to solve property unsustainable lifestyle of breast bus. But you know my last reasonable hoke is this indomitable human spirit the people who tackle what seems impossible and win involved and they may die as a result of that conviction but in the end they succeed I would live to speak about the power. Storytelling we've We've been discussing for at least a few minutes. Or at least made mention of intellect and technology to powerful and very interrelated facets of our human experience in watching the trailer for perhaps the next chapter of your life's work that will be shown and the story told in Jane Goodall the hope which is going to premiere on Earth Day April Twenty second on Nat Geo and include. That she a wild. And that's your moondog. I'll include all those details in the show notes and also will have already mentioned them in the introduction but there was a there was a quote in that trailer about changing minds. And the quote. Is this if you want somebody to change their mind? It's no good arguing. You've got to reach the heart and I wanted to. This might seem like a strange segue. I'd love to ask the question of Mr McGregor. And and how he came to his end. Could you speak to WHO MR McGregor was and ultimately how he died out with an old man like fusco go to Kombi slightly bored on the top of his head? Bit cantankerous and he was just really very very special. He had a special relationship with a young female. I don't know if she was related to him but he was old and she was young. Houston protect Amend probably the DOC stays even was some. The Wall was when the chimps were affected with a polio epidemic. And it was a terrible time. I one would come back dragging a paralyzed. Limb one Mellon Tool Cup right because one arm Toki paralyzed but Mr McGregor was paralyzed in both legs and he dragged himself up to the feeding station and I think the most awful part was on the other. Chimpanzees shunned him a fear of strangeness. Which of course is very adaptive if an infectious disease but I can never forget. It was a group of the other males grooming in a tree with enormous effort. Gregor dragged himself from branch to branch with just the strength of his arms and they took one look and climbed down and the look on his face. Will this effort. Which if I'd done wrong. Why are they going away very slowly he he? He went down to the ground again and in the end we had shoot him because we didn't have any other way of euthanizing him. We could have kept him alive feeding him but on us. But if you'd seen the sadness on his face there was no way that was alive for chimpanzee it could have been cruel so it made a deep deep impression on me. Mr McGregor and when I saw it in the movie it brought brought it'll back was a terrible time. What did you take from that experience? Whether MR McGregor in that entire experience or the polio itself affecting the chimpanzees around you what did you. What did you take from that experience or learned from that experience well and they definitely from human beings. I'm fortunately none of us. None of us a tool. But there was an epidemic in the nearby town and just some unreason. The doctor said. It wasn't polio. What he thought it was so there was no medication that was no vaccination and fuss lame chimps seen way down south near that place an I presume that spread from them up to our community because nobody in our staff or any anybody who got polio wanted. I take away from it. The fact that you know I think human beings have tended to treat people who behave strangely with fear and shown them that's led to a lot of suffering like people with cerebral Palsy To shut them away not realizing that inside. Those strange movements sometimes sometimes strange songs insides of accurately normal brain. But the brain can't express itself so Mr Mcgregor had what we think was his younger brother. An humphry was the only one who never left. You wouldn't go near Raga. But he's fade nearby in the trees. Even when all the rest of the group went far away feeding on some fruit humphry stayed an obsolete. We Youth Anais. We did it when no jumps around including free for at least the next month. I'm became an Saturn trees near where Mr McGregor had been so it it just taught me a lot about how chimpanzees and humans react to something strange if we then look at the work. You're doing now the work you've been doing over the last several decades but particularly with the the youth program and also in my mind trying to affect change with decision makers the the people in positions of power who are responding to their own incentives whether that be could be getting reelected could be power of some other type it could be. Acquisition of of capital could be any number of things. Are there any stories that you have found particularly effective for reaching the heart to grab the attention of of people as you've traveled in spoken with so many over so many so many decades is? Is there anything that sticks out to you? Well most people absolutely right telling stories. I always try and spend a little bit of time finding out the person I'm going to meet piss somebody in in in government or something do have children. They have dogs. I mean just so you can start something often. Not just I'm here for this bla-bla-bla lobbying on the hill for example and then try to tell stories. Because I've found that if you point fingers if you'll augmented if you'll blaming then you don't you don't see change because they're not going to let especially a woman some high powered man. There's nothing to let a woman make him look stupid by saying. Oh your rights him. I'm wrong change. I believe has to come from within. And so if you can reach the heart and there was a medical research lab and I managed to get better conditions in that lab by reaching the heart of the director of the lab telling stories about the chimps and there was another director Alab. This is slightly different. But he had a sixteen year old daughter who came to one of my ledges and I was showing secretly filmed footage of the awful conditions in the lab of which he was director conditions of the chimps. He said is don't came back. One day from this Lech sobbing. I'm saying daddy or so cruel. How can you do this? And he said Jane two years. I absolutely hated you. But he said please. Could you come and see the lab now because you are right and I never accused him directly through his daughter and he changed the lab completely The last story I love I was in a taxi was very early in the morning. I was very tired. I was going to have a snooze on the way to the airport and he had that I was one of those animal lovers and oh he couldn't stand that and his sister was one of those animal lovers to the all these poor people a why won't be helping them. What was it about animals who I thought. Oh well that's the end mice news and I pulled up the window. Lean forward in the jump seat and I told him stories about the chimps and stories about dogs all the way to the airport. We got there. He just grunted and you know. I really didn't make any difference but I had to try. He owed me ten pounds at the end because he didn't have any change so I said we'll give it to you for the work. She does in the shelter animal. I never thought he would but I got back two weeks later. There was a letter from the system and she said festival. I really want to thank you for your donation. Secondly what did you do to my brother? She said he's listening to me. He's been three times to help me in the shelter. So it's always worth doing your best because you never know what effect that is going to have. Sometimes you will never know. It was pure luck that ended the way it did. That's incredible and if if we if we dig into that just a little bit more whether it's that first director of the lab or the cabdriver you mentioned telling stories about the chimps but there are many different ways to tell stories and there are many stories that could be told. What types of stories did you tell either of them that you think could have had that impact? Our I talked about the strong bonds between family members the ON MATERNAL BEHAVIOR. I told stories like when one infant lost his mother who was three years old. It will mel. He didn't have an older brother or sister who would have adopted him with sets what they do but he was adopted. I A twelve year old unrelated adolescent male. Who carried him around shed? His food with him drew him into the night necessarily they slept called up together and most amazing the analysts mail. You should keep well out of the way of adult males socially roused charging screaming. But it'll mel who normally would have been taken away by his mother before he got into danger and spindle risk everything by running in to rescue him if he got too close to those miles even though he was beaten up quite badly himself go see. There's a legal analyst miles of scapegoats for the big meals and he saved Mel's life nominee question. Gus The kind of story that I turn you also seem to be A aside from an expert storyteller very good at using imagery or symbols and sometimes stories themselves are symbols. But could you describe MR H? Who's Mr H H was given to me twenty eight years ago? I mind call Gary Horn. Which is why he's missed. H I'm Gary. When blind when he was two and he won decided to become a magician. Everybody said but Gary you can't be a magician if you're blind. He does shows for children. I watched him three or four times now and of course he sets his props up ahead of time. Children don't know he's blind and at the end he'll tell him and he'll say you know something might go wrong in your life. You can't tell if it does. Don't give up the police away and he does scuba diving cross country skiing skydiving but I think most amazing. He taught himself to paint and when he gave me Mr h e thought he was giving me stuff chimp but Mr Age has a tail and I made him hold detail he said never mind taking with you and you know. I'm ready in spirit. So he's one of those examples of the indomitable human spirit doing skydiving when you're blind teaching themselves to paint and there's a picture in this little book called blind artists which you can only get on Amazon and as a portrait of Mr H. He's never seen him. He's only fell to him. And it's unbelievable and MR H if I'm not mistaken has been many places with you I is. I don't know if you still have Mr h but I have eight. She's in this room with me By get take him to elect show he'd be a child who bust into tears. I wanted to touch Mr h because I tell them they inspiration. Russell but you know I have other symbols. I have one of the long long long I think of. I'm trying to make my my hands over to foot at that from the wing of a California condor. I've got the proper permits for it. And they were. They were downed twelve buds. And now the story many of them flying the skies. And so I have that as a symbol of the pack. We can save animals from extinction. I've got a piece of the Berlin Wall. There was a time after the war when we go up at Berlin Wall was up forever between East and West Germany but it came down. Wolves do come down despite. What one of our country's presidents thinks about roles And so I. I carry these symbols me. I've got a piece of limestone mcquarry Wa Nelson Mandela Labor for twenty one years. I think it was twenty one years in a limestone quarry. I'm before he attained his freedom and moved his country out of the evil regime of apartheid. Do you still have jubilee? And could you explain who jubilees jubilee? You know so. Many people think that because my father gave me a very large stock chimpanzee when I was one and a half but that is why I chose to study. Chimpanzees couldn't be further from the truth but I did love Jubilee and Jubilee. I had when I was one and a half and I'm sixty. I mean eighty-six now so you can imagine he's nearly board now and he's actually sitting in the National Geographic Exhibition in DC In a specially built bullet proof glass case. Because I didn't want him. You Know I. It's dangerous them to go away. He's much to purchase but he was hand carried and he's sitting down. That exhibition is going to go online. They they've made some way of showing it to people so people will be able to see the real jubilee in that school. Becoming Jane generally went with me everywhere when I was a child. I mean literally everywhere and when you then had your own child after your experiences with your mother. My understanding is that You didn't have much of a relationship with your father but more so with your mother and then your experiences with the a chimpanzee mothers flow for instance. How did you think about mothering or parenting? I I imagine a lot of it was very primal drive. That was created new. But what did you decide? Were there any decisions based on what your Mother did with you or what? You observed in flow and others that affected your parenting style or mothering style. You know. Sneha Julio baby tight I'm really an when when I was pregnant. I Two five Mother Rain Nuggets in Africa. I by the way mom raised me. I don't just fought with elaborate. That actually has some really sound advice but I also thought about flow and all those three examples along with as you say assaultive instinct because after the baby was born of course. I adored him that comb Jane Forgotten. What a gorgeous baby was essentially and. Jonty anyway so what I learned from the Chimp. Mothers just like us. There are good and bad mothers and the good chimp. Mother's like mine support that child even if they know they're going to get attacked. They will run to rescue their child from danger. And the offspring of those now we can look back and find that they tend to do better. They more assertive more confident. The males reach a higher position. The hierarchy probably simul offspring and the females. A better mothers but the one thing that I really took away from from Flow and the other chimp mothers. They love to play with their babies would spend hours playing with them and I thought yes. I'm GonNa have fun with my baby too. I think so too mother's Day lying on my back and sort of dangling. Grab from my feet and tickling him and things like that so I had a lot of fun with him and that came through chimps. How did he get the name? Grub very silly. He was born about the same time as little chimp could Goblin and Goblin was a very messy eater. I mean all the other chimps would tumble around playing come out sleek and black. And he had he'd have every burr around Dr his his hair and one case he got hold of a very big banana. It was about as big as him and he's eating it but you know he thought too much so he takes a mouthful large Michael. He spits it into his hand. He looks at it. And then he smashes the hand with a banana space at my son. he was a message to tweet. Didn't want to be weaned and he didn't like baby food and he would do much like Goblin. He was complete mess with it and so it became Goblin Goblin grump and then my son became grumbling. He's real name is probably nightmares. Roughly UH and in in in the film Jane. I'm referring to for people listening in. We don't have to spend a ton of time on this. If you prefer to discuss other things but I I found myself wondering after Grubb was really raised in the Bush and Had this natural existence at at some point the decision was made to help him socialize and be educated and I remember the footage in this film of walking down the street hand in hand in London. What was it like for him going from these all natural environments to that urban environment and being dropped off at school and just as the time after that he was dropped off you know he was quite a bit of time on note in verse us in Nairobi and we did go to school last. Wasn't that you and also my mother had been out visiting twice so he knew very very well and when you went back to England he wasn't just dumped in the school. He went to live where I am now in this house. I'm actually in the room. And so he was with an extended family and he la actually loved school. So you know it wasn't it. It's pseudo sounds brutal but it more brutal for me than him to see enjoyed school and I felt that I shouldn't have let him go. But I wouldn't have non family hadn't been there wasn't a very loving home and it wasn't really that strange. How you relate to being alone. It seems that you're very comfortable. Incredibly comfortable spending time solitary by yourself Certainly in Africa. That seemed to be the case. A how do you relate to that? I think that being alone is something many people. Fear How do you think about it relate to it you know the Child? I was ending hours alone out the guards watching insects with my dog. Going up and down the former to actually really good training. Gumby it's a different and suspend hours up in the top of my favorite tree which I'm looking at right now Beach is a beach tree. And I felt up near the buds on Costa I. I don't know a wonderful feeling being alone being alone in the forest in gumby absolute bliss and the biggest problem with my life on the road is that I have so little time alone. So hotel rooms come to be a haven in a way because I can shut and lock the door. I'm alone and do you find that you recharge by yourself or what. What is what is your experience like by yourself. I know that might sound like a strange question but many people busy themselves to avoid being alone are feeling alone. What what What does it feel like for you to be alone? Just feels really piece. It means that I can think my own thoughts I can do things like reading. I think being a child growing up without TV in a reading reading much less busy than watching a TV show. And I. I think it's very sad that so many children don't get to read more enough oldest television all the time you know. I was in love with chosen and when mom saved up to take me to probably the first Johnny Weissmuller film that came over. Great treat FA- J.J. Took me an after a little while I started to cry jets. Take me out yet. What emphasis the matter? I said but that wasn't Tarzan because as there was no TV. No movies I had my own. Tauzin that I fell in love with wasn't jumping. Weisman would have that opportunity anymore. Because right from the beginning that deluge with wisdom information of how they should see the world the you you strike me as someone with not just unique perspectives on the world but a unique capability in sharing them through not not just storytelling and sheer endurance. But also a high degree of of compassion and this is all a way of leading up to a question related to something you mentioned earlier and that is you just a handful of days ago really a turned eighty six and you seem as sharp as ever as busy as ever. Someone on your team was saying that you they they're impression is that you seem to work from six am to ten. Pm with the exception of a dog. Walk in the middle to. What do you attribute you the maintenance of or maybe even increase of your mental clarity and sharpness and endurance? For such a long period of time people obviously inherited very good genes from my father. Actually that was a major contribution he made to who I am. A lot of the rest of it came from but he had he was tough and strong He could endure so he was in the war anyway. what do I attributed to? While I don't actually think people say do you have do you exercise. Do you meditate. What what food. What Diet and on and on like that. What supplements I see. Well I you know I just eat what's around I don't want to eat very much. I don't care about food. I don't take any supplements I don't have a special diet except time could you -Tarian or when I'm at home now Vegan And I don't have time to do exercise you being just the airports walking was the dog. Now yes but he's old and he's the only goal I've ever met who doesn't like walking. And even when he he didn't he's a whip it smell like cat morning honestly. It was like taking a reluctance snail out for a walk. It's because well I mean if you think about things and I've always loved writing. I think that's very important. I didn't want to be assigned to snow. Wanted to be a naturalist live with animals in light books about them and so I've always loved writing. My mother loved writing to cut. I have a story somewhere confined it now. I dictated to her when I was five and upset. Charming little story by Gerard with the neck. So long he'd reach up to the moon that's why it was always animals. Uc So telling stories thinking about stories that used to write a lot of poetry And just you know right now when I was younger what going to study chimps would mean that I'd be having this life and become thanks to becoming a certified calm when it first happened. I was really really disturbed this because you know why would people thinking about me like that was just me was unlucky person but then I realized well if people recognize me because of geographic and and come up once a signature of Selfie now Make use of it and be nice to them and smile at them and give them a brayshaw until him about roots shoes so there was a time when as I went around the US you could see the root shoot groups bringing up in like comment to the tail but obviously was look back on my life. Honestly Tim and I see that stages and the end of the state was across roads and it never seen. If I consciously made a decision it just was something that happened to change me and I think of made the right decision and I meant to be here and I meant to be doing this. Nut gives me extra. I suppose endurance to cope with it. I can't passionately about future. The Environment Animals Jovan and supposed because I think a lot I gained wisdom. I hope I want to share it. I think you're doing a fantastic beyond fantastic job and one thing I've also noticed gathered from people who work with you on your team and seen in videos. Is that people many fans of yours. Many people you you encounter become very emotional in your presence. They might break down in tears. For instance that is not always the case with figures who are well-known. How would you explain that or why do you? Why do you think that's the case that so many people get so emotional when they meet you? Look at piloted a lot and I THE AUSTIN. They don't seem to know and then they apologize. I know no don't apologize. It's something that some unreasonable. I inspire these. Tia's I ask them why they why that crying they will. I never thought I'd see you. I can't believe I'm seeing. I'm so happy to be to be here. And you made my dream come true and I suppose I don't know. My grandmother used to cry every time she was happy. Seems like that seems like you make a lot of people happy and perhaps it is. I mean as a messenger of hope in many respects that you give people hope I think that There's in some respects a real shortage of hope in in many people's minds and assume spend so much time evening gloom and doom and that is a hell of a lot of gloom and doom. I know but there's also such wonderful things happening am sharing the good stories of successes The nobility of so many people self sacrifice which we're seeing with the corona virus to Then then people realize all is not loss still a lot that we can do to make the subject of wild and automate chooses always at least one on often more people who come up and say I had lost hope but I promise you. I'm going to do my bit. Thank you for giving me some hope again and the job of mine of giving people hope is is a really important one right now right now more than perhaps before and it's so compelling. I think not just because you're good at giving people hope but also because you are in a way living proof and the poster child for what hope can enable you to do if that makes any sense. You're not just a passive commentator giving lip service to hope. I mean you are a case study in. How much fuel and endurance in part hope can provide. I think that's at least for me. Why it's so compelling and convincing and and inspiring so thank you for that. You said that your friend told you to teach your children to be to be optimistic. I it's it's really teach them up but you can tell stories until stories about people and encourage them and support them. I mean so. Many parents have set views on what they want to be. And the less Mike. It from my mother is it was. Nobody was thinking about going to Africa living with animals when I wanted to accept a few explorers you know who wanted to shoot them and put them in museums but when everybody laughed at me and said I'd never get there was just a girl. It was a war. We didn't have money. Mom said if you really want something like this. You're going to have to work really really odd. Take advantage of every opportunity. And if you don't give up you will find a way to do some do that or something. Something else that you really really want to do that story I that was done. I take an share with young people everywhere especially in disadvantaged communities and I wish mom knew how many people have said Jane Bank. You taught me that because you did it. I can do it to you have so many projects and opportunities ahead of you before I perhaps tie to close with a description of a few things that you have coming and then tell people where they can find out more about you and certainly follow along with your continued adventures. I'd be curious to ask if you had a billboard metaphorically speaking that could get a message out to billions of people could be a word of phrase a question and image really anything. What might you put on the billboard member that you make a difference every single day perfect? That could not be couldn't be more perfect. Dr Jane Goodall. You have a new documentary. This is certainly continuing to showcase the incredible work you do. This is Jane Goodall subtitled the hope which premiering Earth Day. That's this April twenty second nine eastern eight central on Nat Geo that she a wild Mundo. It is a two hour documentary. Special that will take viewers through chapters of your journey in sixty years since you're groundbreaking discoveries and Gumby researching while chimpanzees including your activism creation of your nonprofit organization and where and also where people can find more about you Jane Goodall Dot. Org that is the Jane Goodall Institute Jay Gi and Roots and shoots Richard Schutz Dot Org. That is your youth program along with your current efforts to inspire the next generation and I would go a step further and say not. Just efforts but successes. It's tremendously inspiring. Not just not just because of the ethos but the actual effect that you are having. It's just remarkable people can find you on social media. You're doing some very fun. Things like storytime with Dr Jane. But instagram. That is at Jane Goodall. Inst- like institute. I N S T twitter Jane Goodall inst- and same on facebook Jane Goodall inst- and then the roots and shoots is the same on facebook instagram and twitter. The handle is at roots and shoots. This has been such a tremendous honour and pleasure for me to spend so much time with you Appreciate your your generosity in granting the interview providing time and also really keep up the good fight and being a purveyor spreader of hope in a world where it is so easy to succumb to despair and hopelessness. It's it's just tremendous. It's it's really a gift that you are providing so I hope that that you're able to feel that and let that sink in at times but I appreciate you so much for taking the time to chat with me today. I want to thank you to meet a chance to chat to you. Like to buy lots and lots of people sometimes a bit boring. But I haven't been a tool board to into you so thank you. That really means so much and please keep it up. I will do my best to get your message. Your work this interview to many millions of people who hopefully will in turn share it and spread it because I think that that hope really is the foundation here upon which so much else depends and for everyone listening. I will have everything in the show notes links to everything we discussed at Tim. Dot blog forward slash podcast and Dr Jane Goodall. Thank you so much and I hope we get to meet in person someday. She'll we down to parents off. Hey guys this. Is Tim against a few more things before you take off number one then. This is bullet Friday. Do you want to get a short email from me? Would you enjoy getting a short email from every Friday? That provides a little more soul of fun before the weekend and five. Friday's every short email. Where I share the coolest things I've found. Or that have been pondering over the week. That could include favorite new albums that have discovered it could include gizmos and gadgets and all sorts of Weird Shit that somehow dug up in the world of the Esoteric as I do. It could include favorite articles that I've read and that I've shared with my close friends for instance and it's very short. It's just a little tiny bite of goodness before you head off for the weekend so if you want to receive that check it out. Just go to four hour. Workweek DOT COM. That's four Hour Work Week. Dot Com all spelled out. And just drop in your email and you'll get the very next one and if you sign up. I hope you enjoyed. This episode is brought to you by Lincoln Marketing Solutions these days. The million messages per minute not enough hours in the day. How'd you really catch people's attention? This WILLINGTON can help with Lincoln ads. You can catch the right professionals. The right people at the right time. And I'll tell you how I'm using them personally in a minute. 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If you ever use public Wifi at CEO tell or coffee shop where I often work and as many of my listeners. Do your often sending data over an open network meaning no encryption whatsoever one way to ensure that all of your data are encrypted and cannot be easily read by hackers or scripted. Tv's or whoever is by using express VPN and the on boarding process for express VPN meaning the sign up flow. The use of the product is one of the best. I've ever seen in my life all you need to do is download the express. Vpn APP on your computer or smartphone and then use the Internet just as you normally would click one button in the expressive. Secure one hundred percent of your network data. It's kind of ridiculously simple. And as many of you know. I only recommend brands that I have researched and vetted thoroughly for me of many solutions out there expressed. Vpn is one of the best on the market. And I use it personally here a few reasons. 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Jane Goodall

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

1:23:36 hr | Last week

Jane Goodall

"Welcome welcome welcome armchair expert. I'm dan sheppard. This is a very very exciting episode for me. If you've heard the show you nominee anthropology major talk about it ad nauseam and of course the queen of anthropology well margaret. Mead's up there. But jane goodall my goodness jane goodall. What a human being. Jane goodall is. She is a primatology. An anthropologist and an advocate for the environment animals and the natural world for the last thirty years. Jane has been focused on biodiversity protection fighting the climate crisis addressing intensive farming empowering young people through youth program roots and shoots and so much more. She also has a new podcast. The jane goodall hope cast so. Please check out. Jane's new podcast. Jane goodall hope cast enjoy the queen of prime mentality. We are supported by top gear. America i just got in the door from utah where we were shooting. More top gear america. We jumped a trx and excessive distance. Which was so darned fun rob cordery jethro boven. 'em myself of course are on top gear america. I gotta say the feedback has been so wonderful on top gear america. I just love it and the joy ride continues so get ready for more top gear america more adventure more chaos more cars new episodes of top gear america are coming may seventh twenty twenty one streaming only on the motor trend. A- just watch the hot rod episode which was so fun. I raced a ferrari in my buick. Roadmaster station wagon. I won't tell you who was victorious. That's a cliffhanger. So check out top gear america. Right now start your free trial today by going to motor trend. Dot com slash. Tgi twenty one. That's motor trend dot com slash t g twenty one get the motor trend app and check us out are supported by brooke linen There is nothing. I enjoy more than getting down to my birthday suit sliding into my eyes cold hotel quality soft brooklyn ins and just riding around a little bit. 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Treat yourself to comfort with brooklyn's comforter collection go to brooklyn dot com use promo code expert to get twenty five dollars off with a minimum purchase of one hundred dollars that's brooklyn and be are okay. L. i n. e. n. dot com and enter promo code expert for twenty five dollars off with a minimum purchase of one hundred dollars. That's brooklyn and dot com promo code expert. How are you doing well. I've never been as exhausted. I'm busy in my whole. Life has during this lockdown since march. It's been every single day being virtual jane yet. Generally you would be traveling around and talking and within that schedule is built in some little breaks for yourself. I'd imagine yes. This is no breaking since march. It's being virtually every single day. Are you being held captive. Your will because you can signal us with like raise your eyebrows. If someone's forcing you to do all this right. But then i agree to it so well it. It is a huge delight for us to talk to you. We've been attempting to schedule this for a while. I think you're going to speak at ucla. My alma mater. And we were going to speak in person which i was excited about. But i'll take you anyway. I can get you okay. I was hoping today we could go through all the stuff. You're up to that. You're working on your podcast. Jane goodall institute roots and shoots. But if it's okay with you. I would really hope to frame this in a broader theme of being female. I think today that's very relevant thing for us to be looking at how a female perspective can be so helpful why there should be more leadership roles for women and the value of that and i can't imagine someone more significant in that way than you. I think you're in the ruth bader ginsburg mount rushmore of women who have really put their stamp on the world. You reject that you know. Like being compared to her she is such an icon. Yeah i hate to break its use. Oh are you yeah. Well okay so when you started your work i think nine hundred fifty seven may be the first time you go to gombe's a study in no nineteen fifty seven. I went to kenya. Louis leakey and then i had to go back to the uk for a year while he found the money. Because soon i haven't been to college right. Who was going to give money to this. Young untrained girl do something as absurd. This study chimpanzees in a forest. Yeah not a lot of people you could have pointed to to say. Hey look how good this works but yes you went back. You went to cambridge. I think you are the eighth person ever to get a phd without having an undergraduate degree. Which i think is fascinating. I am curious how many there are now but when you started very very male dominated field is that safe to say. Well yes and no i mean there was almost nobody going out studying animals in the wild the world three people and they were all males in a job. Challenge was studying montenegro. Rela and there were two american men in south africa studying chakma a boot. But that was it. Oh okay well the thing that you were unique in novel in in that you got a ton of criticism for can i just say one thing. I'm going to tell you. I was an anthropology major so i worship to you and i wanted to do primatology. Just know that there's a lot of baggage for my love for you in this but my understanding is that you were really the first person to be doing any thalji where you were not naming the subjects numbers so generally when people studied animals prior to you they would just say one a one b whatever their nomenclature was in. You're really the first to name them in recognize their personalities remember. I hadn't been to college when i first went out. Louis leakey might mental. He's the one who picked me for this study. And he wanted a woman that was one key thing he wanted to woman. He felt they might be more patient in the field. So that was one good thing for me and secondly he wanted somebody who hadn't been to college because he wanted a mind uncluttered by the reductionist thinking of the animal behavior people of the time so was nobody out in the field on the numbers were given by most of these people to the animals in labs and animals in captive situations. So the reason i named the mobile wouldn't i. It's just not true to give an animal a name not a number. Uh yeah well really quick about louis do you think maybe his confidence in you. And the other two women that he shepherded through diane fossey who then went and studied gorillas and then i can't pronounce her name who did orangutans t galdikas. Yes yes do you think maybe. He was in a position to feel that way. 'cause his own wife was so prolific as an archaeologist and they had made discoveries together. Do you think that made him more open minded to that. It's quite possible. I got no. I hadn't thought of that before will is possible. I think that in general the criticism for you naming them was. You're kind of displaying. Empathy and empathy was the opposite of objectivity which sciences going for. That was the singular kind of criticism. And i have to say that sounds very very similar to the outmoded male position. That women in general are too emotional and not objective their emotional not logical and that to me the critique of you is more than what's on the surface at that time well. It's absolutely true. That when i got to cambridge big criticism was you cannot have empathy with your subject. You got to be objective and the snow space for having empathy and i disagreed so much because when you have empathy with your subject may do something extraordinary. She'll have empathy. You you you say to yourself. Well i think i know why they did that. And then then you can put on your scientific now jacomb say okay without. Let's prove am i right or am i wrong and ask questions. I listened to your interview. With dave matthews. Which by the way is a thrilling friendship that you guys have on your podcast. The jane goodall hope casts and you gave the example of seen. A young chimp break her arm and then go to her mother. I think you're describing was when this little baby broke her arm and she was the first baby and the mother was inexperienced so every time the baby cried which obviously it was very painful. The mother just hugged her title which made her cry louder. So but you know all those many examples of chimpanzees showing true altruism to each other like an adult male rescuing an often infants who is even related to him and saving his life. Yeah but the point i loved you made is yes. I had these emotions. I was heartbroken for this inexperienced mother. But my kids are as thorough as notes could be. It is as objective as one can be one doesn't preclude the other and i think that was such a novel idea. You're absolutely right. It was tears. Were pouring down my face because this baby was named little jane she was the only one who's fb named for me and you know. She was three months old at that time. We didn't watch many infants. Growing up sues about the fifth. I think it was just tragic. It was the mother and such confusion. The baby so badly hud was nothing we could do. So i'm going to go even further with this. I would argue that your novel approach of having empathy. Open your eyes in a way that someone studying them even for the same duration that you studied them they would have missed things. I think they would not have been open because they were this other. This animal this lower thing that they would have missed the parallels. I would even argue ear enormous contribution the legendary contribution is that you discovered that chimpanzees use tools. That was thought to be something. Only humans could do in in a great definer of what made us human and you demonstrated that and you kind of destroyed that fantasy. Yes and we were supposed to be the only creatures to have personality. The only creatures have minds capable of problem solving and especially the only creatures with emotions and you know. I was tortoise. A child by my dog of course animals have personalities minds and emotions. It's ridiculous when the scientists told me that when i got to cambridge i really wanted it. They really believe what they were saying. Or was it just. They couldn't prove it. That it's better not talk about other tint. Why have a whole theory on. Why haven't i think it serves an actual purpose to alleviate our ethical issues with how they're treated but before we get there you could also say they have culture as well which is something we would have thought was only ass right absolutely. Ah dense culture if you look at one population versus another. They have their own unique set of things. They've learned in our passing on traditions. And all these things that certainly meet the definition of culture behavior you passed from one generation to the next through observation imitation and practice that is a definition of human culture. But when i first mentioned culture. I didn't have any other examples really. But it just seemed intuitively of course as you see the baby's what chain than in other places where i heard there was banging open nuts with rocks which gumby chimps still do the young ones. They're learning that so kusak coaches. I was given so much flack over that you cannot talk about culture. Yeah so. I think the fact that you were naive enough having not been in college and then again. I really think it has a lot to do with you being a woman in that situation that you were empathetic and that through that we get some of the greatest discoveries about that species and i really do think other people would have missed it. I think you're right that many people would i really do. And you know. I've been reading in. The shadow of manifest book wrote about the golden beecham's. It's going to be one chapter a month and it just took me right back. I was reading and thinking every detail is that it was magic to read what i was learning about their different personalities amid was just magical to see. How did it back then now is the person is jane. The person there had to be terrible days in the field. There had to be incredible loneliness at times. You're in your twenties. There was not you deserve your head. Being alone is very different from being lonely. And i've always loved being alone. I mean even. When i was a child that would climb the tree out there. Because i'm in my family and spend ages alone up into branches. I got with my dog onto the clifftops on my own and they were quite wild in those days. So i've always loved being alone. The only time. I was a little bit lonely you know. My mother came with me start. Well again. I really quick. I think that's hysterical as well. That's another male female thing you're twenty four and they insist your mother joined you. That wouldn't have happened to a mail sciences. Now they did. That's not true. They did not insist. My mother join me. Said i couldn't be out in the field on my own. Oh okay okay. And she volunteered to come okay. And it was amazing. People say i was brave. I wasn't brave was what i wanted to do. She was you know she was left alone. With these big booms invading ten because they are very entrepreneurial and they quickly grabbing it thing. That might be a new food buffalo's wandering around snakes spiders. She was brave one and she was a novelist. Yeah well she wrote a couple of books. Okay that's two more than i've written. So i'm gonna caller novelist so obviously had her own set of determination as all on pointing out a determined person. The whole family said the time you're lonely. Yeah yet when she first left just before i saw to using an i really missed having somebody to share the excitement with i have this cook and a guy driving the boat and they listen. They were interested but it didn't mean as much to them as it would have to Yeah i mean why wouldn't the chimps use tools. of course they weren't high fiving each other when you discovered that they were getting termites out now. There was no period. Where of course. Because i'm trapped in my own point of view in as much as i may have been interested in that. Were you ever at any moment going while. But i'm also missing out on this huge human experience. I could be in london. Having drinks with friends did that ever enter your mind. Were you ever concerned about what you are quote missing. Absolutely absolutely not okay. Although i've been very social before i left you know i wasn't a little shy retiring creature. I was out there having fun going to dawn and things like that. I didn't miss it. I didn't miss it. 'cause you are so focused in so fulfilled by this. Pursuit was there in the forest. Only magic of the forest around myth and learning new things every day and will these amazing chimpanzees the different way of doing things complete metric now for those of the listeners who aren't super familiar with just what level of threat different. Primates are your arguably with the most dangerous when you agree dangerous. Yeah as compared to say guerrillas or other big great apes gorillas can lose that temper this young man who is studying chimpanzees in congo and he was attacked ferociously by a male gorilla. Who obviously just ted confrontation with another male. He was mad and this guy survived. I simply don't know right. Attempts can be violent. They're all strong so yes chimpanzees these with each other. They can kill each other. It's lucky they didn't want to kill me. Yes let me. Just say from a personal point of view. I have trekked up to the guerrillas. I felt pretty safe. And then we also went into a force on the hunt for chimpanzees and there were a lot more rules and it was taken much more seriously like this has odds of going bad for more than the guerrilla experience would. That's probably because of the people running the program okay. I'll blame them but as you point out. They're incredibly strong four times stronger than a full grown adult. Human eight times stronger than me. I'm sure very wrong. And they can be very very violent and whether scary moments. Yes there were. Oh yeah but none that ever made you rethink or question. What you're gonna do. No of course. Not i gotta. I couldn't let louis leakey down. Could i no no. No no no that someone's approval. I would certainly be in search of you. Always have that obstinate disposition going through life or did it sort of come when you had this passion. I think i probably always had it. Yeah i think you're born with that or not. Yeah you were. And i have pretty bad dose of it. Can i ask you while you were watching chimpanzees over these many many years. How were the male female roles chimpanzees similar to our own. And how are they different. And was that something that interested you. I was interested in everything. But i loved was watching mother child behavior development of infants relations with brothers and sisters but the males have dominant they have dominance hierarchy they dominate all females and very promiscuous which caused some people to draw not all monogamous and so basically in female comes into eastern when. She's ready for mating. She may be made by all the males when off to the other the various sexually popular of old female flow mayton seven t two times in one day why sewers privy exhaust to the g. She was followed by this string of males and they adolescence. Who don't really get go. They will hide behind a bush and shake a little branch and sometimes the female will look at the alpha male and then creep off behind the bush and is it. There's even evidence. I remember writing a paper called lying in primates. In how they'll also give a call like that. There's perhaps a predator in the area so that all the alpha's run towards it and then they get a shot at the female while the alpha's are out. I think that sort of thing happens sometimes too but mostly that happens when for example chimps hunt sometimes and hunting is a very exciting thing so if the top male sometimes shows possessiveness and other males are not supposed to make his female that happens often but if the alpha male gets distracted and is looking at the hunt bats when the other males run in gas you go and if the alpha male the possessive male catch them. Who do you think he attacks. All i saw that girl for the female up. Yeah that's pretty. That's kind of consistent humans. Yeah yeah if he attacked the male to female it would run often. Have more fun. I didn't think of creating another window of opportunity. So i have a question for you. Does it correlate perfectly with sexual die. Morphism like is the level of male dominance proportional to how much bigger males are than females in species semi between chimps and bonobos male. Bonobo is more or less the same size as the female. And you don't get the same system of sexual relations. And bonobos is well they have a much broader sexual experience than paying troglodyte is right. They're doing more things. That female bonobo is having this pink swelling all the time so they solve a lot of disputes through sexual behavior and females reassure each other by rubbing their sexual swellings together. So i was so glad to louis. Leakey didn't send me to study them. Because the geographic would never have supported. They couldn't in those days of had will these. Pink bottoms pitches. A wonderful photograph in the gets the second geographic article which should obeyed an at c. Sixty nine think and photograph taken by my husband hugo so wonderful photo five males sitting in a row that all of it'll roused looking at the camera has slightly out and always these big erections hard voting off missed little strange missed loin levels. He captured the perfect moment. You know those days. There was no photo shopping. And i saw note to the engraver. Blend in two for blend of graphic was than even when photograph. It's lovely those setting sun and up against you know a beautiful evening light. And i'm holding the walkie talkie to send a message to my mother who's down to tell her. I'm staying up for the night. And i get back. This picture with the note to the grave around each nail is circling since removed from nails. Oh you're kidding. Wow not a while. oh man well. Let's change change now. Of course because i mail i had a particular interest in frodo almost looked like a silverback. He was so disproportionately muscular. I was fascinated by him. Did you name him after frodo baggins was. That's before i realised his personality was entirely not like i say that he did not live up to the name. Frodo ins was as flynn was before him in this dominant at family. He was a spoilt brat. Older brother who supported him a older sister who supported him a top-ranking mother of so he could get away with mudder. I mean he could attack and tease a much older individuals knowing that his family would run the his support and he became a real bully. Yeah and he was enormous though he was considerably bigger than most the other males. Wasn't he not really big because he had so often his risley cash he was most solid. Solid built. Yeah so no we met. You are empathetic and that you are not trying to deny whatever emotional feelings could you come to hate any of them like. Would you be frustrated with frodo. Did act like such a spoiled brat so often and of course his victims are other. Chimps you love. Of course i was mad at him was mad when they did things which were really unpleasant. Horrible i mean. I think of them like humans ryan thorough people. Who do things that irritate. You make you angry. Same that the chimps. Yeah but it would be hard for me if i was in that position to try not to correct behavior versus just observing. No if were in the position you wouldn't feel that tool for one thing. If you tried to intervene in something like that that would be the end of you. Oh yeah well. I might get myself. He was a monster. I mean he was so strong and violent at times. So the very ironic part of your life has to occur to you is that you went deep into a jungle and you're entirely anonymous and at some point you emerge in your a world figure. I think that must be one of the most bizarre trajectories to being recognized the world over most people. Come to hollywood where we're at to get that kind of recognition but you went deep into the jungle and that transition for you. Is it confusing natural. What is that experience. Well when it first happened. I was even out basically shei-pa and first of all all these journalists wanting to interview me and i tried to get out of it and then i remember the first time somebody coming up to me when i was walking through santa fe actually and this woman came up and she started tears in her eyes. Saying you know she actually said. Can i touch you. Can i touch you. This is spooky this issue. I said well. I'll shake your hand. And so the beginning you know people would come up in airports need oneself fees and could i sign something and at first i was really i hated it. I put on dark glasses. And let my hair down. But it still don and then i thought well by this time. I'm trying to raise awareness. I'm trying to raise money for the institute trying to develop our youth program inside the will is obviously something happened. I can't do anything about it on. Ask for it. So will use it so taking brochures around handing them out saying. Do you have children than they've us. Join roots and shoots gives the memory show. Well yes it sounds like. You accepted the reality of what it was. Which is there's no going back. So how do we make the best of the situation. Just so you know. If i met you i would attempt to. Groom you played along demonstrate your your status cuba wonderful groomed bid. Let's start there. Yeah more armchair expert debuted dare. We are supported by. Figs figs celebrates the one hundred percent awesome healthcare professionals by making scrubs. They actually feel excited about wearing figs mission. Making sure healthcare professionals have awesome scrubbed so they can look their best feel their best and perform their best join figs and celebrating awesome healthcare professionals and give them the best groups in the world. I own a pair of these. Why because my nickname. When i play spades is a surgeon. I have figs. 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It's more affordable than traditional online. Counseling and financial aid is available in fact so many people have been using better. Help their recruiting additional counselors in all fifty states. I'm a big big proponent of therapy it has helped me endlessly throughout life. Podcast is sponsored by better help in armchairs. Get ten percent off their first month at better. Help dot com slash dax visit. Better help h. e. l. p. dot com slash dax. Enjoying the over one million people who've taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced better health professional our best friends they have a nine year old girl. I mean we've interviewed bill gates and hillary clinton you name it. None of this stuff is reached their radar. They could care less but the nine year old out we were interviewing you. And she was beside herself. She had to dress up as someone you admired. She's gone as you several times. And i think what an amazing thing that you were born in one thousand nine hundred thirty seven. Maybe a gale even better thirty four. And here's a little girl born in two thousand ten mimicking you. I just think it's so spectacular and for a wonderful reason not because you have a humongous but then show it on instagram. Like i'm delighted that they're young women who address up like you and my daughters are excited so wonderful so with year notoriety in your deep love for the environment for conservation for animals. You've been a part of a couple of different really released successful organisations the first of which is the jane goodall institute which was established in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. And i believe now. There's ten thousand groups in one hundred countries that's going onto the youth program. They are jane goodall institute we have twenty four separate institutes in twenty four different countries. All my goodness and the program. Young people is a program of the jane goodall institute. Got you so roots and shoots is under the umbrella of jane goodall institute now roots and shoots has forty five hundred groups in seventy countries. Do you agree to that about seventy. Yeah sixty eight sixty nine seventy seventy two something like that does groups. We don't even know about because you know the discovered one the far away in the rainforest of guatemala ecuador or something all my young people going from one school to another only love. This program says they started him. The new school so it just grass roots. Yeah walk me through. What roots and shoots does what's the objective and it's youth centric. So what is the goal. How does it work lex that a group get started sates mostly in school and very often those a teacher who tries to get it going or it may be a pie school students or something like that or it may be and the university of somebody may started a kindergarten so you get the group of young people who cab and you tell them now you choose three projects to make the world better to one day help people wanna help animals one to help the environment because the choices they make will depend on how old they are if they're rich or poor if they're living in the town of the country if they're living in china or the united states or abu dhabi or something like that lily should start one. Yeah she by the way it should be so great at. She really wanted. she's a boss. Okay yes you can help hon. You know so. That's how group start. And when. I was traveling around. America through the airports handing out my little brochures. You could follow my progress by seeing way new loop started up just dropping seeds. Yes that's right so now let's go back to. I think the general reservation in the past of acknowledging that animals have an emotional capacity or an intellectual capacity. I think the hesitation there is if that is recognized then you must immediately go to what the ethical dilemma of eating them is or studying them or any of these things. Well studying them with intervention studying them in research laboratories certainly eating them. It's more than the eating of them. It's the way they're kept in the factory farms. It's horrendous and then on top of that this the harm it does to the environment. You're going to feed them. You cut down. Habitats grow the grain. You use fossil fuel grain. The animals to the animals to abbatoir meet the table. They produce methane gas which is like co two greenhouse gases. Thirty two times better at heating up the atmosphere then. Co two it is the the lethal gas up there. Okay so. I don't want anyone to call me a hypocrite. Because i do eat me. Obviously i don't feel morally great about it and i think i've tended to focus on exactly what you just mentioned. Which is the manner in which were getting. The me feels like it could be vastly improved but you know something if you love the taste of meet face alternatives to me dicon tell the difference s identical. You're right you're right. We these life burgers in their insanely delicious ear right. There is no reason to not embrace those. I agree i guess in. Tell me wyan idiot. I'm going to give you an opportunity to point out my flaw so i have no problem acknowledging the value and complexity of animals. I'm not in denial of it to me. It's quite obvious. go to a place. Where we'll i'm an omnivore in omnivores e me and i'm like any other animal. That's an omnivore. I don't feel guilty about playing my role in the food chain now. Obviously playing an absurd role. That i wasn't really designed so i also acknowledged that but i think that's what i fall back on morally. Do you want to blow some holes. In that i will first of all you are able to comprehend the exact nature of the creature that you're eating and you know that that is an animal that has emotions that can feel. Fear and pain plays a role in society or it would do if it was allowed to. And so that makes you separate from the abandoned this also something else to do with health and we have the gut of her before. And the hubby will has long got. Because it's got to get the goodness out of leaves and grass and things a condom four as a short one big cigarette to get rid of the meat before it rots in the intestines which were harming our health this way plus years. These poor animals are given hormones to make them grow faster antibiotics to stop them die because of stress so those antibiotics the bacteria building up resistance because they used all the time. Is there an hierarchy in your mind or no like what about eating insects. Are you more in favor of that. Well i that's something i haven't really come to grips with because this even people now talking about the fact that some plants may have purposes. Well i have to say that. If i was asked to choose between eighteen a pig an mealworm i would choose the mail and i don't think it's too terribly bad to eat insects. Some okay eggs. How do we feel about eggs. Oh if x from heads clucking around in the farmyard. Mind so much. But the factory farms of horrendous the other bad on the environmental and the milk coming from these dairy cows in these off i mean you watch some of the secretly filmed video new. Feel ill. That's what stopped me. When i learned about factory farms for the first time in the late seventies and next time i looked may told my plate. I thought this symbolizes fear pain death. Yeah not appealing. No not very appetizing. Very hungry what you laid out like that. And you know what else when i'm talking to people i never. I never say bad person. You eat meat. You should be mobile. I want to love to this to google checkout pig castle not kosova the artists but pig kosovo you watch that okay. Well here's what happened to me. I watched forks over knives eight years ago and i went vegan for a year. I doubt forks over knives as alarming as what you just told me so. I'm watch it. I might as well go grocery shopping. I because i'm sure. I'm going to have to make a decision afterwards. But really i mean i feel so much better than i stopped. I felt like you feel better when you a vacant for you. I didn't do it right. I didn't put enough time into. What i did is ended eating a zillion carbohydrates in no. I didn't feel much better. I think i felt worse. I'll own a failure on my part and the choices now is so good don't they. Well they're way different than i did it in two thousand. Yes exactly. I mean come on a long way. You know to be honest. What got me off of it. As i was going back to detroit on stocks my father was ill and you just eat vegetarian in two thousand twelve in detroit. Now in la. It's pretty darn good and easy overall. Are you optimistic or pessimistic. Where you add on our state. Well i'm both okay. I know that if we all get together we've got a window of time. We can stop slowing down climate change. We can start healing some of the home that we've done natives very resilient with coming up with our intellect with more and more ways for clean green energy renewable energy and things like that but the thing is we don't have that much time so how do we get people involved. That's why i worked so hard on roots and shoots and so thrilled because many children are changing their parents. Oh yeah mindue daily. It's so annoying. But i do get drug along by a lot of little a little girl in china who i i met when she was ten jr couldn't speak english to came to my lecture. Which of course was translated and she said to her parents. I'm going to learn english. Because i want to talk to dr jane. She started a roots and shoots group and her mother helped her and now she's fluent english. She doing all kinds of amazing. But i got a letter from her mother. She said dr jane. I have to tell you. She doesn't speak english but then her daughter translated. But i was just a housewife and i went shopping. And i never thought Didn't think about anything should now. I've become a thoughtful person. And i think about what i buy and how it was made did it. The environment to said this program of yours does not just change the children. It's changed their parents to. Yeah that's lovely of the things you've done. What is most rewarding matt stuff inspiring a little girl in china or is it the fact that you probably played a huge role in the fact. That chimps are still here. I don't know time what's the one main thing i think. One thing that. I really feel the chimps may to do this but to change the scientific attitude towards animals Yeah that's pretty darn profound. That's a paradigm shift. Yeah it's a paradigm shift and the other one is starting roots and shoots because that now has its own life if i died tomorrow roots and shoots will carry on. But that's such a good point. Yeah for someone who wants to enact. Change trying to figure out how to do it in your absences. I imagine the hardest thing to figure out which you've done. Okay now your podcast. I want to know. Do you like interviewing people. You've been interviewed your whole life. And i was in a similar situation which i'm an actor and i've been doing interviews for fifteen years and i'm like oh i know how to be in an interview and guess what i did not. I knew how to get in. I had to learn how to interview. Have you enjoyed hosting jane goodall. Hope cast well. When i was told i had to host it stupid center system anyway then i found i could do it. It's like the first time i had to give lecture. I felt that for the first five minutes. I literally couldn't breathe. I was terrified. But then suddenly i realized that i do not something from the audience that filled me with with. I don't know what it is but it's a kind of magic which comes to me when i'm out there in front of a crowd that's why this virtual business virtual lectures looking at the camera on top of a screen. That is so hard. I'd had to really put every ounce of energy into trying to give appropriate without an audience Yeah you know. This is a topic. I bring up all the time. There's a term for that. I can't remember it. I am always having majored anthro. I'm always trying to get people to recognize how social of an animal we are like. We have this very obvious understanding that our social so they behave this way in this predictable way and they respond to this and we seem to underestimate that. We're the like apec social animal and that all the things chimps need. We need probably times three this notion of us being an island that is not how we were designed to live and i think you look at all of our mental health issues. We underestimate how social we are and how much we need each other and you standing in front of an audience makes total sense to me because you are feeling the full brunt of community like this is what you were designed to do. That's right. I i do feel like half a suit of purpose in this life and i just have to try and do it you know when i was little. I wanted to write books. Because i was so shy and i started writing when i was four. My mother used to write it down for me. I found stories. I wrote when i was five. Got one lovely. So i always wanted to write want to write poetry but then you know ten years old africa wild animals books that that's what i want to do because women want that sort of scientists than so that the cycle and is it true. You still have the chimpanzee stuffed animal. Your dad gave you as a child. Yes he's in lockdown in washington dc where he was part of the exhibit they put on becoming jane or something like that which i haven't seen yet and locked came to be stippled. Gordon seen by couldn't have him he was too precious. They made him a glass bullet proof case. He's on display like the pope. Well there's an ever an auction and the only thing. I think i'd ever want to own of somebody you know. I think i'd be a good steward of that teddy bear. Should that ever care. You'd be a bad student if you can't well. They're both mammals. It's an easy mistake. My last question about your podcast. I find. I'm just being honest and candid with you. I find that the experience of having fame is underwhelming and more of an inconvenience. But i will say the thing that i most enjoy is that i get to meet someone like you and i have to imagine that you are not impervious to that to do. Enjoy the fact that you can meet people that you were greatly interested in of course because the people i want to me because they could really make a difference. There's none that you just. They're not gonna make a difference but like john. Travolta you love saturday night. Fever and by god. You could have a conversation with john travolta now well. I hate to say that. I haven't had time to go to cinemas for so long. I don't know the film stars. Well i was trying to make it easy for you. That was nineteen. Seventy seven a dea. Saturday night fever. It didn't see that film. Do you have a favorite film. Not the rings ooh k. One do you think about lord of the rings it except he like what's going on now if you think that more door is greed and riches and all these despots who are and we need to grow the fellowship to fight that to fight the black riders who are out there all these big businessmen couldn't care less about anything else and even thought of that recently but if you remember galadriel gives frodo vile of dust and when he sprinkles it all the trees are being cut down by more door come to life and grow up again so the whole thing. It's like a parable of what's going on right prophetic. Yeah he's perfecting. I hadn't made that connection. I made it yes you did. It's proprietary to you now jane. You're so wonderful. I appreciate your time so much. I really want to tell that your captors that you need a little break though okay mic cap too. I'm not a weak and feeble. plus you are. You're anything. But i do have a job to do and job requires me to do what i'm doing so my mother told me if you're going to do something do it as well as you possibly can. While your mother who should be incredibly happy. Because you've done exactly that. And i thank you on behalf of my children's future generations. I'm so grateful to you for dedicating so much your life in time and energy to try to make this place somewhere we can live for more than another one hundred years thank you. That's being absolutely lovely talking to was really looking forward to it. Well we will meet one day. And i will groom you the best of your life. I guarantee he'll band okay. Have a wonderful rest of your day. We appreciate you so much. thanks okay bye. Gene stage tuned for more expert. There we are supported by me under the under the under the undone. Sunday's we unease. Oh my lord. Do i love me on these. I got a pair recently. That are black with white little simple pictures of space explores. I love them. I like him so much. I had the thought. I should get twenty of these weather around. Never not want to be in these me on these now. It is time. We stopped messing around about funny things and talk about something really serious and important your underwear me on these believes undies yelled about from the rooftops or shown off in mere southeast for instagram. Mendis isn't just here to make sure everybody is comfortable. They're also limiting the amount of laundry. You have how thoughtful to membership that not only saves you thirty percent on order but delivers a fun. New pair of undies or sex right to your door each month. Plus you're the boss. You can control your shipments and you can get early. Access to their most exclusive prints. Mayonnaise has a great offer for arm cherries for any first time. Purchasers you get fifteen percent off and free shipping. And he's also has their problem free philosophy if you're not satisfied with any product for any reason refund or exchange it no caveats no questions to get your fifteen percent off your first order. Free shipping one hundred percents satisfaction guaranteed. Go to me undies. Dot com slash dax. That's me undies. Dot com slash. Docs we are sponsored. by carmax. the way car buying should be now you know. I love cars but shopping for a car buying a car. Not so much. That's where our friends at carmax come in because at carmax. They know the best way to buy car. Is your way so whether you're a dude online kind of person or an in-person kind of person like myself carmax. Has you covered. Choose from over. Fifty thousand carmax certified vehicles at carmax dot com. Then check out three hundred sixty degree views research and compare with ratings and reviews schedule a trade in appraisal and apply for financing all from the comfort of home. And when you found that car. That's just right for you. You can buy it online or in store with curbside pickup in home delivery in select markets. So by your next car your way at carmax the way it should be get all the details and start the search for your next car today at carmax dot com and now my favorite part of the show. The fact check with my soul batman. Hello monica they're paging. Mrs padma n- mrs pad man. How your huge on my computer. Oh too big now your life size. We are not together obviously together. We are separated by about eight hundred miles. And what are you doing. Eight hundred miles away but this decided to get out of town this fucking hit the road no to alaska or south to la. Get out of town. I'm shooting season. Two of top gear. America in utah. And how is it going. Oh man it's so good. It's so good. Oh sorry. oh what the hell happened. House my peppermint tea. Oh my gosh making a real life thing. Yeah so much fun. Jumping trucks racing stace german station wagons today. Horsing around Cutting up with the guys. Wow you know that kind of stuff. You love a cut up. I do love to cut up and you have been very productive this weekend. Yeah had almost no fun. I've been only give you. You have fun doing that though right. Yeah well i wouldn't say fun. It's just really satisfying. So what i did was spicer's. Yes yes i decided to get my life together. It was time who's overdo it was it was way overdue. I was feeling in all honesty. A out of control. I needed to gain some control back so the best way to do that is shopping. Which did that is second. Best way is to clean and organized. So i cleaned organized everything. You know my scary closet. That's like very scary because it's a big old mess where we keep the equipment. Yeah yeah yeah. Every time we gotta get the equipment out of there. It's like indiana jones and the temple of doom waiting for darts to shoot out the walls. No well you brought it up. I did clean up a year ago and it took all day. I mean it was horrible. I posted a picture of it in its worst state and it was really. It was like monica geller. Secret closet friends fans will know what that means. Okay you're not gonna know what that means when you said you posted a picture. You're in the process of senior post traumatic stress disorder from the closet. Well that too. I cleaned up a year ago. Beautiful then in within the year. It's gotten a little out of hand again. Sure years a long time. I had to completely fixed that. I had to clean. My refrigerator. made an error basket. Well everyone's up to speed on the fact that your professional gourmet chef now in the cook seven nights a week. I cook a lot. I really impressive. What are you going to cook tonight. I'm going to cook fish. Oh yuck yuck don't yuck that's a that's a bad idea. it's not cooking. Fish inside of an apartment is the one of the world's worst ideas i would open. Listen oh my god. Listen my chef. Kuru alson roman wants me to cook more fish and indoors and she said she said one of the main things that people fear is is gonna make my apartment smell. No it's not okay. You know what's the main thing people fear because one hundred times out of one hundred. Your whole house stinks like a catfish is not catfish. It's gonna be cod inkata's very light. It is not a fishy fish. Cod is feels like an interesting choice. Because isn't that what you get at mcdonald's and a flare fish now wait no properly taught lavish sticks no fish sticks and filet fisher cod very affordable fish. It wasn't that affordable than you got ripped off because it's a real cheap fish. I got a nice to my. I'm gonna make tomato poached fish and it is going to be delicious. What does that mean tomato poached. You poach it in tomato. I guess i don't i can. I'm thinking of poaching and oh no like it cooks within the tomato sauce. Jews garlic shallot some other stuff. I haven't looked up the rest being a bit. Well some of that might masks the smell. But i am. I'm gonna tell you one of my new fears. Which is you know when people stink they. They've passed their expiration date the b. oh and they. They don't have time for a shower so what they do. Is they pop some cologne all over themselves. Yeah and then smear their anti-perspirant on over the smell and now you just have a ton of smells and the b- oh it doesn't go away and then it's it's like an ambrosia or a cacophony of smells or a cornucopia of smells and i'm a little worried about that for you. I know you're talking about. It's like when people try to spray over their bowel movements. That's right yeah. You're right bad. Yeah yeah it's just leave the bra bob moon there. Yeah yeah i said roy. That was horrible okay. I agree here the pure movements in. Don't don't try to perfume that pig about the the b. m. but not about the fish. Can we agree upon a non-bias judge. That will stop by tomorrow morning. We can appoint somebody shack and we won't tell them anything. We're not going to say god thing just going to say we're asking a favorite you stop by monica's in the morning. Anything seems mentionable. You tell us if not thank you. And if they say yeah went to monaco's man it smelt like Not an alley cats. Oh okay well. Listen listen it's gonna smoke good. She promised and i trust her. I think you are extra sensitive issue. Hated the idea of anchovies. You don't like salmon which is crazy. I acknowledge that. And i cook salmon here a fair amount and i'm fine with it. Do you tell me you had a problem with one of these fish fries though that it did rick lake fish know that was the chicken enormous tank. Yeah well i think it up with some yard bird. But i thought you also had a fish mishap mix up so far. Haven't had any fish problems. How about this. Could we agree that if you have the option just why not cook it outside on the grill. No i can't tomato poach outside. Oh and that's that's the prep. That's a preparation of my choosing. Okay i have to cook it today. Because i took it out of the fridge out of the freezer couple of days ago. I am a little worried about that. I think it's funny. I'll stop but on the counter for two days thawed. It thought a while ago. It's been in the fridge. Oh okay how's you does your fridge stink at all now. Smells great well. Those herbs are in their basket makes us smell so good. I have either. Let us basket in an herb basket. the okay. The lead is basket is box but still it. Has its own impressive. It looks like a professional chefs fridge. When you saw picture of it you said too many vegetables. No one says that well. My concern was no one person could eat that many vegetables in the time horizon. That vegetables stay good. I tend to get three or four extra days out of fish couple of weeks outta the veggies over asked him this tomato. You're going to be poaching the old fish with old old fish. Well dale trying although they slashed prices day-old donuts dale bradley. Dale dale is usually signaling. That you're going to get a deal. As i said it wasn't cheap again. I got ripped off because it's very inexpensive ish. That's why it's in fish sticks and blair let me look up right now actually. This is a good factor. Real time fact. Yeah what kind of fish is in a filet of fish away of fish. Mcdonald's you're not going this answer not cod alaskan pohlak. Let's see what is. Alaskan alaska polack. Fuck is a species of cod. Yeah i walk back to cod fans you you you just got caught. I o d. I got fair deposit. How dare you cash on delivery. Copd de cod. You could do the same for fish sticks and you're gonna find it's cod across the board anytime fishing's yeah absolutely they. What make america run. But it's just not a year so gourmet right now in. Its its tuna fish. I love tuna fish. Also the reason she picked cod as this recipe is because it's not very fishy which is why it's fish sticks and whites and fillet fish. Yeah well and how cheap it is. Oh i'm gonna find out hold on top five most inexpensive. Okay if this makes the list. You're in trouble. Not it's supposed to be on the cheaper end. well now. you're changing your story. You said you paid really good money for this. No but like compared to howl of it but it wasn't cheap. It wasn't like five bucks. It was like twenty five. It's it didn't do inexpensive. It said expensive inexpensive. I should have just said cheap. Fish budget friendly fish skate apparently is cheap. Catfish we knew that. Which type of is the cheapest. This is a bad category to be looking white. Flesh fists is usually inexpensive. Has a mild flavor cooks quickly. That's the most popular kinds of whitefish include cod to lappia attic. Catfish grouper bass and snapper. All right okay. This is like the third time in three weeks yet my Well no hold on. Hold on you weren't eating. It and i wasn't going. Ooh i hate fish. I'm telling you that it's an inexpensive fish which is great. You said you said yuck. I said what i was making. You said how you hadn't said yum. So i said i'm excited. I'm making a fish tonight. And i'm still excited. I'm not gonna let you duck it. I know i'm not trying to. I was worried about the smell and there. But now i'm over. It is going to be great speaking of animals. This is jane goodall episode. Oh my god. I'm glad we weren't talking about steak. That would have been really counter or bush meat. What's that that's eating of primates. people do. Yeah well we're we're meat is really scarce they will be primates. Primates are supposed to taste terrible yet because isn't isn't the cause so muscley. It's that we're so tendency. I guess we taste early rubber rubber band the guerrillas. What my anthro teacher. John barker told me it's arm of. She had tried by hope. She hadn't tried any primate. I started to make a joke. But then i stopped. What did you say. Is that what armie hammer told you. Oh that's a topical. Joe topical joke but i have very mixed feelings on that whole thing. Minor mixed minor very very clear. Yeah i know. I can assume what yours are. Mine are pretty much what yours are. I think well. I don't know all the details. I don't wanna like get it. Let's just take the thing we're talking about. Which is the part. We understand is that he had written Sexual text messages expressing a desire to eat somebody And it was. We were told it was consensual right. That's understanding and i have no problem with anybody's weird sexual fantasy. I have a big problem with someone eating. somebody buck. Yeah you can have as kinky of thoughts as you want. Your partner wants to pretend that you're gonna eat each other. What the fuck does that have to do with any of a i. I agree. I thought it was extreme. What was happening if it was consensual. If it wasn't and he was like harassing people and trying to tell them that he wanted to eat them like mate. That's a different story. But that doesn't seem like that was the case. But i don't know well we can get into a much like that's an easy position for us to take. I think the harder one is. I do believe part of the issue is that it was consensual. And that some of these gales now regret it and say there was a power imbalance and now they don't. They're not happy that they participated in that and that's that's a really tricky subject that i have probably bad opinion on. I don't think we can function as a society. If you can retract consent. I just don't i actually don't think it can function if you can tell someone to their face. Yes i consent and then later say no. I don't consent that's no but it's if you feel like you have to say yes. It's way more complicated. But in this case. I don't think he had power. It wasn't like he was employing these people or he was no but i think people will argue that. Because someone's famous that they have a power imbalance over anyone else. And that's i don't drink. I don't think that would hold up. If that person literally had power like could control their job or their wellbeing in some ways. I don't know if if just saying that. That person's famous gives them power. Doesn't i don't think that really holds any water. They actually have power over you whereas bosses and stuff like that do yeah. I guess i'm just saying if we live in a society were consent can be retracted than if someone gives you consent real time in very genuinely and honestly earnestly you then have to say no. You don't like how do you proceed in life in a paradigm. Where if someone tells you they want to do something and you do with them. You're supposed to what assume their consent isn't you. That also feels weird and controlling and dismissive and will no. I think you just have to be cognizant of the relationships you pursue if you're pursuing one with your employees dull because you never know what is happening there. Oh yeah employer employee. Of course. But i'm talking just to people to people me. They have a relationship. And the guy says i want to be kinky and do sem. Yeah and the person says i do. I'd like to try that. And then they didn't enjoy it. Yeah and then later. They say i retract consent. I was forced. I think these cases are a little more nuance in that. I don't know enough about the armie hammer until like really say i don't think him. Being famous is gives him power personally unless he unless they were like actresses and he was calling them in for meetings and stuff like that. Well that'd be grody. Ah yeah. But i i. Don't people have kinky bucks. But i don't want him to really anyone no. Nobody should eat anyone. Like women have rape fantasies and they work out rape fantasies with their partners. They don't want to be raped. Yeah that's fine if they want to express that fear and that way. Yeah but they don't wanna be raped so you could be working out this thing that yeah you wanna be consumed. What's deeper than it. I think if you wanna get emotional about it is like i think the statement is. I'm so into you. That i would consume me and i would never wanna consume a person but i'm so into you i will ask you. That's the benign version of it right because these texts were explicit. They were dark dark by to make you horny forum doubt it did. Make me like whoa this. That's a lot. Yeah yeah. I guess the only thing i can see with what i could see happening. That's uncomfortable is if i was flirting texting with someone and it was like really fun and playful and we were like days in and we were really into it and then it took a quick turn into something very dark. That would be uncomfortable. Like it would really. It would be hard. Although of course. I'd have to say like oh i'm not into that. Yeah but it but if you wrote back yeah i wanna eat your spleen you know. What on earth is the other person's supposed to assume others. If that happened to you that exact same thing you would just not respond. Probably when it got weird or you might even say. I don't wanna eat anyone. And i don't want to be eating whatever you wouldn't then think i should embarrass this person like i should tell people i would not. I would not unless. I was really feeling threatened in some way or like if something was getting out of control there is not. I wouldn't want to embarrass someone. But i would potentially need to say something to other people if it was getting out of hand if i felt in danger threatened or harassed him can we role play. And i'm going to do this. I'm going to go somewhere where i would have to put up a red flag. Okay okay okay. Hey what are you doing. i'm organizing. Oh you're in her house your house yet. What are you wearing face slightly. I'm wearing a sweatshirt and thick socks. No pants is what going right. That's so kinky to where big thick socks and no pants. I'd love to bring over fifteen pounds of cod. Stink up your kitchen and take them socks off once. It's nice instinctive in there. And then i would go. I do not consent to this way. You said it. I was doing was painting one where i would have to. Oh that was. Were you you. When i was wearing the sweatshirt and i was organizing all i didn't. I didn't know that i wouldn't have been organizing sweatshirt with no pants on. I was getting. I wanted to send the texts that i would have sent up a flare. You wouldn't like it if someone's going to bring a lot of cod over thirteen. Fourteen pounds of cod really stink up the place and then work those socks and then tie the socks around. Really what would you say. You wouldn't just say. I'll if it'd be really nice. Yeah you'd ha- you would be cognizant of the person's feelings i'm also i'm also radical. I i would probably go along with anything. Just see what this whole thing's about. I guess that's where things get a little tricky. Because what if like what if i was texting with someone and then they took it to really dark place really playful and i guess you could think for a bit that it was still like you could think for a while it was still playful in until you're like oh shit no it's not but i've already been sort of playing along because i thought it was that now it's not now i have to say no i don't like it but i did play along for a bit. Yeah but like so. what so. All that is is like it's flirting. That didn't pan out like it's like when someone goes up says what's your name at the bar and then you these corny. And you don't like it ends like so it's just like this escalate this. It doesn't click for you and that's that yeah. That's true that like a moral issue. It's just like oh we're not compatible in the fantasy thing you you've got all this fisher trying on load and you want wanna cook it at my house and i'm not going to be able to truthfully say i want to live out this fantasy with you. Jane goodall forging jiangsu connect. You deserve so much more than that. It was a natural flow as a ding ding. Ding okay. what. We both really loved about jane goodall is. She's kind of taken this not by her choice. She has the role of like queen of the planet and yet she's so spunky. That was my favorite. I know i loved when she told you you. You are capable of taking care of her stuffed animal chip because you called it as head exactly like you can't take care of it if you don't even know difference between a chimp and a bear. You can't have it. That's that's why she'd be fine with us talking about the texting. Yeah she probably like it. Maybe she'll leave. Maybe you'll even get a hold of association. Voice her opinion on it. I think i know our opinion. Well no. I definitely don't know her opinion on the sex part but she's definitely not into eating humans or primates or animals at all. Well we also know her opinion on the sexting that was involving bringing fish over. Because she's a vegetarian she would not want you to bring fish over and cook it now under chicanes as much about fish. Well she said the only thing she could put possibly what maybe insects dan. Yeah my ding ding. I don't know. I just wanted to say 'cause insects in sex. Oh my god oh my gosh okay. So how times more harmful is methane gas then. Co two. we're yeah because bills book. Yes how to avoid climate disaster. Okay i'll read. This is from unicef you. Tell me if your number in your head is different from bills book. There's like they go around but go ahead okay. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas with one hundred year old global warming potential twenty five times that of co two measured over a twenty year period. Methane is eighty four times more potent as a greenhouse gas than co two about sixty percent of global methane emissions are due to human activities. What is bill. Say i think he says twenty eight. And i had heard thirty two. That was another number that everyone agreed upon. But i think where it gets. Tricky is the only upside methane is that it doesn't stay in atmosphere. Nearly as long as carbon so carbon dioxide has a really long half life whereas methane dozen so even though it's heating it more it'll go way quicker but the thing that was really that we read in the book nitrous oxide which is also a by product that is like two or three hundred times warming co two. We're going to talk to him. Kelly this week right. Yeah got so scared. I'm so scared. Ding ding ding. There's a really funny friends moment. Where ross can't flirt. And he's trying to flirt with a girl who's delivering his and he actually. I wonder if this doesn't hold up and twenty twenty one. Nothing does continue keeps calling shirts. He gets having her calm back so he can keep practice flirting. He can try to get better each time and he starts talking about gas and how different gases smell smells really funny. Oh i love that show. I'm gonna start getting. oh yeah episodes. Are there two hundred. Release that well in all. How many seasons was it. It was ten but in season five. They hit one hundred. But then there's fewer episodes in the later seasons. I bet it's not quite one hundred. Well it's well. There's ten seasons in they average twenty twenty episodes of season which they had to have two hundred hundred and thirty six. Yeah was gonna say probably ever like the the normal order was probably twenty four and they might have cut it to twenty or twenty two in the latter seasons they never. There's no way they ever went under twenty eighteen eighteen shortest eighteen season ten. Okay at best season nine is eighteen. I wonder if that was because people are doing movies. Why on earth would that be was a cash. Cow twenty four so ten was the shortest and that was eighteen. I think they were ready to be done. And they just the network wanted it so bad that they were and they're getting paid a million dollars an episode each. That's pretty good money. Yeah it's it's pretty good is okay. That's really all i had for jane. No kidding methane. Yeah because she. She knows her stuff. She knows her. Shit yeah i mean. There was a question of how many roots and shoots but she. She explained why we don't know that 'cause they're just kinda sprouting up all over the place. So i couldn't really check a campus. Yeah very womp us. Very skadden compass extra wa-was in pretty darned scan. Scotty all right well. This was fun. And then i'll be home. In two clicks to clicks away. Put the pedal down get right home. I'm driving a hell cat. Durango some sitting on about seven hundred ten horse. Pike got sick. I really get up those mountain roads so it snowy it sure is so you can't go that fast right pretty fast. It's got all wheel drive very stable. Really good car okay. I got here and the weather was worse than it will be when i go home. And what are rob and katherine driving. Rob's driving his huge sprinter van that's all decked out call it's very cool and and just throw is driving a subaru outback. Which i know. He's not thrilled about. Oh it's not his pick no he to likes horsepower. Horsepower added he's a cowboy Yes yeah. I'm the steel horsey rights. Remember we interviewed john. Jovi never forget. Jj alright i love you have fun cooking your fish cam.

jane goodall brooklyn louis leakey jane goodall institute united states dan sheppard cambridge rob cordery jethro boven brooke linen Rela thalji diane fossey galdikas kusak Jane new brooklyn jane
Jane Goodall

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

1:23:36 hr | Last week

Jane Goodall

"Welcome welcome welcome armchair expert. I'm dan sheppard. This is a very very exciting episode for me. If you've heard the show you nominee anthropology major talk about it ad nauseam and of course the queen of anthropology well margaret. Mead's up there. But jane goodall my goodness jane goodall. What a human being. Jane goodall is. She is a primatology. An anthropologist and an advocate for the environment animals and the natural world for the last thirty years. Jane has been focused on biodiversity protection fighting the climate crisis addressing intensive farming empowering young people through youth program roots and shoots and so much more. She also has a new podcast. The jane goodall hope cast so. Please check out. Jane's new podcasts. Jane goodall hope cast enjoy the queen of prime mentality. We are supported by top gear. America i just got in the door from utah where we were shooting. More top gear america. We jumped a trx and excessive distance. Which was so darned fun rob cordery jethro boven. 'em myself of course are on top gear america. I gotta say the feedback has been so wonderful on top gear america. I just love it and the joy ride continues so get ready for more top gear america more adventure more chaos more cars new episodes of top gear america are coming may seventh twenty twenty one streaming only on the motor trend. A- just watch the hot rod episode which was so fun. I raced a ferrari in my buick. Roadmaster station wagon. I won't tell you who was victorious. That's a cliffhanger. So check out top gear america. Right now start your free trial today by going to motor trend. Dot com slash. Tgi twenty one. That's motor trend dot com slash t g twenty one get the motor trend app and check us out are supported by brooke linen There is nothing. I enjoy more than getting down to my birthday suit sliding into my eyes cold hotel quality soft brooklyn ins and just riding around a little bit. How's your comforter looking these days a lot like you feel. Maybe a little lumpy. Maybe a little deflated no longer has the same fluffy used to will. It's time for a refresh with brooklyn and monica. I just got new brooklyn and comforters. And they're so wonderful when monica through hers out. She was immediately alarmed that she had waited too long. So you're probably waiting too long to. And i just have to say the brooklyn and comforter is amazing brooklyn and creates beautiful high quality bedding and homosexuals. They work directly with manufacturers to give you a fair price. No middlemen no markups. they're comforters. Come in lightweight all season. Ultra warm to suit. Every type of sleeper an lifestyle. There's even a weighted comforter option for stress relief and brooklyn's comforters. Pair perfectly with their sheets pillows and deve covers. Treat yourself to alternate comfort with brooklyn's comforter collection go to brooklyn dot com use promo code expert to get twenty five dollars off with a minimum purchase of one hundred dollars. That's brooklyn and be are okay. L. i n. e. n. dot com and enter promo code expert for twenty five dollars off with a minimum purchase of one hundred dollars. That's brooklyn and dot com promo code expert. How are you doing well. I've never been as exhausted. I'm busy in my whole. Life has during this lockdown since march. It's been every single day being virtual jane yet. Generally you would be traveling around and talking and within that schedule is built in some little breaks for yourself. I'd imagine yes. This is no breaking since march. It's being virtually every single day. Are you being held captive against your will because you can signal us with like raise your eyebrows to do all this right but then i agree to it so well it. It is a huge delight for us to talk to you. We've been attempting to schedule this for a while. I think you're going to speak at ucla. My alma mater. And we were going to speak in person which i was excited about. But i'll take you anyway. I can get you okay. I was hoping today we could go through all the stuff. You're up to that. You're working on your podcast. Jane goodall institute roots and shoots. But if it's okay with you. I would really hope to frame this in a broader theme of being female. I think today that's very relevant thing for us to be looking at how a female perspective can be so helpful why there should be more leadership roles for women and the value of that and i can't imagine someone more significant in that way than you. I think you're in the ruth bader ginsburg mount rushmore of women who have really put their stamp on the world. You reject that you know. Like being compared to her she is such an icon. Yeah i hate to break its use. Oh are you yeah. Well okay so when you started your work i think nine hundred fifty seven may be the first time you go to gumby to study no nine nineteen fifty seven. I went to kenya. Met louis leakey. And then i had to go back to the uk for a year while he found the money because soon. I haven't been to college right. Who was going to give money to this. Young untrained girl do something as absurd. This study chimpanzees in a forest. Yeah not a lot of people you could have pointed to to say. Hey look how good this works but yes you went back. You went to cambridge. I think you are the eighth person ever to get a phd without having an undergraduate degree. Which i think is fascinating. I am curious how many there are now but when you started very very male dominated field is that safe to say. Well yes and no i mean there was almost nobody going out studying animals in the wild the world three people and they were all males in a job. Challenge was studying montenegro. Rela and there were two american men in south africa studying chakma. But that was it. Oh okay well the thing that you were unique in novel in in that you got a ton of criticism for can i just say one thing. I'm going to tell you. I was an anthropology major. So i worship to you and i wanted to do primatology. Just know that there's a lot of baggage for my love for you in this but my understanding is that you were really the first person to be doing any thalji where you were not naming the subjects numbers so generally when people studied animals prior to you they would just say one a one b whatever their nomenclature was in. You're really the first to name them in recognize their personalities remember. I hadn't been to college when i first went out. Louis leakey might mental. He's the one who picked me for this study. And he wanted a woman that was one key thing he wanted to woman. He felt they might be more patient in the field. So that was one good thing for me and secondly he wanted somebody who hadn't been to college because he wanted a mind uncluttered by the reductionist thinking of the animal behavior people of the time so there was nobody out in the field on the numbers were given by most of these people to the animals in labs and animals in captive situations. So the reason i named the mobile wouldn't i. It's just not true to give an animal a name not a number. Uh yeah well really quick about louis. Do you think maybe his confidence in you. And the other two women that he shepherded through diane fossey who then went and studied gorillas and then i can't pronounce her name who did orangutans t galdikas. Yes do you think. Maybe he was in a position to feel that way. 'cause his own wife was so prolific as an archaeologist and they had made discoveries together. Do you think that made him more open minded to that. It's quite possible. I don't know. I haven't thought of that. Before will is possible. I think that in general the criticism for you naming them was. You're kind of displaying. Amphitheater and empathy was the opposite of objectivity which sciences going for that was the singular kind of criticism. And i have to say that sounds very very similar to the outmoded male position that women in general are too emotional and not objective their emotional not logical and that to me the critique of you is more than what's on the surface at that time well it's absolutely true that when i got to cambridge big criticism was you cannot have empathy with your subject. You got to be objective and the snow space for having empathy and i disagreed so much because when you have empathy with your subject may do something extraordinary. She'll have empathy you you you say to yourself well. I think i know why they did that. And then then you can put on your scientific now jacomb say okay without. Let's prove am i right or am i wrong and ask questions. I listened to your interview. With dave matthews. Which by the way is a thrilling friendship that you guys have on your podcast. The jane goodall hope casts and you gave the example of seen. A young chimp break her arm and then go to her mother. I think you're describing was when this little baby broke her arm and she was the first baby and the mother was inexperienced so every time the baby cried which obviously it was very painful. The mother just hugged her title which made her cry louder. So but you know all those many examples of chimpanzees showing true altruism to each other like an adult male. Rescuing an often infant is even related to him and saving his life. Yeah but the point. I loved you made is yes. I had these emotions. I was heartbroken for this inexperienced mother. But my notes are as thorough as notes could be. It is as objective as one can be one doesn't preclude the other and i think that was such a novel idea. You're absolutely right. It was tears. Were pouring down my face because this baby was named little jane she was the only one who's fb named for me and you know. She was three months old at that time. We didn't watch many infants. Growing up sues about the fifth. I think it was just tragic. It was the mother and such confusion. The baby so badly hud was nothing we could do. So i'm going to go even further with this. I would argue that your novel approach of having empathy. Open your eyes in a way that someone studying them even for the same duration that you studied them they would have missed things they would not have been open because they were this other. This animal this lower thing that they would have missed the parallels argue ear enormous contribution the legendary contribution is that you discovered that chimpanzees use tools. That was thought to be something. Only humans could do in in a great definer of what made us human and you demonstrated that and you kind of destroyed that fantasy. Yes and also we were supposed to be the only creatures to have personality. The only creatures have minds capable of problem solving and especially the only creatures with the emotions and you know. I was tortoise. A child by my dog of course animals have personalities minds and emotions. It's ridiculous when the scientists told me that when i got to cambridge i really wanted it. They really believe what they were saying. Or was it just. They couldn't prove it that it's better not talk about other tint. Have a whole theory on. Why haven't i think it serves an actual purpose to alleviate ethical issues with how they're treated but before we get there you could also say they have culture as well which is something we would have thought was only ass right absolutely. Ah dense culture if you look at one population versus another. They have their own unique set of things. They've learned in our passing on traditions. And all these things that certainly meet the definition of culture behavior you passed from one generation to the next through observation imitation and practice that is a definition of human culture. But when i first mentioned culture. I didn't have any other examples really. But it just seemed intuitively of course as you see the baby's what chain than in other places where i heard there was banging open nuts with rocks which gumby chimps still do the young ones. They're learning that so kusak coaches. I was given so much flack over that you cannot talk about culture. Yeah so. I think the fact that you were naive enough having been in college and then again i really think it has a lot to do with you being a woman in that situation that you were empathetic and that through that we get some of the greatest discoveries about that species and i really do think other people would have missed it. I think you're right that many people would i really do. And you know. I've been reading in. The shadow of manifest book wrote about the golden beecham's. It's going to be one chapter a month and it just took me right back. I was reading and thinking every detail is that it was magic to read what i was learning about their different personalities amid was just magical to see. How did it back then now is the person is jane. The person there had to terrible days in the field. There had to be incredible loneliness at times. You're in your twenties. There was not you deserve your head. Being alone is very different from being lonely. And i've always loved being alone. I mean even. When i was a child i would climb the tree out there because i'm in my family and spend ages alone up into branches. I got with my dog onto the clifftops on my own and they were quite wild in those days. So i've always loved being alone. The only time. I was a little bit lonely you know. My mother came with me start. Well again. I really quick. I think that's hysterical as well. That's another male female thing you're twenty four and they insist your mother joined you. That wouldn't have happened to a mail sciences. Now they did. That's not true. They did not insist. My mother join me. Said i couldn't be out in the field on my own. Okay okay and she volunteered to come okay. And it was amazing. People say i was brave. I wasn't brave was what i wanted to do. She was you know she was left alone. With these big booms invading ten because they are very entrepreneurial and they quickly grabbing it thing. That might be a new food buffalo's wandering around snakes spiders. She was brave one and she was a novelist. Yeah well she wrote a couple of books. Okay that's two more than i've written. So i'm gonna caller novelist so obviously had her own set of determination as all in pointing out a determined person. The whole family said the time you're lonely. Yeah yet when she first left just before i saw to using an i really missed having somebody to share the excitement with i have this cook and a guy driving the boat and they listen. They were interested but it didn't mean as much to them as it would have to Yeah i mean why wouldn't the chimps use tools. of course they weren't high fiving each other when you discovered that they were getting termites out now. There was no period. Where of course. Because i'm trapped in my own point of view in as much as i may have been interested in that. Were you ever at any moment going while. But i'm also missing out on this huge human experience. I could be in london. Having drinks with friends did that ever enter your mind. Were you ever concerned about what you are quote missing. Absolutely absolutely not okay. Although i've been very social before i left you know i wasn't a little shy retiring creature. I was out there having fun going to dawn and things like that. I didn't miss it. I didn't miss it because you are so focused in so fulfilled by this. Pursuit was there in the forest. Only magic of the forest around myth and learning new things every day and will these amazing chimpanzees. the different way of doing things complete matching now for those of the listeners. Who aren't super familiar with. Just what level of threat different. Primates are your arguably with the most dangerous when you agree dangerous. Yeah chimpanzees as compared to say guerrillas or other big great apes gorillas can lose that temper this young man who is studying chimpanzees in congo and he was attacked ferociously by a male gorilla. Who obviously just ted a confrontation with another male. He was mad and this guy survived. I simply don't know temps can be violent. They're all strong so yes chimpanzees these with each other. They can kill each other. It's lucky they didn't want to kill me. Yes let me. Just say from a personal point of view. I have trekked up to the guerrillas. I felt pretty safe. And then we also went into a force on the hunt for chimpanzees and there were a lot more rules and it was taken much more seriously like this has odds of going bad for more than the guerrilla experience would. That's probably because of the people running the program okay. I'll blame them but as you point out. They're incredibly strong four times stronger than a full grown adult. Human eight times stronger than me. I'm sure very strong. And they can be very very violent and whether scary moments. Yes there were. Oh yeah but none that ever made you rethink or question. What you're gonna do. No of course. Not i gotta. I couldn't let louis leakey down. Could i no no. No no no that someone's approval. I would certainly be in search of you. Always have that obstinate disposition going through life or did it sort of come when you had this passion. I think i probably always had it. Yeah i think you're born with that or not. yeah you were for. I have pretty bad dose of it. Can i ask you while you were watching chimpanzees over these many many years. How were the male female roles chimpanzees similar to our own. And how are they different. And was that something that interested you. I was interested in everything. What i loved was watching. Mother child behavior development of infants relations with brothers and sisters but the males have dominant. They have dominance hierarchy they dominate all females. And they're very promiscuous which caused some people to draw not all monogamous and so basically in female comes into eastern. When she's ready for mating she may be made by all the males when off to the other the various sexually popular old female flow was mayton. Seven t two times in one day why sewers privy exhaust to the g. She was followed by this string of males and they adolescence. Who don't really get go. They will hide behind a bush and shake a little branch and sometimes the female will look at the alpha male and then creep off behind the bush and is it. There's even evidence. I remember writing a paper called lying in primates. In how they'll also give a call like that. There's perhaps a predator in the area so that all the alpha's run towards it and then they get a shot at the female while the alpha's are out. I think that sort of thing happens sometimes too but mostly that happens when for example chimps hunt sometimes and hunting is a very exciting thing so if the top male sometimes shows possessiveness and other males are not supposed to make his female that happens often but if the alpha male gets distracted and is looking at the hunt bats when the other males run in gas you go and if the alpha male the possessive male catch them. Who do you think he attacks. All i saw that girl for the female up. Yeah that's pretty. That's kind of consistent humans. Yeah yeah if he attacked the male to female it would run often. Have more fun. I didn't think of creating another window of opportunity. So i have a question for you. Does it correlate perfectly with sexual die. Morphism like is the level of male dominance proportional to how much bigger males are than females in species semi between chimps and bonobos male. Bonobo is more or less the same size as the female. And you don't get the same system of sexual relations. And bonobos is well they have a much broader sexual experience than pan. Troglodyte is right. They're doing more things. That female bonobo is having this pink swelling all the time so they solve a lot of disputes through sexual behavior and females reassure each other by rubbing their sexual swellings together. So i was so glad to louis. Leakey didn't send me to study them. Because the geographic would never have supported. They couldn't in those days of had will these pink bottoms off a wonderful photograph in the gets the second geographic article which should obeyed an at c. Sixty nine think and photograph taken by my husband hugo so wonderful photo five males sitting in a row that all of it'll roused looking at the camera has slightly out and always these big erections hard voting off missed little strange missed loin levels. He captured the perfect moment. You know those days. There was no photo shopping. And i saw note to the engraver. Blend in two for blend of graphic was than even when photograph. It's lovely those setting sun and up against you know a beautiful evening light. And i'm holding the walkie talkie to send a message to my mother who's down to tell her. I'm staying up for the night. And i get back. This picture with the note to the grave around each nail is circling since removed from nails. Oh you're kidding. Wow not a while. oh man well. Let's change change now. Of course because i mail i had a particular interest in frodo almost looked like a silverback. He was so disproportionately muscular. I was fascinated by him. Did you name him after frodo baggins was. That's before i realised his personality was entirely. Not like i say that he did not live up to the name frodo baggins frodo was as flynn was before him in this dominant at family. He was a spoilt brat. Older brother who supported him a older sister who supported him a top-ranking mother of so he could get away with murder. I mean he could attack and tease a much older individuals knowing that his family would run the his support and he became a real bully. Yeah and he was enormous. He was considerably bigger than most the other males wasn't he not really big because he had so often his risley cash he was most solid. Very solid built. Yeah so no we met. You are empathetic and that you are not trying to deny whatever emotional feelings could you come to hate any of them like would you be frustrated with frodo. Did act like such a spoiled brat so often and of course his victims are other. Chimps you love. Of course i was mad at him was mad when they did things which were really unpleasant. Horrible i mean. I think of them like humans ryan thorough people. Who do things that irritate you or make you angry. Same that the chimps. Yeah but it would be hard for me if i was in that position to try not to correct behavior versus just observing. No if were in the position you wouldn't feel that tool for one thing. If you tried to intervene in something like that that would be the end of you. Oh yeah well. I might get myself. He was a monster. I mean he was so strong and violent at times. So the very ironic part of your life has to occur to you is that you went deep into a jungle and you're entirely anonymous and at some point you emerge in your a world figure. I think that must be one of the most bizarre trajectories to being recognized the world over most people. Come to hollywood where we're at to get that kind of recognition but you went deep into the jungle and that transition for you. Is it confusing natural. What is that experience. Well when it first happened. I was even now basically shei-pa and first of all all these journalists wanting to interview me and i tried to get out of it and then i remember the first time somebody coming up to me when i was walking through santa fe actually and this woman came up and she started tears in her eyes. Saying you know she actually said. Can i touch you. Can i touch you. This is spooky this issue. I said i'll shake your hand. And so the beginning you know people would come up in airports need oneself fees and could i sign something and at first i was really i hated it. I put on dark glasses. And let my hair down. But it still don and then i thought well by this time. I'm trying to raise awareness. I'm trying to raise money for the institute trying to develop our youth program inside the will is obviously something happened. I can't do anything about it on. Ask for it. So will use it so taking brochures around handing them out saying. Do you have children. And they've us join roots and shoots gives the memory show. Well yes it sounds like. You accepted the reality of what it was. Which is there's no going back. So how do we make the best of the situation. Just so you know. If i met you i would attempt to. Groom you played along demonstrate your your status cuba. Wonderful groomed beard. Let's start there yeah. More armchair expert diffused dare. We are supported by. 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Enjoying the over one million people who've taken charge of their mental health with the help of experience better health professional our best friends they have a nine year old girl. I mean we've interviewed bill gates and hillary clinton you name it. None of this stuff is reached their radar. They could care less but the nine year old out we were interviewing you. And she was beside herself. She had to dress up as someone you admired. She's gone as you several times. And i think what an amazing thing that you were born in one thousand nine hundred thirty seven maybe an. Here's a gale even better thirty four. And here's a little girl born in two thousand ten mimicking you. I just think it's so spectacular and for a wonderful reason not because you have a humongous but then show it on instagram. Like i'm delighted that they're young women who address up like you and my daughters are excited so wonderful so with year notoriety in your deep love for the environment for conservation for animals. You've been a part of a couple of different really released successful organisations the first of which is the jane goodall institute which was established in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. And i believe now. There's ten thousand groups in one hundred countries that's going onto the youth program. They are jane goodall institute we have twenty four separate institutes in twenty four different countries. All my goodness and the program. Young people is a program of the jane goodall institute. Got you so roots and shoots is under the umbrella of jane goodall institute now roots and shoots has forty five hundred groups in seventy countries. Do you agree to that about seventy. Yeah sixty eight sixty nine seventy seventy two something like that does groups. We don't even know about because you know the discovered one the other day and far away in the rainforest of guatemala ecuador or something all my young people going from one school to another only love. This program says they started him. The new school so it just grass roots. Yeah walk me through. What roots and shoots does what's the objective and it's youth centric. So what is the goal. How does it work lex. That a group get started sates mostly in school very often those a teacher who tries to get it going or it may be a pie school students or something like that or it may be and the university or somebody may started a kindergarten. So you get the group of young people who cab and you tell them now you choose three projects to make the world better to one day help people wanna help animals one to help the environment because the choices they make will depend on how old they are if they're rich or poor if they're living in the town of the country if they're living in china or the united states or abu dhabi or something like that lily should start one. Yeah she by the way it should be so great at. She really wanted. she's a boss. Okay yes you can help hon. You know so. That's how group start. And when. I was traveling around. America through the airports handing out my little brochures. You could follow my progress by seeing where new loop started up just dropping seeds. Yes that's right so now let's go back to. I think the general reservation in the past of acknowledging that animals have an emotional capacity or an intellectual capacity. I think the hesitation there is if that is recognized then you must immediately go to what the ethical dilemma of eating them is or studying them or any of these things. Well studying them with intervention studying them in research laboratories certainly eating them. It's more than the eating of them. It's the way they're kept in the factory farms. It's horrendous and then on top of that this the harm it does to the environment you've to feed them you cut down. Habitats grow the grain. You use fossil fuel. Get the grain. The animals to the animals to abbatoir meet the table. They produce methane gas which is like co two greenhouse gases. Thirty two times better at heating up the atmosphere then too. I mean it is the the lethal gas up there. Okay so. I don't want anyone to call me a hypocrite. Because i do eat me. Obviously i don't feel morally great about it and i think i've tended to focus on exactly what you just mentioned. Which is the manner in which were getting. The me feels like it could be vastly improved but you know something if you love the taste of meet face alternatives to me dicon tell the difference s identical. You're right you're right. We these life burgers in their insanely delicious ear right. There is no reason to not embrace those. I agree i guess in. Tell me wyan idiot. I'm going to give you an opportunity to point out my flaw so i have no problem acknowledging the value and complexity of animals. I'm not in denial of it to me. It's quite obvious. I go to a place where we'll i'm an omnivore in omnivores e me and i'm like any other animal. That's an omnivore. I don't feel guilty about playing my role in the food chain now. Obviously playing an absurd role. That i wasn't really designed so i that but i think that's what i fall back on morally. Do you wanna blow some holes. In that i will first of all you are able to comprehend the exact nature of the creature that you're eating and you know that that is an animal that has emotions that can feel fear and pain plays a role in society or it would do if it was allowed to. And so that makes you separate from the abandoned. Was this also something else to do with health. And we have the gut of a her before. And the hubby will has long got. Because it's got to get the goodness out of leaves and grass and things a condom four as a short one big cigarette to get rid of the meat before it rots in the intestines which were harming our health this way plus years. These poor animals are given hormones to make them grow faster antibiotics to stop them die because of stress so those antibiotics the bacteria building up resistance because they used all the time. Is there an hierarchy in your mind or no like what about eating insects. Are you more in favor of that. Well i that's something i haven't really come to grips with because this even people now talking about the fact that some plants may have purposes. Well i have to say that. If i was asked to choose between eighteen a pig an mealworm i would choose the mail and i don't think it's too terribly bad to eat insects. Some okay eggs. How do we feel about eggs. Oh if x from heads clucking around in the farmyard. Don't mind so much. But the factory farms of horrendous the other bad on the environmental and the milk coming from these dairy cows in these off i mean you watch some of the secretly filmed video. New feel ill. That's what stopped me. When i learned about factory farms for the first time in the late sixties and next time i looked may told my plate. I thought this symbolizes fear pain death. Yeah not appealing. No not very appetizing. Doesn't make me very hungry. And what you laid out like that. And you know what else when i'm talking to people i never. I never say bad person. You eat meat. You should mobile. I want to love to this to google. Checkout pig castle not kosovo the artists but pig kosovo. You watch that okay. Well here's what happened to me. I watched forks over knives eight years ago and i went vegan for a year. I doubt forks over knives as alarming as what you just told me so. I'm watch it. I might as well go grocery shopping. I because i'm sure. I'm going to have to make a decision afterwards. But really i mean i feel so much better than i stopped. I felt like you feel better when you a vacant for you. I didn't do it right. I didn't put enough time into. What i did is ended eating a zillion carbohydrates in no. I didn't feel much better. I think i felt worse. I'll own a failure on my part and the choices now is so good don't they. Well they're way different than i did it in two thousand. Yes exactly. I mean come on a long way. You know to be honest. What got me off of it. As i was going back to detroit on stocks my father was ill and you just eat vegetarian in two thousand twelve in detroit. Now in la. It's pretty darn good and easy overall. Are you optimistic or pessimistic. Where you add on our state. Well i'm both okay. I know that if we all get together we've got a window of time. We can stop slowing down climate change. We can start healing some of the home that we've done natives very resilient with coming up with our intellect with more and more ways for clean green energy renewable energy and things like that but the thing is we don't have that much time so how do we get people involved. That's why i worked so hard on roots and shoots and so thrilled because many children are changing their parents. Oh yeah mindue daily. It's so annoying. But i do get drug along by a lot of little a little girl in china who i i met when she was ten jr couldn't speak english to came to my lecture. Which of course was translated and she said to her parents. I'm going to learn english. Because i want to talk to dr jane. She started a roots and shoots group and her mother helped her and now she's fluent english. She doing all kinds of amazing. But i got a letter from her mother. She said dr jane. I have to tell you. She speak english but then her daughter translated. But i was just a housewife and i went shopping. And i never thought of Didn't think about anything should now. I've become a thoughtful person. And i think about what i buy and how it was made did it. The environment to said this program of yours does not just change the children. It's changed their parents to. Yeah that's lovely of the things you've done. What is most rewarding matt stuff inspiring a little girl in china or is it the fact that you probably played a huge role in the fact. That chimps are still here. I don't know time what's the one main thing i think. One thing that. I really feel the chimps may to do this but to change the scientific attitude towards animals Yeah that's pretty darn profound. That's a paradigm shift. Yeah it's a paradigm shift and the other one is starting roots and shoots because that now has its own life if i died tomorrow roots and shoots will carry on. But that's such a good point. Yeah for someone who wants to enact. Change trying to figure out how to do it in your absences. I imagine the hardest thing to figure out which you've done. Okay now your podcast. I want to know. Do you like interviewing people. You've been interviewed your whole life. And i was in a similar situation which i'm an actor and i've been doing interviews for fifteen years and i'm like oh i know how to be in an interview and guess what i did not. I knew how to get in. I had to learn how to interview. Have you enjoyed hosting jane goodall. Hope cast well. When i was told i had to host it stupid center system anyway then i found i could do it. It's like the first time i had to give lecture. I felt that for the first five minutes. I literally couldn't breathe. I was terrified. But then suddenly i realized that i do not something from the audience that filled me with with. I don't know what it is but it's a kind of magic which comes to me when i'm out there in front of a crowd that's why this virtual business virtual lectures looking at the camera on top of a screen. That is so hard. I'd had to really put every ounce of energy into trying to give appropriate without an audience Yeah you know. This is a topic. I bring up all the time. There's a term for that. I can't remember it. I am always having majored anthro. I'm always trying to get people to recognize how social of an animal we are like. We have this very obvious understanding that dogs are social so they behave this way in this predictable way and they respond to this and we seem to underestimate that. We're the like apex social animal. And that all the things chimps need. We need probably times three this notion of us being an island that is not how we were designed to live and i think you look at all of our mental health issues. We underestimate how social we are and how much we need each other and you standing in front of an audience makes total sense to me because you are feeling the full brunt of community like this is what you were designed to do. That's right. I i do feel like half a suit of purpose in this life and i just have to try and do it you know when i was little. I wanted to write books. Because i was so shocked by and i started writing when i was four. My mother used to write it down for me. I found stories. I wrote when i was five. Got one lovely. So i always wanted to write want to write poetry but then you know ten years old africa wild animals books that that's what i want to do because women want that sort of scientists than so. That was michael and is it true. You still have the chimpanzee stuffed animal. Your dad gave you a child. Yes he's in lockdown in washington dc where he was part of the exhibit they put on becoming jane or something like that which i haven't seen yet and locked came to be stippled gordon. Seen by they couldn't have him he was too precious. They made him a glass bullet proof case. He's on display like the pope. Well there's an ever an auction and the only thing. I think i'd ever want to own of somebody you know. I think i'd be a good steward of that teddy bear. Should that ever care. You be a bad student. If you can't well they're both mammals. It's an easy mistake. My last question about your podcast. I find. I'm just being honest and candid with you. I find that the experience of having fame is underwhelming and more of an inconvenience. But i will say the thing that i most enjoy is that i get to meet someone like you and i have to imagine that you are not impervious to that to do. Enjoy the fact that you can meet people that you were greatly interested in of course because the people i want to me because they could really make a difference. There's none that you just. They're not gonna make a difference but like john travolta. You'll love saturday night fever. And by god. You could have a conversation with john travolta now. Well i hate to say that. I haven't had time to go to cinemas for so long. I don't know the film stars. Well i was trying to make it easy for you. That was nineteen. Seventy seven a dea. Saturday night fever phil. Do you have a favorite film. The rings oh okay one. Do you think about lord of the rings it except he like what's going on now if you think that more door is greed and riches and all these despots who are and we need to grow the fellowship to fight that to fight the black riders who are out there all these big businessmen couldn't care less about anything else and even thought of that recently but if you remember galadriel gives frodo vile of dust and when he sprinkles it all the trees are being cut down by more door come to life and grow up again so the whole thing. It's like a parable of what's going on. Right prophetic yeah. I hadn't made that connection. I made it you. Yes you did. It's proprietary to you now jane. You're so wonderful. I appreciate your time so much. I really want to tell that your captors that you need a little break though okay mic cap too. I'm not a weak and feeble. plus you are. You're anything. But i do have a job to do and job requires me to do what i'm doing so my mother told me if you're going to do something do it as well as you possibly can. While your mother who should be incredibly happy. Because you've done exactly that. And i thank you on behalf of my children's future generations. I'm so grateful to you for dedicating so much your life in time and energy to try to make this place somewhere we can live for more than another one hundred years thank you. It's being absolutely lovely talking to was really looking forward to it. Well we will meet one day. And i will groom you the best of your life. I guarantee he'll band okay. Have a wonderful rest of your day. We appreciate you so much. thanks okay bye. Gene stage tuned for more mature. If you dare. We are supported by me under the under the under the undone sundays. We unease oh my lord. Do i love me on these. I got a pair recently. That are black with white little simple pictures of space explores. I love them. I like him so much. I had the thought. I should get twenty of these weather around. Never not want to be in these me on these now. It is time. We stopped messing around about funny things and talk about something really serious and important your underwear me on these believes undies yelled about from the rooftops or shown off in mere southeast for instagram. Mendis isn't just here to make sure everybody is comfortable. They're also limiting the amount of laundry. You have how thoughtful. They designed a membership. That not only saves you thirty percent on order but delivers a fun. New pair of undies or sex right to your door each month. Plus you're the boss you can control your shipments and you can get early. Access to their most exclusive prints. Mayonnaise has a great offer for arm cherries for any first time. Purchasers you get fifteen percent off and free shipping. 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That's just right for you. You can buy it online or in store with curbside pickup in home delivery in select markets. So by your next car your way at carmax the way it should be get all the details and start the search for your next car today at carmax dot com and now my favorite part of the show. The fact check with my soul mate batman. Hello is monica. They're paging mrs padma. N- mrs pad man. How your huge on my computer. Oh too big now your life size. We are not together obviously together. We are separated by about eight hundred miles. And what are you doing. Eight hundred miles away but this decided to get out of town this fucking hit the road no to alaska or south to la. Get out of town. I'm shooting season. Two of top gear. America in utah. And how is it going. Oh man it's so good. It's so good. Oh sorry. oh what the hell happened. House my peppermint tea. Oh my gosh making a real life thing. Yeah so much fun. Jumping trucks racing stace german station wagons today. Horsing around Cutting up with the guys. Wow you know that kind of stuff. You love a cut up. I do love to cut up and you have been very productive this weekend. Yeah had almost no fun. I've been only you. You have fun doing that though right. Yeah well i wouldn't say fun. It's just really satisfying. So what i did was spicer's. Yes yes i decided to get my life together. It was time who's overdo it was it was way overdue. I was feeling in all honesty a bit out of control. I needed to gain some control back so the best way to do that is shopping. Which did that is second. Best way is to clean and organized. So i cleaned organized everything. You know my scary closet. That's like very scary because it's a big old mess where we keep the equipment. Yeah yeah yeah. Every time we gotta get the equipment out of there. It's like indiana jones and the temple of doom darts to shoot out the walls. No well you brought it up. I did clean up a year ago and it took all day. I mean it was horrible. I posted a picture of it in its worst state and it was really. It was like monica geller. Secret closet friends fans will know what that means okay. We're not gonna know what that means when you said you posted a picture. You're in the process of senior post traumatic stress disorder from the closet. I cleaned up a year ago. Beautiful then in within the year. It's gotten a little out of hand again. Sure years a long time. I had to completely fixed that. I had to clean. My refrigerator. made an error basket. Well everyone's up to speed on the fact that your professional gourmet chef now in the cook seven nights a week. I cook a lot really impressive. What are you going to cook tonight. I'm going to cook fish. Oh yuck yuck don't yuck that's a that's a bad idea. it's not cooking. Fish inside of an apartment is the one of the world's worst ideas i would open. Listen oh my god. Listen my chef. Kuru alison roman. Wants me to cook more fish and indoors and she said she said one of the main things that people fear is is gonna make my apartment smell. No it's not okay. You know it's the main thing people fear because one hundred times out of one hundred. Your whole house stinks like a catfish is not catfish. It's gonna be cod inkata's very light. It is not a fishy fish. Cod is feels like an interesting choice. Because isn't that what you get at mcdonald's and a flare fish now wait no properly taught lavish sticks no fish sticks and filet fisher cod very affordable fish. It wasn't that affordable got ripped off because it's a real cheap fish. I got a nice to my. I'm gonna make tomato poached fish and it is going to be delicious. What does that mean tomato poached. You poach it in tomato. I guess i don't i can. I'm thinking of poaching and oh no like it cooks within the tomato sauce. Jews garlic shallot some other stuff. I haven't looked up the rest being a bit. Well some of that might masks the smell. But i am. I'm gonna tell you one of my new fears. Which is you know when people stink they. They've passed their expiration date the b. oh and they. They don't have time for a shower so what they do. Is they pop some cologne all over themselves. Yeah and then smear their anti-perspirant over the smell and now you just have a ton of smells and the b. Oh it doesn't go away. And then it's it's like an ambrosia cacophony of smells or a cornucopia of smells and i'm a little worried about that for you. I know you're talking about. It's like when people try to spray over their bowel movements. That's right yeah. You're right bad. Yeah yeah it's just leave the bra bob moon there. Yeah yeah i said roy. That was horrible. I agree here the pure movements in. Don't don't try to perfume that pig about the the b. m. but not about the fish. Can we agree upon a non-bias judge. That will stop by tomorrow morning. We can appoint somebody shack and we won't tell them anything. We're not going to say god thing just going to say we're asking a favorite you stop by monica's in the morning. Anything seems mentionable. You tell us if not thank you. And if they say yeah went to monica's man it smelt like Not an alley cats. Oh okay well. Listen listen it's gonna smoke good. She promised and i trust her. I think you are extra sensitive to fish. You hated the idea of anchovies. You don't like salmon which is crazy. I acknowledge that. And i cook salmon here a fair amount and i'm fine with it. Do you tell me you had a problem with one of these fish fries though that it did rick lake fish know that was the chicken enormous tank. Yeah well i think it up with some yard bird. But i thought you also had a fish mishap mix up so far. Haven't had any fish problems. How about this. Could we agree that if you have the option just why not cook it outside on the grill. No i can't tomato poach outside. Oh and that's that's the prep. That's a preparation of my choosing. Okay i have to cook it today. Because i took it out of the fridge. Freezer couple of days ago. I am a little worried about that. I think it's funny. I'll stop but on the counter for two days thawed. It thought a while ago. It's been in the fridge. Oh okay how's you does your fridge stink at all now. Smells great well. Those herbs are in their basket makes us smell so good. I have either. Let us basket in an herb basket. the okay. The lead is basket is box but still it. Has its own impressive. It looks like a professional chefs fridge when you saw picture of it. You said too many vegetables knowing says that well my concern was no one person could eat that many vegetables in the time horizon. That vegetables stay good. I tend to get three or four extra days out of fish couple of weeks outta the veggies over asked all this tomato. You're going to be poaching the old fish with old old fish. Well dale trying although they slashed. Prices day-old donen stale bradley. Dale dale is usually signaling. That you're going to get a deal. As i said it wasn't cheap. I got ripped off because it's very inexpensive ish. That's why it's in fish sticks and blair. Let me look up right now actually. This is a good factor. Real time fact. Yeah what kind of fish is in a filet of fish. Away of fish mcdonalds. You're not going to like this. Answer not cod alaskan pohlak. Let's see what is. Alaskan alaska polack. Oh fuck is a species of cod. Walk back to cod fans you you you just got caught. I o d. I got deposit. How dare you cash on delivery. Copd de cod be. You could do the same for fish sticks and you're gonna find it's cod across the board anytime fishing's yeah absolutely they. What make america run. But it's just not a year so gourmet right now in. Its its tuna fish. I love tuna fish. Also the reason she picked cod as this recipe is because it's not very fishy which is why it's fish sticks and whites and fillet fish. Yeah well and how cheap it is. Oh i'm gonna find out hold on top five most inexpensive. Okay if this makes the list. You're in trouble. Not it's supposed to be on the cheaper end. well now. you're changing your story. You said you paid really good money for this. No but like compared to howl of it but it wasn't cheap. It wasn't like five bucks. It was like twenty five. It's it didn't do inexpensive. It said expensive inexpensive. I should have just said cheap. Fish budget friendly fish skate apparently is cheap. Catfish we knew that. Which type of fish is the cheapest. This is a bad category to be looking white. Flesh fists is usually inexpensive. Has a mild flavor cooks quickly. That's the most popular kinds of whitefish include cod to lappia attic. Catfish grouper bass and snapper. Come all right okay. This is like the third time in three weeks yet my Well no hold on. Hold on you weren't eating. It and i wasn't going. Ooh i hate fish. I'm telling you that it's an inexpensive fish which is great. You said you said yuck. I said what i was making. You said how you hadn't said yum. So i said i'm excited. I'm making a fish tonight. And i'm still excited. I'm not gonna let you duck it. I know i'm not trying to. I was worried about the smell and there. But now i'm over. It is going to be great speaking of animals. This is jane goodall episode. Oh my god. I'm glad we weren't talking about steak. That would have been really counter or bush meat. What's that that's eating of primates. No people do yeah. Well we're we're meat is really scarce. They will be primates. Primates are supposed to taste terrible yet because isn't isn't the cause so muscley. It's that we're so tendency. I guess we taste early rubber rubber band the guerrillas. Okay what my anthro teacher. John barker told me. It's arm of. She had tried by hope. She hadn't tried any primate. I started to make a joke. But then i stopped. What did you say. Is that what armie hammer told you. Oh that's a topical. Joe topical joke but i very mixed feelings on that whole thing. Minor mixed minor very very clear. Yeah i know. I can assume what yours are. Mine are pretty much what yours are. I think well. I don't know all the details i don't wanna like get. It looks. just take the thing we're talking about. Which is the part. We understand is that he had written Sexual text messages expressing a desire to eat somebody And it was. We were told it was consensual right. That's understanding and i have no problem with anybody's weird sexual fantasy. I have a big problem with someone eating. somebody buck. Yeah you can have as kinky of thoughts as you want. Your partner wants to pretend that you're gonna eat each other. What the fuck does that have to do with any of a i. I agree. I thought it was extreme. What was happening if it was consensual. If it wasn't and he was like harassing people and trying to tell them that he wanted to eat them like mate. That's a different story. But that doesn't seem like that was the case. But i don't know well we can get into a much like that's an easy position for us to take. I think the harder one is. I do believe part of the issue is that it was consensual. And that some of these gales now regret it and say there was a power imbalance and now they don't. They're not happy that they participated in that and that's that's a really tricky subject that i have probably bad opinion on. I don't think we can function as a society. If you can retract consent. I just don't i actually don't think it can function if you can tell someone to their face. Yes i consent and then later say no. I don't consent that's no but it's if you feel like you have to say yes. It's way more complicated. But in this case. I don't think he had power. It wasn't like he was employing these people or he was no but i think people will argue that. Because someone's famous that they have a power imbalance over anyone else. And that's i don't drink. I don't think that would hold up. If that person literally had power like could control their job or their wellbeing in some ways. I don't know if if just saying that. That person's famous gives them power. Doesn't i don't think that really holds any water. They actually have power over you whereas bosses and stuff like that do yeah. I guess i'm just saying if we live in a society where consent can be retracted than if someone gives you consent real time in very genuinely and honestly earnestly you then have to say no. You don't like how do you proceed in life in a paradigm. Where if someone tells you they want to do something and you do with them. You're supposed to what assume their consent isn't you. That also feels weird and controlling and dismissive and will no. I think you just have to be cognizant of the relationships you pursue if you're pursuing one with your employees dull because you never know what is happening there. Oh yeah employer employee. Of course. But i'm talking just to people to people me. They have a relationship. And the guy says i want to be kinky and do sem. Yeah and the person says i do. I'd like to try that. And then they didn't enjoy it. Yeah and then later. They say i retract consent. I was forced. I think these cases are a little more nuance in that. I don't know enough about the hammer until like really say i don't think him. Being famous is gives him power. Personally i in he unless they were like actresses and he was calling them in for meetings and stuff like that while that'd be grody. Ah yeah. But i i. Don't people have kinky bucks. But i don't want him to really anyone no. Nobody should eat anyone. Like women have rape fantasies and they work out rape fantasies with their partners. They don't want to be raped. Yeah that's fine if they want to express that fear and that way. Yeah but they don't wanna be raped. Yeah so you could be working out this thing that yeah you wanna be consumed. What's deeper than it. I think if you wanna get emotional about it is like i think the statement is. I'm so into you. That i would consume me and i would never wanna consume a person but i'm so into you i will ask you. That's the benign version of it right because these texts were explicit. They were dark dark but to make you horny forum doubt it did. Make me like whoa this. That's a lot. Yeah yeah. I guess the only thing i can see with what i could see happening. That's uncomfortable is if i was flirting texting with someone and it was like really fun and playful and we were like days in and we were really into it and then it took a quick turn into something very dark. That would be uncomfortable. Like it would really. It would be hard. Although of course. I'd have to say like oh i'm not into that. Yeah but it but if you wrote back yeah i wanna eat your spleen you know. What on earth is the other person's supposed to assume others. If that happened to you that exact same thing you would just not respond. Probably when it got weird or you might even say. I don't wanna eat anyone. And i don't want to be eating whatever you wouldn't then think i should embarrass this person like i should tell people i would not. I would not unless. I was really feeling threatened in some way or like if something was getting out of control there is not. I wouldn't want to embarrass someone. But i would potentially need to say something to other people if it was getting out of hand if i felt in danger threatened or harassed him can we role play. And i'm going to do this. I'm going gonna go somewhere where i would have to put up a red flag okay. Okay okay hey what are you doing. I'm organizing oh you're in her house your house yet. What are you wearing face slightly. I'm wearing a sweatshirt and thick socks. No pants is what going right. That's so kinky. Where big thick socks and no pants. I'd love to bring over fifteen pounds of cod. Stink up your kitchen and take them socks off once. It's nice instinctive in there. And then i would go. I do not consent to this way. You said it. I was doing was painting one where i would have to. Oh that was. Were you you. When i was wearing the sweatshirt and i was organizing all i didn't. I didn't know that i wouldn't have been organizing or wearing a sweatshirt with no pants on. I was getting. I wanted to send the texts that i would have sent up a flare. You wouldn't like it if someone said they were going to bring a lot of cod over thirteen. Fourteen pounds of cod really stink up the place and then work those socks and then tie the socks around really. What would you say. You wouldn't just say. I'll if it'd be really nice. Yeah you'd you would be cognizant of the person's feelings i'm also i'm also radical. I i would probably go along with anything. Just see what this whole thing's about. I guess that's where things get a little tricky. Because what if like what if i was texting with someone and then they took it to really dark place really playful and i guess you could think for a bit that it was still like you could think for a while it was still playful in until you're like oh shit no it's not but i've already been sort of playing along because i thought it was that now it's not now i have to say no i don't like it but i did play along for a bit. Yeah but like so. what so. All that is is like it's flirting. That didn't pan out like it's like when someone goes up says what's your name at the bar and then you these corny. And you don't like it ends like so it's just like this escalate this. It doesn't click for you and that's that is that like a moral issue. It's just like oh we're not compatible in the fantasy thing you you've got all this fisher trying on load and you wanna cook it at my house and i'm not going to be able to truthfully say i want to live out this fantasy with you. Jane goodall for jiangsu connect. You deserve so much more than that. It was a natural flow as a ding ding. Ding okay. what. We both really loved about jane goodall is. She's kind of taken this not by her choice. She has the role of like of the planet. Yeah and yet. She's so spunky. That was my favorite. I know i loved when she told you you. You are capable of taking care of her stuffed animal chip because you called it as head exactly like you can't take care of it if you don't even know difference between a chimp and a bear. You can't have it. That's that's why she'd be fine with us talking about the texting. Yeah she she probably like it. Maybe she'll leave. Maybe you'll even get a hold of association. Voice her opinion on it. I think i know our opinion. Well no. I definitely don't know her opinion on the sex part but she's definitely not into eating humans or primates or animals at all. Well we also know her opinion on the sexting that was involving bringing fish over. Because she's a vegetarian she would not want you to bring fish over and cook it now under chicanes as much about fish. Well she said the only thing she could put possibly what maybe insects dan. Yeah my ding ding ding. I don't know. I just wanted to say 'cause insects in sex. Oh my god oh my gosh okay. So how times more harmful is methane gas then. Co two. yeah because the bills book yes how to avoid climate disaster okay. I'll read this. This is from unicef you. Tell me if your number in your head is different from bills book. There's like they go around but go ahead okay. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas with one hundred year old global warming potential twenty five times that of co two measured over a twenty year period. Methane is eighty four times more potent as a greenhouse gas than co two about sixty percent of global methane emissions are due to human activities. What is bill. Say i think he says twenty eight. And i had heard thirty two. That was another number that everyone agreed upon. But i think where it gets. Tricky is the only upside methane is that it doesn't stay in atmosphere. Nearly as long as carbon so carbon dioxide has a really long half life whereas methane dozen so even though it's heating it more it'll go way quicker but the thing that was really that we read in the book nitrous oxide which is also a by product that is like two or three hundred times warming co two. We're going to talk to him. Kelly this week right. Yeah got so scared. I'm so scared. Ding ding ding. There's a really funny friends moment. Where ross can't flirt. And he's trying to flirt with a girl who's delivering his pizza and he actually. I wonder if this does it. Hold up and twenty twenty one. Nothing does continue keeps calling shirts. He gets having her calm back so he can keep practice flirting. He can try to get better each time and he starts talking about gas and how different gases smell smell. It's really funny. oh. I love that show. I'm gonna start getting. oh yeah episodes. Are there two hundred police. No that well in all how many seasons was it. It was ten but in season five. They hit one hundred. But then there's fewer episodes in the later seasons. I bet it's not quite one hundred. Well it's well. There's ten seasons in they average twenty twenty episodes of season which they had to have two hundred hundred and thirty six. Yeah was gonna say probably ever like the the normal order was probably twenty four and they might have cut it to twenty or twenty two in the latter seasons they never. There's no way they ever went under twenty eighteen eighteen shortest eighteen season ten. Okay at best season nine is eighteen. I wonder if that was because people are doing movies. Why on earth would that be was a cash. Cow twenty four so ten was the shortest and that was eighteen. I think they were ready to be done. And they just the network wanted it so bad that they were and they're getting paid a million dollars an episode each. That's pretty good money. Yeah it's it's pretty good is okay. That's really all i had for jane. No kidding methane. Yeah because she. She knows her stuff. She knows her. Shit yeah i mean. There was a question of how many roots and shoots but she. She explained why we don't know that 'cause they're just kinda sprouting up all over the place. So i couldn't really check a campus. Yeah very womp us. Very skadden compass extra wa-was in pretty darned scan. Scotty all right well. This was fun. And then i'll be home. In two clicks to clicks away. Put the pedal down get right home. I'm driving a hell cat. Durango some sitting on about seven hundred and ten horse. Pike got sick. I really get up those mountain roads so it snowy it sure is so you can't go that fast right pretty fast. It's got all wheel drive very stable. Really good car okay. I got here and the weather was worse than it will be when i go home. And what are rob and katherine driving. Rob's driving his huge sprinter van that's all decked out call it's very cool and and just throw is driving a subaru outback. Which i know. He's not thrilled about. Oh it's not his pick no he to likes horsepower. Horsepower added he's a cowboy Yes yeah. I'm the steel horsey rights. Remember we interviewed john. Jovi yes never forget. Jj all alright. I love you have fun cooking your fish cam.

jane goodall brooklyn louis leakey jane goodall institute America dan sheppard cambridge rob cordery jethro boven brooke linen Rela chakma thalji diane fossey galdikas kusak Jane new brooklyn
Dr. Jane Goodall

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

54:54 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Jane Goodall

"Walker the PODCAST NUMBER. Ten Sixty two. This is a very special episode. Today is Earth Day that this is going up April twenty second so I am putting up this podcast with Dr Jane Goodall which I recorded yesterday and she. We did video conferencing. She's in the UK right now and it was. It was an incredibly inspiring and meaningful conversation with her. She is such a beautiful soul just turned eighty six a couple of weeks ago and and busier than she's ever been. I think one of the things that so incredible is that when you're talking to her because we could see each other. Obviously it's you can see the empathy that she has for literally all living creatures and you can see it in her eyes and one of the things that she goes back to that we talk about in. The podcast is that she is just lives in the moment. She's incredibly present and you can see the presence and you can feel it and when she's talking to you she's really focused on you and it was. It was really incredible. This will go down as one of my all time. Favorites we Had A little technical glitch at the top because we were trying to for some reason. The software was muted on her end. So you know at the top of the podcast when we're talking about like oh you're you're you're not muted. We can hear you. We can hear each other that that's what that is but she was just so great. She's promoting her new documentary on NAT. Geo which is available now. It's called Jane Goodall the hope and so. Yeah so go go watch that Lydia and I watched the other night. It was spectacular. I mean seriously the things that she has accomplished and you know she just does things. She doesn't when you know when constantly she's taken pads in life if people have said Oh. You can't do that. That's not possible. And she she just does it anyway. She figures it out and she proves them wrong and she does that. Because it's something that's important to her and it's important to the world so I highly recommend you watch the documentary after you after you listened to the podcast and you know we and also she's just so sweet you know we Afterwards we were talking like after we finish the podcast about you. Know I'm I'm GonNa make a donation to the institute. I was inspired to make a donation to our institute after we talked. And by the way if you WANNA learn more about the work. She's doing or the work her institute is doing or the the the program for children roots and shoots that she started. You can go to Jane Goodall Dot Org. So we're talking about pop culture and sort of television and stuff and she said Oh. I don't really don't really have time to go see movies. I if I do watch. Tv It's usually like nature documentary. But if I really want to relax I watch Agatha Christie or Poirot and it just it just seemed so perfect so wonderful and anyway. I sincerely hope that you enjoy this. Podcast as much as I enjoyed having the conversation and that it that it inspires you a in a myriad of ways in the last thing I'll say is that in one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. Yours truly was a contestant on celebrity jeopardy the first question that I buzzed in on and got right. She was the scientist who lived in the forest with the chimpanzees to study them. Who is Jane Goodall? Yes so it all came back around twenty three years later. It's possible I'm reading too much into the connection of that at any rate. I'm very proud to say that this is the ID ten episode number ten sixty two with Dr Jane Goodall Ice Protocol Feverishly Typing. Like maybe it's a preference in a setting or trying to trouble shoot. You got it to work. I'm so glad loves sonny. I've got a thing which was before the aim news so I am not before. That's what I'm used you know. Technology is supposed to make our life simpler. It just complicates things over time. How are you doing? Oh I don't know I don't know I've never been a busy in my entire life NAPA. Which is ironic considering that. You probably aren't leaving your assuming you're not leaving your house a whole lot. Not just walking the dog that he minutes among morning-till-night doing video messaging and Hud causing interviews and skype sends zooms doesn't stop. Do you prefer the nonstop travel or do you actually find that? You're weirdly busier this way. My busy this way you know having to be with it onto questions and think of messages to send out whereas on the lecture tour okay this lectures and there's an interview here this interview but in between you know and the plane journeys if you want to you can just do nothing rights anyway. I'm still alive and I will buy you. I'm good you know. We're we're very fortunate. We you know we have the things we need. We had just gotten a puppy a couple of weeks before the quarantine. So we're very focused on him in. So that's that's been that's been really nice. What's a good what's a good I? I noticed that a lot of your lectures. You do some chimpanzee greetings. What's a good chimpanzee greeting? Who who who and does that specifically mean something? Do you understand that that means this is me Jane? They will have different pantsuit really the distance greeting so when they're in proximity they essentially let each other know. This is me. Don't kill me that. That's from Faraway Fuel. Concept you go. Wow Mr h with me. You know my mental mascot all look at him. Yeah where did he come from ninety five years old now? He's being to sixty five countries. Gosh it is that basically the piece of home that you take with you everywhere. This was given to me by Michael Berry own. Who Lost his eyesight? Twenty-one thought he was giving me a stuff chip I made him who the tail he said taking with your new new. I'm with you in spirit. He goes hupa diving cross country skiing. Skydiving taught himself to paint a while. The most amazing portrait of Mr Age Louisa only above Felton. That's incredible and so Mr h accompanies you to all the countries at everything by simple being dominated the human spirit. Well I just seen how much normally travel that. You're literally three hundred days a year. You're traveling I. I'm watching the documentary and there was a brief moment where you said you know. I believe it was in the UK. Your home there were that okay. This is home but do feel a sense of home anywhere you ever able to. You know it'd be the pre quarantine Arab Able to feel a sense of this is the house I grew up in. It was my grandmother's house. We came here on my sister. I came here and the war when five This where I grew up the books I read this child have with made the trees outside I used to climb and my roots my sister lives in competently with family and I come between was from what the it looks like you. Just have this really sweet attic space with Blake with a bed right next to a window is that is that accurate. I am now. Wow Oh yeah. I can see the book shelves and all the pictures and everything. It's astonishing to me that I think the thing that struck me a lot was your mom's seemed like she was an amazing woman because it seems like she was incredible because it seemed like you know in the nineteen forties. She was encouraging you to do things that were not generally things that women were thought to do. And she seemed like she encouraged you to pursue your passion but also warned you like this is going to be a lot of work it. Can you just sort of talk about having that influence in your life at that time in the context of that because it seems pretty remarkable when it is the thing is I was born loving animals and I had a mother who supported me so when I went and a half and she found a whole lot of worms in my bed she said Jimmy Hope to say wondering? How do they walk without legs at Getting angry she just said I think we put the model they might die and then it didn't get angry when I disappeared for four hours staying on a farm in the country even though actually called the police officer four hours house waiting for him to land egg so no things like that and then when I dreamed to. Africa was eight no ten anytime at two little ten Iran toss NBA. And that's when my dream began will go to Africa. Live with wild animals and write books about them not thinking of being assigned to. Coast to coast women. Want in fact. Nobody was going out living with animals writing books about them in the wild so everybody laughed at me. Don't money was raging Africa's faraway you'll just ago. That mom said if you really want this. Yes you didn't have to work very hard. Take advantage of every opportunity. And if you don't give up maybe you'll find a way so you know. She supported me right through also difficult times. I mean the the idea that it just seems like there was the perfect cocktail for you to be the perfect person to do all of these things. Because it's not it's not only the commitment and the science but also they're such humanity behind at least how it seems that you approach the world and time after time they're all these obstacles that seem like most other people would give up or that you're doing things that are sort of revolutionary in the field and people are going know that you can't do that you can't do that but then something about you just keeps marching forward in a very calm but confident way and so was that was that innate. Did you have to learn that or was that something that your parents instilled in? You know it was just in eight. I mean I'm obstinate. Stubborn dealing even more like a Russian doll not me over spring up again the more that some of these males scientists. They're all men by then really in my field. Not Quite but most of them in the mall that they criticized the more. I thought well. My mother taught me if somebody disagrees number. One listen to them because maybe they bought some points you though talk but if you still think that your right of Brighton them then you must have. The courage appeal conviction to me. That that idea though of listening to people even when you don't agree with them is seem so antifa nickel to what our culture is right now. Which is you know we. We live in a everyone lives in their own little confirmation bias bubble in anyone who doesn't agree with that is the enemy and I was just so moved. I guess just like this you know and I my hope. Is that part of what people take away from you and your message in your work and your documentary is exactly what you just said which is like even if you don't agree with someone listen to them because how else can we find common ground. Or how else can we determine which direction we're GONNA go in or even hope to do good if we're slashing and also you know I've discovered the snow point hammering in here rhyme cutting the heart and the only way I've found to get the hardest one to take a little moment to have a feeling for who you're talking to you know. Is there a link to they have a child at dog or something? And then try and get to the heart with stories. So I'm I don't think I've ever been. You're a bad person. You know you change your ways if Bob Blind I. I was born that way. I couldn't do that. I'm not made to do that. But even befriending people that you know and getting companies that that the traditional activists are go. You can't work with that company. You shouldn't talk to that person. I love the idea that you say. Well can't but can't we get them to see like fighting with them isn't going to help. Can't we just be human with them and show them get them to change? Get THEM TO CHANGE. Course get them to invest in the environment get them to invest in animals and that feels like such a radically different approach. Me Work you know and you can't get a lot of animal rights people stop talking to me when. I sat down with the with the people in the medical research. How can you sit? Is it if you don't talk to people? How can you possibly expect their inge right snow good pointing a finger saying stop wrong because they came to find ways of telling you you're wrong but that ultimately go in through and showing films and educating like you were able to gain access to the educate people to effectively? Do you wanted them to do which was to stop. You know the certain kinds of of research I mean it. Do you ever feel a sense of? I was right or do you. How do you sort of keep pride and ego out of the equation when you're trying to accomplish things because that can be such a dangerous thing with people? It's easy the so much less to do. I mean you know. What am I accomplished out of what I would like to accomplish out here is probably that you really think that? Yes me Research labs. We still got people burning fossil fuel. We still got forest disappearing. We still got climate crisis. We still got people not realizing that it's our what we're doing to animals in the environment that led to this pandemic as was predicted by science years and years ago. And you know so the so much to educate. That's why my roots in to the program for us to me is probably the most important thing because mega carry on. When I'm gone will yes and also the idea that it can be difficult to change in adults mind but it's not difficult it well some yes. I mean sudden people a person. Your country wouldn't even try to change his mind. What might I do see of mine? Nervous people if you if you broach some right. I tell you I was in a cab driver. I knew I was in Iran to that. May All the way to Heathrow. You'll like my assist. She does stuff with animals. Zoli stopping people blog our Madonna. So I told him. Stories told him about the gyms that told him how we're helping people in. Africa didn't make any difference when we go Heathrow. He didn't have changed and he me ten pounds so I said if it till Sista. I didn't think he got back after two weeks. That the promise that one. Thank you so much for your donation to what did you do to my brother. I mean normally. I wouldn't have noted always was trying and he's seen three times to help me volunteer the rescue center. My Gosh and that's just from talking listening to people. Yes telling him. Stories so was any of this cultivated with. I mean wh when you're living among chimpanzees you obviously must have had to be very empathetic and very acutely aware of them. Did any of that teach you how to deal with people better? Well I think. Probably my mother tool in the first place but you know the weird thing is when I finally got to Cambridge until it was held. I've done everything wrong. Empathy wasn't supposed to be part of science. You've got cold and objective and according to me. That's what's wrong with science and I think his name. Because if you have empathy than you intuitively think well. I believe he or she is doing that. Because then you can use science to find out if you're right but without the embassy might never get a moment and where do you think that comes from? Why has that been? Is it because they feel that emotion gets in the way clouds thing you know in the we're talking about the mid sixties when I went to Cambridge to do a PhD? Never having been to college by the way I think the animal behavior it was a news new branch of science and they wanted to make into hard science which it can't and shouldn't be of. It's changed now definitely changed. How did you know when you first got to Gumby? How did you know oh I can interact with these chimps? And they're not gonNA tear my head on like. How did you get that confidence or understand? What was what was the first moment when you first interact with them where you knew. Oh I think I'm going to be okay. I think I think I can do this. I never never thought that I couldn't do it. I was afraid they wouldn't be time. We only had six months start with the chimps runaway runaway runaway runaway. And you know then. Fortunately one chimpanzee. David Greybeard began to lose his fear. And he's the one I so fishing for termites using making tools and that brought in the National Geographic. They said okay. We'll county on funding. The research amazed sent you. Go back to Phil. That's what took story of the chimps runs the world. Scientists had to believe what I was saying. Finally when they saw the film as well as reading my descriptions they had to believe it right and when you came back and started did you come back and start lecturing immediately. Did you have to potty was symbol? All of this data at the time just Cambridge all I had to do was right lane thesis. I had a fabulous of supervisor robitussin. He was one of the talk to truly animal behavior people of the time and he actually came to. Gumby many really realize what's right and he helped me to put all my crazy new ideas in such carefully thought scientific way that. I couldn't be criticized by the scientists and I love that I love thinking do something logically thinking through. Yeah but if that means that then what does this mean in how the two link together something that absolutely fascinates me right but it seems like you're superpower communication like of all the amazing things you've done communicating seems to be like your real superpower because even this idea documentary? Where you you know the idea of what has to be about the head and the heart. That's not an easy balance for most people. Some people are either one or the other but somehow not only do you have is balanced. But then you're able to communicate that to scores of different types of humans and non humans at the same time so where when you're approaching a different person each time what do you see what do you think are you thinking. How do I unpack and communicate to them? Do you have one approach for everyone? Is it specific to each person? Specific comes from the moment it comes. I think this you know talking to you. I get the sense of who you are as we talk. I never Well prepared roughly. What you're going to say in the points you want to make but it various like I don't know a gift I was born with it. I was born Republican my Welsh ancestry. And how do you maintain a sense of calm and patience when especially the work? You're doing not only so important to you but to the world and you know that a lot of people are just stubborn. And for whatever reason just aren't gonNA listen and you come up against people. I'm sure who just have a wall up. How do you maintain your patience in? How do you maintain your calmness in those moments? I don't know I mean I conned on so there's deep philosophical questions about myself because it's just who I am in. Fortunately that's who I am. I mean honestly it's on. May sound stupid but I feel I'm on a mission and I'm here for a reason and so I suppose that helps am very good at living in the moment so when I'm talking to you now I'm talking to you. I'm not doing anything else right. You know and also if you really have done your best and I think this came from if you really really tried and Daniel Best Still doesn't work. You can't go on heating yourself right but I feel like that's not a very common. That's not a very common trait anymore. You know there's so much stimuli in the world that it feels like were just overloaded all the time. I don't even know if we're able to process everything I don't. I refused to have a cellphone. I don't have one really not even just a backup for safety. Oh I'm going off on a thing I better just have just encamped case Little Clam. Shell and I use it on. Nobody knows the number. I don't remember a repeat of the number. My sister and the two people who organized tour run. I Like I'm here at this airport. Are where are you when my sister's meeting that but that's all I use it and what's interesting about that? Is that when you're talking about being in the moment of removing yourself from all of that other extraneous technology stuff? I I would imagine allows you to be in the present as much as possible. Try I mean. Of course I have email to do right now video messaging but that's very different from continually like people just hooked onto their you know ascending little texts. Tweet sorte long. Do you think you would be addicted to it if you if you started getting into it at all not my thing one of the things that the other thing that struck me was just sort of a. I guess just an acceptance of life issue. Which is that each time. You came up against something that you wanted to solve. You realized Oh in order to solve in order to solve the problem the chimps we have to talk about the culture and the environment and the earth and it just feels like it gets bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger. So how do you not get overwhelmed? I mean actually. It's grown so much one obvious thing leading to another is. That was all carefully planned out. You know I flew over Gumby. Nineteen ninety nine to what had been part of a great forest belt across Africa. A tiny island trees and hills obvious. If we don't help the people we contact gyms that traveling the world learning about all the terrible things. We're doing to the planet in spite of this brilliant intellect. We have not surprising. Young people were losing hope and that led to the roots and shoots program which is helping young people understand if you actually take action. Now do your thing you know that. Thousands of other young people are doing that they they knew. Stop being able to think globally so when people say think globally Ackley Sarong way round. You think globally or depressed on help never thought of it that way and I also the idea that when people feel hopeless most people. Just sit in that whereas you have this idea of like okay. I don't see hope so I'm going to create it. I have to create the home or seek it out. I guess it's my signature now. Hope giving hope Said to me when I first began talking to them out these for high school students. You've compromised our future. Meaning adults is generations unless nothing we can do. We have compromised stone. We still stealing it except right now. It stopped the as clean and you can see the stalls eaten in the cities but they didn't agree with them when they said there was nothing that could be down. So that's when route suits began. An you know its main message. Each one of us make some impact every single day. Just in the little choices we might run. That's that gets people I mean. So many people come up to me. Octa lectures I had given poke. I promise you I'll do. My bit will gear but I think most people believe that they alone or insignificant which is why people go. I'm not gonNA vote. My vote doesn't count or I'm not GonNa do this. I'm just one personal. I don't matter how do we sort of infused and the idea of people. Yes you do matter because it's involved matters the it's the opposite. I say no if it was just you wouldn't make a bit of difference but it's not just skew if everybody said. I'M ONE POST. I don't make a difference. I'll do nothing. Nothing would get done. But if you know that you'll not the only person that's why the roots and shoots communities like a family growing around the world hundreds of thousands of young people from kindergarten university and everything in between and it sticks with them you know and they realize that not with a family so people in China Kebab and Save Kusei care about the environment. I was in route suits in primary school notes. Fifty six of its in eighty six. Get rummell the time. It's in sixty five countries active right now so because you are involved with a lot of things obviously you have to. It's so interesting that you started as this kind of singular the singular movements. I mean I know you were part of a group and you work with Dr Leaky. But you know you're out working with chimps and then it just gets bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and now you're a really kind of a movement and you oversee you. You have to like delegate. How are you comfortable delegating? You know or if it were you. Would you be really deeply involved with everything in every level at every detail noah anything I really insist on being involved with I will not have people write something because I'm so of so many Right about this blurbs for Winston if it's got my name on it okay you can draw something but I'm not it's going to be made that writes it Rights got so I have to be deeply involved in that amend the rest is an overview I mean I have such amazing teams credible team in the US. Fantastic in Tanzania the ones looking after the chimps in South Africa Chimp Eden ones a shampoo in Ghana Congo. Just amazing people who somehow appear the right time in the right place. Were you comfortable talking in front of people you comfortable being a speaker or early terrified. I for the first time I had to speak. I literally felt I couldn't breathe very shy child. I never spoke at school really an you. We very self conscious or did you just sort of feel like what what what what were you feeling in those moments where you just felt like you couldn't really be a part of what was going on. Yeah what was five thousand people in Dar Constitution Hall. I thought what I can't do this. I was too shy but it was. I mean that it was actually when I was in front of the People. They pulled something from me. And that's how I always been but I guess I guess that has a lot to do with having a purpose remission because if you have a purpose of remission that's larger than you and it's not just for yourself would you say it's fair to say that you always at least have that to fall back on. Yeah I think so. I mean you know when I first went to college to university back in the mid sixty s. I wrote a popular book I geographic had said that was one of the parts of the deal and the book came out. I was very nearly sent away because scientists did not write popular books a while. Everyone had in. This book is true as I know how it could be. But what's the point of just something in keeping it's stuck in an ivory tower? I want people to know I want people to understand. I want people to realize onnell's on just things. They have cuss melodies minds and emotions sentient and I was told. That dog is my dog behind me. Him companion that rusty. Yes that's Rusty. You had to have the strength of conviction though to know that you that even in the face of people saying no this is this is this is rubbish. We don't have to listen to this. People don't work that way. You still have the confidence to to push ahead but in those moments did you experience self doubt or was that just never part of the equation at all. Oh of course it was then I would think it all through like when I took money from an oil company and signed the okay. Let me think this thing through. That was CONACO before it joined out with Dupont and Phillips and so on and they were the most ethical oil company. I I've ever met until I said to myself. I'm flying in planes driving. 'cause USING ELECTRIC. I'm using the products of these companies. So how can you put critical if you come site? I love to take your money. Let's work together to do things veteran veteran Betta and you know I wouldn't take money from oil companies. Some of them the terrible. But know you got so thinking things through logically. That was what science to what may to do but they did build this incredible reserve you. You influence conaco to build this incredible reserve to save all these chimpanzees who were in abysmal conditions and Conaco really was I mean they would they would have. People woke on the ground to do a seismic line. They will drop food from helicopters. They didn't have great trucks destroying the forest. If anybody to Bush meat the whole crew would be denied a bonus that week I mean they. They really really did things right. And of course they were so right that they they didn't make it commercially. That but actually they didn't find oil insufficient quantities. If they had we walked out the director of exploration we'd worked out exactly how this would be used to get the oil and that would protect all is huge area around it. We have have that map still somewhere in Gumby. Did you have a place like like a special place that you would go to reflect a reflection point can you? Can you just kind of describe your favorite place? There for me will lead to one the peak that I found early on sevenoaks to valleys and with my binoculars I was after hours. I slept out. Sometimes you know it's a it's a very special place. We have the water fools Kesse Kayla. Waterfall which drops eighty feet. And that's where the chimpanzees sometimes do that. They're amazing. Waterfall displays the hair out. Stamping in the war-torn swinging into the spray. On the buy than sometimes you see that is the end may sit me. See THIS COMING DOWN. And then they see it flowing away. What is it so it's coming to which going but it's always here? I think that could if they could speak. They could share what they were feeling. That could lead to early animistic religion. You know the water of the Sun Stars and things that the early humans didn't understand. And what does it mean? I read that you said that you were in the chimpanzee hierarchy you had a lower position within their hierarchy wrote. I you you what you're part of it. I know I tried to be like looking in from outside okay. The wasn't time you see it. In the movie we had been on a feeding station. I could interact with the gyms. We stopped ages because we can give them diseases. They can give us but you know the beginning. It was common the one or two people doing studies mostly feeding stations. And I didn't ever want to be part of the hierarchy wanted to stand away and observe and it became irritating after bet when they got to near wanted to see the normal behavior. They wanted to study you a step further down. Knock me OV- Oh yeah. I read about him he was I. I was reading that. You know when you first got there you experienced all this really amazing behavior that you had an expected and then slowly over time you started to see a more aggressive side of the Timpson net. One in particular photos sounded like he was. Maybe not the nicest chimpanzee horrible like horrible people had a self side to. He loved babies. He was so gentle with them. So what is it? They learning when you're when you're observing all the sudden you know aggressive behavior warlike behavior. What does that tell you about? Does that inform anything about people as well? Are you seeing like the the basis for human behavior is giving you a better understanding of us? Yeah that's why leaky sent me. He believed it was a common ancestor about six million years ago. Chimp like human like and so he felt will if Jane Cities Behavior today similar or the same in chimps and humans. Possibly that's been wrought with two species from that common apelike human like ancestor. That he thought would give him a better feeling how early humans might behave because he's been his life searching colorful sliced remains. Behavior fossilized so you know. Finding they have a dockside like Gos- make made me feel. It's time when this was kind of political thing with the Ritz nature or nurture. We born with a clean slate and learn aggression or is some innate aggression in us and I came out on the side of Innate Aggression. Honestly doc around the world today is very hard to say we're not at we have some innately aggressive tendencies but just as we are capable of violence like that like the gyms so to love compassion altruism and our greatest capacity because about intellect and our language for trying to understand should an immense most cases. I think it does control away. We behave we control our aggressive impulses. Mostly we made museum in once but could kill him. You don't actually kill him. Did you ever feel that your feel that you were in imminent danger at mean if an aggressive chimp is coming at you? They're essentially you know they can cause a lot of harm. Did you ever feel unsafe for? Did you understand wolf? I keep a certain distance. How did you? How did you feel safe in such a different environment? When Frodo is optime he would come from forty forty meters away to grab may drag me in stem on me and you can't keep a distance if a gym wants to get close. You CAN'T DO IT IN A. He's probably ten times from the mate but the thing is he actually was just showing off. If he wanted to kill me I would be now right right right right operated strength so it's basically just like a person beating their chest and barking right right right just to show like Oh. I'm a tough person. They do the same exact stuff you see two male chimps you know. Having a dominance conflicts showing off to each other standing upright swaggering or making a furious skull. Doesn't that remind you of Sutton politicians? It reminds me of a lot to politicians politicians but just people I feel like social media has allowed us to draw out. Most of those kind of you know basic early hominids. You know types of behavior patterns screaming and chess beating and puffing up and performing you know and it's mostly with chimps may try to avoid physical contact. Who's it could be dangerous for them right. So they night to buy bluffing did they will fight it comes to it. Why do you think people? Don't see the connection. What do you think it is that makes some people think that humans are so much better? I think maybe they've never shed light with an animal. I think they just you know. And that's one of the things that route suits is about is is helping people understand children understand and you know the videos out there now on youtube that absolutely priceless. You can't what some of them are not realized that animals are sentient beings. Say so can you talk a little bit about how to if someone wants to help? If someone wants to be a better citizen of the world can you talk about how to cultivate empathy or how to how to Extr how to instill at into other people you know some ideas of listening and talking and getting involved for people who might be especially for people who grew up on devices and not necessarily interacting in person at even though we can't at the moment. Can you talk a little bit about cultivating patients empathy? All those really beautiful things that allow us to connect in a in a real deep way. Well I never tried to teach people at I. Just tell stories about it and hope that they'll want to go and sit watch nature because I'm anti staggered by how much people miss and how sad that is. You know I can be walking through an airport in this too. Little Sparrows on something amazing is going on and everybody just walks by nobody notices and they missed so much so with with our roots and shoots we many try and get young children if we can't take them into nature we try and bring nature to them right and it. It makes a huge difference then. No animals can calm down nervous. People they can they can help with post traumatic stress disorder. They can help out to stick. Children learn to read it. They contact with an is absolutely amazing. As we're wrapping this up we have a few minutes left with you. I just want to say happy. Belated Birthday thank. You did you do. I mean imagine you were in quarantine for your birthday able to do anything. No we didn't do anything and You know six of us in the house but we try and keep segregated to some extent. Sure this tonight. She sheds my belt day. We had supper in one room and her daughter and Pinochet Supper in another room. And the Judy's two grandsons grown up now more or less. They had supper separately to so we had you know. I said we should really have zoom connection. How do you and your sister the exact same birthday that those are astronomical odds? You're not twins now not twins note but not even the light. Not a bit really. Yeah so just is part of I don't know a birthday reflection. I guess what are you hoping to achieve still? Obviously there's a never ending list of things to do. But what are your top priorities right now. Running the Youth Program of the Youth Movement. I should say more and more roots and shoots. We just started in the Middle East. We sort of everywhere. Now got a long way to go in Latin America but you know once he gets going and you get the right people it takes off like it's sweeping across India right now. Oh fantastic. How's the roots and shoots program doing in America Gun pretty well? We went to a bad time when the Jane Goodall Institute wanted to make money out today but that little phase went away and people changed the people in New People. Now it's back to how it's supposed to be grassroots movement. Young people choosing what they want to do because then they act with passion and the when the when the gathering from different parts of the city of wherever I found at the end of a meeting when they been exchanging ideas they were saying together. We can until I said yes we can but will we The different some. Now they all end up staying together we can together we will. I was at a big talk at twelve minutes slot to talk to the the second biggest music festival in Europe and I got sixteen thousand people oil standing up saying together we can together. We will save will tastic. What can they? What can people do if? There's not a roots intrigued program in their community. Dot One the start one. I mean we like you to register. It doesn't cost anything but we like to share. We bought lots of ideas and suggestions we like to share. What the different groups doing but anybody who start a route since huge group dislike not stocking in prisons in some countries and we've had roots and shoots in retirement homes works really well in China. Owed people say we thought we'd finished but now we know we don't have that John's right. I've been following your work for a long time and I guess I just find it refreshing that someone is able to bridge these worlds find commonality between not just us in the animal kingdom but also which up. We're a part of but also just people I again. It feels like you're superpower is finding commonality and communicating and I I really do think that will be a tremendous part of your legacy and hopefully one that people take away not just A. We have to conserve the environment but also learning how to educate not just that we have to educate learning how to communicate educates. Yeah because only if you do it right. Sit really sinking in. Some people can teach a subject via the open. It's so boring the way they do it but the people that trying to teach don't really learn anything that it's really about. The stories in the connection to the stories connections isn't people. Some people are so determined to get to the top Not something they want to do whether it's math so physics or whatever the have to learn in a boring way but these days you can. You can learn an awful lot in a non boring way on the Internet deceptive. Be careful that you you looking at something. That's factual not it's so hard to know. Sometimes it's just so hard to know what's real or not As we're as we're wrapping this out. Can you just describe one specific thing that brings you joy in a time when everyone is home and scared and the world seems like such a terrifying place? What's a good? What brings you joy what what keeps hope alive for you. Well think thinking about the young people doing thinking how nature can take over right now with this unlocked down around the world you know. It's going to be cleanest air on earth vape appropriately fifty years since it began. Nature has amazing ability to to come back. We give it a johns and you know. I'm looking out the window. Now in the setting some is coming through the leaves of the Copper Beech. And it's just so beautiful and the BLACKBIRD. I heard him singing. Just now you can see this even in the middle of a city and we're working to get more and more oven farming urban gardening greeting sixties Green Walls. Green stuff growing on the roof. This the I think the biggest hope is that people are changing as a swell of people who understand that. Our intensive factory farms a harming the environment and releasing methane and at Inter adding the climate change and also providing opportunity for viruses to jump from these poor animals to several times sub understanding. And that's the big hope and this crisis we're going through now. You know either again to emerge Stephanie. People will the people the first time go clean? Now come see the stars above if enough people don't want to go back to the old pollution. Maybe it'll be sufficient groundswell to change assim politics. I don't know that that's so there's an opportunity for a little bit of a reset. Yeah it's a perfect opportunity and at least we might might learn how to be respectful of animals nature. If nothing else will I think? Part of that is not just seeing ourselves as separate or not seeing ourselves as humans are up here. Everything else is down here but seeing us as a as a functioning community member of nature positive it and we I on the natural world of food for clothing for clean now regulating the temperature and the rainfall. We're confident we can't live without it so if we go on destroying it we destroy ourselves ultimately in. That's all these young people who voted not in spite of that though I do that. You Understand and appreciate everything that you've accomplished that you feel a sense of of of great satisfaction. I'm I'm very happy about the root shoot program. I'm very happy that more and more people understand the true nature animals but all the different things. I've done that come to light in. This film fills me with amazement. I don't know how it happened. It didn't want it. I didn't work for it. I didn't want to gain this. What do I call it? Notoriety is perhaps not too good blood. People stay oh you're an icon. I didn't want to be an icon but when I discovered that's what people wanted the Oregon amongst us it Razzie meet people are used to in an airport Can I do a selfie while you give them a little break? Shown to get your children involved in roots and shoot that sort of thing. That's fantastic. I can't thank you enough for just being so wonderful to talk to and giving me an hour of your time and also for just making everything human like just providing humanity maybe humanity is not is not even because that seems to exclude the Animal Kingdom as well but just putting a very empathetic point of view onto things and you really infuse that into everything that you do and I just honestly can't thank you enough for for being for your time. I think the main important would is respect respect. Each other should respect animals. We should respect nature. I hope you stay safe and healthy and thank you so much. You too have a wonderful evening. Okay us will gaining complete enjoy overeat.

scientist Dr Jane Goodall Africa UK Africa Iran Jane Goodall Dot Org Jimmy Hope Agatha Christie Walker Lydia Cambridge sonny skype NAPA Animal Kingdom Skydiving johns
Jane Goodall: Never Giving Up

BrainStuff

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Jane Goodall: Never Giving Up

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren vocal bomb here. Some people just don't quit. It's okay to quit occasionally, it's best to, but let Dr Jane Goodall be an example, to us, all sometimes you have a far fetched dream and instead of dismissing it, you do it anyway. And when you've cheered what you set up to do, just when you're at the top of your game, your dream might change based on what you've learned along the way your knee dream is bigger and more difficult to realize, but you do it anyway. Repeat into old age never slowing down. And you might even get nominated for a Nobel peace prize. The key to Dr Goodell's persistence, seems to have a lot to do with knowing what she liked from a very young age. And then just insisting on doing it. Her father gave her a stuffed chimpanzee when she was a baby. And she took it with her everywhere, even though it was by all accounts terrifying. She grew up loving to observe and catalog animals, and dreamed of one day living with African, animals and writing books about them for a living. Her mother, who was a novelist herself told. All that, that seemed like a perfectly reasonable idea, even though it was the nineteen forties and not at all. But middle class English girls were expected to do after she finished school. Goodall couldn't afford to go to college. So she worked odd jobs in London for a few years until a friend, invited her to visit her family's farm in Kenya at which point Goodall, immediately quit her job, and waited tables, until she made enough money to pay for the price of boat fair to Africa. While in Kenya. Her friends, justed, she contact the paleontologist, Louis Leakey curator of the corn did museum in Nairobi to discuss. Primates Aliki was interested in studying primate behavior in order to better understand early human species leaky hired Goodall as his field assistant on a paleontological dig and later asked her to return to England to research primates and raise money for a long-term observational study on wild chimpanzees, the gun base stream, national park in Tanzania into live nineteen sixty twenty six year old Jane Goodall began setting up her field station at Gumby, which would become the site of the longest running. Wildlife research project in history. British authorities initially balked at the idea of a young woman doing this kind of work on chaperoned. So Goodell's mother van accompanied her for the first few months Goodall observed, the chip head See's daily for two years before she earned their trust. Her method was just to watch the animals, and imitate their actions, recording everything that happened in a field journal. Two of Goodell's most important discoveries during this period, had to do with what chimps eight and how they went about getting food Goodall was the first to observe chimpanzees killing and eating the meat of small mammals prior to this. They were thought to be vegetarian and perhaps her biggest contribution to our understanding of primates was the revelation that chimps used collected and modified grass stems and sticks as tools to fish, termites out of their nests Goodell's discoveries were so significant Leakey said, now, we must redefine tool redefine, man, and he arranged for her to write a dissertation at Cambridge University on the behaviors of wild chimpanzees. It was accepted and she became one of only eight people ever to graduate from Cambridge with her PHD without first earning her undergraduate degree in nineteen sixty four Goodall married. Hugh on, Loic a Dutch wildlife photographer who leaky sent to record her activity in the field. They had a son in nineteen sixty seven who spent his early life with his parents at Gumby after Goodell in Loic divorced in nineteen seventy four. Good. All Mary, Derrick Bryson in nineteen seventy five who was the director of Tanzania's national parks during this time Goodell published books about her experiences in research at gone BEI, including in the shadow of man, which was criticized by scientists because of good old habit of naming subjects of her research. She called her most famous study subject, David greybeard, but the book was Beilby popular and has since been translated into forty eight languages as she lived and worked in Gumby. She began to notice changes to the chimpanzees habitat deforestation and mining practices forced the animals out of their homes and into spoiler in smaller areas. More than one million wild chimpanzees lift in Africa hundred years ago. But today, only a fifth of that population exists Goodall saw the writing on the wall. Which is why in the nineteen eighties Goodall changed her focus from observing chimps to working to protect their habitat. She founded the Jane Goodall institute in nineteen seventy seven which works to keep human communities and wild Chipenzi populations in Africa, healthy and coexisting peacefully roots and shoots is a program to power young people worldwide to make a difference in their local communities now at the age of eighty five Goodell spends about three hundred days a year, traveling and speaking about Africa. Chimpanzees, the environment and her other passions. Although Goodall sees the hideous parts of what humans are doing to our planet. She continues to be hopeful about our future. She wrote in a New York Times op Ed in two thousand seventeen quote, the lust for greed and power has destroyed the beauty. We inherited but altruism compassion, and love have not been destroyed. All that is beautiful in humanity has not been destroyed. The beauty of our planet is not dead, but lying dormant like the seeds of a dead tree. We shall have another chance. In two thousand nineteen Goodall was nominated for the Nobel peace prize. She was also included on the two thousand nineteen time one hundred list of the one hundred most influential people in the world. We spoke by Email with the author of the petition to nominate Goodall for the prize, one Myron shackle, a research, associate at western Washington University's department of anthropology. They said, I believe there's no better choice to receive the next Nobel peace. Prize civilization is today facing perhaps its greatest challenge ever, the twin puck elliptic threats of global climate change and biodiversity loss. Both are caused by humans and both are linked in that boasts stem from human misuse of the environment. No one has ever done more or better work than Jane Goodall to bring peace between humans, and their environment and thereby create the conditions under which humans can be at peace with each other Jane Goodall is the global face for global peace. Today's episode was written by Justin shields, and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio. How stuff works for more on this in lots of other topics that aren't monkeying around get it because chimps are apes not monkeys. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and from our podcast, my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the new Capital One saver card. Earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out, you can cash in what's in your wallet.

Dr Jane Goodall Dr Goodell Jane Goodall institute Africa Louis Leakey Gumby Tanzania Kenya Capital One New York Times Nairobi Justin shields Cambridge University apple Hugh Aliki David greybeard Cambridge London
Every Day We Live, We Make an Impact: A Conversation with Dr. Jane Goodall

Blazing Trails

27:32 min | 5 months ago

Every Day We Live, We Make an Impact: A Conversation with Dr. Jane Goodall

"Woo-hoo. ooh Me Jane another chimpanzee would recognize it was me. In that Jane is none other than Dr Jane Goodall the celebrated primatology, lifelong conservationist sharing with us the district greeting call the chimpanzees she's been studying for the past sixty years. Welcome to another episode of blazing trails. I'm your host Michael Revolt themselves studios. Jane Goodall has dedicated her life to protecting chimpanzees and fighting tirelessly for a better world but today like millions of people around the planet. Dr Goodall is also in self-isolation in her childhood home in England in April she joined salesforce Jodie Connor to talk about the powerful ways. This pandemic is reminding us how we're all interconnected. But before we jump over to Jodi acquired about work, dot, com work, DOT COM, and all new suite of APPS and resources that leaders around the world can use to reopen reskill employees and respond efficiently to the covid nineteen pandemic reopening will be journey but worked dot. COM is your guide to learn more go to work DOT COM. And now, salesforce is jody Kohner and Dr Jane Goodall. She is a world primatology renowned. Hello she is a renowned a primatology just anthropologists conservationist author activist trailblazer, personal hero of mine treasure to the planet She has been doing sixty years of groundbreaking work studying chimpanzees and Tanzania and really redefining species conservation She is a U. N. messenger of peace and she now dedicates all of her time to the Jane Goodall Institute which she launched in Nineteen seventy seven. So Jane Welcome. Welcome to our little show here not as like to thank you for inviting me and mock any off and I have collaborated on planting trees, which of course is slightly. Right now but. I want to greet all of you listening from around the world and hope that you're keeping safe and welll and all your loved ones as well. Is this an awful lot of suffering people who've lost their jobs and people who have loved ones who are Dying on dead, but you know the rest of US battle on, we don't know how long for but we will get together. We will survive this as we have survived a things in the past. So this is just to welcome you and say how happy I am to be here with you. Thank you and triggering off of that and what we have survived in. The, past you know this is certainly not the first cross species contamination that you have lived through when you were in combat, Tanzania the family of monkeys where stricken with polio, SARS and HIV were also other species viruses and wondering if you can speak for a little bit about what these occurrences have taught you and what we really need to learn from these incidents well. I hope that this time we will really take up the lesson that this. Kobe. Powers I mean it's the first time. The whole world is being shut down but you said lived through their experience I lived through World War Two you know that was grim. We were fighting a known seen enemy. Now way fighting an an unseen minute anime in this virus I was also in New York that time of the destruction of the twin towers that seemed like the ending of the world for a while it did change the world and I've been in other. African. Countries when those killing and rioting on things like that. But? Yes. The thing that people really need to understand is that we have brought this pandemic on ourselves. It's being predicted for years and years and years by people studying these. So called zoonotic diseases, that's animals that's diseases that jump from animals to people and very often it's things like the wet markets that's where they sell live and dead animals for meat. In Asia, it's the BUSHMEAT markets in Africa it's our intensive farming of domestic animals in all these situations animals are crowded together with people often an on hygiene comes sanitary a crowded and extremely cruel conditions, and that gives the opportunity for a virus to cross the so-called species barrier. And it attaches itself to another virus in all bodies and we get these pandemics. So yes, you mentioned size was Mazda came from domestic bactrian camels HIV, one HIV to came into places from eating chimpanzees, and so we you know we moving deeper and deeper into the animal's habitat, destroying the forests br bringing animals in close contact with each other so that viruses jumped from one animal to another that animal may be better able to posits viruses onto us, and then of course, animals are being pushed out in two human communities because they're getting less and less of their own habitat. So the crop rating example. And this time, let's hope and pray that we learn from this pandemic which has hit every one so hard commercially with loss of life loss of jobs, loss of livelihoods and try not to let this happen again, and the last thing I'd say on the hat is the being with the chimpanzees which on monkeys by the way that apes taught me so much about how like us they are, and at the beginning I was told by the scientists. Nineteen, sixty mid sixties but difference in kind between us another animals and only we had personalities, minds and emotions, and of course, being taught by my dog, my Dobrusky I grew up with him. He taught me we not the only beings of personalities, minds and emotions. But now the doors opened and way realizing it's not just primates so like us but elephants, dolphins, buds, pigs are as intelligent as dogs more intelligent than some they can actually enjoy painting and. You can google pig castle and at Castle Oh that's raising. Let's genius and. Some crows can do Oeste them eight-year-old humans and so. These animals that are passing these viruses Aung unknowingly the ones sold in the markets that one's crammed into our intensive farms. They too are individuals with personalities, minds, and emotions. They feel fear distress and certainly pain. So we have to consider that as well as the effect on us. It's what we're doing to animals and to the natural world. So what do you? Think the role of businesses are right now I mean never to your point, the whole world is impacted by this and we're all having to really reconsider what our relationship is with the planet. What would you call to action be? What do you want businesses thinking about? Well, I think many businesses have already begun to think about the impact on the natural world and Take steps to do things differently and salesforce is one of those businesses and I can think of many more even some of the oil and gas businesses are beginning to put more money into green energy sustainable energy. So hopefully, this is a wakeup call that we need to do things differently because we have to realize that our human populations are growing and this determination. And the economic development at expensive the natural world is going to destroy us because already in some places, the natural resources being used up foster, the nature can replenish them the seven point, two, billion people, Dow, twenty, fifty, they say nine point seven and what we'll do. So we've got to thinking a different way of how we interact with the planet with each other. I know you have been hedging down on Africa and I'm also curious to kind of learn about and I've been seeing that Kobe nineteen is on the rise down. There I'm curious if we're learning more about how this might be impacting the chimpanzees, do you have any insights into what's happening there will be a many of the primates are potentially susceptible to the covid nineteen virus and we have to sanctuaries for orphaned chimps whose rather Being killed for Bushmeat Aman, of course, the Gombe Chimpanzees and is also studying chimps in Uganda and Barundi, and Marley, and DRC, and so we're having to take as many precautions as we can anybody goes into the field has to wear masks and have hygienic close of just being washed. No visitors allowed. So the sanctuaries suffering because they dependent on tourism to keep going some of them, and so you know we have huge extra. Demands for sums of money that would budgeted for, but we have to do it. You know and also, Africa. So in the US as you know health benefits, the some kind of care the money is being given to some NGOs, some businesses to tide them over under alone in Africa. So many people just live day today little stallholders beside the roads What are they going to do? They have absolutely no safety net and so Some leaders saying where we can't do shut down because people will die of starvation. So it's very worrying to think that the surgeon Africa is just beginning is just beginning right? Well, listen you. You recently had a wonderful quote in the Washington Post talking about your hope and that you have hope that you did live through World War Two and by the time you get to eighty six. You realize that we can overcome these things. So. There's a lot of doom and gloom out there. Jane, and I'm wondering about your message of hope and how you hope humanity is going to change after this. You know one hopeful thing is everywhere. There are communities coming together and individuals to help. It's a spirit of community. Getting together but is really wonderful to see an also I'm hoping there are so many millions of people living in some of the big cities who never know what it is to breathe clean air except perhaps fortnight's holiday somewhere. To look up and see the starry sky in the middle of the city, and this is happening all over the world. If there's enough millions and millions of people than ultimately those millions of people who do not want to go back to the old days of pollution will be able to push business and government to make the necessary steps to prevent too many emissions and to do what? It takes to prevent another pandemic, but also to keep a home and are these the types of messages that we're going to get to see in the documentary I. Think it's called Jane Goodall. The hope is I think we can use all use a good dose of is it's pretty amazing. It's actually happening now. Isn't it? It I? I'm assuming you didn't know this was coming when you. Will basically I think many people have seen the previous documentary Jane the concentrating on the early days the one as the best days of my life this is more about the world I've done an activist, the impact it's had on so many different kinds of people going from you know some very poor passed in the middle of nowhere in Africa the People James. Baker and and the head of NIH. So I'm fascinated when my back I think that's strange. How did that happen? It's pretty remarkable. You've had a tremendous impact on this planet. It's really staggers me and I don't understand how this happened is nothing I thoughtful. Wanted A yes. I wanted to help protect chimpanzees and get them out of medical research of animals to. Fight the intensive farming, not just the animal farming but the agricultural this way poisoning, the land with chemicals messing about with genetically-modified food and it's dangerous. Yeah. Yeah it is. So you're sheltering in place like everyone else humans around the world and I feel like you're just kind of alluding to as well that the call of the wild has just never been stronger. You see those starry nights you know in India and Punjab, they can see the Himalayas the. Pandas in Hong Kong Xue are mating. You know. Yeah? Yes. Right. I. Saw a Fox in my in my neighborhood this week. So I feel like you know the humans are inside and the is never been happier and and we can't get out and so I'm curious to hear from you someone who's drawn so much of your inspiration in your spirituality from being in nature just how are you getting? Your nature fix I'm lucky. I'm in the House it's a family home. It was my grandmother's have some raised the money to actually buy it because she never had any money. She was married to a poor, the German and it's questionably garden, and this is where I am now over here are the books that I read as a child Tarzan. Dr Doolittle. And Garden outside you have gotten outside I can see. So you can get out into the garden. People Count and I've been a bit shocked recently to hear from people who have probably much larger homes even the news that larger than those who say, Oh, they feel are imprisoned that movements grossly grumbling at them just imagine what it's like to be six people in one small room until that, you can come out and beaten if you do. I consider myself really lucky. I've got the garden. We've got birds out. We have foxes stonefoxes have always been around yet. It's not rural, but it's the cliffs leading up from the ocean and I can take the dogs he unfortunately rather old he's never liked walking. Ness. So sometimes, are you one of those people Jane will put your dog in a baby carrier and push him around no I don't know that. Wouldn't like it he. Like taking a reluctant smale for a walk. FORCED, March. March nature's everywhere you know even in the inner city, we sometimes to program a young people roots and shoots. We have them going around a city and they've actually found endangered species that nobody knew is there they've done numb citizens, slams aunts quite exciting and really happy to hear you bring up roots and shoots I think I was just looking into this for my own kids I. Wonder if you WanNa talk a little. Bit about that there. So many parents at home with their kids and they're trying to keep them educated and entertained and roots and shoots is just another real intimate program right now yes it's one of the things I'm proudest off really starting that back in Nineteen ninety-one with twelve high school students in. Tanzania. It's now in sixty five countries and growing those hundreds of thousands of young people from kindergarten university and everything in between. The main message of roots and shoots. Each one of US makes a difference. Every single day we have a choice of what sort of different will make. Let's all of us. And each group chooses foot self three projects. One to help people want help animals when healthy the environment and then they don't have to do the same thing but they share their projects with each other. We bring them together from around the world, and so I would say over these years, hundreds and thousands of young people have been working to make this a better world and they keep their values of the Salata that in this film that's coming out, they keep their values even when they're grown up and sometimes have very responsible positions. So I go around China and people come up to me and say, but of course, I care about the environment I was in roots and shoots in primaries. So it's having a huge impact, it's my greatest reason for hope, I, love that I feel like everyone should do this or should be no age limit on this. I am reading books for the children some of the books I wrote two children we pull it I think storytime with Jane or something you know thinking all the time of other things to do to keep young people occupied just imagine this happening twenty years ago we wouldn't have been able to have this sort of communication. You know the human intellect is amazing. It's the thing that makes us more different from the rest of the animals than anything and it's bizarre this intellectual being destroying its own the home but. You. Know the intellect is amazing and this is just one example that I'm talking to people I can't see you will I can feel you all that and you also need you are loved. You know more than any other guests that we've had Jane. We have had more children reaching out to send you their regards and just say, hello through are the parents of the people who work at salesforce we perceive well, wishes from Lily and from Eva and from rex, and we got the most adorable video from a five year old boy named Theo and we're going to email it to you afterwards. But. He had a great question. He wanted to know his name is Theo Lorenzen and he wanted to know if you still have your stuffed ape jubilee well was given to me when I was one and a half years old and I still have him. But unfortunately, he's on lockdown just like the rest of us he had been exhibition put on by the National Geographic I. Think it's called. Jane Something Am I. Did I was reluctant to let jubilee go at me spree precious eighty four and a half years old. So generally is locked that he they took him away for you. Well, no I I agree because I. Okay. The People's I wouldn't let him go till. They made a bulletproof case but Hingis can. I do have the oh I do have missed H. and LOW MISSED APE I've had him for twenty eight years and he's with me everywhere given to me by a blind magician who decided you know he'd learned skydive and he's learned to paint. And he thought he was giving me a chimpanzee but I made him hold the tail said Gary Chimps don't have tails. Never, mind taking away you go. You know my spirits with you. Gary Horn and the that he's done called blind artists and in it is a portrait of Mr H. He's never seen who need felt oh, that is really You can get it on Amazon he published it himself and It's H.. A. U.. N., H.. U. N. album I will check that out. Okay. We have a few minutes left. Catherine has any bar play submitted questions through Saturday we could take. A couple of questions. The first question I have for you is you spend many years absorbing chimps at awhile what lessons have you learned from them that you've been able to apply to your life visible pay to be how are science was to make an there was this unbridgeable chasm between the US, which just isn't true but you know on a more sort of intimate level. So to speak in Chimpanzee Society as in ours, there are good unless good. Mothers I was fortunate in having a supportive mother who was the only person who didn't laugh at me when I was ten and dreamed of going to Africa living with animals, writing books about them and she just said Jane. If you really want something like this, you'll have to work really hard advantage of every opportunity. But if you don't give up, we may find a way less message I take all around the world and we find in chimps we now. Onto the fourth generation and we find that the offspring of the protective affectionate supportive mothers do better. The males reach a higher position in the hierarchy simul kids and the females better mothers, and I also learned from watching some of the mothers they have such fun with their babies they play with them. They lie on their backs dangling from their feet they tickle them they chased him around the trees. I'm going to have fun with my baby and I did. Wonderful and kind of a somewhat related question. What was kind of the greatest act of compassion that you witnessed between the different at chimpanzees over time observing the most moving compassionate is when an adult chimpanzee adopts Muller's often usually it's not about the system they almost automatically adopt an infant. The child must be at least three survive because they suckle for five years but sometimes unrelated adult. So adolescence will adopt the men say their lives is very moving to see. How another one of our employees, SA's like you've witnessed so many different things over the years and so many acts of cruelty towards others, animals, how are you able to keep your compassion and not get burnt-out considering angry what kind of tips do you have for us to kind of maintain that composer a hook? On Festival in I'm pretty obstinate and I'm not going to give up an more people try and do things that I think are wrong more. I'm going to tackle them but I think the big secret is not to show aggression not to point fingers not to lay blame but you've got to reach the heart is not much good arguing and if You reach the heart. How do you do the I do it with stories are some lovely stories I could tell you but it's time. But if you can cause a person to think even if they don't agree with you at the time, you leave the story with them that they then think about later and I watched so many examples of people actually. And don't make people lose face, it doesn't work. Good advice always other other questions Katherine. Have more questions. So on another side note, there have been reports of increased poaching in Africa related to Kobe nineteen, and so what are some ways that we can kind of contribute now to the conservation efforts on the ground and support local communities I think it's going to be very important to raise money to enhance programs like ours to carry program is working with the communities around Gumby and also in the. Other African countries and if you want people to stop poaching, you have to do two things one, you have to find alternative ways of people making a livelihood if they were, for instance, getting money from punting, poaching, cutting down a forest fire or making charcoal and things, and secondly you have to work on the demand. So our roots and shoots programs in Asia, you know concentrating on telling people. Actually Rhino Horn is just like fingernail and Pangolin scales wound help you and have bile give you a disease. So we work on that end but I think people can truly help by supporting conservation programs on the ground involving local people it's true poaching does go up because conservation organizations are no longer able to pay rangers the National Parks same situation people starving, and so they go and kill the animals, the parks or shoot elephants sell the ivory it's legal. Thank you for sharing that with US getting that important call. To action to get involved support, these local conservation organizations is there anything you'd like to leave us with any parting words anything you want US thinking about as we head into our weekends? Well, you have a week him. I don't know what a weekend is to be honest. It just carries on for me. You know reading books for people and doing video messages and interviews and Pud costs and you name it, we do it and I'm putting words are you know think of any which way you can get children involved? In programs like roots and shoots think of how you personally can make a difference in your life whether it's contributing money whether it's raising awareness. There's always something people can do. It depends who you are what your interests are but just I think the most important thing to remember is that every day we live, we make an impact and think about the consequences of the more choices we each day or do we buy it we wear what we eat. Where did it come from? Did it harm the environment it resulting? Cruelty to animals is it cheap because of child slave labor or inappropriately paid labourers in some other country and try to make ethical choices and went billions of people make ethical choices we'll be moving towards better world. Thank you. Thank you the impact that you have had on our world and us, and just me personally I'm so inspired by you. You are an absolute treasure. So please promise me. You will take care during this very crazy time and and we hope to be talking with you again soon be well. That was Dr Jane Goodall with jodie Connor talking about how it's more urgent than ever to stop destroying the planet and to protect it. You learn more about Jane's work by checking out the Jane Goodall Institute at Jane Goodall Dot Org. I'm Michael Rowbotham sells for studio soon. Thanks for joining us. Today.

Dr Jane Goodall US Africa Jane Goodall Institute salesforce Tanzania Jane Welcome Jodie Connor Asia Africa DOT COM SARS Jane Goodall Dot Org Kobe Michael Revolt Kobe Theo Lorenzen Rhino Horn
Jane Goodall read by Cristina Mittermeier

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

22:24 min | 8 months ago

Jane Goodall read by Cristina Mittermeier

"This episode of good night stories for rebel girls is based on the bestselling books by the same name. If you like today's episode, you can find Jane Goodall story on page eighty, two of volume one. Get your copy today at rebel girls, dot, com or wherever you buy your favorite books. Once upon a time there was a girl who dreamed of living with animals in Africa. One day that dream would come true and her discoveries about chimpanzees would forever change the way people see animals. Her name was Jane Goodall. As a child Jane lived in Bournemouth England she spent hours watcher. Quietly observing the animals outside. She kept earthworms underneath her pillow until she learned that they were happier in the dirt. She tamed a Robin by leaving a trail of crumbs on her window sill, slowly coaxing incite. Eventually in built a nest in her bookcase. Once! Jane waited inside the Hanes House, refusing to wiggle even though the rough Straw scratcher skate. She was watching the tickets to see how they lay their eggs finally one appear. And saw the Jane running to tell her mother. I know how a Neg- comes out. Meanwhile her mother had been searching for Jane for hours, but she always encouraged changed curiosity. Change father encouraged her love of animals to. When she was a baby, he batard jubilee. Especial stuff Koi sold honor of the first chimpanzee on at the Longdon Sue. To Baligh was James Constant companion. Tagging along on all her adventures. I'm Cristina Mittermeier and this is good night stories for rebel girls, a fairytale podcast about the rebel women who spirals. This week. Dr, Jane Huddle. Chain was born. Valerie, Jane Morris Goodwill in London in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty four. When World War Two began her father mortimer. A former race car driver joined the British army to in France. Jane her Mother Ban and her younger sister duty moved to a red brick home by the sea in. Bear, the goodwill family live with many pets. Cats dogs, guinea pigs, a terrapin, a canary, an even tortoise who kept disappearing, so they paint his shale right rent. Chain one said. Growing up. I was shy, an always wanted to be outside playing. Most often I could be found sitting high in the length of each tree in our backyard. I read and I did my homework there. Up on her perch chain loved to read stories about Dr Doolittle a character who talk to animals in Africa. She also became a big fan of the character Tarzan. She felt passionately in love with Tarzan and was jealous that he married the wrong jayme. Reading those stories, she began to dream of going to Africa herself. I H ten. Chains goal was to live with wild animals. I'm write books about. which she cold other suffered dream, everybody laughed and told her that she was a girl. Everybody except her mother, who said if Jane really wanted something, she should work hard. Take advantage of opportunities a never give up. Van Never told her she couldn't do something because she was a girl. Jane never forgot her mother's advice. Though. Jane was shy. That didn't prevent her from sharing her passion for wildlife with others. At Age twelve, she formed the alligator club with her sister, Judy and two friends sally and sue. They made a museum to store artifacts like feathers, seashells and detailed nature notebooks. Jane put together the Alligator magazine to showcase our findings. The Nature Club even raise money to help old. Jane was a good student. Her family couldn't afford college. Van had just enough money for Jane to attend secretarial school to learn the skills needed for office work. Jane, eventually got a job filing. Oxford University which she found boring though her supervisor did let her bring her pet hamster hamlet. Who Work? A friend help Jane a different job in London with a studio that made documentaries. Jane and Join Editing Film and choosing background music. Big City. Life in London was exciting. Jane still long to be nature. Ben An opportunity arrive in the form of a letter from a school French. The French family had a farming Kenya and she was inviting Jane to spend six months there with her. Of. Course gene was happy to accept, but she couldn't afford the expensive ticket who Africa. That wouldn't stop Jane. She left her. Job moved back home and began working as a waitress. Jane was quite good at it. She could balance as many as thirteen place on her arms. All the money she earned waiting tables. She saved under the partner. After five months she had enough for a ticket just as her mother had pulled Shane didn't give a now. Dream was coming troop. On March, thirteenth, nineteen, fifty seven Jane stood on the dock ready to board. The ship Kenya Castle. Except there was one problem. Her last book was missing. Passport must've fallen out of her purse. I'm Jen couldn't leave without. Her, plan! Seem Dash. Until an employee from the travel agency race toward the ship with Jane's travel documents in. Someone had returned them to the agency just in the nick of time. Ship set sail with Jane Onboard. Many passengers struggled with sea. Sickness but Jane spend much of the three weeks at the prow of the ship. In her wirt as forward as one could get. She couldn't wait reached Mombasa. From there, she took a train to her friends farm. Jane finally arrived on April. Third Nineteen fifty seven her twenty third birthday. They even had cake for her. Best pressing was finding a while giraffe running alongside of winding dirt. Jane felt at home in Africa from the moment she arrived. They, however, she needed a job. Friends suggested to reach out to Louis Leakey a famous scientist. He and his wife. Mary was also a scientist studied fossils together. The couple discovers some of humans. Earliest answers at a place called all divide CH-. John Lewis met. He was impressed by Jason Fousiya some for the natural world and her venture spirit. As Secretary Jane joined the leaky, said older by. Working there required. Long hours spent crouched into third painstaking the brushing fussell's free. Jane didn't have training for these past, but she learned quickly. Lewis believed chimpanzees could help them better understand humans ancestors. No one had ever observed them long term in the while. Lewis wanted to send someone to do a study of Champs. At be streamed game reserve in Tanzania, now called Gumby National Park. He's ideal candidate who des Excellent observational skills, an open mind, deep patients and know how to survive in the wild. While hiking old by Jane and a friend had encountered a male lion. A dangerous situation while armed. When Jane recounted the story to Louis around the campfire. He told her she done everything bright. According to Jane, it was right then that Lewis made the decision about who should research the chimpanzees. Jane was perfect for the job. In June nineteen sixty Jane set off for Gumby. Alone? She brought her mother along. Officials refused to allow Jane stay there by herself. They didn't think it was safe for young woman to be alone. Always Supportive van couldn't let this opportunity pass her daughter by so mother and daughter shared a small army tent and met open the evening to talk about their daily adventures, fine Kim Pissy with their own project clinic where she provided medical care. Bear face many threats in the early days at Gumby, leaping leopards, fighting t t flies prickly bikes. Jane and her mother both contracted malaria on were sick for three weeks finds fever reached a dangerous one hundred five degrees before they both recovery. But fear didn't stop Jane. She later said it was so fascinating. That nothing could deter me. By October, van returned to England. As much as Jane loved sharing the campsite with her mother. She relished her time alone in the forest. Jane New the too much noise and activity scared away the animals. At first whenever they spotted her, they would dash away. She could only watch him at a distance with binoculars. Jane work hard to slowly establish the chimpanzees trust. She dressed in a simple outfit that blended in with four surroundings, and she wore the same clothes embry day. She mimicked the chimp's behavior. Each day she packard tin box with a blanket, sweater, food and coffee. And prepared to spend hours upon hours. Silently sitting, waiting and always observing. Most scientists at the time for to give the animals they absorb numbers instead of names. But as Jane grew to not be chimps and their distinct personalities. She named them all. Flow was a popular older female channel and a caring mother Fabian Vegan I'm baby fee. Not all the champs were always carrying. A chimp was charge that Jane causing tumble off the edge of a cliff. She was injured, but okay. Thanks to the soft pushes. That broke her fault. Her favorite champ was David rapier. He was the first. Let chain close. Perhaps he was curious about her as she was about him. On like the others when Jane Approached Them David didn't run. He came to accept her even picking up a Nana from her hand. So gently, no snatching. She wrote in a letter home. It was thanks to David that Jane me to important discoveries. I she saw him eating a Bush bake. Prior to that, scientists had believed chimpanzees only ate plants now. She had evidence that they were omnivores. The second and more important discovery happened when James. Watch David at a termite mound. He broke off a long stalk of grass and inserted it into the mound when he pulled it out, it was covered in termites tasty snack. Soon Jane saw other chimpanzees fishing with grasses. They also strip steaks of their leaves to make crude tools. Something scientists call object modification. Till Ben. It was thought only humans could do that. According to Jane these was cost to either redefine man or accept chimps as human. Careful observations as twenty six year old self pod scientists where a breakthrough in understanding animals. Before those discoveries. Jane had feared that funding for her project. That Kombi would be caught because she hadn't learned anything new. But after she documented the chimps, using tools and National Geographic, society gave a grant to continue chains were. Some critics tried to discredit gentile because she hadn't received academic training beyond high school, so Lewis helped her get admitted to Cambridge University. They recognize the value of her work at Gumby and count the back door her classes. Eventually gene would earn a doctorate from Cambridge in nineteen sixty two. Becoming Dr Jane Goodall. National Geographic wanted to publish a magazine article about Jane's work. And it was hard for her to take pictures in the midst of observations, so they arrange for a wildlife photographer Hugo van logic to join gene. At first, she wasn't happy to have a stranger in what she called her little paradise. Pleased to find out that Hugo love nature and animals as much as she did. National, geographic published Jane's first article. My life among wild chimpanzees with Hugo photographs in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three, and the nine hundred sixty five. CBS aired the television, Special Miss Gell and the wild chimpanzees, a documentary national geographic made with Hugo's footage. Twenty million viewers watched fascinated by Jane's robbery, knowledge and hard work. quickly, she became a worldwide celebrity. As Jane grew to know and love the chimpanzees, Kombi. Baby came like a family tour. She would later say what an amazing privilege Wass to be utterly accepted by a wild animal. Flow fee David Greybeard under arrest. We're in James Only family at though. Jane and Hugo fell in love beer. After he's assignment and that and he left Gumby Hugo sent chain and urgent telegram. would. She marry him? She answered yes. The Cup of their wedding cake was decorated with a clay figurine of David Greybeard. Pictures of their chimpanzee. France lined the walls up their London reception. Nine hundred sixty four flow birth to another baby flint. Giving Jane an opportunity to observe chimpanzee mothering from the very start. Flow gave flint lots of cuddles. When he was being naughty, she distracted him instead of punishing him. She was playful with their children. Jane Nine that like people chimpanzees laugh when they play watching flows caring patient mothering was an inspiration to Jane when she and Hugo had their son whom they nickname rob. Jane had been more time keeping grub safe as a toddler in Gumby so her students spent more and more time in the field, meanwhile chain began writing books and continued making films with Hugo. As jeans frame grew and family responsibilities changed. She spent less time alone in the forest, observing animals chains. Books were so popular she would spend months away while sharing them with readers. More eager students join Jane At. To learn an assist with her work. In Nineteen, seventy, seven, the Jane Goodall Institute was founded there to study and protect chimpanzees. In one thousand, nine, hundred six chain, attended a conference that made her aware of the threats to welching. In some places in Africa. Hunted? In other parts of the world they were kept in cages for research. This horrified Jane. She? Later said I arrived at the conference. As a scientist, I left us an activist. She became committed to conservation and education and took action to help chimpanzees right away. One of the ways they were being threatened, was by the forestation. Fewer trees meant less food and less land for chimpanzees so Jane started a program called. Care who help communities live sustainably implant more trees. Another of Jane's Programs Chimpanzee Zoo. Works to protect chimpanzees in captivity. It makes sure places like sues have enriching healthy living environments. She also has a kids program called roots and shoots. It has members in more than one hundred thirty countries. Learn about animals and how to protect nature. In some ways, it reminds Jane of her early days leading a nature club with Tutti Sally Sue. Jane explained. The alligator club had only four members, roots and shoots is encouraging hundreds of thousands of young people to take action and tried to make this a better world for all living things. Today, the Gumby champ observation that Jane started is the longest continuous study of any animal in their natural habitat in history. James still keeps a small house at Gumby. It is the same one she lived in with Hugo. According to Jane, the best days of her life were spent their. People sometimes ask why she doesn't spend more time there now. The answer is she still has worked to. Jane travels around three hundred days each year all over the world. She's never place longer than three weeks. She has too much important information about animal, advocacy and conservation to share. And she's spreading an equally important message about how we must all show respect and love for living things around us especially each other. Now jeans role is to make sure that the next generation are better stewards and we've been to the Earth And whenever Jayme visits her childhood home England, she's created an old friend. Eighty five years after Jane I received the Gift From her father, her beloved stopped chimps. Jubilee still sits on her dresser. He's hairless from all. The loving Jane has given him. Much like love. She shared for animals and with the world. Harold I'm shady from Nashville Tennessee. Today's episode was hosted by Cristina Mittermeier, a marine biologist activist and conservation photographer Christina founded the International League of conservation, Corps, Talk I, and he's the CO founder of see Legacy a nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection of our JEN's. This podcast is a production of rebel girls and Boom Integrated Division of John Marshall Nubia. It's based on the book series. Good night stories rebel girls. visit www dot, rebel girls dot com and use the Promo Code rebel podcast. Get fifteen percent off. Are Executive Producers Are Elena if he and Danny Lani this season was produced by John. Marshall. Cherry Sarah Storm and Robin. Lie, Karen. Is Production Manager. This episode was written by Rebecca Barons and edited by ninety proof read by Danielle over your original theme music was composed and performed by nature of our jockey. Who is also sound design. This episode Muttiah Marchelli was the sound mixer. Until next time, stay tuned and stay rattle.

Dr Jane Goodall Jane Huddle Jane I Jane New Jane Goodall Institute Jane Onboard Jane Morris Goodwill Jane At Jane Nine Gumby Hugo James Constant Africa Van Never London John Lewis scientist Cristina Mittermeier Africa Louis Leakey Chain
A Conversation With Jane Goodall

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:06 min | 8 months ago

A Conversation With Jane Goodall

"From NPR and Wvu are. Boston I'm Anthony Brooks and this is on point when you were a child. What did you want to become? Our next guest dreamed of living in Africa on wild animals and Sunday writing about her adventures and her jeep dream came true Jane. Goodall began studying wild chimpanzees in Tanzania sixty years ago. July nineteen sixty Jane Goodall a twenty six year old English girl has embarked on a remarkable adventure. At the request of the British anthropologist, Dr L. V. Leaky. She has observed the daily lives of chimpanzees in east. Africa That's from the National Geographic Documentary, the hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees, and over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activist. Jane, Goodall is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations Messenger of peace. She's also dame dame of the British Empire and. and. She's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees, which came out in nineteen, sixty nine and reason for hope, spiritual journey, which came out thirty years later lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gone Bay, and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you and to me and it's lovely to be on the program which I've seen on the number of times before and yeah. Sixty years pretty amazing. I don't. Go well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing. I wondered if you could serve, take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen sixty, nineteen, sixty, twenty, twenty-six, you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged? You faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park. It was a game reserve and. The the problem. was that on the other side of Lake Tanganyika just across the world. They Belgian Congo's it was then had erupted, there was violence and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely full of fleeing refugees lost their. Possessions, so it was, it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake. Get get to the Gumby National Park, but once off their. You know it seem brother unreal. It just felt am I really here. Can this really really be me? Climbing up after the tent was erected, looking out over the lake and hearing baboons, balking breathing in the smell of the forest, really was magic I. Bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects, the chimpanzees I mean it wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them. I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? Well I for the first two three weeks, I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities was still part of the crumbling Grisham Empire back then? and. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So? He showed me some of the trails and the secret was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley, and then you wait, and you hope that the window to violent, so you can see trees moving, and often it turn turn out to be baboon on monkeys, but sometimes it was chimpanzees. And once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do a then. I would find a tree that was ripe fruit. That very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees runaway. As soon as they saw me, we'd never seen a white eight. You know they just the very conservative. and. Well! I was really worried Sony money to six months and I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things and one of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and t to animals in general, because anyone who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees. I mean there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's. It's not just a skilled scientists observing something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals, and said well. My life I being outside in Magadan, waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet, so that the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies. And I would watch squirrel occasionally. There was Fox and of course I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals, so when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university. Nobody else was studying gyms. Virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild, and so I just did the same thing. And gradually gradually the chimpanzees got use to me and. It was David Greybeard. Love it, David Greybeard I began to lose his fear, and he really helped the others to lose their fear, because if he was in a group with them instead of running away, they sort of I. Suppose they thought well David Sipping Man. He was a leader, so she so scary after all and then gradually. Lack of fear, turn to aggression that was. Pretty Nasty. Through four weeks, where the chimpanzees treated me like Predator, it wanted me to go away. But I didn't. I just sat pretended. I wasn't interested in. And interestingly it was specially when it was raining. And you know if you watching people in the pelting rain, you see, take risks. They'll run across the road. They normally wouldn't an chimps to a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realized I wasn't going, and luckily they didn't try and attack me much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance, acceptance and trust, and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary. You know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch. Diseases can catch this, so it's not today, but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I. Those days were absolutely the best I knew the chimpanzees so well. I trust them and may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical I WANNA. Ask You about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools. Nobody knew that before you did that. Can you describe that discovery and how it made? You feel when you observe it? I mean when you sort of figured out what they were doing. Did you know at that moment? That Only God? This is amazing. We didn't realize this before. Now. Remember hadn't been college. I wasn't under his and it was David. Greybeard did David Greybeard and that was walking through the forest. It's been raining, and then I suddenly so back shape sitting on a termite mound, and I wasn't really close, but close enough to see very well through binoculars and I could see him breaking up grass stems pushing them down into the termite mound, picking the insects off with his lips, amid sometimes breaking off the leafy Twig, which had to be trimmed to make it useful as a tool. And quite honestly, it didn't surprise me that the chimps could do that on the other hand, Western science through that only humans used inmate tools. We were defined as man, the toolmaker and so I knew that this was a very exciting observation. I knew that my mentor Louis Leakey would be tremendous excitement, and indeed it led to the breakthrough because he was able to approach the National Geographic, and not only that they provide money for me to carry on the six months ran out, but eventually they sent the photographer and filmmaker Hugo van. Loic and it was his film that you know that really took them the behavior of chimps around the world. Let's go to Jane who's calling from Orleans. Massachusetts go ahead, Jane. You're on the air. Thanks for the call. Thank you so much. Yeah, my question was. How did you tell the line between accurately identifying the emotions? You're seeing in these animals without overly anthropomorphized them. Great Question James. Okay this this thing about anthropomorphized thing I mean. Quite honestly you know. When I leaky made me go to Cambridge when I being with the chimps, the two years, and I knew them as individuals I knew their behavior I'd seen. Grooming peacefully resting relaxing playing laughing. Weeping and will not weeping, but I'm being very very miserable young ones when they weren't allowed to suckle anymore, I'd seen anger resentment I'd seem sense of humor. and. I was shocked when I got to Cambridge to do a PhD because Leakey said there was no time to mess about with an undergraduate degree, I was very nervous. It can imagine. And be told by many of the professors that I'd done everything wrong. I shouldn't have given the chimpanzees names they should have had numbers that was scientific, and I couldn't talk about personality I couldn't talk about minds capable of problem solving and I suck me. Talk about it motions, but you see when I was a child I had this wonderful teacher. That was my dog rusty, and he told me that in this respect, the professors were absolutely wrong. We are not the only beings on the planet with personality, mind, emotion, and lovely, because chimps so like US Biology Michelle Ninety eight point, six percent of our DNA and because of Hugo's film. That Science Bradshaw was forced away from this reductionist way of thinking and today you can study all those things you can study personality, mind and emotion. Hm, I'm glad you made that point about dogs. Because someone who's had many dogs I love dogs. I've always felt like. Of course there's emotion. Of course there's personality. Of course. There's all that stuff that doesn't just belong to us. Human Beings. We're talking to Jane Goodall about her legacy, climate, change and conservation coming up later in the hour. Stay with us. I'm Anthony. Brooks this is on point. A. This is on point. I'm Anthony Brooks. We're talking about sixty years of research with Jane, Goodall ethologist, conservationist, activist, and founder of the Jane Goodall Institute. She's a global conservationist. She's active as well in spreading the word about the importance of tackling climate change, and we're gonNA. Get to all that as well as your calls Jane Goodall. I just I have to come back to this question about dogs that came up before the break because I've read that that a dog's not chimps where your favorite animals that true. Absolutely to and you know chimpanzees so light people don't even think the McDonald's i. mean that that just just. Know Ferry people. So. The explosive development of our intellect really is the biggest difference. Yeah, yeah, so your work has expanded from from studying and saving chimps to climate change, and and honestly saving the world in that wonderful documentary. The hope you referred to at one point is the Mother Teresa the environment. Bit of a tough job you say, but how do you think about the the biggest challenge that we're facing right now? Well. I think this actually three major challenges and one is. We must alleviate poverty because you see an African village, and it's the you know it's. Huge crippling poverty as lack of good health education, the degradation of land as populations grow, and it was when I flew over the tiny combination of which had been part of a huge forest. And, by nine, thousand, nine, hundred ninety was the. Island deforestation all around were completely bad hills, and that's when it hit me. We don't help. People find ways of living without destroying the environment. Then we come, save the chimps, and so that began the the Jane. Goodall Institute JJ began a program which we Cari. which is now. Six other African countries very successful wouldn't go into it. People could look it up. On the Web, but The people have now become A. Partners in conservation so one we need to solve poverty to. We need to do something about the unsustainable lifestyle of so many millions of people on this planet who have? Than may need. Don't think about do I. Need this thing I'm buying you know, and then we also have to think about the fact. This seven point two billion people on the planet today at already we're running out to natural resources faster than nature can replenish the men's someplace. And in twenty fifty, it's estimated there will be. Nine point seven billion ten billion people, so these are problems that we we must be thinking about if we want your planet, it's the they're huge problems. I won't ask you about that. One you the one that you referred to as maintaining these unsustainable lifestyles, and I wanna ask you about that because it seems to me that one of the biggest challenges is how we define progress and governments and lots of people define progress by growth by expanding GDP so it doesn't that work in opposition to what we need to do, and if so, how do we deal with that? How do we reverse the thinking around? Expansion isn't necessarily compatible with saving the planet. It's It's compatible with destroying the planet. It doesn't make sense. You can't have unlimited economic development on a planet with finite natural resources, and if we don't. Get together. A new green economy find a different way of of. Thinking about success. What is success right now? For the most part IT'S A. Being successful in business, if money getting stuff. Getting power. And we need to start thinking about success being. We need to have a life that we can enjoy a life where we can support our family. Yes, not go over the top. We've I mean who needs four houses. Quite come on how? Who needs to yards? Who needs a private plane that a few people actually do, but most people don't. So we have to. We think way way live, because if we don't you know, we're already on a downward trajectory. That's why began our program young people roots and shoots because it's their future, and we've been feeling it and be wanting to be very passionate about these issues. Jangling and ask you about roots and shoots because I'd love to hear more about that program. We've got a lot of callers that want to get in on this conversation with you, so let's go to Lynn. WHO's calling from Bridgewater Mass? Go hedlund. You're on the air with Jane Goodall. Thanks for the call. Hello thank you so much and Dr All. You're such an inspiration to so many and I'd love to hear from you how you. Went from being an observer to research you now worldwide activists, and what words of advice you have to our young people to get involved and make a difference today. Thanks Luke. It it. It just happened and I think it was the geographic films and articles spreading around the world and. People began to be fascinated by the behavior of the chimpanzees and I. Don't know how I mean. People he says today the time an icon will I never planned to be an icon, and at first I hid I. Mean I was so shy. But then after a bit once I left Gumby and was trying to raise awareness. Raise money and things like that. I realized that when people came up in the airport and wanted to Selfie or something I could. I could use that. To tell them about roots and shoots to. To say that they could help by joining the institute and you asked about what we tell young people what I tell, the young people is every single day you live, you make some kind of impact on the planet, and you have a choice faced a mess. You're very very poor, which when you have no choice, but you know. People. Listening probably can have choice. Think about what you buy. How did it on the environment in its production, the lead the cruelty to animals like the terrible factory farms. Cheap, because child, slave, labor or budge late. Wages that don't even enable people to live promptly. And make those ethical choices. When billions people make ethical choices, they start moving towards different world. Jane Goodall I WANNA ask you about the current pandemic, and how that's affected your your research, and and and and what you talk to people about in terms of challenges we face, because among the concern concerns the emergence of diseases like covid nineteen. And the link between the destruction of nature, and the current pandemic I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about that, and how this pandemic has affected the way we need to think about these issues. Well the fact that the way I think about it but I'm hoping the silver lining will be that it helps more and more people to think about these issues, and you know the people studying the so-called zoonotic diseases diseases that jumped from animal to a person. that. They predicted a pandemic like this. We keep getting epidemics. We keep getting diseases. We disrespect nature we destroyed for. We crowd animals together, which can lead to new animal diseases. We push animals into close contact with people. That you can have a virus or bacteria jumping from one animal to one person may be Biden's with a cell in the human body may be that leads to a new disease like coke nineteen, and it's disrespected animals. We we hunt them kill them. Eat Them. We sell them in on hygiene nick. Breed markets in Africa which is where HIV AIDS began we traffic then selling them from different parts of the world to the wildlife markets and pet markets in Asia animals from all over the place, different species of crowded together in horrible on hygiene conditions, and again it's a perfect environment for virus or bacteria. Indeed, let's could nineteen is thought to have begun in in one of these markets in will have in. China and saws began in another of these markets in China, And Mas began from domestic camels in the middle, east and many many diseases have jumped from animal to person in our. Stately horrendous factory fogs. I want to play. A little bit of sound from the National Geographic documentary the hope in this scene your with former US secretary of state James Baker reflecting on the partnership that you to form. You had lunch with him to discuss your goals and how he might help you. Let's listen to just a little bit of this. I remember during that lunch telling her that I love nature because I was an honor and fisherman. But. I'm interested in clean water and clean air and improves serving the resource and preserving the environment. He seemed to think that what I was doing was. Something that was worth while because he telex to tell OCCC and those based telex only embassies of the countries I was going to, and he said please help chain. So. I'm fascinated in this just because when I think of the work you do I might not think of someone like James Baker. As the first person, you would ally yourself with or get help from talk a little bit about that alliance in how he was helpful. To you and and into what you were trying to do the work you're trying to do. Well at the time I was also tackling the use of chimpanzees in medical research, the terrible conditions, and so I was doing a lot of talking to different people on the hill and I think again you know this this geographic film Jane and the chimps beauty and the beast. People fascinated. I got messages are so would like to meet you. That's what happened with James Baker. I didn't initiate that. He asked if I would come and have lunch with him. And so I was just about to set off to Africa to learn more about the plight of the gym, so they were gradually disappearing forests were going. How he helped. Was this telex into the embassy's? They will help to. Manage to do a great deal more because of. The night could otherwise done because very little money by the way I tackled him about the hunting. Did you say them? And and how did he respond? We I said you know that I completely disapprove punting them. You and they said well. Yes, I imagined you. You did and We didn't pursue it too far but I. You know I can't just sit and let people think I approve hunting especially now especially. so-called sports hunting I mean that is absolutely horrendous today. It's really horrendous animals. Becoming extinct and people go out an rare of the animal and the more close to extinction. It is the more money they pay to go and it. Who can want to kill an elephant giraffe Abacha, these beautiful animals, and then glow to them and put the head on the wall. Oh, it's terrible You speaking of the work you did Around medical research and saving animals from the chimps in particular for medical research in that documentary, the hope you told there was a very very powerful story of meeting a chimp named Joe in one of the labs, and he was in a cage, and you reminded of what it's like for these animals to live in the wild, and and the wonderful life they have in the wild, and you had an emotional response. A tear trickled down your cheek. Tell us how Joe Joe responded. To that or You Know I. Don't really know why the labs that me in triage for them did and this was the first one hours in a state of shock actually seeing. I had to see with my own eyes to really talk about it anyway. This joe there are agents in one room, each in a separate cage on steel balls around and thinking about the chips are going be He'd been that twenty years, and of course little tears down onto my mosque and he reached out regionally. Wiped away the tears. and. was incredibly emotional moment for me and finally with the help of many other organizations, chimps being A. Being a medical research on chimpanzees as being stalked everywhere. That was It was quite a scene to see. Joe Johann reach out and touch your face and wipe that tear away. You had other unlikely allies including several leaders at at the oil company, the oil and gas company CONACO PHILLIPS WHO helped build a new facility for chimpanzees in Brazzaville. Congo, so here's Rodney mcallister, who was Conoco's a country manager and helped lead the project. The facility and had to be disassembled freighter to the Congo taken out over that miserable excuse for what's left of a road. And assembled in a location is remote and hostile. It was my job and I believed in. And I wanted to see it happen. Jane asks you to do something. You're not gonna off and say. PROJECTOR. Heck now so you and Rodney mcallister remain friends to this day. How much flack did you catch for partnering with an Oil Company? And and why do you think it's important to work with people who you may not agree with in in very profound ways? Well first off. It wasn't CONACO Phillips back. Then it's changed back then. CONACO was the most environmentally friendly oil company. Probably ever I mean I can't go into tool now, but when I I was offered held by them to set up a sanctuary. I thought through very carefully and I thought well one. I've really learned about Conaco what they're doing. And how they exploring is having the minimal impact on the environment, and secondly I'm flying I'm driving. I'm actually paying money for their products. So how hypocritical to say well. You're really trying to do good, but you're not. All companies are not going to take your money, and therefore the school suffer it. It was just a critical. And still if you can join a company that's trying to do it right. And help them to do better. That's a really good thing to do on the other hand to take money from a company that is really bad company, not trying to make any improvement. That's not a good thing to do. And what they ended up doing was truly helpful, right, I mean. They created a wonderful reserve for the for these chimpanzees. To Sanctuary, they built these buildings, and they had good relationship obviously with the government, so that was really my introduction to the. To the President and Minister of Environment. And Education actually in Congo Brazzaville, which was incredibly helpful as the as went on on Icho left because they didn't find viable oil there. And, so we had a big struggle to keep its component a sanctuary, we still you know always trying to raise money about one hundred and seventy chimps their now because of the Bush meat trade mothers shot. Through to eat. At, babies sometimes pinched stolen to be traffic to be sent off overseas. Pet so trained into taking. Back, the medical? Jayne good old standby. We gotta take a break. We're talking going to talk about a lot more. My Guess Jane Goodall. Thala just conservationists activists best known for her long term study of Z's Anthony Brooks. This is on point. A. This is on point I'm Anthony. Brooks were talking to Jane Goodall about her legacy and the challenges surrounding climate change and species conservation, and let's go right to our calls. Jane Goodall. We've got a lot of callers who want to get in on this conversation. Juniper is calling from Nashville go ahead, juniper. You're on the air. Thanks for the call. Hi. My name is junior juniper I'm eight years old I was wondering what parts of the world need the mostly searched because I want to be that when I grow up juniper. Thanks so much for that Jane. Did you get that? I hunt. She wanted to be a better. Question what part of the world needs the most research? Because? Yes, she wants to be a vet when she grows up. Well I tell you that there isn't a single country where event is needed where we need every single country, animals need help. Animals need to be protected, and sometimes they're veterinarian who come and work in sankt trees to look after the chimpanzees. We have battery help now in in the national parks, the wild chimpanzees because the so few left that we have to make sure to try and keep them healthy, so we can dot them and treat them if necessary a bad wound for example. juniper thanks so much for that. Call Jane Goodall I'm so glad that juniper called a eight years old and I have to say in my household. The th there is cross generational appeal for you. I've been following your work for a long time. My nine year old son knows who you are and is. Really enamored of the of the kind of work that you do so this seems like a good moment to ask you about roots and shoots and sort of what your messages to young people, but tell us about roots and shoots, and and and what it does. Well it. It began in Tanzania and nineteen ninety-one. And it was when twelve high school students came to see me in my house, and they came from eight different schools, and they were very concerned about all kinds of different things. Poaching Fox wasn't the government doing more street children with no homes. A wide range of problems that they felt needed solving so I told them to go and get their friends, and we had a big meeting, and that's when roots and shoots was born, and basically we decided that the main message was every individual makes a difference every day of Rian, individual as role to play in matters, that every group would choose three projects one to help. People want help animals when to help. Help the environment because everything in nature's interconnected, we parked over not separated from the natural world and some big problem today so anyway, what began twelve high school? Students is now in sixty five countries and growing fast, and it's got hundreds of thousands of members i. don't remember how many groups are as many groups. We don't even know about you know. We suddenly found a little group somewhere in the forests of Ecuador. Roots and shoots. We found out about the by accident. and. Changing the world that they literally these young people know that rolling up those leads taking action that planting trees, which is very important today that cleaning streams doing campaigns about. Single, use plastic and today we have members in kindergarten, and we have members in university and everything in between, and they are changing, while they are my greatest reason for hope. And I hope any child parent listening. We'll try and get involved because changes their lives, too. So. Let's go to Tanya. She's calling from Concord Mass Tanya. You're on the air. Jane Goodall! Thanks for the call. Go ahead! Thank you, Anthony. Thanks for your great hosting and Ms Goodall. It's It's a great honor to the listening to you and to be speaking with you. I wanted to point out that in terms of for more experimentation on chimps, year or so ago I was. At the conference at the Radcliffe Institute that's Harvard and there were some researchers from China who were showing slides. Of their experimentation on chimps in in in trying to find a cure for depression, and it involves crisper. Taking a gene modifications and it was very very sad to see the poor suffering chimp and the coordinator of its cage, just huddling over. It was a terrible sight and. and there was a push to get more US support to to get back into experimentation on chimpanzees precisely because of their. closeness to us and I. I just wanted to mention that and hear what you have to say. Thank you. Thank you Tanya Jane Goodall to what extent are his? That kind of research being conducted on chimps, and to what extent are you still concerned about that? Most monkeys now but. The occasional Jim. In Germany, for example to patents were just refused. Could Genetically Modifying Chimpanzee but we have routine shoot salute at China, the huge movement in China to protect animals. It's it's growing fast. many states now banned eating of dogs, and after the Kobe nineteen, the government was very quick to ban the a sale, the trafficking and the eating of wild animals. So it's changing. It takes time you know America for example, until recently was the second largest importer of ice in the world coming to China then China banned the importation of ivory. And these things just take time, but yes, we can try and fight poaching in. Africa but we also have to work on the demand. Because when money is involved when people can get rich by shooting a rhino and selling its horn, they going to go on doing it even if it's illegal, so that's where roots and shoots comes in and we just working working away on reducing the demand for wild animals and cruelty to domestic animals well Tanya. Thank you for that call one more call. Alex is calling from Walpole Massachusetts. Go ahead, Alex you're on the air with Jane Goodall? Thank you for the call. Thank you and I. It's it's an honor i. Agree with everything that's been said in terms of. How we can help. or progress in terms of the climate disruption and I just wondered. Jane. what you thought. The biggest impediment was to. Progress on climate disruption, and also maybe a personal kind of. question about what brings you joy. and. At that thanks! Okay well. festival, one very serious impediment is leaders in countries who deny climate change together. Latest in countries, who as in the US rule back environmental protection. Regulations. They try very hard to do that. You know there's me hoping they'll be a groundswell of people not wanting to go back to days pollution when Pepsi the first time in a big city they had the privilege of breathing, clean air, which should be a human right but while we have presidents and prime ministers and leaders who are dying to get back to business as usual and open up coal, mines and things like that. It's very very difficult, but we just must not give up. And what brings me joy well, it's being out in nature and. It doesn't have to be the forest chimpanzees. That's my. Most favorite, but somewhere out to nature preferably alone with a very close friend. And just feeling a part of it. And you know people associated with the natural one of our new see little children there in a beautiful place on there are birds, and there are butterflies and I saw two year old. An all he was doing was playing around on his on his dental cell phone, video games and things. This is tragic because it's been proved lose. Contact with nature is important psychological element in children. I glad you brought up how much you love being out in nature and in the forest, because at one point in that wonderful documentary, the hope you describe the feeling that you get as one you get in a cathedral. I I love that that analogy. Yes, It's it's really true, and there are some places in the forest when the trees ought show behead. It reminds me of some of those great cathedrals where the the such. In know whether you whether your religious or not, but the atmosphere, because so many hundreds of thousands of people have been in there. They've been praying may have been. In contact with what I call a great spiritual power. And that's the same for me in the forest. Let's go to Marcus who's calling from Cambridge Mass, Marcus. Go ahead! You're on the air. Thanks for the call. On. This is good. All I've been I've been a fan of your's ever since I was a GRUBS H. Your son Grubs Age and do the question is. The question is about zoos interaction with apes and zoos here in. BOSTON, we have the Franklin Park Zoo and how? My interaction was I'm a painter and do oak via guerilla was a painter and I brought my My pastels and oak came up and watched me paint and guerrilla. Actually punched me. In through the glass because I was filming him for, how do you feel about? People experiencing a bit of what you do with that kind of. Interaction and is is. Okay well, first of all you know this good Susan Bad, Zunes but I have to say that. During all my years, zoos have improved so much and the really good sues have wonderful exhibits, not some space, good animal groups. Keep assume understand them and what's really interesting. Is that during the pandemic when the zoos shutdown. They animals became deeply depressed because for them, the visitors of entertainment you know like television them. And it was specified eating to talk to people still working in the sues feeding the animals, and so on, say that they were really really impressed, so he were having to find ways to occupy the men. Cheer Them Up. So I know that many many people look into the is a chimp, gorilla, or elephant, or whatever it happens to be an that gets them, they're they're hooked for life. They understand they looking into the eyes of sentient being. What shouldn't be zoos? Elephants Dolphins Whales. Company will do because we'll need to run. You said there are good zoos and Badu's. What's an example of of a good zoo? Your favorite zoo? Well! In the US the San Diego Zoo is is is really good, has wonderful exhibits, and it also raises a lot of money for conservation of the animals out in the wild Get the chance to go and see the animals in the wild, which gives them a much better. Attitude when that looking up to the captive ones. So I. Think Sue's play a big role in in education and in conservation. You celebrated. You're eighty sixth birthday in April but in the documentary. The Hope you say that the kind of life you're living now is completely crazy. There are times when you think you cannot go on like this and and I think if I'm recalling correctly. You travel something like three hundred days a year. Dick Yeah. Go ahead, sorry. Oh I was just wondering. How do you find time to relax and unwind and I guess what keeps you going three hundred days a year. Well, thing is you know I'm being grounded? Since the beginning of the pandemic luckily was called when I was at home here in a I'm speaking to you from the house where I grew up in Bournemouth England on the south, coast. And own my things are here. My sister have. Here so my my a. It was a good place to be grounded. Are Funded I've had been so much busier during this time dive ever been in my life before with interviews like this and put costumes skype. Reading books to children. Read the shadow of Man. The first book I did which is now out on our website free being reading other books, children lots of emails and video messages to all the twenty four Jane. Goodall Institute's the Sankt naval needed cheering up, and it's been very tough because Ecofin I. Mean Gumby were terrified that it will reach the Chimpanzee National Park and surrounding areas with our gyms because they catch onto seizes. You have. You embrace this idea about hope and I want to ask you about this. Three of your books plus another set to release next year have hope in their titles. The documentary the National Geographic documentary about you is called the hope what keeps you. What makes you hopeful and I'd love to end on this note because there's so much going on right now from the pandemic. To climate degradation, which can really leave a person feeling despair about our planet, but you have hope and I'd love to hear what keeps you hopeful. What I? If will you hear all the time? Think Globally Act locally, and that's completely the wrong way round because quite honestly. I think everybody who thinks about the state of the planet globally will lose the they just. have any energy to do anything locally. They'll be so depressed but of the whole message of roots and shoots. If you start actually doing something to make a difference Ben, you suddenly feel you know while I am making a difference and you know that will run the world up with people making a difference, so as I said earlier, the young people are giving me the most home. I'm very passionate about that. Then the extrordinary intellectual pause you know we're now coming up with ways that we can live in greater harmony with the planet with thinking about ways we can live a lighter ecological footprint every day, which is going to make a difference. Let makes you feel better. and. then. There's the resilience of nature I described flying over gone a little tiny island furriest around by compete. Onto Hilson creeped about. Because people stop afternoon down and they realize no, while the. Jane Goodall let's leave it there on that hopeful note about the resilience of nature. Thank you so much for joining us today. It's been such a pleasure philly great. Brian to everybody. Jane Goodall I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point.

Jane Goodall Jane Anthony Brooks Africa Jane Goodall Institute US James Baker Goodall Institute Tanzania China goodall Boston Congo Louis Leakey Lake Tanganyika Gumby National Park David Greybeard Hugo van Fox
Jane Goodall, Coronavirus Update, Science Diction. March 20, 2020, Part 1

Science Friday

48:14 min | 1 year ago

Jane Goodall, Coronavirus Update, Science Diction. March 20, 2020, Part 1

"This is science Friday. I'm John Dan cocky sitting in for IRA flato end. I just WanNa start by telling you IRA is fine. He's just spending a week at home instead of his planned trip to watch baseball. Spring Training. Don't worry he will be back next week. And hopefully hopefully baseball will be back soon to later this hour. We'll be talking with Jane Goodall. This year marks the sixtieth anniversary of chimp research and the Gumby. But First Americans are being told that we're living in a new normal social distancing vigilant hygiene restrictions placed on schools and businesses. That will be part of our lives for quite a while. We're also hearing that. The world will be different after Corona virus that the fabric of our society will forever be changed and we may be starting to see some of those changes. Play out right now here to bring us some of the stories of this new reality Sophie. Bushwick she's tech editor for scientific American Sophie. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for joining us. Thank you First of all. Let's address the news coming out this week that people with mild or a symptomatic cases of this novel Corona virus or doing more to spread the disease than scientists. I thought so. Explain this to us so as early as earlier this month. The health officials were saying that they thought the majority of the spread of current viruses coming from people who were already shown visible symptoms. They were maybe coughing and the spraying Spit that had a virus in it on their surroundings and other issues like that but more and more studies have been coming out that suggests actually people with no symptoms at all could be spreading virus fact some people who were infected with the virus and not yet showing symptoms had what's called a higher viral load that means there's more They they produce for example is if someone were to to to cough and to have the droplets of saliva go to droplets of saliva from somebody. Who's not showing symptoms would have more viruses in it than a droplet saliva from someone who is showing symptoms So this is pretty scary. Do these people go on to have more serious symptoms later on though some of them do some of them. Don't some of them so for what we do know? Is that a lot of people who get infected. When they're first Can Be tested for the virus. They might not necessarily be showing any symptoms of it. Some of them later. Go On to develop mild worse severe symptoms and in other cases somebody might not realize that they could advocates so mild. They wouldn't even realize that they had been infected. But they do know that. There's at least One outbreak that they trace to people who were infected but didn't have any visible symptoms. So so this is a lot more evidence that seems for social distancing. Even if you're not sick and You don't know if someone is sick when you're when you're near them you know this is really something that we have to take seriously even more so than we thought before. Absolutely I think that somebody wants one thing that officials have said. It's the way to think about social. Distancing is not that you're trying to avoid getting sick yourself but assume that you have it and then you're trying to keep other people say okay so there's one scary story. I promise we're going to get to at least one story. That's not incredibly frightening today so but let's go to another scary news story here. Hospital respirators are in short supply. In Italy we know about that but we may soon be seeing the same problem here in the US. Tell me more right. So hospitals in the United States have limited number of intensive care unit beds. Icu beds that are used to treat severely sick patient and they have a limited number of ventilators so one thing that can happen in severe cases of Cove nineteen pneumonia. Is that the people who are sick. Need to be put on a ventilator that will breathe for them because their own lungs can't do the job The problem is New York and other states across the country how they limited number of ventilators currently being used and the worry is that we're going to have more patients than ventilators soon which is going to make force healthcare workers to make these awful life and death decisions about who gets lifesaving technology and of course those are decisions nobody wants to have to make the numbers here are really staggering. Eighteen thousand ventilators could be needed in a place like New York City. And how many are available now? Well there are fewer than ten thousand Currently in New York and the problem is many of them are actually in use. So they're not necessarily even though that count is you know there are thousands of them. Many of them are actually being used right now. And so you can't just take a patient off of one of those ventilators to give it to a cove in nineteen patient. They think they could be short by Sixteen thousand ventilators which is very scary. So whenever we're talking about flattening the curve right. This is how we keep a shortage like this from happening. Exactly this is exactly what people are talking about with flattening curve. The idea is you WANNA have fewer people at any given time needing these machines needing a bed in an ICU and leading professional care from doctors and nurses and other workers who are relying on personal protective equipment. Like masks and gowns. That may soon be in short supply. Okay so there's also news this week that the government is in talks to US anonymous cell phone location data to help better understand how corona viruses spreading. Tell us more about what they're trying to do here. So what they're talking about is that there's two different kinds of things people think about when they're talking about tracking the location of your smartphone. So this is a case where they would use the location data from people smartphones to just build up a picture of how people move around. Certain areas of a city were a region of the country. So this isn't the case of Big Brother following you individually around to see you've interacted with instead when researchers are building models of how viruses spread and trying to figure out how quickly they spread it helps to know what the foot traffic might be like in Times Square on a given day. So they could say. Let's assume that people follow these walking pattern. What would happen if one of the people walking through here was carrying What was infected with Corona virus and potentially spreading it? How would that simulation look? How would that same simulation? Look if you assume you've got ten people or hundred people on a given day so this is just helping researchers Better track how quickly cases are going to increase in how quickly this virus is going to spread. That's the specific application. They're looking at now on the other hand. Other countries are using more individual data. And they what they're trying to do is for example some companies even here have talked about potentially developing an APP. That could tell you. Hey you were in proximity to someone who is known to be infected with crooner virus on X. Today here's what you should do Do about it. Maybe they should tell the person that they need to quarantine themselves or that. They need to warn their own contacts to get tested. So this is something that China's strong right now. I've been reading that. Israel is doing something like this. I I assume the privacy experts are pretty scared about this idea though crack so the idea of using anonymous data. Privacy experts are more on board for that. Because you're not tracking the individual person. The idea of this other APP is it really opens up. Some scary implications. Because what if the government decided to prosecute you for walking for going on a walk if you if you were infected it just opens up the door to even more privacy invasions and it also opens up the door to in application that maybe people could keep using after the corona virus crisis passes Okay One more scary story here. Reports of a lot of bad actors out there using the fear of corona virus now to spread malware in performed phishing attacks on people's like spreading another type type of virus. What's happening right so in this case it's a digital virus that you want to avoid being infected with so the idea. There's a couple of different things going on. One is some bad actor sending out emails that claim to be maybe with health alerts they might say the. May include a link that looks like it goes to the CDC website but in fact redirects you to a website. That's going to try to steal your information or download. Software other cases are phishing attacks where it might direct you to a website where it says. Here's some important health information sign in using certain credentials using. Maybe your email password. You want to avoid those websites as well and then another thing. That's going on is There John Hopkins says developed a map that maps the spread of corona virus in real time really helpful tool however what hackers have done. Is they've taken the that Mac and they're using it to lur people to other websites so they might say here's a link to the map and you click the link and then that website might tell you before you view the math. You need to download the software and that software would infect your computer. So if you're looking for a map please only go to the one on the John Hopkins website. That one is safe And in general. Just be cautious about downloading software from unknown websites and about entering your credentials in unknown websites. Be careful about clicking links in your emails even if those emails claim to be about health information okay so something else. We're hearing a lot about is deep cleaning up planes. Getting deep cleaned cruise ships are being deep cleaned. Even offices are right now. What I don't know if he what does deep cleaning really mean right now okay. So deep cleaning is one of those terms that can mean different things depending on. Who's saying when people say there are what organization say they're doing deep cleaning? They mean they're doing very thorough cleaning. But there's not a Specific formula that that refers to some of the things that they're doing are pretty cool for example. Some airplanes have started using Misting Cabins. Were certain specific. High traffic areas with this deeper of disinfectant To try to cover as many services as they can In other cases deep cleaning means super things like cloth and saucer carpets and soft surfaces. You can't clean that with disinfectant. The way you can wipe off a harder surface so in some cases what that means is washing Clothing and bedding in hotter water than would normally be you in an attempt to kill pathogens. I mean we've all had the experience that planes are pretty gross places to be. Why weren't they doing this in the first place right? I mean if you if you ride a plane and whether now or later if you're on a plane trip I highly recommend that you bring disinfecting wipes and wipe down the area around two in anything you might touch because yes so things on a typically do not get cleaned as often simply because there's just not time so a lot of times. The plane lands at an airport the passengers disembark and they need to load the plane right back up. So they've got a limited amount of time and they're going to focus their cleaning efforts on high traffic areas. They're going to try cleaning restrooms. They're going to try cleaning. Things get touched a lot like Handles and knobs. And they're not necessarily going to have time to clean the trae on your seat back. I guess not. Hey Sophie before I let you go a little bit less than a minute. Left people are trying to escape from this terrible thing that we're all stuck in right now and they're escaping by actually watching movies and playing games about pandemics. What's going on right? So there's been a surge in popularity for things like the movie contagion which is about a fictional pandemic and for Games in which you're trying to your you play a member of public health team fighting against a pandemic one game called Plague Inc. People crashed the website trying to download it. And so what could be going on? Here is psychologically feels good to think that you are taking action and doing something instead of being helpless and these Games and media. Help people do that? Sophie Bushwick Tech Editor for Scientific American Sophie. Thanks so much for the update and stay safe out there. If you would please I. Will you too when we come back? Jane Goodall joins us to talk about her work with the chimps and her work today encouraging hope and conservation around the world. Stay with us. This is science Friday from WNYC studios this signs Friday. I'm John Dean cocky sixty years ago this year. Researchers began a project observing the behavior of wild chimpanzees. Gumby what are these? Researchers was young Jane Goodall. Who would go onto document tool use among the chimps and change our perceptions of the Animal World Sixty years on now Dr? Jane Goodall is a global conservationist. She's founder of Jane Goodall Institute and U. N. Messenger of Peace Dr Jane Goodall. Thanks so much joining us in his good to speak with you once again. Walk into science Friday good to speak with you too but by the way when I went out to gump wasn't concluded research with me alone. Your I guess that's right so a group of researchers versus you alone. Tell us about that. Take take us back to the time if you would well. Yeah it's actually you know it's it's very easy for me to remember going along the lake shore looking up the hill. It's very steep. It's a series of valleys running down into Lake Tanganyika and looking there. I'm thinking how am I going to find fees but then having dreamed about being in the wild with animals since I was ten once we got the ten top? I climbed up a little way getting towards evening and I sat then. We'll but boone's balking and bud singing and looking out the lake and it was just the most incredible you know. My dream has actually come true. It must be an amazing feeling when your dream as young girl comes true. What what do you remember about about that time when you actually realized my goodness? I'm going to have chimpanzees surrounding me. I it wasn't like that at first they would take one. Look and run away. It took come with. I would say six months before I could sit calmly with chimps around me but luckily after four months one of them David Greybeard. I named him. He was the one who began to lose his fear and he was the one who showed me to using and making told something that when it was thought that only humans did the initial observation of tool use. Is that still the most important thing that you think we learn from your research? No I don't actually. I think the most important thing is you know when I went to Cambridge to two years. I hadn't been to college before but I'd be the chimps two years and I was nervous and the professors told me that I shouldn't have named the chimpanzees. They should have had numbers. I couldn't talk about personality. Mind or emotion because those were unique to us but I had this wonderful teacher as a child who told me that wasn't true and that was my dog and Because Kim Pansies so biologically like us on because by this time my to be husband had been taking photographs and filming science. Have to change this reductionist way of thinking and realize we're part of a not separated from the rest of the Animal Kingdom. What do you think researchers have learned from watching these chimp families in all these lineages in all these years after you? I spent time there alley just into the fourth generation and you know to be an A. Analysis. We know the fathers are so one of the things that fascinates me. Is those good and bad? Tim Others just as in human society. I was lucky in having a good supportive mother. She supported this crazy dream. Everybody else laughed at me and so we find that looking back over sixty years typically the offspring the good supportive mothers do better males reach a higher position. The hierarchy probably saw more infants and the females are better mothers. What's a good cheap mother likening? What's the behavior that characterizes a good mother from a bad mother in that world human? I think we can all assume what we know a bit about humans but tell us about in the world. It's exactly the same as in the human world you see That is a good. Mother will be protected but not overprotective. She will be playful to be attentive. She'll always run the support child even if a child has gotten squabble. With the infant of a high-ranking female on the mother knows that she's GonNa get beaten up. She will still go to the support of a child and you know learned from chimps that what is really important for us is for the child have to be surrounded by up to three adults who consistently that the child and make the child feel secure and even if it's not the biological parents as long as they've is that small group of Support. Look around the child that gives them a really good start and it's the same for chimps. We're talking with Dr Jane Goodall and you can tweet at us at Sei fry. If you have some thoughts or ideas for her do do you ever think about the fact that someone else may have done this. If you hadn't have gone out to the gumby sixty years ago that someone else may have seen this behavior. Do you think they would have had the same experiences. Learned the same things I presume. I mean. They'd gone to Gumby but we know that chimpanzees in different parts of Africa. Behave in different ways. They actually have cultures which the young ones learn by observing the adults and chimps like us have along childhood and I think that's important because they have an awful lot to learn do. Do you ever think the world would have been different or the world in this. Research would have been different if you would've looked at some other form of of African Wildlife Giraffes for instance I mean. Is there something very specific that we learned because we studied chimpanzees? Because they're so close to us or do you ever think about the the idea that you could have gone off in quest to to. I Dunno search for elephants. I would have studied any animal. Louis Leakey who wanted me to study the chimpanzees. I think the the importance of that I had not been university. I hadn't been taught you know that there was a difference in kind between US an other animals if I had been to university and scientists had tried to indoctrinate me in that way. I don't know if I would have been the same or different but Louis Leakey punched on this mind as he called it. Uncut did with reductionist scientific thinking. So you know. I went and watched the chimpanzees. I came to recognize them. I could see that different personalities like you can see their emotions of happiness sadness via dispatch in more or less the same as and because of that because science began to change it had to then we our relationship with the rest of the animal world has changed and we know CNN's study emotion and intelligence and creatures take the oktoberfest. So much of your work now is is about conservation. I guess I ask. What do you think the world has learned about conservation from some of your African research? I learned that I'd been in the field for about up until from sixty to eighty six. But you know it's a conference where different people by then were studying. Tim's and it was very clear. Tim Numbers with decreasing for. It's disappearing and I'd Gumby. It's very tiny national park. It was surrounded by twelve villages and they were literally struggling struggling to survive extreme poverty overused soil terrible soil erosion where they cut down the trees on the steep slopes which they had to do to try and survive. And so that's when it hit me if we don't do something to improve that they're alive. Help them find ways of living without destroying the environment? We can't possibly begin to to save the chimps to conserve the gym. So go on studying with James. So the Jane Goodall Institute began our program. The car I take care in those twelve inches. It's now in a hundred four religious the whole range in Tanzania and in six other African countries where we're studying chimpanzees so You know the the the villagers have now become our partners in conservation. How much do you think the world though by and large has changed in their views of conservation? All this time it feels sometimes as though we take a step forward and then a big step back. What are your thoughts about sixty years of conservation in the world? Sixty is because when I began. It wasn't really this need for conservation equatorial forest belt right across Africa. The Amazon still wild unknown. And so it's sort of hit. Suddenly this sudden need the sudden realization that habitats being destroyed as human populations grew the Western world got more greedy and wanted more and more stuff as they economy works on businesses creating material materials goods. That are going to be self-destructed in so many years that people go and buying and buying wasting and wasting in a vicious circle and you can't. It's absurd to think you can have unlimited economic development and the planet with Finite Natural Resources so the battle of those of us who want to conserve. The environment is huge. Because we're up against the big companies corrupt government corrupt business. And you know sometimes you think well how on Earth we ever gain to make. Change the change. We must make because we apart of the natural environment. We not separated from it. We depend on for is clean and clean water for his oceans absorbing carbon dioxide for example but my biggest hope lies in the fact that we in Nineteen Ninety. One started our roots and shoots program and it began with twelve high school students in cans. India who are concerned about different things. It's now in It's in sixty five countries. It's got hundreds and thousands of young people from kindergarten to university. And they all choose between them three projects. They choose one to help. People want to help animals one help the environment so these projects differ depending on their age kind of environment in ritual poor the country the religion sometimes. So it's my greatest hope because everywhere I go. There are young people wanting to tell Dr Jane what they doing to make the world. A better place enthusiasm excitement determination. I I love that idea though of of doing something for the animals doing something for people and doing something for the environment. So many activists to seems pick one of those three and focus all their efforts there as opposed to saying we need to take care of all three of these things doing or I learned about the interconnectedness of everything out in the rainforest. Where you you love. Every species no matter how small has a role to play and all of it is important if you want to maintain the biodiversity of the area and that's what keeps the habitat healthy we're talking with. Dr Jane Goodall Global Global Conservationist. Of course she's the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and we're taking some of your tweets at Sei fry I'm John Kaczynski and this is science Friday from WNYC studios at the Davos Forum on climate. Change this year. You through your support behind. An effort called one trillion trees. It's aimed at widespread nature restoration. Can you tell us more about that? And why I think it's important. Yes that was Benny of salesforce. That got behind that and made it prominent and the thing is that it's it. It's been apparently worked out that one trillion trees would be sufficient to absorb the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and sutton planting trees is important. protecting the existing forest is even more important but planting trees hoping to restore degraded forest land Planting trees in other areas too because that regulate the temperature of the city. It's provide shade but perhaps most important of all it it. It raises the comfort level of people having green around them. There are a few of your comments at Davos that were a bit controversial. You said that the environmental problems we're dealing with wouldn't really be a problem. If we had the global population we did five hundred years ago. What did you mean by that statement? Well what timing is that today it said that we have seven point two billion people on the planet and already in many places where using natural resources faster than nature can replenish them and obviously as poor countries get richer. They want the same standard of living as we have in the West. So you know on the one hand we have our unsustainable lifestyles and you have extreme poverty destroying the environment because you have to survive but then it's predicted that the in twenty fifty will be nine point seven billion of us all wanting that's a lifestyles. So how can the Planet Cope? So what I mean by it. Is You know as I'll numbers grow. And as we make a real change in in our mind to and learn to live with much much less and alleviate poverty at the puck and also look after the environment. So I think you get the picture. It's just been fact and one comment that I heard With you know. Jane's blaming the Southern World India Africa Because they have many children but in fact one child from a wealthy society will use up by two. No numbers differ but ten times more maybe slightly more natural resources than a child and a poor poor community in Africa. So so as you said before. It's about that inbalance. That the that the world of big businesses in corporations and the wealthiest used so many more resources than than the poorest people in in the southern part of the globe absolutely it's really affordable this climate change and yet the people who suffer the people who really haven't contributed to it a tool. It's extremely on fat and hopefully our roots and shoots young people. They've all got the same attitude. They all know that things have to change the oil getting ideas as to what to do about it and they're very passionate about things like palm oil plantations and plastic and older sorts of things and planting trees. We've guaranteed that all you want. Five million threes this year. And that's a pretty. That's a pretty enormous number. We actually have some tweets coming in from some young people and we'll get to some of those just a moment. You can join our conversation at Scifi with Jane Goodall. In just a moment please stay with us. This is science. Friday from WNYC studios. This is science Friday. I'm John Cocky. We're talking this hour about global connectedness conservation and hope. My guest is Dr Jane Goodall founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and U. N. Messenger of peace. We have some tweets coming in John says Thanks Dr Goodall for all her conservation. Work I use her advocacy. For planting trees along farms adjacent to Gumby to help explain landscape corridors and conservation teaching ecology principles and James has a tweet us as our nine year. Old has been so inspired by your work. His dream is to work with and Save Orangutans. So what advice? Jane Goodall. Do you have for him and his hopes? Maybe he is part of roots and shoots but if he doesn't find out how to become involved because then he's with other young people who he'll find other others who want to help rung attends and they desperately need it so my advice is to learn all the can about them not to give up his dream and in with roots into taken find ways to help come now. Jingle. You've lived through a lot of areas in the world in which things have been scary and times have changed. It seems very scary right now. I'm wondering if you can talk about How you feel about this particular moment in history as were all huddled in our homes and unable to go outside and socialize. Well it is a very scary time. I'm not in a position to not socialist. 'cause it was quite a large family of us in this. House the house where where I grew up. It's a family home But I think I think the if you will you always look for some kind of silver lining in these situations. I remember the time when I felt initially as horrified as now was with nine eleven when I was in New York and that was a shocking time. And you know it. Sort of had a paralysing effect not only in America but around the world. This is actually affecting everyone. So the the Little Silver Lining is not reopen the discussion about the interaction with wild animals trafficking of them selling them selling them from meet people blaming China for this virus and yes it did start with what they call a wet market and in China And so did so did saws another wet market in China but HIV virus That started in Africa with people eating chimpanzees and monkeys and there was a terrible pandemics started with from contact with Catalina Slaughterhouse in the United States. So we just have to rethink as we get closer and closer particularly to wild animals. The viruses in them can do what they could cross the species berry jump into us and it's usually from handling them from the blood eating slightly uncooked meat and that sort of thing. There was another pandemic from getting from camels in the Middle East. So it is raining making us rethink of relationship with with other animals it is but even with the signals. Do you have hope that that we that we get the message this time around. Well China immediately banned or Import and selling of wild animals in China and close down all the old meat markets Hopefully because this pandemic seems to be worse than the others having more effect economically But this ban will be made permanent and extended to extended to the animals used in traditional Chinese medicine but then we come to Africa well until we eradicate poverty. It's going to be very hard to stop people handling wild animals in Africa because a lot of them depend on them for food So you know these these are. This is how all this connectedness of everything is really sometimes very very challenging and clearly. I don't have the answers what we should do. But I don't know how to get that you've spent so much time studying the behavior of chimpanzees. I'm wondering as we consider just the boundaries of society. What what it means to be a society when we can't interact in the way we once have I. Do you think that there's any wisdom that we can draw from the chimps and the societies that they have Well that's so like ours but I think what it does is help suspend to understand ourselves. I mean you know they show emotions. Happiness sadness fear Anger grief. They definitely grieve a have. Just just the same as US kissing embracing holding hands touching one another begging for food they also and I was horrified to find out a very dark brutal side and they can have they killed can kill each other kill individuals from a neighboring social group and of course these are the kinds of things that humans have done for as far back as we know the. It's you know Louis. Leakey sent me to study the Tim's because he reckon there was a common ancestor a like human like about Six million years ago. That's what most people believe now. So he thought well it's James. He's behavior similar the same in chimps today and humans today. Maybe that was in that coming in. And he was fascinated in that because he was he was a paleontologist. He was searching for the remains of stone-age people until he's an odd. This will help me to imagine how these people living so long ago. My two behaved. I want to read one more tweet. In this comes from Brooklyn and goes back to the beginning of our conversation. We were talking about how you know a good chimp mother from a poor chimp mother and she wants to know. Do Chimp mothers disciplined. They're young they do they when they're very young. And you know this is something I. I noticed and practiced with my own child a lot. No punishment and I've seen human mothers you know in a little little tiny child Spills miracle feeding trained pokes around in their finger. Well actually the child is exploring how they love them and their mother will slap it. Well it's okay to slap an older child who knows that you shouldn't spill milk. Livio table but for a little child of one and a half so tim. Mothers are really good at distracting the infants when they're doing something irritating like trying to steal the mothers to the same mother. Tim. And she's fishing for termites with one hand and tickling her infant with the other and so but if the infant goes push how beyond her patience they punished with a little bite on the hand. It doesn't break skin but it makes the child scream. I I'm thinking that might resonate with a lot of parents men and women who are stuck working at home with children running around the house these days. Lots of Lots of new things to do until the way into put out post about that. These children who are stuck at home. We'll actually somebody else tweets a man the tweets. Have you ever considered doing fireside chats on the podcast or during this young today? Tell tell us more. What are you going to do with making a list of people who might agree to to do such a fuss side job on a put cost? What would that sound like? I mean if you had a regular podcast or a regular message to get out to people what would you want to communicate to people who who would seek out your podcast? Well I think You know I was thinking of the found site chat. It would be me and one other person and you'd pick people who had interest in the different things that I'm interested in. You know whether it's what we do about the wild animal trafficking or whether it's About Child Kit trial kids comparing chimps and humans Climate. Change those kinds of things. And if you've got interesting people the conversation would be interesting points if you would quickly to to another environmental or conservation leaders. Somebody who you might sit down for one of those chats who we should know about well one person that I try and sit down and chat with is skiing out of the caprio because he really has passionately about the environment and I know him quite well and I think it would attract a lot of people if he is down and chattered. I don't know if he'd agree but you know he might David attenborough might agree Unless other people. They haven't made the list scared. I'm hoping that some of them are listening right now. And somebody's going. Maybe Leo will call you right after this because I think that I can. I can imagine that millions of people would download the podcast. Jane Goodall. Thank you so much once again for spending time with us. I really do appreciate it. Thank you to. Please stay safe. All right Oh yes. I'll stay safe as I possibly can wash my hands a lot. Keep my distance. No no hugging elbow bumping and all the rest. We'll elbow bump when we see you next time. Thanks again Jane Goodall. She's a global conservation founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and U. N. Messenger of peace. Okay think of the word cobalt. It's a striking shade of blue and element on the periodic table and at one point a tricky Goblin from German folklore. Over the centuries science has given birth to words that are now part of our everyday life. Dinosaur meam vaccine will say more about vaccine in just a minute. That's on your mind and when it comes to tracing back the story of where those words come from who better than scifis resident were dirty Ohana mayor. She's host of the new science fiction podcast. She's here to tell us. The details of words like cobalt. Welcome back Johanna. Hey John How are you? I'm doing quite well. So cobalt there's there's a good story behind this word there is an it starts in the fifteen hundreds with a bunch of minors in Germany and this one particularly Peski or that was giving them a ton of trouble. Okay so the thing that was going on is that first of all this or when they dug it up it looked kinda like silver. It had this sort of metallic sheen on it so they thought they had great luck there but when melted it down it was not silver at all it turned out to be just a lumpy rock of whatever and so the second thing that was happening was that something in the order was making these miners sick and they just cannot figure out what was going on so the miners came up with their own explanation. Which was as good as any other. Which was it had to be a Goblin. Of course naturally of course but the thing was it wasn't just any Goblin. They the minor said that it was a particular kind of Goblin from German folklore and the Scotland was called a cobalt. That's with a K. And with a d. and the cobalt Goblin had a reputation for being particularly troublesome and mischievous. So they were saying that it was as Cobol Goblin that was like stealing the silver out of the war and make them sick. And it wasn't until two hundred years later when chemist came along and had a hunch that walked inside this Pesky or there could be valuable element isolated in it so when he when he finally succeeded in. Isolating the element. He's stuck with the miners name. And he called this new element cobalt with the US. Just have to ask the what was actually making them sick if it wasn't a Goblin so it turns out that when cobalt is found in nature it's combined with arsenic often so that'll do it. Oh so we'll do it. I'm John Dan Kaczynski. This is science Friday from WNYC studios all right so tell us about this new podcast science fiction. Very exciting yeah. Science fiction is a very nerdy new. Show all about words and science history. Yeah so each episode looks at one particular word or phrase like cobalt and Kinda digs into the science story behind it excellent. So so what are some of these other words that you're looking at so on the docket for the first season we've got cobalt meam dinosaur and like you mentioned earlier vaccine off very timely okay? So we've been hearing a lot about vaccines tells. The story of this word. Sifford that one. You have to look back to the time of smallpox which actually is a really ancient disease. I didn't know this before. I started researching it. But there's evidence at Pharaoh's got it and it was totally devastating disease that people just couldn't figure out how to get rid of it. They tried everything from like herbal remedies to. There's one record of a seventeenth century. Doctor Prescribing twelve small bottles of beer in a day to try to get rid of smallpox hold. It actually sounds like an okay treatment. I know maybe we should all try and get back to you anyway. So they couldn't figure out what was going on until in the eighteenth century this doctor named Edward Jenner came. Along and Edward Jenner formally tested and documented this sort of hypothesis that have been floating around and so the deal was. There's this kind of Apocryphal Story. That Edward Jenner overheard a milkmaid bragging about how she would never get pockmarked face from smallpox because she had had this other disease called cowpox. So yeah here. We go talking about another animal borne disease. Cowpox and smallpox are both part of the same viral family. The just manifest differently so smallpox obviously super serious but cowpox when it manifests in humans. Not so bad you just got some kind of like mild but kind of nasty source and so for quick biology recap. The idea was that cowpox and smallpox were from the same family is so once you get infected with relatively mild. Cowpox your body. Defendant develops the defenses to kick it and then once smallpox shows up those same defenses are able to kick in and say. Oh Yeah we recognize this and nip it in the bud. So Edward Jenner finally tested out this theory and he published his findings in a report called an inquiry into the causes and effects of Very Ola vaccine any and so here's the very nerdy etymology part of the story and in Latin Varia let means pustules and vaccine means essentially something that comes from a cow so variable avec Sahni basically means CAL pustules or cowpox the basis of the word vaccine. Yes Super Fun lovely. How did we start to use more? Broadly than just about cowpox right. So Louis Pasture actually can take credit for that. He was the one who stretched the meaning beyond using cowpox. Do not against smallpox haw once again. Thanks TO LOUIS POST DOOR. This is going to be a fascinating podcast. Where can people find out more information you WANNA? You can subscribe to science-fiction. Wherever you get your podcasts. And we also want you to take a survey if you can at science Friday dot com slash diction survey. Tell us if you like the show. Excellent Johanna mayor is host of science. Fiction subscribe wherever you get your podcast. Thanks so much on thanks John Charles. Bergquist is our director in our producers are Alexa limb Christy Taylor Katie Feather and Kathleen Davis. We had technical and engineering help today from Paul Rest. Bj Liederman composed our theme music. If you missed any part of this program or you'd like to hear it again. Subscribe to our podcast or ask. If you're smart speaker to play science Friday we want to assure listeners that we hear your concerns about corona virus. We've put together a handy page in our website. You can find it at science Friday dot com slash corona virus facts and on the science Friday. Vox Pop up. There's a lot more about corona viruses. Well I'm John Kaczynski in New York.

Dr Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Institute United States New York City WNYC studios Africa founder China cowpox John Dan Kaczynski Sophie Bushwick Icu cobalt Louis Leakey Dr Jane Corona Edward Jenner baseball cough Tim
Deepak Chopra's Infinite Potential

Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Deepak Chopra's Infinite Potential

"Close your eyes. Take a deep breath. Now, let's go. Shopper and this is infinite potential. He knew podcast where we explore what makes us conscious beings and wide matters that we are. Consciousness is perhaps the most precious thing in the entire universe. I'm bringing together the stories and conversations with remarkable people thought leaders, scientists artists philosophers and fence that have transformed my perspectives and can transform yours as well. What does Jane Goodall think we can learn from the animal kingdom, we apart of this incredible web of life and the more. We learn about it the more. We learn about us. How does Dr Sanjiv Gupta? Explain what's going on inside the three pound mystery that recall brain, our brain, we have only only begun to understand what it is capable of. Why does Russell brand think humor and change the stories retail ourselves. I feel that Huma is powerful force. That intuitively connects you to the unseen world. And the laughter is the consequence of that temporary elimination of that temporary connection. Together. We will explore the frontiers of outerspace die started floating up, and it was this giddy crazy moments. It's like a rebirth and deep inside. What makes us creative connected. He was being beings. The brain mind system is changing because the world collectively is changing because it is a time of grow or die. And my choice is yours is always to grow. Join me on this adventure may subscribing here or wherever you get your podcasts to get each episode delivered to you. This is infinite potential every time I meet with you at the end of army's always think do I exist, and I just manifest you to hang out with you. Because it's a lot of fun. It's loaded.

Dr Sanjiv Gupta Jane Goodall Russell three pound
What's Podcasting Got To Do With Marketing?

Duct Tape Marketing

24:22 min | 1 year ago

What's Podcasting Got To Do With Marketing?

"This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing podcast is brought to you by Columbia claims platform that helps growth focused ecommerce brands drive drive more sales with super targeted highly relevant email facebook and instagram marketing. Walk into another episode of the duct tape marketing podcast. I Jan Johnson. My guest today is guy. Kawasaki is Chief Evangelist of Canada. Great Online Design Service in executive fellow of the Haas school a business at the University of cal Berkeley and he has the distinction of being on my show for about six the sixth time. Probably I think we talked about this last time. You're on my show. I think I'm the only person only podcasters to interview for both versions of art of the start and that in a nickel will buy you coffee but yeah so how. We're GONNA talk about our number things today. It's been been far too long Most recent book is called Wise Guy Lessons from life. So we're GONNA GONNA touch on that but I was like to get a little update on canvas so one we start there is an evangelist. This is your only job right to talk about it. I also have four children but who's counting so so I'm the chief evangelist of camera and for those of you who may not have heard of camera It is an online graphics design service beside the Sydney Australia and the essence of canned ways that it has democratized designs that basically nickname eighty one can create beautiful designs for social media posters. Business cards presentations t shirts. Whatever you want and I'll just tell tell you that in the month of October Kemba made a hundred and thirty nine million images so we make about four or five a big images per day at canvas for people all around the world so there you know there are dozens of folks that have tried to crack that nut? Why do you suppose Canada? It was so successful. I mean there are other online design tools. That are around a long time. That haven't been that successful. Well I think that. What are the key decisions? Asians was that we decided. We're going to make every conceivable design type and within design type hundreds of templates. So what I mean by those two words. That aid designed tie is a square. Instagram is the Graham Image Right A. Designed type is a sixteen by nine presentation of design. Type is a a kindle book cover so when you come to Canada you say all right I wanNA create a a pinterest pin. Want great the itsy store. I want a great the Ebay. They store cover photo. I WANNA create the cover photo for my linked in account and all of those. We have the optimal dimensions already. Figured out and A. and within those design types we have hundreds of templates. So you find a tablet that you like you upload your own photo or you use one of our stock photos you change the tax and a- promise you in the time it takes to boot photoshop you could finish design and so oh were they. The I totally agree. I mean the the ease of saying You know for example. If you're working with a small business client like we do and they are on six different platforms and you need a header image. For each hour of the all the things every single one is a little different size is just so convenient. Just go boom boom boom boom so I know that while I mean I don't know if you realize this but even more convenient than going boom boom boob we have a feature called magic re size and what magic is okay so did the basic design for one one. Now we will re size this for all the other five plant. But I don't know about that because that's the ten dollar months one right. I'm not going to pay him dollars. Arbroath not your books are free right now. That that's awesome. So what are they going to stay true. Do you think there'll be a temptation to say. Let's get into audio and video editing and all those kinds of certainly video because we already do that Uh going to sixteen by nine presentations. You know. We're trying to make it so that mere mortals can have beautiful powerpoint like presentations How I don't know we would like it? So that every graphic in the world is produced by canvas. We're not we're not We're not shrinking violence. It Campbell. All right well I guess you just told me I'm GONNA I'M GONNA pony up to ten bucks a month okay we can end this up. You Fourteenth Fifteenth Book Wiseguy. Yeah wiseguys number fifteen. I truly do think it'll be my last asked. Also is because you're out of things to say or because retired well shit. I was a lot of things to say on my third book so I it's partially retired but switching to the next topic. I am now convinced that podcasting is the new book writing because well will. The advantage of podcasting is well. You know you can be in front of your audience. A minimum of fifty two times a year. You can you can change change on a dime so you know next week. If if you know John I says I want to be on your show you can put them on right whereas in your book doc it takes a uterit- a book take six to nine months to publish it. So let's let's say two years and then it's done it's late and concrete and you never going to touch it again Dan unless you fix typos and you know so you get that initial burst of. I don't know maybe for you. You know five million people by your first version and but then in some people some people read it. But it's never picked up again whereas podcasts menier in their face every week as so much better except for the plus. I mean that that one lives on track. Well what the Plus the lasted longer service. But I digress. Uh Well I completely agree with you on the Pie. I mean there's somebody you mentioned an obvious benefit but I mean of the first time you in our map was is through this format and and you know I. I'd like to at least call you. You know a little bit of a friend. you've been word of bike career over the years and I think you know this is worthy introduction. Production happened the first time. And I've done that with most people but see. I'm an idiot because it took me. I'm just a late bloomer. And I took them hawking at forty four at the surfing. It's one at the podcasting sixty five you know just. I don't know why people listen to my advice. I don't even have asking questions because you just going along my purse questions here but I was GonNa ask you that. What did what was the resistance or is it just literally a matter of just didn't get around to it? Oh podcasting okay so it is. There's the the high road answers the low road answer which acidy want I. I want both in. We'll bounce them out okay. So the high road is you know. I'm at the end of my career. I've made a lot of connections. I've made a lot of friends and I can tap into that so that I can interview a Jane Goodall Margaret Atwood a Steve. WOZNIAK Steve Wolfram. Oh from Bombshell Dini. I can get to these people because of I've been with for years and years so I have this tremendous competitive advantage to interview people that many people could not get. Unless you're terry gross or you know maybe Malcolm glad well so I feel like you know and now I have a much better filter system because I'm so much older that I you know theoretically have accords wisdom so I can ask the right questions so you know. My time has come to do a podcast featuring remarkable marketable people. That's the high answer you want to hear. The low answer will also women Thing about the lawyer for minutes so it is your podcast is called guy. Kawasaki remarkable people in. That's ultimately what you're doing so the chances of many actually being a guest pretty minimal. I well I have a test if somebody asks me on the PODCAST Fair test. So we'll several million answer. Then the low answer is when I came out with Wise Guy. I was a guest on many podcasts. So I I got to talking to somebody's podcast story okay. So how often do you do. This one guy said fifty two times a year. Another guy said one hundred fifty six times a year and I said so so. What's is your model advertising his ship? I say okay. So where does the advertising always says. Well there's one or two ads in the pre rolls one or two ads intimate owners one or two ads at the the in and I said well how many people listen to these days. Quarter million. How much do you get parade? Well the front was in the front. Get Twenty grand. The ones in the middle had fifteen grant ran in the ones that the sitting there doing the math. So let's say there's six of them and they're doing like fifteen thousand bucks each on average and I say it six times fifteen is ninety ninety times fifty two is frigging four and a half million bucks. That's you know ten times bigger than any advance answer book I ever Got Alam. I writing books for not mislead sixty five. I just WANNA travel anymore. You're just like surf. Yes so okay. So maybe I can make my podcast successful. Basically podcast surf. I don't know if I'll make four and a half million dollars a year but you know if I come well I I don't even need to come close to that behalf so you know maybe this is my path to retirement tire bed and a better life more surfing. So that's the low answer. I did it for the money to remind you that this episode is brought to you by Cleo acclaiming helps you build meaningful customer relationships by listening and understanding choose from your customers and allows you to easily turn that information into valuable marketing messages there's powerful segmentation email auto responders at ready to go. Great reporting. You'RE GONNA learn a little bit about the secret to building customer relationships. They've got a really fun series. Called Klay goes beyond black Friday. It's a Docu series. A lot of fun quick lessons just head on over to Clavijo Vio dot com beyond BEF beyon black Friday so we're recording this in December of twenty nineteen depend upon when people are listening to this. You've launched the show. Oh already your first guest or at least the first show is able to see. Was Jane Goodall. A lot of people know her work for years with the APES in Africa. Kind of What's the basis of your relationship with her and that interview okay? So about a little more than a year a year ago the person who runs the Ted ex in Palo Alto out of the blue asked me if I wanNA interview Jane Goodall for her at tax ex and that's like will Duh. Of course you WANNA interview Jane Goodall Panic so it actually cost me a lot of money. Because I turned on a speech I coulda got paid speech for the same time I said. Now you know you can always get another paid speech. But how often can you interview Jane Goodall so I interviewed gene in good offered ten x which is on Youtube if people want to see it and I really became friends with her. I don't know sometimes you just hit it off with the person right. And so we've been communicating indicating and stuff like that and I communicate with her staff and pick fitzpatrick and I will always help Jane goodall she wants to raise money. Or you know make something thing go out on social media and then I decided to do this podcast and I said well you know I. I need a spectacular remarkable person as the I guess us who could be. You weren't available so who could be better than Jane Goodall. And so as she she was going to be in San Francisco Org recorded her and Yeah I mean life is good. It's good to be Guy Kawasaki sometimes wall and I I know you have a good relationship. Because I've seen pictures of her grooming you a she's looking for lice in my head which I think was reminiscent of her work in the jungle. Wasn't it yes. Yes who else is up for the show who who else you plan to talk to In the upcoming weeks yes. Jane Goodall is out. So is Phil Zimbardo Phil. Zimbardo is the Stanford psychology professor. Who did the a Stanford prison experiment were kids and kids simulated being guards and prisoners next week? Is Stephen Wolfram. He is the creator of Mathematica and Dan Wolfram Alpha the the search engine got a PhD Twenty Macarthur Award. Twenty one The next week after that. What is Margaret Atwood the author of handmaid's tale? And then believe it or not. We have we man we man from Jackass the MTV series and movie and then I have bought Joe Dini who. I'm sure you heard of because you know you're into sales and marketing like I am so I have bob show Vini he's been on the show. Yep Yeah he's great great so basically. That's the kind of people I have. I mean they you know because a remark they cut. They passed the remarkable test. Yeah Yeah so what do you have to learn to do. This is a different format. Says Different Technology. Maybe a different skill when you feel like What's IT GONNA take you too to get GEICO sake to remarkable podcast hosts? Well I've done a lot of panel moderation and stuff off fireside chats where I've been on both sides so it's not like it's not like us. The Jane Goodall analogy if I was Tarzan and I got off a ship from Africa. Now I mean London will have to figure everything out so I. I've been to this Rodeo. Maybe wearing different hats. But I've been to this Rodeo and have you listened to the Jane Goodall One. I listened to about half of. Yeah you can see that. Well one is to tell you the truth. I believe that the role of the podcast there is to make the guests look great and I also believe that you know if you look at the minute spent who's talking. It should be about ninety ten or nine nineties. Jane and ten is guy and and so. That's something and lots of people have said. You know. I really like your podcast guy because you let Jane Talk. I think a lot of podcasters. It's all about them right. They're just talking and talking and talking and then finally the gift to say something and then the podcast gets back on on a riff. So that's not what I don't step on my guess and now I just I don't I don't honestly. I don't know well how to get subscribers or advertisers but I figure you know if I get all these guests in. I produce great podcasts. I'm a big believer in. If you you. If you build it they will come so I think that's a lot of it and you're also doing the networking. You contacted me to tell me about it and you contacted a lot of people. The Taliban I mean that's you know that's that's kind of marketing. One on one right well. Not Nothing is easy right. I mean well I if you're Michelle Obama and you started Michelle. Obama remarkable remarkable people podcast. I'm pretty sure you'll get five million subscribers in the first day but I'm not Michelle. Wao Do you listen to podcasts. Yes yeah you're you're what are some of your favorites. I listened to Malcolm flat wells revisionist history who are trying to get as a guest. I listened to a wait wait. Don't tell me I I listened to freakonomics I listen to Joe Rogan. Listen to Terry Gross. I'm a big. NPR Fan basically right right right. Yeah Yeah you can hear. A lot of those shows have moved to the podcast format. But but obviously there's still a still broadcast as well. Where do you think this is going? The the audio only begin. Maybe that maybe you're not in the position right now where you want to future cast trends and things you just trying to figure it out to make your work for you but it seems to me like audio content right now I mean podcasts have been around a while but it seems to to me like audio content is really hot. It's going to get hotter. Yes I I I think that podcasting it's kind of like artificial intelligence so artificial intelligence for the last thirty years was going to be the next big thing right. Finally it is so I think we may be there with podcasting. A A lot of it is It's critical mass. In a sense you know apple has created a critical mass. Where podcasting in? It's it's in the same sense I think one of the things I've noticed his. QR codes which was supposed to be a big thing. Apple finally made it a real big thing because now when you you just put your camera on a Qr Code. You don't have to download. A cure reader writes all of a sudden. QR codes make sense. And I think apple did the same thing with podcast it now that they've done so much they put a podcast player on every IOS devices apple created another market yet. And you know I I can do this before. That was the gate and that was one of the initial challenges with podcast and it was hard to get us hard to show people. How will this? Yeah Yeah where do you think spotify quantify fits into this and it seems to me like spotify is is really gaining some traction into podcast space Do they take on Apple. Or is it just broaden the universe for everyone find I mean based on two episodes. I don't consider myself an expert but you know spotify has taking a different position in a sense. They're like Netflix. Right so Netflix. Just does a share stuff anymore. Netflix has series right so so similarly Amazon prime. I watched Jack Ryan on Amazon Brian. The Amazon Prime Olds Jack Ryan right in so spotify. Five tried to create content not just distribute content. And so they're supposed to be making this huge investment in podcasting and We'll look back and say wow. That was a genius. Move or will look back and say well what a Dumbass move and. I don't know at apple if apple said we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA GONNA be a content creator. Well they they do that right. They created the morning show for Apple. TV and all that so I guess we'll see I duNno. I think that's a direction. Lot of people are GONNA head in. Wouldn't be surprised. I wouldn't be surprised if Just like you are playing the evangelist role for Canada I'm wondering when people start when when companies like that start bringing in somebody like you to be a guest were to be their spokesperson. I as a podcast well funny. She mentioned that because I chief advantage of canvas and I told Canada I told you know the other people canvas so right now you have your candle social media. You know Instagram facebook all that but and you have your email list but there's a there's a limit to how many times you can send an email to someone in your registered user database and that limit is not fifty two times times a year so I making the case that if we could get my subscriber subscriber base to up chameleon or soul that is a fricken tremendous weapon so if you have a guy called Sakis remarkable people has a million subscribers and Guy Recall Sakis chief evangelist of Canada so at an extreme the pre roll the midway and the end ads could all be Campbell so imagine fifty two times a year. You can hit a million people with an ad three times. Oh my God I mean life is absolutely so yeah. That's going to be a role that I think you start. Seeing is that whether they're media companies or just companies seeing it as another channel channel. I think are going to start buying up people's reach you know with the bucket. Yeah because I mean for the very simple reason the you could hit people much more often with a podcast and you can't with an email milch campaign accenture did a five or six podcast a series of will I am right and you know you couldn't you couldn't hit your accenture database six times or Probably Maybe Eighteen Times Kazura at multiple ads inside the six episodes. There's no way you could hit your install base with eighteen email campaigns. First of all. There's not eighteen interesting email campaigns. You could do so. I think that's the key point is it's far more engaging content at an email ever will obi. Well I mean you know in a sense you know how how does. NPR raise money. I mean you know do you. Don't enjoy the pledge drive right so you feel a moral obligation to reciprocate at an similarly with wikipedia. You don't like to see that only banner where Jimmy Wales is asking in you for money. But because we Pierre provides such great information and content. You feel a moral obligation to donate so you could make the case that if Geico Sakis. Remarkable people has all graded wisdom and advice and inspiration. And then it's you know it's sponsored by Cava. You might feel Geez I should you. You know help guy out and you scandal. That's the way I think it's I think it's a good theory. We'll time it was great. Catch up with you again and I wish you luck in this new venture and I will not ask to be on the show I would just wait. Why by email for for the invitation or if it should well I hope someday to send you that email all right? Let's hope that you have a four files. Yeah we're recording with some new new technology here that That I think is GONNA be awesome. So if you they don't have four files. It's my fault for convincing you to do this and I will appear again. Try It all right. Well I went to seventy Mahalo that care.

Jane Goodall apple Canada Instagram Kawasaki NPR Africa chief evangelist Dan Wolfram spotify Malcolm Jan Johnson Jane Goodall Margaret Atwood Jane Goodall One Chief Evangelist of Canada Guy Kawasaki Netflix Campbell Columbia
Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

On Being with Krista Tippett

50:55 min | 7 months ago

Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

"Support. For on being with Krista Tippett comes from the Fetzer Institute helping build the spiritual foundation for a loving world. FETZER envisions a world that embraces love as a guiding principle and animating force for our lives. A powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves, others, and the natural world learn more by visiting FETZER DOT Org. Several years ago, I moderated a gathering on an island off is stunned bill that included the primatology I. Jane Goodall. I knew about her epic early years studying chimpanzees in the wild at first without even college degree. The science she proceeded to do also ended up shaping the self understanding of our species. She recalled modern Western science to the fact that we are a part of nature not separate from it, but what I'd never gleaned from all I've read about her across the years yet saw powerfully when we met is how fully she had mid-career given her life's work over to a new passion. Humanity had become a threat to its own Ken in the natural world with the same careful. EMPATHIC is she trained on the entire ecosystem of the gumby forest. She began to do her part to tend to the human pain and misunderstanding that led to her beloved chimpanzees suffering. This hour on zoom line in a world and pandemic. We explore the moral and spiritual convictions that have driven this extraordinary woman, what she is teaching and still learning about what it means to be human. I believe a trick of the intellect which is so startling. Eighty was the fact that we develop this way of communicating. So I you things, you don't know. Me, things, I don't know. We can teach children about things that aren't present, and all that has enabled us to ask questions like who am I. Why am I here? And I believe part of being human is questioning a curiosity trying to find on. An understanding that there are some answers that feast on this planet is life. Is Life. Full. We will not be to also. I'm Krista Tippett and this is on being. Jane Goodall spoke with me from warmoth England in the home where she spent part of her childhood living with her mother and her beloved grandmother whom she called, Danny? Both are largely in her many books and stories. WanNa Start where I always start which is how how if I ask you about be spiritual background of your childhood of your earliest life. However, you understand that word now where does that memory take you? Well I wouldn't have thought of anything spiritual when I was a child. Now my grandfather was a congregational minister. I never met him. We mom my sister. Came to live in this house for I. Am now with my grandmother and Moms two sisters. So was he the husband? Of Danny? Was He that other of your grandmother you call Danny as? He was the husband of Danny. I wish I'd met him because he sounds completely wonderful, but I didn't and so we sometimes went particularly religious. And I love to spend most of my time outside in the garden was pre television, pre laptops, cellphones another event. And so we had. Books and imagination a nature. So I learned a lot from nature I was outside. And I, love climbing. Trees had special tree which I'm looking at right now be. Spend hours and hours up beach. Feeling chose to the sky and the buds. I. Suppose that was the chose this to some kind of spiritual feeling nature. That I had I wouldn't have thought of it as that that time. Right you've. You've said that you really feel like you. Loved animals and loved nature I think from the womb onwards a woman would. My first serious observation of animals was four and a half when I waited for hours to see a headland. To, say, it was my to Muslim. WHO's enabling me to do what I've done because she didn't know where I was. I was hiding a hen house waiting because nobody would tell me what the hell was. The came out and it wasn't logical as it was. It was a logical observation that it didn't make sense. Wasn't obvious. So I handle into a hen house where they slipped night and the next. Round the. You. Know she must. So I crawled off to, which was a big mistake she flew out with school Safiya. and. So in my little four and a half year old mine, I must've thought well, no Hanrahan. I think five, the hen houses. So, I went into an empty one, hundred waited at apparently awaited about four hours. They even called the police. They will also change Jomie Ghana for a holiday onto this farm. and. By mother must be really nervous. You can imagine your little. Has Disappeared on, he show me rushing towards the house. She saw my shining eyes on. Sat Down the wonderful story of how a hand lays egg on the reason I love that story is. Isn't that the making of a little scientists asking questions not getting the right on some citing defined out. Making a mistake, not giving up dining issues. You know a different mother. How Day off without telling us don't you depth donated again might have crushed that early scientific curiosity at my might not have done. I've done. It strikes me There's another story that you tell. So let me just say you. So. We're speaking in twenty twenty, just about sixty years after you went to. I went to the gun base. Stream Chimpanzee Reserve in Tonga Meka, which is now Tanzania July nineteen sixty I was born in that year nineteen, sixty few months after you went to convey. And I'm so aware that what you began to see and study and turn into scientific observation. They're really transformed the world I grew up learning about I was also struck like the store. You just told about watching the hen laying the egg, the stories about you taking worms to bed as a child or your love of your dog. Rusty. There's another store that struck me when I was reading. Think this was in in the shadow of man about when your mother was with three for a while. In the early part of the study, she went back to England your I alone. And how you're walking around kind of naming the aspects of the forest. Good Morning Peak. Hello Stream a when for heaven's sake calmed. down. And then of course, that echoes stories that are so alive in our culture, and even the ones have influenced you the doolittle's Tarzan wind in the willows. As a parent children and adults in the presence of children's see, aspects of the natural world is animated and alive, and they give things. Name said, the human imagination has always inclined this way. So. There's one way in which as I as I read this story, understand that you one thing you did, you helped substantiate an intuitive understanding and bond that human beings have you put data to the truth, such stories carried well when I first went to gone. Nobody else had studied chimpanzees in wild, right uncharted territory. And of course, the first problem is that the chimps runaway the soon as they may never seen anything like this white eight. Beautiful. And it was very wonderful that time that my mom was the reason she says the British authorities not tank, any laws outpost crumbling British Empire back. And they wouldn't take responsibility for becoming on my own they. have to bring someone with knee. So she Poland. So, she was said to boost my morale as early days because I get by dejected the chimps runaway again. She was pointing out that on this peak I discovered I. Use my binoculars and she did you, you're learning how the chimpanzees make beds at night bending the Brunch or so. You'll learning how they sometimes travel alone sometimes in small groups, and sometimes in big excited gatherings, you're learning the foods that they eat McCall they may. So. You're learning more than you think. Really sad that she left just two weeks before that breakthrough observation when the one chimp who had just begun loses via darling. David Greybeard. As him, using a making tools to fish And? That was the turning point. That was what enabled my mentor Louise Leaky to go to the National Geographic Society. Agreed. To Fund the research when the six months money row? Now, six months money came from American van through pitch. Done. Great. told him still. And they sent Hugo van now to take the graphs to make film UK mind as husband and his photographs and film. Geographic magazines and documentaries, but forced science to believe what I was saying because people that many of them had said, well, why should we believe what she says she hasn't been to college, she's just to go. But when they hugo's film than they had to believe when they saw what you saw. Yeah. But I do think it's worth underlining because it's so hard for people. Now to imagine that as late as you know, the latter half, of twentieth, Century Human Beings thought that we were the only creatures who made tools. That's what list science believed if somebody at that time had gone to the pig in the rainforest in Congo. They could have told you I've sat and talked to the nave. Watched it. Right. It was man toolmaker. It was Osmond Hill who define now stuff. and. So it was it was talk I. Think the Scientific World, and when I finally with made to go to Cambridge University by Louis. Leakey, said I needed a degree, it wouldn't always be around it. Monday. Also, you were the eighth person in the history of Cambridge to come in, you came to do graduate work without an undergraduate degree which was almost unheard of. Yes. He the. Yeah I was weakened with signed a two said, well, you've done your study. Wrong. You shouldn't have named the chimpanzees they should have had now because at science. And Yukon talk about personality mind capable of solving or emotions because of the unique to us. But the dog you mentioned rusty, he told me when I was a child. That certainly wasn't true and not the only beings on the planet with cuss analogies, minds in emotions, and we all part of a not separate on the rest of the animal. Kingdom. I was actually taught in this in the textbooks. The difference between us and all animals is one kind, right? That's such. An important distinction for you. Would you elaborate on what you mean white? So important, there isn't a difference in kind in kind what what does that word hold? The opposite of it is degree. The difference is degree in other words following Darwin Syria be pollution. You know species gradually evolve and wages one of the species and so. I just could not believe. that. The scientists was saying that took too many of the religions talk to the Buddhists. To to the indigenous people they believe. That with part of the Animal Kingdom. They believed animals are all brothers and sisters, right? Arrogant. Western. Science and I think it probably stems from religion God. made man made man different God made man to have dominion over the birds and the animals fish. So but. That is a wrong translation I put Hebrew friends yet. The Low Hebrew word which I do not remember. But I've written it down one of my books men. Steward Not Dominion Right The Dominion, but but that that point of view that way of thinking and seeing. Also. Penetrated western science. It seems to me that the significance of your work in the self understanding of our species. There's so many ways to talk about it, but it also these observations reconnected us as you said. That we part of the Animal Kingdom that we are part of nature, not just in our bodies has another way you say that there's social and emotional continuity. With. The natural world that we're creatures. Rather than all the other creatures being creatures as another way people talk about I. Think. The, genesis, stories. We'll. Just. Very arrogant to think that way, you know some people's filter, the other thing which very dangerous about signs I was told. At. Cambridge. that. You have to be absolutely objective, and you must not have empathy zero subject and to me that right from the beginning with. So wrong because when I was watching chimpanzee family, for example, and one of the young ones some a little strange. And so because I was empathetic towards. I thought. Well, if you know if they will human, they do it because of. Whatever? That gives you a platform. You can stand on that platform. Ben Try to analyze what you see in a scientific way. Pathy, it gives you know stuff intuition. That moment which you wouldn't get if you didn't have empathy either been also the code scientific approach I, believe post led to a lot of suffering on this planet. I. Mean, you also experienced because I think you were open because you are seeing observing. You also experienced empathy. On the part of the chimpanzees you were studying, right? I mean that there's that moment with David Greybeard that you've described about offering him a piece of fruit which he did not take. But he took your hand instead, he took it drop to gently squeeze my fingers which. Chimpanzees reassure each of. which you understood as him, sensing, motivation and honoring it. Well you know the thing was we totally understood each other in a language that clearly predated human spoken language language off the postal languages. So almost the same holding hands passing on Olympic Kissing. Embracing. You know a judge just. When we communicate nobly, virtually the same as chimpanzees swagger, shake off his son. Male, chimpanzee is sometimes remind. Number, human. Male. Politicians. Lay Bristol, and they tried look big important and intimidated by punching the lipson furious I'll. Leave. A.. I'm Christopher Tampa. Being today exploring what it means to be human with the legendary primatology St- Jane Goodall. So nine, hundred and sixty went to convey. You. Began to write your work became well known. As you said, on many ways, you've described nine, hundred, eighty, six, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, one to. Yield. To organize a conference of primatology in Chicago. Around. Chimpanzee behavior in different environments and and you've actually described that not just as a turning point, but in some places as a road to Damascus moment. Could you tell that story? What happened to there is by the time you know by nineteen, eighty, six, I have my ph date I. built up a research station and best of all, I could spend hours alone in the rain forest mess. I felt that deep spiritual connection to the natural world and also him to understand the ended connectedness of all living things in this tapestry of life where each species matter, how insignificant place probably vital role in the whole pattern. And I imagine continuing in that way. The rest of my life. Why not? And then we organized it was when I published that big book, the chimpanzees of Gumby cutting behavior. And had all my signed of sedation, but it also had all the stories because the story, an anecdote. Very. Carefully. Recorded observations on any job because you only see once those those anecdotes, sometimes the key to unlocking a puzzle. Terribly, important and a collection of any else stories. Has Been Very very important in my research. Anyway, I am arranging to bring the six other studies sites, but then a we invited scientists from each and also from noninvasive captive research like big big zoo groups, for example. But, we had one session on conservation and one session on conditions in some captive situations. and. Both what. uttley shocking. I mean I knew those deforestation going on. I was totally unaware of the extent of it, and that's way back in nineteen eighty, six chimpanzee numbers decreasing the rise of the Bush meat trade as the commercial hunting of wild animals of food. They live animal huntin shooting mothers so that you can sell 'em babies locally as petzold trade, the mobile seems. And that was a huge. and. Then the captive situation that was eight seeing our closest relatives who can live for up to will more than sixty years in five foot by five foot medical research labs surrounded by Iron Baas, Toki alone nothing to do just because their bodies A. so like us we share ninety eight point six percent of our DNA. So. I. Didn't make a decision. I just knew when I left I gained so much from the chimpanzees I had to try and do something to help. That's why cool at my Damascus moment. I wondered as the scientists on my leftism. He's oppose you call me an activist or something like that. Just happened I. Knew I had to do something. It's quite astonishing to me too though that the other the next move you made really was very similar to. The approach you took the skills you had learned and cultivated in studying. In Bombay. Seeing the plight of chimpanzees than lead you. In fact be an activist in terms of the plight of human beings that led. To forest disappearing into these kinds of atrocities perpetrated on. On these animals on our Ken. I believe that the title of Your Book in the shadow of Man in nineteen. seventy-one was that chimpanzees live in the shadow of man as we evolve to overshadow them with our powers of thought and speech. But what you also then picked up was how we evolved and become a threat to the natural world from which we emerged and with which we remained in kinship. Yes, absolutely, and it's a big puzzle, the biggest difference between US chimps and other animals if the explosive development of our intellect. Because Signs is now acknowledging that you know animals are not. Machines. They want soared the huge flurry of information really exciting about animal intelligence. Ranges from. You know chimpanzees using computers in clever ways and elephants with a very close social Relationships between her members and crews who turned out to be able to actually use a nate tools and. Pace, you know they're they're intelligent stokes more intelligent than some and. Not. We know the octopus is highly intelligence. and. Lino trees communicate exactly plant life. The intelligence plans. Yeah. So here we are with this into late to enabled us to do something very different from Ole animal successes. That's designer Rob Kit, for example, went up to mas and the rocket as being crawling around taking photos for us to see the at one time people. Maybe we can live on laws. Well, we now know that's not possible. Bizarre. Isn't it the most intellectual? Great? Surely, that's ever lived on the planet is destroying it suddenly home, and I always believe it's because this disconnect between that level clever brain and you might have love compassion. I truly believe anyone head in hard work in harmony. Can we attain not true human potential? But again, you know that empathic scientific that you brought in Gombe Bay of like wondering how you might behave in that situation. When you flew over Gumby and a small plane. That was another moment that shaped the approach you took. To. To doing your part. With our species? Always, believed that if you want to. Understand and be able to talk to people about something that you need. First hand experience, which I forced myself in the medical. And began a long long struggle, but which finally success at. To Stop Research on chimpanzees and maybe I, should divert a little bit. He just say that. In dealing with these people in the labs, you know lots of animal rights, people stop talking to me, they should help you sit down with them. You don't sit down and talk to people. How can you expect to change? So I also had previously the value don't be confrontational. So I told them stories because they don't believe that people change because that bullied I, believe people change because they change from within. So I didn't blame them what they were doing I just gave stories and showed pictures of the gum. BEECHAM's lazing around in moving, playing, swinging through the trees men in Van Lines. They probably never even seen that before. So that's high. Out How I dealt with them, then he has going to Africa to land has tended Why Chimpanzees disappearing, Muslims? Going on an learning a great deal about it. But even as I was learning about the chips, I was learning about A. Crippling poverty of so many people living in and around Kobe touch. Right. It, it's like you looked at the ecosystem that gave rise to poverty, and that gave rise to this distorted relationship to the land which had these ripple effects on the. The chimpanzees and the other. Great. Apes. right and that you started stitching an ecosystem back together again will lead us the. Yes. So they were your partners they. You listen to them. I think and yet let them lay it. They become partners, they depend on the forest protecting. It isn't just the the wildlife, its own feature. After a short break more with Jane Goodall. You can always listen again and here the unedited version of every show we do on the on being podcast feed wherever podcasts are found. On being is brought to you by the John Templeton Foundation harnessing the power of the sciences to explore the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind learn how their guarantees are helping to address the coronavirus crisis a templeton. Dot Org. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being today I'm with the primatology Jane, Goodall. She's been widely interviewed and chronicled in this year of pandemic sixty years on from when she first went to the bay forest in what is now Tanzania and transform the understanding of Western Science and culture about the closest kin to humanity. We're exploring what she's learned and is still teaching about our species. She's been talking about her more recent adventures which took her out of the forest I, advocating the human habitat of research laboratories towards ending experimentation on great apes, and then into a unique method of holistic community based conservation. Gumby. Call to car. Three decades ago, she also founded the roots and shoots movement with the inspiration of twelve teenagers on her porch. In Tanzania. It's now in nearly one hundred countries. Did Roots and shoots emerge out of to curry no roots and shoots. Because our to carry was expensive to operate. We've already are starting in some African countries. Around the world gradually, Pelletan further around. Talking to people about the problems in Africa, the reason for them and hoping to raise certainly awareness, maybe some money and I kept meeting Young People Susan. Nineteen ninety. Young. People who seem to have lost hope and talking mostly about university students. Some high. School. and. They will mostly just at the take but some depressed, really depressed, somewhat angry. When I asked them why they felt that way? They all sent more or less the same ups in Asia in North and South America Europe. By then I hadn't gone to the Middle East but I know they say the same man now because they said, you compromise future than this nothing, we can do about it. So you've heard that saying, we haven't inherited this planet raw ancestors. We borrowed it from children. We have been borrowed. We've stolen and we're still seeking today. Yes. These teams are as alive now. I love the would you the all of the nuance of the title of the name Roots and shoots? Think also really speaks to the philosophy of this. Would you just describe love? Oriented High Love Trees. I think my my very favorite individual tree has to be in my garden and when beach began to grow over one hundred years ago, actually A. Pretty tiniest seed. And if I picked it up at that time, it would have seen. So small and little rowing, shoot a little roots, and yet there is what I call magic. It's a live fullest in that little seeds. So powerful. That to reach the water at the tree will need those little roots can work through eventually, push them aside and little shoot to reach the sunlight which tree will need photosynthesis had work its way through cracks in a brick or eventually knock it down. Until we see the Greeks walls as all the problems social and environmental, we have in victims on the planet. So it's a message of help hundreds of thousands of young people around the world can break through and can make this world, and we've got members in kindergarten university everything in between. and. It's my greatest recent pokes everywhere I, go these young people telling me showing me finding is what they're doing, what they being doing, what they plan to do to make the world better. In your book reason for hope. You use the language of moral evolution and even spiritual evolution as your hope for our species. and I wonder what that means for you, and how do you think about the contours of that challenge? That was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine that you wrote that book. Yeah. Twenty years on. A change place at an strange strange time. Is. Well, I think that during this time. We've seen. Very big move towards more moral behavior greater understanding. And you can just trace it very clearly are. To animals around the world, the growth of these are organizations took protecting animals, cruelty ben on the other hand. You proliferation organizations find help victims, human victims of domestic violence and orphans, refugees, and migrants. So we're. Getting. Some people? Much more much. Much, further advanced than others. Well I. think that something that you became aware of in your study of chimpanzees over time and that you've always been aware of in the human condition is our capacity for. Great empathy and play, and creativity, and intelligence, and also cruelty and atrocity. Okay I was shocked to find chimpanzees have this dog aggressive side like us. made the more like us. They will, which is a sad statement to have to make. But I think early humans are capable of true evil because a chimpanzee will kill, but it's a spur of the moment. It's it's an emotion. It's an emotional response to a situation was we can sit down far away from intended victim and in cold blood plan out the most brutal forms of torture. That's that's the difference. Intellect that has enabled us to think in those terms. There's irony that you have spent these years these decades now. Since. That Damascus experience of as you say when you realized you had to be. That you became not just a scientist but an activist. And you needed to be working with human beings in changing. Our relationship. To. The natural world. There's just kind of this inverse. You know the stories, the early stories in early writing and the films. There's almost this dreamlike quality to the to the fact that you this young. Englishwoman. Without a college degree where who had always wanted to go to Africa. Always loved animals that you were able in in your go work with Louis, leakey, and. and become a scientist and be in this extraordinary place where you're so at home and then you have ended up. As part of the calling to that same purpose. Spending most of your time outside that forest, not now in the middle of the pandemic. But spending a lot of time in airplanes, and on the road, you've asked this question in writing. What if I had known that my efforts would keep me more or less permanently on the road. What I've been strong enough committed enough to start out along such a hard road but I that you still. Feel that the answer to that is yes. I think so I. I, look back over my life and she always turning points when I could have done this or I needn't have done it i. think it made the right decisions. You know was only difficult things happen beating Louis Leakey in. And him taking me to own. Divi and seeing how we I reacted to rhinos, lions and deciding. Person He'd being looking for, but united rental goes back to having this amazing mother mom. Let me go. Alone on a boat, Africa wasn't Unin those. Young men did the. Will to but. It wasn't like students today, go off and have experiences backpacking was totally different and the other thing she did which. I think helped to make me who I am off to the wall. You can imagine that during the war sounded Yeoman, Roy sent chills on spine, right? We hated the Nazis we hated. And yet off to the war. When my F- Ankle, one out to Germany was the English sector he headed up. And he found a German couple, three children onto somebody. Allen. Good English. And among let me go hit Nicole because of what she told me, you know just because of Hitler and the Nazis doesn't mean Germans are bad people. She wanted me to save myself. That we are beyond allows human beings and some stances on culture. Nationality. Change, the way we behave, but inside it'll way human. Very. Good lesson for me too long. I think it's such an important lesson to put in front of. Our species now. because. The challenges are great kind of the eggs essential challenge of what it means to be human in this century. You know amazingly. Low I, think I imagined it start with, but roots and shoots has developed a very strong ethical set of of moral values. And I found increasing those I call. The alumni were part of roots and shoots at school colleg. You know they hang onto those valleys. In China people come up to me, and of course, I care about the environment I was in roots and shoots in. School by time in all schoolbooks, it's interesting. Isn't it? So we have a huge group of young people in China, passionate about the environment and protecting animals. Laura. Student. and. Again, you know that's it's so important to hear that story, which is a story of that are happening, but it's It contrasts with big sweeping generalizations that good made. I mean I. I think we tend to turn especially in a moment where people are so fearful in their bodies, right? which is very hard for us to behave at our best when we're so fearful in our bodies. So. Confronted with, uncertainty. But we turn these great challenges before us into big fights. And I just you know I mean I'm going to read this passage. From reason, for hope, you said, you said this a minute ago, but I don't think it can be emphasized too much. If we think about what's before us in terms of. How we completely rearrange our relationship with the natural world. Had, a, we remake the world. Around what has surfaced in pandemic of what is simply unsustainable and inhumane? And I think of you. In. Gombe Bay going into the present to mysterious kin of humanity and and observing and what you learned about approaching the other, and here's something you wrote. In reason for hope, it is my task to try to change their attitude. In this matter, they will not listen if I raise my voice and point an accusing finger. Instead, they will become angry and hostile, and that will be the end of the dialogue. Real change will only come from within laws and regulations are useful, but sadly easy to flout. So I keep the anger, which, of course, I feel as hidden and controlled as possible I tried to reach gently into their hearts. There's that hardward. Well. Lucky isn't it? I was wanted to write I've loved writing. Yes, and I think I was given A. On purpose give. One gift to a healthy body. I mean not not too many eighty, six year. Old Can do what I was doing before the pandemic. Working harder now than even on a tour I have to say. To my voice just getting. On awesome. Video messages to send people and emails, I. It doesn't stop. But. The healthy body is one, but if communication writing speaking against, Joey work acted. Yes. Of course. But nevertheless, it was a gift that I discovered when I was. So terrified of my first ever lecture, which was the five thousand people in what's now dog constitution hope food geographic. Washington DC. I was terrified and I. I swear three minutes of behind grieved although people said, they didn't out to sit, and then suddenly that was five thousand people. And it was like something came the skimped like, yes, I. Want to share with. Them? I. Think it's a wonderful thing to share. Something like that. You've often quoted. This line that your grandmother Danny conveyed to you biblical mantra. As they days socialize strength be. With you now, absolutely definitely, and you know I made my grandmother. What we called a Bible box. It was six latch oxes. You'd. So it was like a little chest draws pulled out with the paper clip, I. Read Every single chapter of the Bible. It took about three months I. Think. It was a secret, the her Christmas present on a road map I wrote out the text on one side, and where came from the Bible the other. and. So, I was sitting off on one of my elvis tours of was seeing the off, my sister, you know. And she said, Oh, have a habitat before he goes called out. A text which read he who has once set his hand. APPLY PLOWSHARE ATTORNEYS BACK IS NOT FIT for the Kingdom of Heaven. So Jewison okay. A few. Do the other tours I got exactly the same. We always put him back in. Just. Last week when I was moaning about how busy I am. She said, Oh takes they came up I you we both neely I think he was speechless. And nobody else in the house of a happened one. Well I. Is Clear before me? I think. So I think that we all are you a debt of gratitude for accepting the adventures and this and and the sacrifices and the hard work that come with them. If I if I just ask you enclosing a huge question. But I'm curious about how you might just start answering it today how your sense of what it means to be human keeps evolving. What is it? What it means to be human means to be human I? Mean I am PROSAIC I. Know that. We're. Not Full. Progression of life forms. That, way. Not. In not, in many ways, we are so much a part of the animal kingdom, and then what's differentiated US Assistant. You. It was some point earlier, Utah divided our intelligence, but we're not really a very intelligent species always when we destroy your home, but is our intellect enables anyway. So. Think, not everyone agrees with me, but I believe the. Trick of the today intellect, which is so startling. Really was the fact that we developed this way of communicating speaking. So I can tell you things. You don't know. You can tell me things, I, know we can teach children about things around present and all that has enabled us to ask questions. Like who am I? Why am I here? What is the purpose of? It'll is report. Is, sort of spiritual guiding force out now. and. I believe part of being human is questioning a curiosity. Trying to find on says, but understanding that there are some answers that at least on this planet is life. Dislike full. We will not be able to answer. And I get. Paid. When Scientists will say, but we know how the NFL started start with the big bag. Yes. I'm sorry book for. Big Bang lease. So and you know fascinating more and more highly intellectual people most offensive signs, physicists and so on. On Francis Collins, he started off some agnostic. Then when he began unraveling the human genome, he changed completely and became a believer and all of these great brains have said there is no way that what's happened is just John's. At intelligence behind the universe is. What it is, who it is, probably what it is I, haven't the faintest idea, but I'm absolutely show that that is something. Seeking for that something. To being human. Well Jane. Goodall. Thank you so much It's a real honor to speak with you and a pleasure and I was very glad as I was getting ready for this been in your presence physically those years ago because I can imagine you and. Your, thank you for all the gifts you've given to. Really, than I've loved talking to you and I was just going to depress my video, got a billion press. So I can see you. Oh, I, don't actually I only have sound. Sorry I'm sad about that. But maybe in this strange world we inhabit, we will physically be in the same place again, one of. Not. Okay. Good I'm glad to hear you say that. You can see the icon see. Rusty. That he is special. Special. Here. Is Mum Cookie people in my life and David Greybeard. Greybeard what's up here, but he's GonNa each case. He's in the house. Okay It, was me talking to you. Thank you so much. Jane Goodall is the founder of Jayme Goodall Institute, which has a presence in more than thirty countries. She's been the subject of many films and documentaries including Jane Goodall. The hope and her books include in the shadow of man and reason for hope a spiritual journey. Special. Thanks this week to Sumantha Bacher and Orion magazine for making this conversation with Jane. Goodall happen an edited version of it will appear at a Ryan online in the fall. The being project is Chris Cagle. Lily Percy. Laurent. Aaron Cosco Kristen Lynn Eddie Gonzalez. Billion Vote Lucas Johnson Suzanne early, Zach Rose Siri Grassley. Colleen check Cristiano Mortell Julia. Cycle. Gretchen handled and. The ongoing project is located on Dakota, land are lovely. Theme Music is provided and composed by Zoe. And the last voice that you hear singing at the end of our show is. Cameron. Kinghorn. On being is an independent nonprofit production. The on being project, it is distributed to public radio stations by WNYC studios. I created the show at American public media. A funding partners include the FETZER institute helping to build the spiritual foundation for a loving world. Find them at Fetzer DOT, Org. Kelly. A pay foundation dedicated to reconnecting ecology culture and spirituality supporting organizations and initiatives that uphold a sacred relationship with life on earth learn more at Kelly Appiah, dot org humanity united advancing human dignity at home, and around the world find out more at humanity united dot org part of the on Meteoric Group, the Osprey Foundation a catalyst for empowered healthy and fulfilled lives and the Lilly. Endowment. An Indianapolis based Private Family Foundation dedicated to its founders interest in religion community, development, and education. On being is produced by on being studios in Minneapolis MS so.

Jane Goodall scientist David Greybeard Danny Africa Krista Tippett Damascus Tanzania Fetzer Institute Animal Kingdom warmoth England Louis Leakey Hugo van FETZER DOT Org US Gombe Bay FETZER primatology St- Jane Goodall Ken
ICYMI - Jane Goodall on Studying Chimpanzees & Fighting Climate Change

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

08:10 min | 5 months ago

ICYMI - Jane Goodall on Studying Chimpanzees & Fighting Climate Change

"You're. Listening to comedy central. Shaft Jane Goodall. Daily social distancing show. Well thank you so much for inviting me to join you. I feel like it's not even my invitation to give you or somebody who has been in the hearts and minds of so many people across the globe you've been studying our primate cousins for six decades now I mean. Arguably we know more about the world of primates because of you than we ever would have had you not gotten involved. Learned everything there is to know about our primate cousins I think. So I mean you know sixty years we're still learning new things about the same chimpanzee community, and especially when are entering the fourth generation, you know they can live to be about sixty years old. studied. Them. Will time. You can see the fact of different kinds of mothering you can look. Now we can detect the fog by doing DNA analysis from their fecal samples. So we can say, well, does the paternity of any influence on the personality of the child old questions like this absolutely fascinating. I've always wanted to know how to Jane Goodall, twenty six years old decide you know what I'm going to go and study chimpanzees and what makes them tick and who they are. Well. It actually all began when I was ten years old growing up in England on growing up in the days before TV and computers themselves phones spending time outside. Then when I was ten Iran Tarzan of the APES, I've decided I'm going to grow up to Africa and live with wild animals, write books about them. Everybody loved. How will you do that? Well who is raging? Annual Justice. But my mother, my amazing mother she's right here behind me. She just said if you really want something, they now have to work really hard. He could teach every opportunity, and if you don't maybe be find a way and that's the message I take to young people around the world. Particularly in disadvantaged communities, we seem to be the only species that at an alarming rate destroys our environments. We we don't see any other animals doing this. We see a natural balancing nature we see and understanding of one thing affecting the other, but it feels like more and more, and you you discuss this from the perspective of an animal. Researcher. Habitat being destroyed. The world is changing. Do you see those effects within the chimpanzee communities that that you so often frequent? Well no but you know something I think if they developed in intellects along the lines of ours, they would probably do exactly the same I feel that what we're doing to join the planet is because we can do it awhile. But ourselves into this situation where we can cut down forests like that. And what's the result event? Well, we basically bought a pandemic on ourselves and we basically brought about the climate crisis that that's we've done that and it's high time that we step back from saying lush wait we don't we care about the future of our children. Do we care about the health of the planet because we're out to this natural weld not separated from? You have become. Even more famous over the over the past few years, not just for your research and you work. But also as being an outspoken climate change activists over the past few months. In fact, we've seen your social media exploded with people just engaging with you and connecting with you, and you really have become one of the loudest voices calling for change when it comes to our fights to stop the climate from getting warmer. What do you think people don't understand the conversation I think people are burying their heads in the sand I? Think you know even climate change deniers have begun to say Williams the climate is changing I mean Yukon deny can you I? Mean you cannot deny the fact that temperatures. You can't deny the fact of these terrible fires that arranging and so many parts of the world. You can't deny the the isis melting and you see the ice on the tops of the mountains disappearing snow and Yukon denied the drought. So yes but there are still some people say say, yes. Yes. But that's just natural. It's not going to do with us. Will those people who refuse to listen to science with scientists have proven that the levels of carbon dioxide? The main greenhouse gas have risen exponentially and in a way never seen throughout the whole course of evolution. So What do we? What do we say to them I? Don't know they refused to believe it but young people. The beginning to understand. That it's our full. But you know this dependency now for people to lose hope. Because some signs saying we reached the tipping point nothing we can do that. I refuse to believe in we bought a window of time if we get together. Then we can at least not to heal some of the home we've been. What would you say to a young person who has lost? Hope a young person who wants to change the world but feels like they cannot yell that's why started this roots intrudes because I was meeting young people like that. WHO said you compromise on future on this nothing? We can do about it. That's I said no no, you're wrong. And the main message of this program is that every single day we live, we make some impact on the planet a we get to choose what sort of impact we night would we buy we did it come from? Did it harm? The environment was cruel to animals we can choose however most living in deep poverty and the so many of them made con choose entered destroy lost trees to try and grow food to feed their families or be allows fish in Dubai, the cheapest junk food because they have to survive. So changing the gap between the haves and the have not alleviating poverty thinking each one of our environmental footprint. These are the things that really matter now everybody and gets involved if you up in sleeves and you say, well, I can't change the world like in cleanness stream. And then that stream water will. Clean into the. Riffa. And there are many other people cleaning streams the reference getting cleaner Lena event would the into the Ocean then. You know the old around wealth, a people tackling the same things that you can. then. Cumulative effects of Individual Action starts to issue. And then you feel hopeful it's when you take action that you leave this feeling of this fat and. I I hope as many people take action as possible I. Thank you for changing not just my life but I think the lives of many many millions of people around the world Dr Jane Thank you so much for joining me on the show. Well thank you and you're the exactly the same. So shake on it. Thank you so much. The daily show with cover noise years addition watch the show weeknights at eleven ten central on comedy, central and comedy central. I watch full episodes and videos at the daily show dot com follow us on facebook twitter and instagram and subscribe to the feeling show on Youtube for exclusive and more. This has been a comedy central. PODCAST.

Jane Goodall Yukon Dr Jane Africa Researcher Dubai England APES Iran facebook Youtube Lena instagram Williams
Amazing Creatures // Dr. Jane Goodall

Deepak Chopra’s Infinite Potential

43:20 min | 2 years ago

Amazing Creatures // Dr. Jane Goodall

"Let me start by giving. You a good old chimpanzee greeting who. And that means this is me, this is Jane. Nine hundred sixty Dr Jane Goodall, walked into Gumbo stream national park in Tanzania and changed the world forever. Jane, Goodall, all blond and beautiful killing these in the wilds of Africa, Dr Goodall discovered chimpanzees used grass stems to help them hunt for termites, and as we all know now that they feel emotion and have distinct personalities. A research on chimpanzees ended perception of their interaction with the natural world and each other. She observed them behaving in familiar, human moods and challenge yourself to engage with them as fellow conscious beings. Not just scientific subjects. So what makes us human? And how can we both admire our unique gifts and not forget that we are just one small connected part of something vast and grant, we are part of this incredible animal kingdom, the more. We learn about it the more. We learn about our selves. And I'm sure you agree with me that anyone head and hard work in harmony, can we achieve our true human potential. And this is infinite potential, maybe explore what makes us conscious beings and white matters that we are. Today. Doctor Jane Goodall is the world's foremost expert and chimpanzees one of the most respected voices in the world. And she still woman on a mission as I learned in recent conversation. Dr Goodall has always approach things a little differently. My mother tells stories about when I was very small. I was four and a half. We lived in London that time not so many animals and mom took me for a holiday on a farm in the country. And it was really exciting. I can still remember meeting cows and pigs and and she face to face English press through. That's right. And I was given a job of collecting the hint sakes, so then picked around in the form yard. But there were about a no six or eight and houses where they slept at night with miss books around the age. So I would go around, and if there was an egg popped in my buzz gets the pearly began asking people, but we'll have the whole that the comes out 'cause I couldn't see a whole that big. Clearly, nobody told me so I still remember seeing this Brown hen going up into. A hen house. I must have filled. You know, she's going to. Cruel off to her. That was a mistake. She flew out this walks of presumably fear. And so my little four and a half year old mine must have no head will land kits dangerous place. But now, I'm on the part of discovery. So I went into an empty Heddon house. Waited quietly and the hen came in finally, am I still can see her rising little bit on her legs and this white slightly soft a coming out. Mum had been desperately looking for me. Nobody nura was they called the police. So you could imagine Howard. She was but when she saw the excited, it'll go rushing towards the house instead of how dare you golf without telling us, don't you dare do that. Again, she saw my shining eyes and sat down to hear the wonderful story of how hen lays in a. And the reason I tell that story isn't that the making of a little scientist curiosity asking questions not getting the right answer deciding defined outfield. Self making a mistake not giving up and learning patience. It was all their different kind of mother might have crushed that scientific curiosity, and I might not have done what I have done. Too long way from hence to primates and to me the chimpanzee which has maybe more than ninety percent of his genetic structure similar to ours. What was your first experience with a with the chimp running away from me? They'd never seen a white IPE before this was gonna be national park. It took a long time low to patients, but remember learned that in the hen house. And finally one of them had this beautiful white beard, and I called him David greybeard, and he began to let me get close. And it was David greybeard who gave me a very. What kind of moment to call it sort of not life changing, but something but. Made me realize this is going to be my life because he had just begun to allow me to actually follow him. And he was going through the forest, and I was going off to him. Then he went through thick tangle of detail. I lost him. And I find him another day. But when I finally got through he was sitting looking back, and it looked as though he was waiting for me. And maybe he was I don't know. So he was sitting is between us was a right bread palm nut, which they love. And so I picked it up and held it out to him on my hand, and he turned his face away. So I put my hand closer. And he reached out he took the not he dropped it. But very gently squeezed my fingers abets how chimpanzees reassure each other. So in that moment, we communicated in a way. Which must have predated human language. He was saying, thank you know, way in a way. Yes. Two chimps have guilt or shame or humiliation. Or now disgust. A frustration. I never totally sure about some of those emotions, you know, because it's very easy for us to say, well, we were in that situation would be feeling shame dog guilty. They are they learning the doing this is wrong because they being punished and therefore it's it's a confused. Pronunciation beer of some kind of social hierarchy goes ladder area on the males fight for it. And some of the ways that they posture and gesture swagger around reminds me so much of some politicians, and so it's very important for some males. Not all their different someone to get to the top. And some do it by using their intelligence. They find an ally. Either a convenient one of the time or maybe a permanent one like your brother, and they. Oh, knee Tekla, higher rank you in that allies, others just stole men and want to use their strength aggressive natures to get to the term those ones don't last as long as the intelligent ones, British Sooners, you introduced this hierarchy of social status with its humans primates. I think then there's the opportunity to evolve these emotions guilt shame mistrust and shila. They have those things just what does it mean when a chimp behaves asto his ashamed I don't exactly know haven't managed to get far into a chimps mind. But I'm people will you know to go away from chimps for moment. We had a dog home, and he knew it was bad to steal because he was punished for stealing. So sometimes we'd get back, and he wasn't visible anywhere. And we'd find him called up in a chair. And he had stolen a pack of food beheaded eaten it he was lying on it. So he knew it was wrong reeling guilty, and he was feeling guilty. So if dogs can of course, chimps. Rupert Sheldrick is a common friend of us, and Rupert goes onto even think that dogs have better normal psychic abilities that they can read your mind. Even you know, if a dog owner or the human companion of a dog is in London, and the dog is in Paris, and each his mind and wants to come home earlier the dog moves to the front of the house waits at the door as soon as the human companion has had an intention to return home. What's your opinion on all this? Well, the strangest one most fascinating to me was with this parrot colden key. See I heard there was psychic parrot, and this experiment with five envelopes with pictures in. Nobody knew the pictures. But what the pictures were except this one woman who didn't know anything about the parrot or anything. She just had to choose five pictures and put them in on loops. And as the Amy opens I on blowed key Seve's in another room. And I'd be that see you knows no way. He could. Yes, I agreed about it. But I've met the many times. I see. So as she opens the first one, it's a photograph of flowers strictly ones and Casey kind of Mering pretty flowers. Nice flowers. Then shoop the second one, which is a man on his cellphone, very clearly. What you say on you so phone the only mistake that he makes out of these five is of all the Q Leah picture of a man stepping out of a car, and he sort of half in half out and the word on the word is caused. So he supposed to say, but he doesn't he says what you doing with your head Patil hit back in. Why is this not a breakthrough revolutionary insight into the nature of consciousness? I think it is. And you know, I was told an notes for not scientific, and I shouldn't use anecdotes and to me, I think don't. So the breakthrough into the mind and dotes things which helps to understand sciences Viktor two million to make experiments, and then you tell the story right way doesn't the word wise in the world talking about it. I think sciences is very reluctant is going to be proved about twenty nine times. And yet scientists frequently get stuck on the assumptions, they do they do they don't like them challenged. So this distinction between pure instinct and riches plus away will and emotion, which is kind of survival. But also, there's an element, of empathy. What we humans would call compassion and love, but there's an element of that in all censh- and life. Are you kind of sympathetic to that worldview, you think that all centurions has some level of emotional consciousness? I think they do. And unfortunately, we say an element of aggression, and you know, the dark side of human nature, we see that you were one of the. The first to identify that the dark side of humans is also present and chimps do you. Remember the that in the early seventies? The subject of whether Puma NHS were born with a blank slate or they had inherited aggressive or other instincts, and it became a political issue. And I remember going to this big conference in I think, it was Paris, and about aggression, and when I talked about the aggression, the chimps people coach showed at me, and I was actually told that I should not talk about that. I should down play. Because then people might think that we humans have an aggressive instinct through. Of course, we do look around the world. But at that time soulages for trying to push it under the carpet. Luckily, you know, my mother taught me tab, the courage of my conviction and not to give in. Otherwise, I wouldn't have published any of that stuff. That insight is very helpful in understanding our own nature, but also the nature of life in general. And since the whole ecosystem is is a combination of the symbiosis and predation at the same time may we're all part of the food chain. But we also have a deep. Longing to understand our connection to all of life. I mean, that's one thing that humans. Really? Are in way, different from other species that requests in. Question this questions while we while we hear what is the meaning of my life. And then we tell stories we make them up. When we come back. We'll tell more stories with Dr Jane Goodall. Scf can be stressful between work family and everything in between. It's not always easy to find time for yourself. That's where talk space comes in talk. Space is therapy for how we live today talk space online therapy makes taking care of your mental health more affordable and convenient than ever before simply provide your preferences for therapy and talk space will match with one of your three thousand plus therapists, the very same day, send your therapist unlimited text ordeal picture of video messages from anywhere at anytime. No matter what you're going through. You're not alone talk space has more than three thousand licensed, therapists, who are experienced in addressing the challenges. We all face to match your perfect therapist for a fraction of the price of traditional therapy. Go to talk spe. Dot com. Make sure to use the code Deepak to get forty five dollars off your first month and Choya support for the show, that's Deepak and talk space dot com. Join more than one million people who feel happier with tok space. The fact that I'm speaking to you right now, and that you're listening, and hopefully understanding is pretty amazing. And while it connects us, some would say is what separates us humans from the rest of the animal kingdom, which is what I wanted to us. The gene good about. So this brings me to this question regarding language because deepest Dorian still us some of them that up until say fifty sixty thousand years ago, there were many species of humans, you know, Neanderthals and homo habilis actors on and on 'til one species. Sapienze us created a language for gossip and storytelling who started giving names to perceptual experience and calling them objects in when giving names to other animals. It's part of a story of. Every thing in creation, we've given the word too. But as soon as we start telling stories, then, you know, the more outrageous stories are we are the best species. And you know, we know how to love the more sophisticated those stories get the more. Actually, we lose our connection to the source of all existence in this is the fall from grace. And in this new dimensionality of experience, you kind of separated yourself from all that exists. I mean, I, you know, always amazed at how similar we are to Jim pansies, and for that matter other animals to in sharing emotions like, fair and pain and anger on things. Like that. But clearly we're different for the reasons that you've just been talking about. And so we developed this way of using words, and I'll talk so for the first time we could actually teach our children about things that would actually present because chimpanzees learn by observing. And so yes, they have a culture behavior Paul's from one generation to the next through observation imitation and practice, but you know, we can with words discuss the paused and tell stories about it, and perhaps make use of it chimpanzees certainly can make plans for the immediate future. But we can make plans to what we're going to do ten years ahead and most important of all we can discuss. So if we have a problem, we can bring people from different walks of life with different experiences to try and solve that problem. So it's an bizarre that the most intellectual creatures ever walked the planet is destroying it. So the home, but. It seems made as a disconnect between this extremely intellectual mind, the human heart, which is love and compassion in the wisdom tradition of the east this in sunscreen. There's a word called prog up rod which translated into English means the mistake of the intellect that the mistake of these lectures that we are separate from everything else and our children today. Look at look at them. I grew up in Brixton and cement and concrete, and they're on their little electronic gadgets, and they'll sit next to each other in a bus instead of talking the what's happening to us. Civilization. On a self destructive more anywhere destroying us. We are because we need the the planet. We need the natural world. And if we go undestroyed destroying the forest pollute in the oceans nulla rest of it. We will destroy ourselves. Bacteria reminding me something that I learnt recently have from some naturalists, and this is the phenomenon that now biology is exploring his what they call being grounded. So when you walk barefoot on the earth, or when you walk barefoot on the grass or on the beach, or even when you touch a tree you are electromagnetic Lee connected to the electromagnetic fields of the planet. And in a sense, you're re organizing a resetting your biological rhythms with the rhythms of nature. So this particular person was a naturalist with Stelling me that when animals get sick, or whatever they borrow themselves in the ground or sit in the. Ground until the recover. And so one of the things that's happened. With the modern society is a biology's out of sync with the biology of nature Sabih logical organism whether we like it or not it's a self-regulating biological phenomenon including the web of life, and I'm doing some research on this right now and looking at oh when people are grounded, even if I touch a tree, and you touch me and somebody else such you. We're all recent biological rhythms. I wonder what you think about this. Well, I think we have to add into this equation. The fact that you know, so much of what's out. There has been so polluted with chemicals in the ocean food, we eat it's very hard. You have to go quite far to get into sort of real untouched nature. And the real untouched nature is getting smaller and smaller and smaller. So I suppose in your research, you'll take into account the fight that because we developed electric city. We now don't have the sort of cycle at an animal will have where goes to see when it's darkness wakes up when it's light. But we pay no attention to that. Edison, invented the. But without it now. Well, we could do without. It's like, you know, we would what we're doing the planet. We could actually do without oil and gas. I mean, it would be very hard. Technologies already exist. He has to but but we could not do without water. Yes. And fresh water supplies are any danger. And, you know, something this is wonder, I don't if you can explain this. But I was in Bordeaux just recently on a climate change conference. And I was just thinking it was being translated you see bit by bit. So just thinking next I'm going to talk about water, and how if we lose our water, you know, that will be the next wars and the three big glass for the bottles on the table in front, and as I was thinking, this is what I'm going to talk about one of those bottles cracked down the water dropped onto the floor. So I've kept that bottle, and because to me it's incredibly symbolic to may symbols aquarium. So this brings actually a very important question that I want to ask you as a scientist without actually enraging current thinking on evolutionary biology. We a species that has evolved as a result of some direction by a deeper intelligence or consciousness that is in a way guiding de-evolution of species, I know, this would be very controversial and might enrage strict physically so materialists, but just seems to me the evolution is kind of directed in a way of more creativity. More questioning more. Inquiry and more even abstraction as we start to get into realms of thought from tools to now the internet now intergalactic space exploration doesn't seem all together. Random to me. I don't think for one single second. It's random at you know, when I was out in the rainforest and out in the rain for as your in the middle of an ecosystem where the interrelation of all things is so clear and each tiny little species has a role to play and it may seem insignificant. But if it disappears that can have ripple effect because maybe that was the main food source of some of the creature and so on and that can lead to ecosystem collapse losing one little species. You know, this is a very this thought that we are inter beings interest in this inter is in Buddhist terms that wall censh- and beings about of an infinite consciousness than that cinch in beings what recalled biological organisms? Are actually species of consciousness essential beings. And they're all part of this web of life. If you fiddle with even one little strand in the web, the whole web is affected. The weather's live we meddle with it to our peril. And we're already modeling onto too much. After the break. What happens when survival instincts of humans and chimps collide, stay with us. Robin Hood is an investing app that lets you buy and sell stocks ETF's options and cryptos all commission free. While other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every trade. Robinhood doesn't charge any commission fees. So you can trade stocks and keep all of your profits. Plus, there's no account minimum deposit needed to get started. So you can start investing at any level. The simple intuitive design of robinhood makes investing easy for newcomers and experts alike view, easy to understand charts and market data and place a trade in just four taps on your smartphone. With Robin Hood, you can learn how to invest in the market as you build your portfolio. Discover new stocks drag your favorite companies. And get custom notifications for price movements. So you never miss the right moment to invest Robin Hood is giving listeners of infinite potential a free stock like apple Ford or sprint to help you build your portfolio. Sign up at infinite dot robinhood dot com. I understand that being able to practice mindfulness everyday is something we all want to achieve sometimes it can be really hard when we are overwhelmed with work and other aspects of life. There is an app I highly recommend which might help you to be more mindful every day. It's called blanket. St- blankets is the only app that takes the best key takeaways. The need to know information from thousands of nonfiction books and condenses them down into just fifteen minutes. So you can read or listen to with an audio feature. Blink makes it so easy to finish four books day while you're on the go, I like blankets because it opens a door for people who may be too busy with the stresses of life family and work to read everything they might want right now. For a limited time blankets has. A special offer just for our audience. Go blankets dot com slash infinite to start your free seven-day trial. That's blinking. I spelled B L I N K. I S T blinky dot com slash infinite to start your free seven-day trial. Again, that's B L I N K. I S T blinky dot com slash infinite. Now, let's return to our conversation reducted, Dr Jean Gudang. Chimps have a sense of humor. Do my favorite sense of humor, though, is coca the gorilla a signing gorilla and was a young woman and she went into the. Lab he was volunteering and she was told occupied cocoa while we prepare cocoa supper. So as CoCo had just learned all the colors, not just the primaries all of them. So this young woman is picking up something that's blue and something that screen, and then she picks up a white cloth and cocoa signs red. And the young woman says Okoko, you know, better than that what color is red. Coco if you don't tell me what color this is you have upper to supper coca reaches out takes the white cloth. Picks off a minute speck of red fluff and says red red red. The notion that humor can be shared language between humans and chimps made me think about another story. The story is about a man named Rick and a chimp named Joe Joe. And about the way we are instinctively connected to each other. And maybe at a very deep level to all living beings. Yes, Rick, Jo-jo bless your that story tell it, but I have to tell two stories opposite side of the spectrum. So Joe Joe was a chimpanzee who is NS zoo. And he had lived in that sue for many many years by himself. So he wasn't very good at interacting socially when they rescued him and put him with this group on an island chimps don't swim, and he still started getting on. But then one day a male is challenging him. Joe Joe's terrified, Andy. So frightening gets over the Varia. Into the deported beyond. Three times. He disappears under the surface. And then he's gone and keeper standing there just watching. And this one visitor goes the SU one day a year with his wife and kids he jumps. And he has the swim under the water. He gets hold of Joe Joe's body gets over that Barry out pushes Jo-jo into the closure and hear his wife screaming the children crying daddy. Daddy. Daddy. And he's coming back to join them. Three of the big males coming out, bristling hair and screaming big teeth show and. At the same time the banquets to sleep and Joe Joe sliding back into the water. And you see Rick standing with his hand on the railing looking up at his firmly looking at three males looking at Joe Joe. And he went back again he pushed Joe Joe Joe Joe not that. Although he seemed lifeless spits out some water finally grabs a tuft of grass, and we pushing manages to drag himself to safety three meals to sport. And so that evening Rica's interviewed on radio and asks why did you do it? You must have known. It was dangerous. And he said I happened to look in his eyes. And there was a message there. Won't anybody? Help me. So beautiful and the other story the other way around a chimpanzee or rescued from medical research put on an island in Florida with three females also rescued the male is known as old man young man employed to look after them told not to go near them. They hate people. They'll try to kill you. But he watches a baby is born. And Mark sees how old man loves baby and protects it from real imagined harm and Hsieh's food the hug each other and brazen kiss anything. I must develop a relationship with them. How can I look after them? Otherwise, anyhow, eventually, he takes a banana, and he goes to the island warm, these little pedal boats and one day, he does step on shoe. Nothing happens. One day. He does to grew moat. None and one day old man grooms him back and one day. He does to tickle in his tickly shoulder an old, man. Loves so everything's lovely females keep away but one day slips fold on his face babies near startles screams. The mother rushing to the rescue as mothers will bite Cinta marks. Mech? Feels the blood trip down the other two females running to support their friend one bites his wrist and won his leg. And he's looking up thinking how can I get away? Now, his Obermann thundering across the island with his lips punched in a furious scowl hell and things he thinks I heard his precious infant, and he prepared to die. But what does old man do? He drags these three females away keep some off Mark while he drags himself. Painfully to the boat. And I met Mark when he came out of hospital, and he said, Jane, the snow question Oldman saved my life. And to me, this is really symbolic because if a chimpanzee and one who's been harmed by people can help a human friend in time of need. Then surely we with our greater ability understanding can help others in that time of need. This every great stories of story. This the best love story of ever heard. You know that saying we have inherited the planet from our parents. We borrowed it from our children. But we haven't we stolen we still stealing their future. And so coming into the the reality of now and me on this planet, and is the repurpose am I here with the mission? It feels like it, and my mission seems to be to give people some hope because you don't have Hobo should you bother to do anything. So this is where you know, I'm concentrated on trying to save life life life. Are you hopeful that we will as a collective consciousness start to realize the so again start reversing some of the damage because technically speaking a lot of this is reversible. I think there's a growing awareness everywhere. But I think the one of the big problems is people feel hopeless and helpless. What can I do? And so the message is that every single day we live each one of us make some impact on the planet. And those of us fortunate enough to be not an extreme poverty. We have a choice as to what kind of difference again to make you know, if we think about the consequences of what we buy what did it come from? How is it made that it involve cruelty to animals child slave labor harm to the environment? Doctors no part of our. Conversation. Anyway, collective gun decision rate so becoming aware when moving in that direction. I think we have a window of time. We've got to do something about the unsustainable. Lifestyle of everybody else knew me, my lifestyle, isn't sustainable. We've got the crazy idea. You can have unlimited economic development on a planet of finite, natural resources. We have the tools, and it's about language the wave discuss language, and how the supports helped us develop an intellect but the other day when I was out in the forest this. I've never seen it before or cents. It was an amazing fly was most beautiful colors. It had golden has and it landed on my finger, and I was looking at it, and it's a fly. And I thought because we use that word fly where belittling something is a miracle of creation. And if we didn't know what to call it a fly. We would be utterly amazed. What is your hope for humanity? Now. I think my greatest hope is in the people because they are changing the world they are influencing their parents. And so the goal is a critical of young people who understand that. While we need money to live. We shouldn't live for money. That's when it goes wrong. Second reason for hope the sprain, which is beginning to come up with technology that will enable us to live in harmony and director own lives lead, a slight and ecological footprint as we can. The next resilience of nature. Many ecosystems that we destroyed given a chance can become beautiful again animals on the brink of extinction can be given Jones. And finally, the indomitable human spirit, the people who tackle the impossible. What seems impossible and we'll give up. The best example of that indomitable human spirit and reminded of phrase from the great Indian to gore. He said every child that is born is proof that God has not yet given up on humans. So many things that make us human. But part of what makes us human his dad, which is not human from wildlife to resources knocked. Jane Goodall has reminded us today that the natural world is intricately apart of who we are and likely in more ways than we can even fat. Listeners who are interested in supporting dodge Goodell's ongoing work should visit roots and shoots dot ahrq. Her youth service organization whose mission is to foster respect and compassion for all living things to promote understanding of all cultures and beliefs and to inspire each individual to take action to make the world a better place for people other animals and the environment in some small way. I think she's done that for all of us who had the pleasure of listening to today. I'm Deepak Chopra. Thank you for listening to infinite potential. If this episode connected with you, please share it with the friend and leave us comments. So we get to hear from you. In our next episode. We explore the mind a one of the great comedians of our day Russell brand. Now, it's time for our gratitude list, infinite potential is produced by David Shadrach Smith, and Julie mcgruder it's edited by Sam dingman and Andy Jaskiewicz. The audio engineer is Bob tabards. Caroline wrangle is our associate producer and Serena Regan is the coordinating producer. We especially thank our guess sponsors, interns, and everyone who has contributed to bring infinite potential to you our show is created and executive produced by David Chadwick Smith. Jan Cohen and me, I'm departure. Thank you for joining me.

Doctor Jane Goodall Joe Joe Joe Joe scientist hen house London Deepak Chopra Paris Mark Robin Hood Tanzania Heddon David greybeard golf Rupert Sheldrick Rick Africa Howard Andy Jaskiewicz David Shadrach Smith
Jane Goodalls hope

The Science Show

10:25 min | 11 months ago

Jane Goodalls hope

"Ladies and gentlemen you are in for a special treat tonight. Dr Jane Goodall People Think of as being associated with chimpanzees. Only but actually. She's much more than that. All these young people looking at her like. She's a deity so much. Love Charlotte onto me this assessment and. I thought well this is going to help me do what I do. We say slow down. She says time's running out to speed up. I HAVE TO RUN. Snuggled arguing you to reach hall have to do it. Jane Goodall an extract from her film. The hope released on Wednesday. She leads the sideshow about thinking. And consciousness and saving those animals. Wednesday was Earth Day. The Fiftieth Birthday. In fact that's when National Geographic released the hope and when I had the chance to speak to this pioneer of animal behavior. I'm in a cottage on the south coast of New South Wales. And she's in London alright rather than respond at all on line for you. Hello that Jen Goodall Robin Williams. We hadn't met for a little while and once when we were the museum and we had big audience of several hundred people you came onto the stage off dry introduced you and you gave me a great big kiss on the lips and then as I was trying to come to terms of you explained. This is a common greeting chimpanzees. I thought it right. I do remember kissing you on the live but can do that but I'm sure I didn't. I'm sure I post to speaking embraced. You could have on that. But how are you going to be now? So we're very worried about them. Because of a pandemic and with taking all the precautions we can we've reduced. The stock is me when customers have time going to check on women that China is close and everything very very worrying time processed off and the chimps and baboons can be infected monkeys convenience and they go in and out of the off. So it's a very tense situation. And what about the other chimps in Africa generally populations so that's still decreasing? We have Institutes programs and Achim nine different concrete now suing roots and shoots and forest protection and of course the forest where the chimpanzees are Books you need protein. The live animal trade people living in the forest taking that just angels with them so the chimps leading a pretty tough time many animals indeed and given that and other things that we're thinking about. The fire has few weeks ago in Australia. And the problems of the Barrier Reef fifty percent of the reef gone. And what's happening in the Amazon and yet you still have hope. Tell us how well maybe laid big difference. If I lived through World War. Two for the first time came face to face with the coach and I still remember. I was thinking never near so seeing those first photographs of people looking like walking skeletons when the come will never entered and fortunately we had Winston Churchill and I think Europe with all including with a full under the Nazis. But it's nothing encouragement. Helped us get to win and so? I feel we've been through so many dog times in human. He's been an always we come. And maybe this time this time they make it so much worse than the previous epidemic stock in the same way with viruses crossing over from animals into people and because I mean we suddenly be hopping being on the move the baby crash closer together. Some of them have moved out and come into conflict with humans plaguing. And so on and we've been selling them for food and the markets and create conditions for us of finances. So I'm Payton. It's time you actually lum that. We've got to start respecting than that. And I'm starting to getting Betas and feelings just like us and we must do something must happen in urine spot in many ways by what you mentioned before roots and shoots what our roots and shoots out. We can't use. It's a program to young. People began with twelve high school students and ten to Nia and nineteen ninety one. It's now in sixty five countries and growing its members from kindergarten who university and everything in between the main messages every single individual. Everyone of us. My toes has a role to play and makes a difference every single day and every group makes it chilly of Crete project. People hold the most healthy environment because they get petunias tooth project. Relevant to that age Economic status the country's in religion politics and because they choose it that passionate they roll up please and they get to work in counting trees. Caring trash that the ship was passionate politics and they are changing the world dedicated they really cast and they have host. They are going to make a difference. They are going to cut in the world around. How can they do that as young people taking over in Brazil doing dreadful things to the Amazon and various other parts of the world? Where you know. They're pretty tough. People that traffickers of animals you know this is the fourth biggest international criminal trade. It's worth twenty billion a year or more. How can kids take that sort of thing on the kids? Obviously that cool back on the line hoping we're in the forest coca nineteen will election like big. Ben could not believe huge outcry now but what young people can do and are doing is because people like John where what's going on that writing that joining together and saying we have to stop being politicians. I'm the educating sometimes. The parents they educate Capable of making major decisions. The of course the children themselves come stock but they can help to range around people. So I'm not going to be a grunge film can hopefully bring it commend as normal people. I stepped out on the edge concealed paying. Yeah expand team financial all this of course in your film released for birthday two hours long and wanted about well. The general is showing what happened during my life. The things that I began the grown the impact that the I and the Jane Goodall Institute and moved into actually made and posted my ideal geographic. They wanted to carry on from the documentary. Chain distresses my early days and not much about what I'm doing now so they wanted to show the impact that my knife Chad I do it myself. I just wants only things happened. No it's a wonderful how you went into what they used to call the jungle without a degree and then you went to Cambridge and persuaded them that you could actually be a scientist and call your chimpanzees by certain names but told me in the film. I saw you dancing with Prince Harry. Had you get on with him we to come and speak once a yeah? We've been gathering. Young people. Eighteen to twenty four joe from different countries. Mood cheech neither and having them in Windsor Castle. It's amazing and I off Harry if he would come and he agreed. This was not a planned thing. I was wondering if you remember Jim. -queaking showed him when he met for the first time. And Don Chapman can both of us. Well that's why I remembered your greasing. I remember standing on stage just outside the Australia Museum and you you may have kissed me on the cheek but I always remember. It was a kiss on the lips. Thank you very much. And congratulations on the field. We mustn't do that now. Thank you so much but we come come. Lay brought the too far apart. Okay right your kids for you but not dominate the protocols of Kim Behavior Jane Goodall Age Eighty six stronger than ever and her film. The hope was released by National Geographic. This week the sideshow on our end.

Jane Goodall National Geographic Jane Goodall Institute Prince Harry Amazon Jen Goodall Charlotte Barrier Reef Winston Churchill China Australia South Wales Europe Achim London Don Chapman Windsor Castle Australia Museum Africa