17 Burst results for "Jane Goodall Institute"

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:32 min | 10 months ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Jane Goodall Institute's the Sankt enable needed cheering up and it's been very tough because the code it I mean Gumby were terrified that it will reach the Chimpanzee National Park and surrounding areas whether gyms because they catch your pieces. You have. You embrace this idea about hope and I want to ask you about this three of your books plus another set to release. Next year have hope in their titles documentary the National Geographic. Entry about you is called the hope what keeps you what makes you hopeful and I'd love to end on this note because there's so much going on right now from the pandemic. To climate degradation, which can really leave a person feeling despair about our planet but you have hope and I'd love to hear what keeps you hopeful. What I did will you hear all the time think globally act locally that's completely the wrong way round because quite honestly. I think everybody who thinks about the state of the planet globally will lose the they just. have any energy to do anything locally they'll be so depressed but of the whole message of roots and shoots if you start actually doing something to make a difference, ben you suck me feel you know while I am making a difference you know that will run the world of the people making a difference. So as I said earlier, the young people are giving me the most home. I'm very passionate about that. Then assists extrordinary intellectual. Ours. You know we're now coming up with ways that we can live in greater harmony was the planet with thinking about ways we can live a lighter ecological footprint every day, which is going to make a difference that makes you feel better. and. Then there's the resilience of nature I described flying over going beans a little tiny island ernest around it by Kooky. Onto any. Hilson. creeped ball. Because people. Puffing. And they realized The. Erosion. Well Jane Goodall let's leave it there on that hopeful note about the resilience of nature. Thank you so much for joining us today it's been such a pleasure philly great. Brian to everybody. Jane Goodall Anthony Brooks. This is on point..

Jane Goodall Institute Jane Goodall Anthony Brooks Jane Goodall National Geographic Chimpanzee National Park Gumby philly Brian Hilson.
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:16 min | 10 months ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Someone who's had many dogs love dogs I've always felt like, of course, there's emotion. Of course, there's personality of course there's all that stuff that doesn't just belong to US human beings. We're talking Jane, Goodall about her legacy climate change and conservation coming up later in the hour stay with us I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point. This is on point I'm Anthony Brooks, we're talking about sixty years of research with Jane Goodall ethologist conservationist activist and founder of the Jane. Institute, she's a global conservationist. She's active as well in spreading the word about the importance of tackling climate change, and we're GonNa get to all that as well as your calls. Jane. Goodall I. Just I have to come back to this question about dogs that came up before the break because I've read that that. Dog's not chimps are your favorite animals that true. Absolutely true and you know chimpanzees. So light people don't even think the McDonald's I mean. They'd just it just I know ferry people. So. The explosive development of our intellect that really is the biggest difference. Yeah. Yeah. So your work has expanded from from studying and saving chimps to climate change and and honestly saving the world in that wonderful documentary. The hope you referred to at one point is the Mother Teresa of the environment. Bit of a tough job You say, but how do you think about the the biggest challenge that we're facing right now? Well I think this actually tree major challenges and one is way alleviate poverty. See African village and it's you know it's just huge crippling poverty as lack of good health and education. The degradation of land is populations grow and it was when I flew over the tiny combination apart, which had been part of a huge forest and by nineteen nineteen was the tiny island deforestation all around completely bay hills, and that's when it hit me. We don't help people find ways of living without destroying the environment. Then we come save the chimps so that began the Jane Goodall Institute JJ began of a program which we call to Cari. which is now in six other African countries very successful. I wouldn't go into it. People could look it up. On the web but The people have now become A. Partners in conservation. So one we need to solve poverty to we need to do something about the unsustainable lifestyle of so many millions of people on this planet to Waymo may need. Don't think about. Do I need this thing? I'm buying. And then we also have to think about the fact that seven point two, billion people on the planet today. And, already we're running out natural resources faster than nature can replenish them in some places and in twenty fifty, it's estimated there will be. Nine point seven billion ten, billion people. So these are problems that we we must be thinking about if we want planet, it's their huge problems. I won't ask you about that one you the one that you referred to as maintaining these unsustainable lifestyles and I wanna ask you about that because it seems to me that one of the biggest challenges is how we define progress and governments and lots of people define progress by growth by expanding GDP. So it doesn't work in opposition to what we need to do, and if so how do we deal with that? How do we reverse the thinking around? Expansion isn't necessarily compatible with saving the plan. It's it's compatible with destroying the planet. It doesn't make sense. You can't have unlimited economic development on a planet with finite natural resources and if we don't. Get together wine a new green economy and find a different way of. Thinking about success. What is success right now for the most part, it's you know being successful in business if money getting stuff I'm getting power. And we need to start thinking about success being we need to have a life that we can enjoy a life where we can support our family. Yes. But not go over the top with I mean who needs four houses quite come on health need. WHO NEEDS TO YARDS WHO NEEDS A private plane? A few people actually do but most people don't. So we have to rethink waylon because if we don't, you know we're already on a downward trajectory. That's why began our program for young people, roots and shoots because it's their future and we've been feeling it and thereby wound to be very passionate about these issues. Jangling and ask you about roots and shoots because I'd love to hear more about that program. We've got a lot of callers that want to get in on this conversation with you. So let's go to Lynn who's calling from bridgewater mass go hedlund you're on the air with Jane. Goodall. Thanks for the call. Hello thank you so much and Dr. Goodall. You're such an inspiration to so many and I love to hear from you how you. Went from being an observer to research church. Now, a worldwide activists and what words of advice you have to our young people to get involved and make a difference today. Thanks. You. Know it. It just happened and I think it was the geographic whose articles spreading around the world and People began to be fascinated by the behavior of the chimpanzees. And I don't know how I mean. People he says today that I'm an icon. Will I never planned to be an icon and at first I hid I mean I was so shy. But then after bit on left being was trying to raise awareness, raise money and things like that. I realized that when people came up in the airport and wanted to sell selfie or something I could I could use that opportunity to tell them about roots and shoots to. To say that they could help by joining institute and you asked about what we tell young people what I tell the young people is every single day you live you make some kind of impact on the planet and you have a choice. In this, very, very poor which when you have no choice but you know..

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Dr. Goodall Jane Goodall Institute JJ Anthony Brooks US founder Waymo McDonald A. Partners waylon Cari. Lynn hedlund
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:03 min | 10 months ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"East, Africa that's from the National Geographic documentary. The hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activists. Jane. Goodall. Is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations. Messenger. Of Peace She's also dame dame of the British Empire and she's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees which came out in Nineteen sixty-nine and reason for hope, a spiritual journey which came out thirty years later, lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gombe Bay and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you. Antony, and it's lovely to be on the program which I've been on the number of times before and yeah, sixty years is pretty amazing. He is gone. Well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing I wondered if you could serve take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary, which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen, sixty, nineteen, sixty or twenty, twenty-six you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged you faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park where it was a game reserve than. The the problem was that on the other side of Lake, Tanganyika just to cross the were. They Belgian. Congo's it was then had erupted. There was violence, and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely fall of fleeing refugees love step Olympus. So it was it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake and get to the Gumby. National Park but once I got there. It will seem rather unreal. It just felt am I really here can this really really be me Climbing up after the tent was erected and looking out over the lake and hearing baboon sparking. Breathing, in the smell of the forest really was magic. I bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects that chimpanzees I mean. It wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? I put the first three weeks. I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities. It was still part of the crumbling British Empire back then. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So he showed me some of the trails and the could was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley and then you wait and you hope that the windows to violent. So you can see trees moving and often it turned out to be baboons or monkeys, but sometimes, it was chimpanzees and once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do. Then, I, would find a tree that was ripe fruit. They're very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees away. As soon as they saw me, we've never seen a white eight before. You. Know they just they're very conservative. And Well I was really worried though Sony money to six months. I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things. One of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and to to animals in general because one who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees I mean, there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's it's not just a skilled scientists observing. There's something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals until all my life by being outside and Magadan waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet. So the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies and I would watch squirrel occasionally there was Fox, and of course, I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals. So when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university nobody else was studying gyms fact virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild and so I just did the same thing and gradually gradually chimpanzees got used to me. and. Was David. GREYBEARD. Beloved David Greybeard who I began to lose his fear and he really helped the others to lose fear because if he lives in a group with them instead of running away they social I suppose they thought well David sitting and he was a leader. So she comes so scary after all Aman gradually the lack of fear turn to aggression that was a pretty nasty. Through four weeks where the chimpanzees three to like Predator, it wanted to go away. But I. Didn't I just sat pretended I was interested in them and interestingly it was specially when it was raining and you know if you're watching people in the pelting rain, you see him take risks though. The road they normally wouldn't an chimps go a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realize I wasn't going and luckily they didn't try and attack me and much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance acceptance and trust and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary, you know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch diseases we can catch this. So it's not today but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I those days absolutely. The Best I knew the chimpanzees so well, I trust them may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical. I WanNa ask you about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools nobody knew.

goodall David Greybeard British Empire Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Institute Gumby National Park Africa Jane Gombe Bay founder Tanzania Congo Tanganyika National Park United Nations Antony Magadan Sony Fox
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"L. V. Leaky. She has observed the daily lives of chimpanzees in east. Africa That's from the National Geographic Documentary, the hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees, and over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activist. Jane, Goodall is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations Messenger of peace. She's also dame dame of the British Empire and. She's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees, which came out in nineteen, sixty nine and reason for hope, spiritual journey, which came out thirty years later lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gone Bay, and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you and to me and it's lovely to be on the program which I've seen on the number of times before and yeah. Sixty years pretty amazing. I don't. Go well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing. I wondered if you could serve, take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen sixty, nineteen, sixty, twenty, twenty-six, you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged? You faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park. It was a game reserve and. The the problem. was that on the other side of Lake Tanganyika just across the world. They Belgian Congo's it was then had erupted, there was violence and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely full of fleeing refugees lost their. Possessions, so it was, it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake. Get get to the Gumby National Park, but once off their. You know it seem brother unreal. It just felt am I really here. Can this really really be me? Climbing up after the tent was erected, looking out over the lake and hearing baboons, balking breathing in the smell of the forest, really was magic I. Bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects, the chimpanzees I mean it wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them. I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? Well I for the first two three weeks, I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities was still part of the crumbling Grisham Empire back then? and. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So? He showed me some of the trails and the secret was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley, and then you wait, and you hope that the window to violent, so you can see trees moving, and often it turn turn out to be baboon on monkeys, but sometimes it was chimpanzees. And once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do a then. I would find a tree that was ripe fruit. That very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees runaway. As soon as they saw me, we'd never seen a white eight. You know they just the very conservative. and. Well! I was really worried Sony money to six months and I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things and one of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and t to animals in general, because anyone who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees. I mean there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's. It's not just a skilled scientists observing something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals, and said well. My life I being outside in Magadan, waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet, so that the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies. And I would watch squirrel occasionally. There was Fox and of course I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals, so when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university. Nobody else was studying gyms. Virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild, and so I just did the same thing. And gradually gradually the chimpanzees got use to me and. It was David Greybeard. Love it, David Greybeard I began to lose his fear, and he really helped the others to lose their fear, because if he was in a group with them instead of running away, they sort of I. Suppose they thought well David Sipping Man. He was a leader, so she so scary after all and then gradually. Lack of fear, turn to aggression that was. Pretty Nasty. Through four weeks, where the chimpanzees treated me like Predator, it wanted me to go away. But I didn't. I just sat pretended. I wasn't interested in. And interestingly it was specially when it was raining. And you know if you watching people in the pelting rain, you see, take risks. They'll run across the road. They normally wouldn't an chimps to a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realized I wasn't going, and luckily they didn't try and attack me much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance, acceptance and trust, and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary. You know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch. Diseases can catch this, so it's not today, but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I. Those days were absolutely the best I knew the chimpanzees so well. I trust them and may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical I WANNA. Ask You about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools. Nobody knew that before you did.

Jane Goodall David Greybeard Gumby National Park Jane Goodall Institute goodall Lake Tanganyika Africa Tanzania Congo Jane Gone Bay Grisham Empire United Nations Messenger of pe founder Magadan Sony Fox
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Always. I had wanted to go out into the field and study animals on that first day when I looked at the wild and rugged mountains where the chimpanzees live. I knew that my task was not going to be easy in Gombe Bay. Without a college degree Jane began her study of wild chimpanzees at the time little was known about chimpanzee behaviour Jane later wrote. It was not permissible. At least not an ethological circle to talk about an animal's mind. Only humans had minds but Jane observed the chimps had unique personalities with capacity to feel and display affection support joy and sorrow. It was obvious watching them that they could be happy inside. And then the communication signals kissing embracing holding hands patting on the back shaking the fist swaggering. Throwing rocks all of these things done in the same context. We do them in the fall of nineteen sixty. Jane witnessed a chimpanzee squatting on a termite mound placing pieces of grass into the mound and raising the grass to his mouth. Chain discovered that the chimp had been using the grass stem as a tool to fish for termites. It had been previously accepted that humans were the only animals capable of making tools when Jane sent her groundbreaking findings to Dr Leaky he wrote. We must now redefine man redefine tools or accept chimpanzees as human over the course of her study at Gombe Bay. Jane also found that chimps have an aggressive side systematically hunting and eating smaller primates Jane even observed Intergroup violence between two groups of chimps in nineteen sixty. Three National Geographic published. An article about Jane through that piece she connected with photographer. Hugo van Loic Hugo. Jane married one year later and eventually had a son named Eric Lewis. Dr Leaky urged Jane to attend the University of Cambridge where she earned a PhD in theology in nineteen sixty five. She became the eighth person in the history of Cambridge to be permitted to pursue a PhD without an undergraduate degree about a decade after they married in nineteen seventy four. Jane and Hugo divorced a year later Jane Mary. Derrick Bryson a member of Tanzania's National Assembly who died in nineteen eighty. Jane used her incredible discoveries to promote conservation to people all over the world appearing on television writing about her research. Even founding a global nonprofit called the Jane Goodall Institute in two thousand and two Jane was named a U. N. messenger of Peace by Secretary General Kofi Annan in two thousand four Prince Charles deemed Jane a dame of the British empire. Today Jane continues to champion Human Rights and conservation through the Jane Goodall Institute. Jane is credited with challenging long held beliefs about chimpanzees. Her discoveries shifted the ways. Humans see observe and think about primates. Well for me. Animals are part of our world and just because we can destroy our world and exterminate species for ourselves. Doesn't mean that we should do it. I don't we have the right to do it. And we can books and see dinosaurs. I don't want my grandchildren to only know chimps and go relieve some giraffes and elephants from books. So you know we all destroying our own future all month we're talking about explorers and contenders on Sundays. Were taking a break from our normal episodes to highlight women. We've previously covered. Who did amazing things in healthcare for more on why we're doing what we're doing? Check out our encyclopedia. Amanda Newsletter Will Manteca Weekly. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia. Monica and you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny. Kaplan before you go I want to tell you about another show. I think you might like. Do you want to know what really made exceptional original ingenious people take a new podcast called personality? We'll delve into the minds of famous historical figures icons answering questions like what Albert Einstein today be diagnosed with. Add host Doctor Gail Saltz psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. We'll be joined by amazing experts on each episode to understand how both nature and nurture iology experiences shaped their character and struggles her sinology episodes launch weekly every Monday. Listen to personality. Spelled P. E. R. S. O. N. O. L. O. G. Y. Wherever you get your podcasts special thanks to lose. Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator oxygen Sunday..

Jane Jane Goodall Institute Jane Mary Gombe Bay Hugo van Loic Hugo Dr Leaky Kaplan Doctor Gail Saltz Albert Einstein Tanzania Cambridge Derrick Bryson Chain University of Cambridge co-creator Manteca Weekly facebook
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on BrainStuff

"She founded the <Speech_Female> Jane Goodall institute <Speech_Female> in nineteen seventy seven <Speech_Female> which works to <Speech_Female> keep human communities <Speech_Female> and wild Chipenzi <Speech_Female> populations in <Speech_Female> Africa, healthy <Speech_Female> and coexisting <Speech_Female> peacefully <Speech_Female> roots and shoots <Speech_Female> is a program to <Speech_Female> power young people <Speech_Female> worldwide to <Speech_Female> make a difference in their local <Speech_Female> communities <Speech_Female> now at the <Speech_Female> age of eighty five <Speech_Female> Goodell spends about <Speech_Female> three hundred days a <Speech_Female> year, traveling and <Speech_Female> speaking about Africa. <Speech_Female> Chimpanzees, <Speech_Female> the environment <Speech_Female> and her other passions. <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> Although Goodall sees the <Speech_Female> hideous parts of what <Speech_Female> humans are doing to our <Speech_Female> planet. She continues <Speech_Female> to be hopeful about our <Speech_Female> future. <Speech_Female> She wrote in a New York Times <Speech_Female> op Ed in two thousand <Speech_Female> seventeen <Speech_Female> quote, the <Speech_Female> lust for greed and <Speech_Female> power has destroyed <Speech_Female> the beauty. We inherited <Speech_Female> but altruism <Speech_Female> compassion, <Speech_Female> and love have <Speech_Female> not been destroyed. <Speech_Female> All that is beautiful <Speech_Female> in humanity <Speech_Female> has not been destroyed. <Speech_Female> The beauty of <Speech_Female> our planet is not dead, <Speech_Female> but lying dormant <Speech_Female> like the seeds <Speech_Female> of a dead tree. <Speech_Female> We shall <SpeakerChange> have another <Speech_Female> chance. <Silence> In <Speech_Female> two thousand nineteen Goodall <Speech_Female> was nominated for the Nobel <Speech_Female> peace prize. <Speech_Female> She was also <Speech_Female> included on the two thousand nineteen <Speech_Female> time one hundred <Speech_Female> list of the one hundred <Speech_Female> most influential <Speech_Female> people in the world. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> spoke by Email with <Speech_Female> the author of the petition to <Speech_Female> nominate Goodall for <Speech_Female> the prize, one <Speech_Female> Myron shackle, <Speech_Female> a research, associate <Speech_Female> at western Washington <Speech_Female> University's department <Speech_Female> of anthropology. <Speech_Female> They said, <Speech_Female> I believe there's <Speech_Female> no better choice to <Speech_Female> receive the next Nobel <Speech_Female> peace. Prize <Speech_Female> civilization <Speech_Female> is today facing perhaps <Speech_Female> its greatest challenge <Speech_Female> ever, the <Speech_Female> twin puck elliptic <Speech_Female> threats of global climate <Speech_Female> change and <Speech_Female> biodiversity loss. <Speech_Female> Both <Speech_Female> are caused by humans <Speech_Female> and both are <Speech_Female> linked in that boasts <Speech_Female> stem from human misuse <Speech_Female> of the environment. <Speech_Female> No <Speech_Female> one has ever done more <Speech_Female> or better work <Speech_Female> than Jane Goodall to bring <Speech_Female> peace between humans, <Speech_Female> and their environment <Speech_Female> and thereby <Speech_Female> create the conditions <Speech_Female> under which humans <Advertisement> can <Speech_Female> be at peace <Advertisement> with each other <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jane <Speech_Music_Female> Goodall is <Advertisement> the global <Speech_Female> face <Advertisement> for global <Speech_Music_Female> peace. <Advertisement> Today's <Speech_Music_Female> episode was written <Speech_Music_Female> by Justin <Advertisement> shields, and <Speech_Music_Female> produced by Tyler <Advertisement> clang <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brain stuff <Speech_Music_Female> is a production <Advertisement> of iheartradio. <Speech_Music_Female> How <Advertisement> stuff works <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for more on this <Speech_Music_Female> in lots of <Advertisement> other topics <Speech_Music_Female> that

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall institute Africa New York Times Goodell Africa. Myron shackle iheartradio Washington three hundred days
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

"This is Dr Debbie the whole crew is sitting here waiting for your call is one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five. This portion of edible radio is underwritten in part by Schmidt's naturals, smell seriously, amazing support animal conservation with Smith special edition lily of the valley, natural deodorant. It was created in collaboration with the Jane Goodall institute in five percent of each purchase supports angels in the wild. You could learn more at its dot com. And thank you Schmitz for underwriting animal radio. You're listening to animal radio phones are open at one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five. Radio. Begging you do to your animals begging over play dead. If you want the anywhere. You wanna go? That's my dog. Annie, she's healthy now. But recently, she broke her leg and I had to rush her to the bat. Thankfully, she's protected by embrace pet insurance. They covered her surgery and reimburse the clean quickly embrace offers one simple plan for unexpected accidents and illnesses that you can personalize to fit your budget to learn more. Visit embrace pet insurance dot com to get a free quote policies. Underwritten by licensed insurer of American modern insurance group coverage subject to policy, terms and conditions. Visit embrace bed insurance dot com. For coverage details this animal radio news update..

Jane Goodall institute Annie Dr Debbie Schmidt Schmitz Smith five percent
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

"Get the jingle singers out? Animal radios underwritten in part by Schmidt's naturals, smell seriously, amazing and support animal conservation with Smith's special edition lily of the valley natural deodorant created in collaboration with the Jane Goodall institute. Five percent of each purchase supports animals in the why learn more at Schmitz dot com. You're listening to animal radio phones are open at one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five. On animal radio in remembered to Spade. Anew your pets? That's my dog. Annie, she's healthy now. But recently, she broke her leg, and I had to rush her to the vet, thankfully, she's protected by embraced pet insurance. They covered her surgery and reimbursed the clean quickly and brace offers one simple plan for unexpected accidents illnesses that you can personalize to fit your budget to learn more. Visit embrace pet insurance dot com to get a free quote policies. Underwritten by licence insurer of American modern insurance group coverage subject to policy, terms and conditions. Visit embrace bed insurance dot com for coverage details people say less is more at red barn. We think less is better. It's what you won't find that sets are natural premium pet food apart. No, byproducts, no, corn or soy, no fillers. Just the natural ingredients your pets need to live the healthy life. They deserve. Look at the label. We want you to read bar naturals. Petfood simply the best. Find it in your local pet. Specialty store. Jar chicken rolled food as a meal or shredded as topper? This is an animal radio news update. I'm Laurie Brooks..

Annie Jane Goodall institute Schmidt Laurie Brooks Spade red barn Smith Petfood Five percent
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

"And let's take your calls toll-free at one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five. Well, this sweet-smelling portion of animal radio is underwritten by Schmidt's naturals, smell seriously, amazing and support animal conservation with Schmidt's special edition of the valley natural deodorant created in collaboration with the Jane Goodall institute. Five percent of each purchase supports animals in the wild. You could learn more at Schmitz dot com and Schmidt's underwriting animal radio, I'm actually wearing it smells, so good. You're listening to animal radio. Call the dream team. Now at one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five. Challen cable. Can you smell that your dog can? Happy holidays merry Christmas. Happy new year want to take this time to say, thanks. I really enjoy being an animal radio. I'm not perfect. I don't have all the answers. But what I do have is a deep passion and desire to help you understand your dog and give you the tools you need to give your dog a happy fulfilling life, most of its common sense. And understanding that dogs are just a little bit different than we are. I think that's what makes him so magical. I mean think about it. They live totally in the moment. They don't think about the future of the past. It's all about what's happening now dogs. Don't hold grudges. They're not greedy and a dog will never break, your heart. They wanna please you. They just need to know how. And if I can help you get to the answer it brings me the greatest joy and satisfaction. You know, sometimes we love our dogs so much we love him too much. And we treat them like there are children. And sometimes when we do that, they get a little confused like you or I would be if we went to another country where we didn't know the customs in the language the difference between our dogs and us is that we're capable of learning the customs in the Lang. Your dog can never learn English. He can never learn what it's like to be a human. But we can learn to act and think like a dog, and that's probably the greatest thing you can do to ensure that your dog.

Schmidt Jane Goodall institute Lang Five percent
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

"Two and a half years, and then on it up with Unilever, December on our launching into one hundred twenty nine countries. So people really. Want stuff that is fire, mentally, friendly and cruelty for he hasn't been tested on animals, which you know for a longtime, make ups, and all the beauty supplements have been tried on animals and sustainable practices. People really are buying into that. It's a, it's a real vertical space for, you know. Oh, it's huge. Everybody wants to be free and and the be quite honest like I was quite shocking. I sponsored the Bill in California, which to end animal testing on on cosmetics products and pass. But like what I learned that processes, there's much better attorney testing methods that are out there that actually more accurate. And the fact that companies still tests on animals is quite I. I don't see the reasoning beyond that. There's other ways to do it. I suggest testing on my ex-wife just to see if there's any reaction all those, you know, go ahead. I'm sorry. The first thing I looked at when I picked up the DOD, the first thing that was important to me was the aluminum, yes, because, yeah, heard about that. Use it. I use only aluminum free when I founded this Lumina m- free. It was awesome, and it smells so it's a win win, and the money goes back to Jane. So yeah. How did you get hooked up with Jane? That is actually a very interesting story. So her. Grandson is one of my good friends, and I was at his house one day and Jane happened to becoming over that evening speak. And I listen to her, speak and got the meter, talked her in person, and I've heard about the major things he's done in the past and and doing today. And and I have to like, what is she looking for? Like what is what do you think the biggest hurdle is involving more people and helping have a big a positive impact on the planet. And so it always sat in the back of my mind and then fast forward to December when I was working on my IPO and and we had eleven office from strategic and thirty eight offers from hedge funds. And I was really dead set on the IPO. I actually had a meeting with Unilever and ironically, and I never would have thought that strategic would have well drain would be supportive strategic and so happened to be chained in Paul polman, here's a current global sea of Unilever friends, and you'll. Lever has a lot of sustainable programs. And and when I was calling task about feedbacks, I do deal with lever. They wanna expand it really facet. It would be really good for the brain. We can accelerate and house and I like, you know what, I think this is time that that the we bring Jane and help her charities and our impact around the world. And she had a cool idea sent that she's been working on and and that's kind of where it all clicked. It was kind of a spontaneous little moment where I painted from an IPO to deal with Unilever and Jane. She was a really big part of that fact that she spoke highly Paul and and and you really support a bowl supportive on the natural space and brings cross the world. If you wanna learn more Schmidt. Naturals dot com is the website, Michael. Thank you so much for spending time with us today and taking care of the environment and give it back to the Jane Goodall institute. Thank you for having me.

Jane Unilever Jane Goodall institute Paul polman attorney DOD California Schmidt Michael one day
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

"Animal. I want to smell it at one more time. I liked the way it's. I don't think there's anything wrong with a guy where does it smell too. So let me smell pets back to me. That's lilies of the valley antiperspirant deodorant. I think it actually smell good on the guy as long as you're not like reason, you're pit and like having him smell it from that way. You know, I think like we're doing today. Passing it around the studio. This is the new DOD at that Jane Goodall getting behind. She actually gets five percent of each of the purchases. It goes back to organization the Jane Goodall institute and on the phone with us. We have the CEO of Schmidt's the makers of this in a perspiration. Michael camaraderie joining us. Hi, Michael. How are you doing? Pretty good. How about yourself? Very good. You know what? I'm very impressed with your life story. I, I got a little background about you. Wikipedia God bless. You are really kind of an entrepreneur have always been since your early teens and you were actually a millionaire when you were in your early teens that, correct. Am I reading that right? Is Wikipedia right? The yes. Thank God for computer and the internet? Yes. What were you doing at thirteen that made you a millionaire can be honest. I started out playing video games, computer games, playing a game starcraft. I got really good at it. And then I started making websites and then hosting and then hosting other people's websites. And next thing you know I had over ten thousand accounts, pay me over a hundred bucks a month to host the websites. Wow. So how does that lead to the anti purse bird and deodorant business. Oh. Though, I guess from web hosting to online advertising. So thirteen seventeen and web hosting than online advertising, seventeen to.

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall institute Michael CEO DOD Schmidt five percent
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Animal Radio

"It's animal radio, celebrating the connection with our pets in our primates, which could be you just learned that with his Dr Jane Goodall. So. You travel now about what three hundred days a year and you're mostly speaking about environmental twice, and I'm wondering how can I personally just one single person affect positive change? Well, I made many people who have come on wear the mesh that we've created on the planet, and he knows well as I do old of terrible things happening. And so people feel helpless and hopeless. Bevill do nothing, but I at least say to people, you know, each day that we live, if we single one of us, we make some of impact thinking about what we buy, whether it comes from how was it made that this on the environment? Does it involve cruelty to animals like intensive farms? Is it cheap because of child, slave, labor? So finding out a little bit about what you buy, a making ethical choices, which if it was just you would wouldn't do a thing, but you know. There are now millions of people beginning to think this way. So if we look at the cumulative effect of millions and millions of ethical choices, so we need to buy products, haven't done Imos heaven. Tell them the environment and hopefully give back. A little. I understand that you've you've teamed up with an anti purse or deodorant manufacturer. I'm not sure about. That's all that they do, but Schmidt that the product, cruelty free. Nothing's tested on animals. It hasn't calmed the environment and this this deodorant. They asked me my favorite flower smell, and I said, they leave the valley. So it's it's many of the valley and the Jane Goodall institute gets five percents of every stick sold are like that. Just or is there a men's Senate person? I don't know if you want to smell like. 'cause smell of lilies of the valley. So I'm like this. I like the smell them smell in some right now, and it's mel's. Very good. Actually, I'm wearing it, yes, it's a lefty smell, isn't it? Yes, it is like a Goodell. I'm wondering US France just time that I was so envious. I would see your documentaries living out there with these wild animals that you had been working with and and we're so tame and kind with you. Do you just miss that day long for those days now that you're on the road so much? Well, I think back of them we've great, nostalgia, and you know the recent geographic. Have you seen Jane? Yes. No, I haven't. I haven't. Oh, what you should because that's the best. It's the only one of older to been made, which takes me right back into the skin of doing. Twenty six zero Jane. And you know, seeing feeling I'm once again among those days. I got to know so very well flow and feed the and they've been greybeard and Goliath, it's very nostalgic feeling, but going be not the same. Most of the chimps I really knew so, well, I have passed on, you know, they can live sixty years, but it was sixty years ago that I began. So it just isn't the same as tourists around and things I was so lucky. I just had that world myself. You didn't. Now these days, there are so many people who are getting involved in animal activism. How would somebody become a young Jane Goodall again? Well, our young people whose passionate gardens that the monkeys apes in the wild, and if they really are passionate, probably these days. They'll have to get some kind of agree leaky sent me particularly because I haven't been to college because he thought I would have a mind that was uncluttered with a scientific reductionism as the most at that time, you know, on most have personalities, minds or emotions according to science that I was told by my dog, that wasn't true. So today people can study those things. But when I, I dreamed of Africa when I was ten, everybody laughed at me, how will you get the, you know, you don't have money in your family Africa's far away and the war, and you're just the girl. But mom always said, if you really want this, you have to work extremely hard and take advantage of all and any opportunity and don't give up. So that's what I say. The young people as I'm traveling around the many of them actually, you know, follow their dream and they get the even if they have..

Dr Jane Goodall Jane Goodall institute US Schmidt Imos Africa Goodell Senate mel France sixty years three hundred days
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"But unfortunately it's not in writing. How did you feel about the fact that Michael kept chimpanzees at Neverland went to see him to tell him it was bad. That was bubbles. I think the public by the way is living a wonderful in retirement, very beautiful chip, whereas him and bubbles has a great the skill. He takes a little piece of paper. Benson, half makes whole amend makes a mosque. So I have a mosque make by levels and you met CoCo once. Right, thicker twice on Weiss. Yeah. A lot of people somehow, I think maybe mistakenly really associate you with cocoa, but it wasn't. You didn't have. Now they mistake me with grenades in the midst of Sigourney Weaver and an eight person. Get your own movies. I had a flight attendant and she was very polite on the flight. As I left. She said, it's been such an honor to heavy on the flight mitzvahs smiled up my, you know, she's going to say, guess who I had on my plight and they say, but she's done to. And you just for the record though, you actually knew dime quite well, right? Yeah, I think you'd said that she was a little bit more take risks more than you would out in the while. Rashit connive begged and begged is dying. What with the local people? No, I can't. Because if they get to know the guerrillas the poaching will be was Lissette. But with us, the chimps know the difference between people who work with them and people who don't. And you always say, why do people think chips or intelligence? So you'll realize will absolutely no their own stuff. I think the thing that you also said at one point that she may have been a little envious of both you and baroque because because of what there was something you've got children and husband son's. Yeah, she really. That was a big thing for her to should never very tortured woman. Very sad in two thousand. Thousand fifteen near the end of the Obama administration. The US finally classified chimpanzees as a fully endangered species as opposed to remaining split status which allowed them to be experimented on. I guess that's something you had long called for. I don't think you were share you'd ever see. Now, in contrast, we have the Trump administration drastically cutting funding to US aid, which supports the Jane Goodall institute among other things. What's your take on the direction in which America's leadership is heading on these issues under our current administration? Well, I think you can imagine how I feel about it and Oviously every time. One of these things goes up Bill is put into the house in congress wig into best to try and prevent it being paused. I mean, that's all we can do. But at this, you know, that's why what so hard with the young people. So. So even if you can't fight a current administration, you can work to get young people coming up who have different set of values and who understand that it's not. It literally is not possible to have unlimited economic development on a planet with finite natural resources and the sooner we realize we depend on mother nature and we go on destroying mother nature at our own peril and all we not any longer worrying about future generations. We only worrying about right here and now how sad, if that's true, many of us in America are confounded by an constantly trying to figure out President Trump. You have reached. The conclusion that I think was was very fascinating and it got a little bit of pickup. You believe that he reminds you of chimpanzee. Right? I didn't say that this is the fallacy. See what I said was that when male chimpanzees competing for dominance, many of their behaviors remind me of Sutton politicians when they are also competing for dominance and probably at the Atlantic monthly. And I think Donald Trump's name did come up put because compared him with a chimp it would be kind of insulting, well, that's nothing that he has ever done either. But in terms of anyway, it would be insulting to the. To get this right. How has climate change already affected gempts? Well, what it what it does. It's made, you know, we used to have very clear rainy season with the short reigns, the long rains in the dry season. Now, no short, long range. It's kind of a muddle..

Sigourney Weaver President Trump Michael US America Benson Obama administration Rashit connive CoCo Lissette Jane Goodall institute Weiss Atlantic monthly Oviously congress Bill Sutton
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on The Fandom Podcast

The Fandom Podcast

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on The Fandom Podcast

"Well, and I want to say, I wanna say it was in two thousand three. I think they're the complete farside the very nice to volume set, but I'm just a fabulously produced what was published and throughout the complete farside. He includes letters to editors that were sent complaining about the far side or letters he received directly from fans asking him to explain panel like next to a panel, it'll just have a, you know, a letter. I don't understand this one and they give three possible interpretations. Please tell me what this is supposed to be. And he doesn't offer any explanation. He just puts the letters he was getting or the claims that we're going to newspapers a next to dozens, dozens of of his panels throughout the these, this two volume set. You get these random letters to the side where it's just people saying, again, like kind of like the couch was like what I want to know because I feel like this is saying something and I'm not getting it. None like your. Like you're saying breaded it's pre internet. So this was people taking the time off to cut out the panel, mail it to the newspaper editor officer directly to Gary Larson and include these questions, and I find really funny, he said, so you mentioned that there was a lot of controversy over different panels and Gary Larson in an interview. I think it was with twenty twenty said, yeah, all that controversy. That only happened because people didn't get the jokes. If they would have gotten the jokes, they would've laughed at it. And it's like, I think that just summed up all of all of human existence. If you if you get the joke, you're not upset about it. Also, I think it takes a special kind of person to knock it a joke and feel like I need to contact the creator of this joke directly and get an explanation. They owe that to me. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it's funny because we think that nowadays we are in a culture where everybody gets offended over everything, but to see these, these fairly simple drawings just to know that they sparked outrageous and public apologies and things like that were were supposed to be issued. It just kind of blows my mind. The another. One of the comics that stood out to me was one where it's got to. They look like chimpanzees and unattractive, and it's like a, it's a male and female. The females picking through the mails for and pulls out a blonde hair says, well, well, another blonde hair conducting a little more research with that Jane Goodall tramp. And you know, it's, it's, it's monkeys. It's the, he was being funny about it, and the Jane Goodall institute got really upset and demanded a public apology, which is funny because Gary Larson absolutely was a huge. Fan of Jane Goodall because of all of his biology background. And so he called the mother and just just for people who don't know, Jane Goodall was the woman who did a lot of research about chimpanzees. And she was like one of the most important people for like mapping their behaviors and stuff like that. So if you're if you're gonna ask someone to name an ape scientists, someone who's studied any member of the family. I think the only name anyone could possibly come out. Come up with would be Jane Goodall. Yeah. If you're not if you're not a specialist in that field for the common culture, like she represents scientists who studies Japan's apes monkeys like all the right, right. And so he called them to apologize in. He actually got all the way up to Jane Goodall. And apparently Jane Goodall had no idea that this comic had come out and when she read it, she just laughed and she thought it was hilarious. And so I mean, it's really interesting to see. I mean, I think these were kind of the first. I think these were pre internet versions of means right here. Simple sharable like, here's here's a Meam that the people can take completely out of context and get all upset about or just absolutely find hilarious. I don't know. We just find the father of the meme. We might have to think about that. So now I know that I mean came before the internet as it's something that existed before the internet, but I'm not exactly sure what the definition is. Any any input is is that when you want us to tell you the definition of, if you know it..

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall institute Gary Larson twenty twenty Japan editor officer
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"The clear unambiguous commitment that's needed clinches the commencement of negotiations on a full comprehensive treaty eliminating nuclear weapons and again i'm speaking with jonathan gone off is the president of the global security institute is says on numerous coveting advisory boards including the lawyers committee for nuclear policy the jane goodall institute the ngo committees on disarmament and middle pows initiative and he's also a senior adviser and united nations representative of the permanent secretariat of the well summits of nobel peace laureates and ambassador for peace security and nuclear disarmament of the parliaments of the world's religions so and i might add to flush she just told us their intensive reagan you use it all started with a cage opinion and the cia getting together after the cuban crisis buffet there was also the avalanche a crisis in november of nine in eighty three and that had a profound effect on little reagan who was a a real hawk uh when he first started out and in a cap wind berger was talking about nuclear decapitation which the the gerontocracy in the kremlin took very personally uh reagan said the savage would end up on the sheep of history they interpreted that as a nuclear threat and of course president reagan was having fun taunting the wounded bear been able to watch a really shook reagan up when he landed his words were taken seriously by the russian leadership and they almost went to nuclear war of nothing it's bad enough to have a nuclear war on purpose they have won by accident is unconscionable and this new nuclear posture review leads us more into that territory in it because they're talking about lowyield nuclear.

president global security institute jane goodall institute middle pows senior adviser reagan cia berger jonathan united nations representative
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Became an epic epa tell we ended up having to we built a 7'1 mixedage at our office and we brought in a sound editor before we brought him picture editor two years ago and we what we did was we acquired through the jane goodall institute 55 years worth of audio recordings and then began the inevitable task of of of trying to treat synchronized chimp sounds for for the phone and how close where you getting every when you were it would yet access these audio recordings did you have audio recordings of specific chimpanzees that match the chips in the fill we didn't have like flows voice per se but they were the film went was after we did our work the technical people came through and were like states tough on spa boy i had this financially to hire a sound at her for two years is lake it's really money if money so i got really liking hired some kitty just graduate from sc and paid him really nothing but it was his first job meant he had this fancy seven one room and he was stoked than settlement for two years and and he just put it food and under sifted some bananas and that i remember wade we hired the film was a we brought in the sounds energy recently disobedient the bees and he's a big hollywood guy and i was assuming he was going to sort of redo all the stuff at once he is high on the city's like you know i think we should keep josh on the project in maybe i'll just give him all the chip so getting access to jane goodall herself is not that easy thing she's a busy woman i told she's benz three hundred days a year on the road carry out the causes of her jane goodall institute and maybe via this film wasn't as big a deal to hers it was too you can you talk about what that interaction was like getting her on board the project i think anyone haruna makes films knows that it's a lot easier to make a film any film as a cleberation between the subject in the filmmaker.

epa editor wade josh jane goodall jane goodall institute two years three hundred days 55 years
"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"jane goodall institute" Discussed on Ologies

"So we'll do it but it's not always pleasant and so where can people find you're you're you're at the la zoo sending one sees a cool a cooler could chick like super pretty super apparently girl fake wind in her hair always i always look fresh as a daisy the marks on my outfit are not boob at all they're totally just like dirt i'm usually if a chimpanzees of mahalia mountain and if if i do keeper is not around or accessible our education staff is excellent and they are spread out oliver this they were most of them have knowledge about the animals all over this so like seek someone out if you the questioner commoner concern like really most of the time we have a very logical answer for things and if we don't we can always get the information to you for sure so as always find smart people ask them questions yes we're normally pretty nice and as a footnote if you are curious about how you could make an impact or how you can contribute to great ape conservation a couple of ways number one don't use companies that use great apes in their products or advertising or animal shows don't pay to take a selfie with a chimpanzee don't perches a birthday card that involves a chimpanzee wearing sunglasses on it you can also learn about the situations that chimpanzees are facing in the wild by going your local zoo or you can like the facebook pages for the jane goodall institute or the world wildlife fund and the other thing you can do that i never even thought of but check four palm kernel oil in the ingredients of things you eat.

la zoo mahalia mountain oliver jane goodall institute world wildlife fund facebook four palm