29 Burst results for "Jane Goodall"

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:32 min | 5 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Jane Goodall Institute's the Sankt enable needed cheering up and it's been very tough because the code it I mean Gumby were terrified that it will reach the Chimpanzee National Park and surrounding areas whether gyms because they catch your pieces. You have. You embrace this idea about hope and I want to ask you about this three of your books plus another set to release. Next year have hope in their titles documentary the National Geographic. Entry about you is called the hope what keeps you what makes you hopeful and I'd love to end on this note because there's so much going on right now from the pandemic. To climate degradation, which can really leave a person feeling despair about our planet but you have hope and I'd love to hear what keeps you hopeful. What I did will you hear all the time think globally act locally that's completely the wrong way round because quite honestly. I think everybody who thinks about the state of the planet globally will lose the they just. have any energy to do anything locally they'll be so depressed but of the whole message of roots and shoots if you start actually doing something to make a difference, ben you suck me feel you know while I am making a difference you know that will run the world of the people making a difference. So as I said earlier, the young people are giving me the most home. I'm very passionate about that. Then assists extrordinary intellectual. Ours. You know we're now coming up with ways that we can live in greater harmony was the planet with thinking about ways we can live a lighter ecological footprint every day, which is going to make a difference that makes you feel better. and. Then there's the resilience of nature I described flying over going beans a little tiny island ernest around it by Kooky. Onto any. Hilson. creeped ball. Because people. Puffing. And they realized The. Erosion. Well Jane Goodall let's leave it there on that hopeful note about the resilience of nature. Thank you so much for joining us today it's been such a pleasure philly great. Brian to everybody. Jane Goodall Anthony Brooks. This is on point..

Jane Goodall Institute Jane Goodall Anthony Brooks Jane Goodall National Geographic Chimpanzee National Park Gumby philly Brian Hilson.
"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:16 min | 5 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Someone who's had many dogs love dogs I've always felt like, of course, there's emotion. Of course, there's personality of course there's all that stuff that doesn't just belong to US human beings. We're talking Jane, Goodall about her legacy climate change and conservation coming up later in the hour stay with us I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point. This is on point I'm Anthony Brooks, we're talking about sixty years of research with Jane Goodall ethologist conservationist activist and founder of the Jane. Institute, she's a global conservationist. She's active as well in spreading the word about the importance of tackling climate change, and we're GonNa get to all that as well as your calls. Jane. Goodall I. Just I have to come back to this question about dogs that came up before the break because I've read that that. Dog's not chimps are your favorite animals that true. Absolutely true and you know chimpanzees. So light people don't even think the McDonald's I mean. They'd just it just I know ferry people. So. The explosive development of our intellect that really is the biggest difference. Yeah. Yeah. So your work has expanded from from studying and saving chimps to climate change and and honestly saving the world in that wonderful documentary. The hope you referred to at one point is the Mother Teresa of the environment. Bit of a tough job You say, but how do you think about the the biggest challenge that we're facing right now? Well I think this actually tree major challenges and one is way alleviate poverty. See African village and it's you know it's just huge crippling poverty as lack of good health and education. The degradation of land is populations grow and it was when I flew over the tiny combination apart, which had been part of a huge forest and by nineteen nineteen was the tiny island deforestation all around completely bay hills, and that's when it hit me. We don't help people find ways of living without destroying the environment. Then we come save the chimps so that began the Jane Goodall Institute JJ began of a program which we call to Cari. which is now in six other African countries very successful. I wouldn't go into it. People could look it up. On the web but The people have now become A. Partners in conservation. So one we need to solve poverty to we need to do something about the unsustainable lifestyle of so many millions of people on this planet to Waymo may need. Don't think about. Do I need this thing? I'm buying. And then we also have to think about the fact that seven point two, billion people on the planet today. And, already we're running out natural resources faster than nature can replenish them in some places and in twenty fifty, it's estimated there will be. Nine point seven billion ten, billion people. So these are problems that we we must be thinking about if we want planet, it's their huge problems. I won't ask you about that one you the one that you referred to as maintaining these unsustainable lifestyles and I wanna ask you about that because it seems to me that one of the biggest challenges is how we define progress and governments and lots of people define progress by growth by expanding GDP. So it doesn't work in opposition to what we need to do, and if so how do we deal with that? How do we reverse the thinking around? Expansion isn't necessarily compatible with saving the plan. It's it's compatible with destroying the planet. It doesn't make sense. You can't have unlimited economic development on a planet with finite natural resources and if we don't. Get together wine a new green economy and find a different way of. Thinking about success. What is success right now for the most part, it's you know being successful in business if money getting stuff I'm getting power. And we need to start thinking about success being we need to have a life that we can enjoy a life where we can support our family. Yes. But not go over the top with I mean who needs four houses quite come on health need. WHO NEEDS TO YARDS WHO NEEDS A private plane? A few people actually do but most people don't. So we have to rethink waylon because if we don't, you know we're already on a downward trajectory. That's why began our program for young people, roots and shoots because it's their future and we've been feeling it and thereby wound to be very passionate about these issues. Jangling and ask you about roots and shoots because I'd love to hear more about that program. We've got a lot of callers that want to get in on this conversation with you. So let's go to Lynn who's calling from bridgewater mass go hedlund you're on the air with Jane. Goodall. Thanks for the call. Hello thank you so much and Dr. Goodall. You're such an inspiration to so many and I love to hear from you how you. Went from being an observer to research church. Now, a worldwide activists and what words of advice you have to our young people to get involved and make a difference today. Thanks. You. Know it. It just happened and I think it was the geographic whose articles spreading around the world and People began to be fascinated by the behavior of the chimpanzees. And I don't know how I mean. People he says today that I'm an icon. Will I never planned to be an icon and at first I hid I mean I was so shy. But then after bit on left being was trying to raise awareness, raise money and things like that. I realized that when people came up in the airport and wanted to sell selfie or something I could I could use that opportunity to tell them about roots and shoots to. To say that they could help by joining institute and you asked about what we tell young people what I tell the young people is every single day you live you make some kind of impact on the planet and you have a choice. In this, very, very poor which when you have no choice but you know..

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Dr. Goodall Jane Goodall Institute JJ Anthony Brooks US founder Waymo McDonald A. Partners waylon Cari. Lynn hedlund
"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:03 min | 5 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"East, Africa that's from the National Geographic documentary. The hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activists. Jane. Goodall. Is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations. Messenger. Of Peace She's also dame dame of the British Empire and she's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees which came out in Nineteen sixty-nine and reason for hope, a spiritual journey which came out thirty years later, lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gombe Bay and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you. Antony, and it's lovely to be on the program which I've been on the number of times before and yeah, sixty years is pretty amazing. He is gone. Well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing I wondered if you could serve take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary, which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen, sixty, nineteen, sixty or twenty, twenty-six you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged you faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park where it was a game reserve than. The the problem was that on the other side of Lake, Tanganyika just to cross the were. They Belgian. Congo's it was then had erupted. There was violence, and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely fall of fleeing refugees love step Olympus. So it was it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake and get to the Gumby. National Park but once I got there. It will seem rather unreal. It just felt am I really here can this really really be me Climbing up after the tent was erected and looking out over the lake and hearing baboon sparking. Breathing, in the smell of the forest really was magic. I bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects that chimpanzees I mean. It wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? I put the first three weeks. I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities. It was still part of the crumbling British Empire back then. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So he showed me some of the trails and the could was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley and then you wait and you hope that the windows to violent. So you can see trees moving and often it turned out to be baboons or monkeys, but sometimes, it was chimpanzees and once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do. Then, I, would find a tree that was ripe fruit. They're very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees away. As soon as they saw me, we've never seen a white eight before. You. Know they just they're very conservative. And Well I was really worried though Sony money to six months. I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things. One of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and to to animals in general because one who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees I mean, there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's it's not just a skilled scientists observing. There's something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals until all my life by being outside and Magadan waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet. So the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies and I would watch squirrel occasionally there was Fox, and of course, I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals. So when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university nobody else was studying gyms fact virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild and so I just did the same thing and gradually gradually chimpanzees got used to me. and. Was David. GREYBEARD. Beloved David Greybeard who I began to lose his fear and he really helped the others to lose fear because if he lives in a group with them instead of running away they social I suppose they thought well David sitting and he was a leader. So she comes so scary after all Aman gradually the lack of fear turn to aggression that was a pretty nasty. Through four weeks where the chimpanzees three to like Predator, it wanted to go away. But I. Didn't I just sat pretended I was interested in them and interestingly it was specially when it was raining and you know if you're watching people in the pelting rain, you see him take risks though. The road they normally wouldn't an chimps go a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realize I wasn't going and luckily they didn't try and attack me and much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance acceptance and trust and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary, you know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch diseases we can catch this. So it's not today but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I those days absolutely. The Best I knew the chimpanzees so well, I trust them may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical. I WanNa ask you about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools nobody knew.

goodall David Greybeard British Empire Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Institute Gumby National Park Africa Jane Gombe Bay founder Tanzania Congo Tanganyika National Park United Nations Antony Magadan Sony Fox
"jane goodall" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:15 min | 6 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Agnostic. Than when he began unraveling the human genome, he changed completely and became a believer and all of these great brains have said there is no way that what's happened is just chance. So what that what that intelligence behind the universe is? What it is who it is probably what faintest idea but I'm absolutely show that is something. Seeking for that something. Called to being human. Well Jane Goodall thank you so much It's a real honor to speak with you and a pleasure and I have be I'm very glad as I was getting ready for this that I been in your presence physically those years ago because I can imagine you and Yeah. Thank you for all the gifts you've given to. Really, I loved talking to you and I was depressed my video video so I can see you. Don't actually I only have sound. Yes Sorry I'm sad about that. But maybe in strange world we inhabit we will physically be in the same place again one of. Okay good. I'm glad to hear you say that. I always. Yeah. It would be. His Senior Prom. That's state say. That he is special special. Dog. Here is. Mum. Kooky people in my life and they gradient dated Rabia was up here but he's He's gone each case. But. He's in the house. Yeah. Okay. Thinking to you. Thank you so much. I. Hope that the sound isn't too bad after all themselves worries. I think it will be fine. It will be fine. We will make it work and and it's your voice. So I wish you a rest of your day and thank you for taking this time with us..

Rabia Jane Goodall
Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:46 min | 6 months ago

Jane Goodall on What it Means to Be Human

"WanNa Start where I always start which is how how if I ask you about be spiritual background of your childhood of your earliest life. However, you understand that word now where does that memory take you? Well I wouldn't have thought of anything spiritual when I was a child. Now my grandfather was a congregational minister. I never met him. We mom my sister. Came to live in this house for I. Am now with my grandmother and Moms two sisters. So was he the husband? Of Danny? Was He that other of your grandmother you call Danny as? He was the husband of Danny. I wish I'd met him because he sounds completely wonderful, but I didn't and so we sometimes went particularly religious. And I love to spend most of my time outside in the garden was pre television, pre laptops, cellphones another event. And so we had. Books and imagination a nature. So I learned a lot from nature I was outside. And I, love climbing. Trees had special tree which I'm looking at right now be. Spend hours and hours up beach. Feeling chose to the sky and the buds. I. Suppose that was the chose this to some kind of spiritual feeling nature. That I had I wouldn't have thought of it as that that time. Right you've. You've said that you really feel like you. Loved animals and loved nature I think from the womb onwards a woman would. My first serious observation of animals was four and a half when I waited for hours to see a headland. To, say, it was my to Muslim. WHO's enabling me to do what I've done because she didn't know where I was. I was hiding a hen house waiting because nobody would tell me what the hell was. The came out and it wasn't logical as it was. It was a logical observation that it didn't make sense. Wasn't obvious. So I handle into a hen house where they slipped night and the next. Round the. You. Know she must. So I crawled off to, which was a big mistake she flew out with school Safiya. and. So in my little four and a half year old mine, I must've thought well, no Hanrahan. I think five, the hen houses. So, I went into an empty one, hundred waited at apparently awaited about four hours. They even called the police. They will also change Jomie Ghana for a holiday onto this farm. and. By mother must be really nervous. You can imagine your little. Has Disappeared on, he show me rushing towards the house. She saw my shining eyes on. Sat Down the wonderful story of how a hand lays egg on the reason I love that story is. Isn't that the making of a little scientists asking questions not getting the right on some citing defined out. Making a mistake, not giving up dining issues. You know a different mother. How Day off without telling us don't you depth donated again might have crushed that early scientific curiosity at my might not have done. I've done.

Danny Jomie Ghana Hanrahan
Get to Know Cristina Mittermeier

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

05:04 min | 6 months ago

Get to Know Cristina Mittermeier

"Welcome to good night stories rebel girls. I am Sadie from Nashville I'm eight years old and I'm interviewing Cristina. Mittermeier was the narrator of last week's episode of good night's toys for girls. If you haven't heard last week's episode now is a good time to go back and check it out. Christina, would you like to introduce yourself? My name is Christina Mittermeier I am a national geographic photographer I'm the CO founder of see legacy and like Jane Goodall I also love animals. I am the mother of three children. All of whom Love Tyson and they all love stories about Jayne good. Why did you create see legacy? I created see legacy because I wanted photography an adventure to be an invitation for everybody by publishing my phonograph on my stories on social media, everyday I tried to invite people and share what I. Love about the oceans with everybody. What makes you a rebel thorough? What makes me a rebel girl is that? I grew up in the mountains of central Mexico, but my dream was to swim with dolphins. Everybody told me that I couldn't do it. Because this was not for girls, but like chains mother, my mother champion me, and she said if you WanNa, go swim with dolphins, you have to find a way to get to university and become a marine biologist, and that's exactly what I did. When did you first become interested in photography? And can you tell us what type of photography or most interested in when I finish my studies in University to be a marine biologist I realized that our oceans were in a lot of trouble. Pollution overfishing. All of these things were threatening. The ocean and I wanted to help just like Jane wanted to help Tim Pansies. I thought that science was going to be the tool. I could use to help, but I realized that people are more. In learning from stuff that they understand they can see. Photography became the tool that allow me to communicate with many more people about not just help beautiful the oceanus for all the things we can do to help. When I started my career, photographer I wanted to be a nature photographer. Kasai love animals. I soon realized that I really had a lot more talent to tell stories about people, so my photography became a combination of my love of nature and my interest in people, and then a become an underwater photographer so today I use my camera to tell stories about animals in the ocean and the relationship that humans have with the largest ecosystem on our planet our ocean. Photography allowed people all over the world to see the amazing work. Jane was doing with chimpanzees. What's your favorite thing about photography? My favorite thing about photography is that it's a universal language. It is something that we all understand today. We all have cameras in our telephones, and that makes us all photographers is something. We all know how to do really well and so much like photography National Geographic Allow Jane Goodall to share his stories with a very large audience, so to has my camera on my work with National Geographic, allow me to share the story of our oceans and the importance of protecting the largest. On our planet, our ocean. What is it venture? Mean to you? A venture for me is having the courage to step through the of things that I. Don't know yet sometimes that means getting in the water with a whale, or the shark sometimes means getting on stage with the large number of people and speaking in public. The most important thing about my work is that I wanted to be an. An invitation to adventure for everybody the natural world is there for all of us to enjoy and I. Want my work to be an invitation to you. How do you stay positive in the world? That doesn't always care for the environment. The reason I stay positive in a world that doesn't always care for the environment is that I am the mother of three kids their own much older now, but. I want for them to have the kind of planning that I have come to love and enjoy I want them to be able to go out into nature and spend time with wild animals, and to know that they have a future in a living planet, so I have no choice but stay positive. What's one thing? Young rebel girls can do to protect the oceans are oceans are the largest ecosystem on our planet, and we know so little about how they work. So what we need is more girls to go into. The scientists become marine biologist become underwater photographer filmmakers so that together we can tell the story of how beautiful and important our oceans are thanks Christina.

Jane Goodall Christina Mittermeier Love Tyson Tim Pansies Nashville Cristina Mexico Co Founder Jayne
"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:42 min | 6 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mothers shot. Through to eat. At, babies sometimes pinched stolen to be traffic to be sent off overseas. Pet so trained into taking. Back, the medical? Jayne good old standby. We gotta take a break. We're talking going to talk about a lot more. My Guess Jane Goodall. Thala just conservationists activists best known for her long term study of Z's Anthony Brooks. This is on point. A. This is on point I'm Anthony. Brooks were talking to Jane Goodall about her legacy and the challenges surrounding climate change and species conservation, and let's go right to our calls. Jane Goodall. We've got a lot of callers who want to get in on this conversation. Juniper is calling from Nashville go ahead, juniper. You're on the air. Thanks for the call. Hi. My name is junior juniper I'm eight years old I was wondering what parts of the world need the mostly searched because I want to be that when I grow up juniper. Thanks so much for that Jane. Did you get that? I hunt. She wanted to be a better. Question what part of the world needs the most research? Because? Yes, she wants to be a vet when she grows up. Well I tell you that there isn't a single country where event is needed where we need every single country, animals need help. Animals need to be protected, and sometimes they're veterinarian who come and work in sankt trees to look after the chimpanzees. We have battery help now in in the national parks, the wild chimpanzees because the so few left that we have to make sure to try and keep them healthy, so we can dot them and treat them if necessary a bad wound for example. juniper thanks so much for that. Call Jane Goodall I'm so glad that juniper called a eight years old and I have to say in my household. The th there is cross generational appeal for you. I've been following your work for a long time. My nine year old son knows who you are and is. Really enamored of the of the kind of work that you do so this seems like a good moment to ask you about roots and shoots and sort of what your messages to young people, but tell us about roots and shoots, and and and what it does. Well it. It began in Tanzania and nineteen ninety-one. And it was when twelve high school students came to see me in my house, and they came from eight different schools, and they were very concerned about all kinds of different things. Poaching Fox wasn't the government doing more street children with no homes. A wide range of problems that they felt needed solving so I told them to go and get their friends, and we had a big meeting, and that's when roots and shoots was born, and basically we decided that the main message was every individual makes a difference every day of Rian, individual as role to play in matters, that every group would choose three projects one to help. People want help animals when to help. Help the environment because everything in nature's interconnected, we parked over not separated from the natural world and some big problem today so anyway, what began twelve high school? Students is now in sixty five countries and growing fast, and it's got hundreds of thousands of members i. don't remember how many groups are as many groups. We don't even know about you know. We suddenly found a little group somewhere in the forests of Ecuador. Roots and shoots. We found out about the by accident. and. Changing the world that they literally these young people know that rolling up those leads taking action that planting trees, which is very important today that cleaning streams doing campaigns about. Single, use plastic and today we have members in kindergarten, and we have members in university and everything in between, and they are changing, while they are my greatest reason for hope. And I hope any child parent listening. We'll try and get involved because changes their lives, too. So. Let's go to Tanya. She's calling from Concord Mass Tanya. You're on the air. Jane Goodall! Thanks for the call. Go ahead! Thank you, Anthony. Thanks for your great hosting and Ms Goodall. It's It's a great honor to the listening to you and to be speaking with you. I wanted to point out that in terms of for more experimentation on chimps, year or so ago I was. At the conference at the Radcliffe Institute that's Harvard and there were some researchers from China who were showing slides. Of their experimentation on chimps in in in trying to find a cure for depression, and it involves crisper. Taking a gene modifications and it was very very sad to see the poor suffering chimp and the coordinator of its cage, just huddling over. It was a terrible sight and. and there was a push to get more US support to to get back into experimentation on chimpanzees precisely because of their. closeness to us and I. I just wanted to mention that and hear what you have to say. Thank you. Thank you Tanya Jane Goodall to what extent are his? That kind of research being conducted on chimps, and to what extent are you still concerned about that? Most monkeys now but. The occasional Jim. In Germany, for example to patents were just refused. Could Genetically Modifying Chimpanzee but we have routine shoot salute at China, the huge movement in China to protect animals. It's it's growing fast. many states now banned eating of dogs, and after the Kobe nineteen, the government was very quick to ban the a sale, the trafficking and the eating of wild animals. So it's changing. It takes time you know America for example, until recently was the second largest importer of ice in the world coming to China then China banned the importation of ivory. And these things just take time, but yes, we can try and fight poaching in. Africa but we also have to work on the demand. Because when money is involved when people can get rich by shooting a rhino and selling its horn, they going to go on doing it even if it's illegal, so that's where roots and shoots comes in and we just working working away on reducing the demand for wild animals and cruelty to domestic animals well Tanya. Thank you for that call one more call. Alex is calling from Walpole Massachusetts. Go ahead, Alex you're on the air with Jane Goodall? Thank you for the call. Thank you and I. It's it's an honor i. Agree with everything that's been said in terms of. How we can help..

Jane Goodall Juniper Anthony Brooks China juniper Concord Mass Tanya Jayne sankt trees Tanya Tanzania Nashville Alex Africa Ecuador Kobe Radcliffe Institute US Rian Walpole Massachusetts
"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:50 min | 6 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That you can have a virus or bacteria jumping from one animal to one person may be Biden's with a cell in the human body may be that leads to a new disease like coke nineteen, and it's disrespected animals. We we hunt them kill them. Eat Them. We sell them in on hygiene nick. Breed markets in Africa which is where HIV AIDS began we traffic then selling them from different parts of the world to the wildlife markets and pet markets in Asia animals from all over the place, different species of crowded together in horrible on hygiene conditions, and again it's a perfect environment for virus or bacteria. Indeed, let's could nineteen is thought to have begun in in one of these markets in will have in. China and saws began in another of these markets in China, And Mas began from domestic camels in the middle, east and many many diseases have jumped from animal to person in our. Stately horrendous factory fogs. I want to play. A little bit of sound from the National Geographic documentary the hope in this scene your with former US secretary of state James Baker reflecting on the partnership that you to form. You had lunch with him to discuss your goals and how he might help you. Let's listen to just a little bit of this. I remember during that lunch telling her that I love nature because I was an honor and fisherman. But. I'm interested in clean water and clean air and improves serving the resource.

James Baker Biden China AIDS Africa Asia US
"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:09 min | 6 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"L. V. Leaky. She has observed the daily lives of chimpanzees in east. Africa That's from the National Geographic Documentary, the hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees, and over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activist. Jane, Goodall is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations Messenger of peace. She's also dame dame of the British Empire and. She's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees, which came out in nineteen, sixty nine and reason for hope, spiritual journey, which came out thirty years later lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gone Bay, and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you and to me and it's lovely to be on the program which I've seen on the number of times before and yeah. Sixty years pretty amazing. I don't. Go well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing. I wondered if you could serve, take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen sixty, nineteen, sixty, twenty, twenty-six, you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged? You faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park. It was a game reserve and. The the problem. was that on the other side of Lake Tanganyika just across the world. They Belgian Congo's it was then had erupted, there was violence and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely full of fleeing refugees lost their. Possessions, so it was, it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake. Get get to the Gumby National Park, but once off their. You know it seem brother unreal. It just felt am I really here. Can this really really be me? Climbing up after the tent was erected, looking out over the lake and hearing baboons, balking breathing in the smell of the forest, really was magic I. Bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects, the chimpanzees I mean it wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them. I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? Well I for the first two three weeks, I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities was still part of the crumbling Grisham Empire back then? and. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So? He showed me some of the trails and the secret was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley, and then you wait, and you hope that the window to violent, so you can see trees moving, and often it turn turn out to be baboon on monkeys, but sometimes it was chimpanzees. And once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do a then. I would find a tree that was ripe fruit. That very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees runaway. As soon as they saw me, we'd never seen a white eight. You know they just the very conservative. and. Well! I was really worried Sony money to six months and I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things and one of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and t to animals in general, because anyone who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees. I mean there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's. It's not just a skilled scientists observing something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals, and said well. My life I being outside in Magadan, waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet, so that the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies. And I would watch squirrel occasionally. There was Fox and of course I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals, so when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university. Nobody else was studying gyms. Virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild, and so I just did the same thing. And gradually gradually the chimpanzees got use to me and. It was David Greybeard. Love it, David Greybeard I began to lose his fear, and he really helped the others to lose their fear, because if he was in a group with them instead of running away, they sort of I. Suppose they thought well David Sipping Man. He was a leader, so she so scary after all and then gradually. Lack of fear, turn to aggression that was. Pretty Nasty. Through four weeks, where the chimpanzees treated me like Predator, it wanted me to go away. But I didn't. I just sat pretended. I wasn't interested in. And interestingly it was specially when it was raining. And you know if you watching people in the pelting rain, you see, take risks. They'll run across the road. They normally wouldn't an chimps to a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realized I wasn't going, and luckily they didn't try and attack me much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance, acceptance and trust, and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary. You know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch. Diseases can catch this, so it's not today, but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I. Those days were absolutely the best I knew the chimpanzees so well. I trust them and may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical I WANNA. Ask You about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools. Nobody knew that before you did.

Jane Goodall David Greybeard Gumby National Park Jane Goodall Institute goodall Lake Tanganyika Africa Tanzania Congo Jane Gone Bay Grisham Empire United Nations Messenger of pe founder Magadan Sony Fox
"jane goodall" Discussed on Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

07:37 min | 7 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

"By October, van returned to England. As much as Jane loved sharing the campsite with her mother. She relished her time alone in the forest. Jane New the too much noise and activity scared away the animals. At first whenever they spotted her, they would dash away. She could only watch him at a distance with binoculars. Jane work hard to slowly establish the chimpanzees trust. She dressed in a simple outfit that blended in with four surroundings, and she wore the same clothes embry day. She mimicked the chimp's behavior. Each day she packard tin box with a blanket, sweater, food and coffee. And prepared to spend hours upon hours. Silently sitting, waiting and always observing. Most scientists at the time for to give the animals they absorb numbers instead of names. But as Jane grew to not be chimps and their distinct personalities. She named them all. Flow was a popular older female channel and a caring mother Fabian Vegan I'm baby fee. Not all the champs were always carrying. A chimp was charge that Jane causing tumble off the edge of a cliff. She was injured, but okay. Thanks to the soft pushes. That broke her fault. Her favorite champ was David rapier. He was the first. Let chain close. Perhaps he was curious about her as she was about him. On like the others when Jane Approached Them David didn't run. He came to accept her even picking up a Nana from her hand. So gently, no snatching. She wrote in a letter home. It was thanks to David that Jane me to important discoveries. I she saw him eating a Bush bake. Prior to that, scientists had believed chimpanzees only ate plants now. She had evidence that they were omnivores. The second and more important discovery happened when James. Watch David at a termite mound. He broke off a long stalk of grass and inserted it into the mound when he pulled it out, it was covered in termites tasty snack. Soon Jane saw other chimpanzees fishing with grasses. They also strip steaks of their leaves to make crude tools. Something scientists call object modification. Till Ben. It was thought only humans could do that. According to Jane these was cost to either redefine man or accept chimps as human. Careful observations as twenty six year old self pod scientists where a breakthrough in understanding animals. Before those discoveries. Jane had feared that funding for her project. That Kombi would be caught because she hadn't learned anything new. But after she documented the chimps, using tools and National Geographic, society gave a grant to continue chains were. Some critics tried to discredit gentile because she hadn't received academic training beyond high school, so Lewis helped her get admitted to Cambridge University. They recognize the value of her work at Gumby and count the back door her classes. Eventually gene would earn a doctorate from Cambridge in nineteen sixty two. Becoming Dr Jane Goodall. National Geographic wanted to publish a magazine article about Jane's work. And it was hard for her to take pictures in the midst of observations, so they arrange for a wildlife photographer Hugo van logic to join gene. At first, she wasn't happy to have a stranger in what she called her little paradise. Pleased to find out that Hugo love nature and animals as much as she did. National, geographic published Jane's first article. My life among wild chimpanzees with Hugo photographs in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three, and the nine hundred sixty five. CBS aired the television, Special Miss Gell and the wild chimpanzees, a documentary national geographic made with Hugo's footage. Twenty million viewers watched fascinated by Jane's robbery, knowledge and hard work. quickly, she became a worldwide celebrity. As Jane grew to know and love the chimpanzees, Kombi. Baby came like a family tour. She would later say what an amazing privilege Wass to be utterly accepted by a wild animal. Flow fee David Greybeard under arrest. We're in James Only family at though. Jane and Hugo fell in love beer. After he's assignment and that and he left Gumby Hugo sent chain and urgent telegram. would. She marry him? She answered yes. The Cup of their wedding cake was decorated with a clay figurine of David Greybeard. Pictures of their chimpanzee. France lined the walls up their London reception. Nine hundred sixty four flow birth to another baby flint. Giving Jane an opportunity to observe chimpanzee mothering from the very start. Flow gave flint lots of cuddles. When he was being naughty, she distracted him instead of punishing him. She was playful with their children. Jane Nine that like people chimpanzees laugh when they play watching flows caring patient mothering was an inspiration to Jane when she and Hugo had their son whom they nickname rob. Jane had been more time keeping grub safe as a toddler in Gumby so her students spent more and more time in the field, meanwhile chain began writing books and continued making films with Hugo. As jeans frame grew and family responsibilities changed. She spent less time alone in the forest, observing animals chains. Books were so popular she would spend months away while sharing them with readers. More eager students join Jane At. To learn an assist with her work. In Nineteen, seventy, seven, the Jane Goodall Institute was founded there to study and protect chimpanzees. In one thousand, nine, hundred six chain, attended a conference that made her aware of the threats to welching. In some places in Africa. Hunted? In other parts of the world they were kept in cages for research. This horrified Jane. She? Later said I arrived at the conference. As a scientist, I left us an activist. She became committed.

Dr Jane Goodall Jane New Jane Goodall Institute Gumby Hugo Jane Nine Jane At scientist David Greybeard David Hugo van National Geographic James David rapier England Africa Cambridge University Cambridge Wass gentile robbery
The Superposition Principle

The Portal

10:53 min | 8 months ago

The Superposition Principle

"Hi It's Eric with some thoughts for this week's audio say on the topic of Super Position. Now to those of you in the know. Superposition is an odd word in that it is the scientific concept we reach for when trying to describe the paradox of Schroeder's cat in the theory and philosophy of quantum measurement. We don't yet know how to say that. The cat is both dead and alive at the same time. Rigorously so we fudge whatever is going on with this unfortunate feline and say that the cat and the quantum system which it's life depends are a mixture of two distinct states that are somehow co-mingled in a way that has defied a satisfying explanation for about a century. Now I'm usually loath to appeal to such quantum concepts in everyday life as there is a veritable industry of people making bad quantum analogies for example whenever you have a non quantum system that is altered by its observation that really has nothing to do with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Jane Goodall Chimpanzees are almost certainly altered in their behavior due to her presence. But there is likely no competent. Quantum theorist who would analogize chimps two electrons and goodall to her mission observable executing a quantum observation. Heisenberg adds nothing other than physics. Envy to the discussion of an entirely classical situation. Such as this whoever I have changed my mind in the case of superposition if I would like to explain to begin with superposition isn't a quantum phenomena for example. Imagine that you'd come from Europe to Australia. And that you had both euros and Swiss francs in your pockets. You might then be said to be in a super position because you have pocket change in both euros and francs rather than a pure state of only one currency or the other the analog of a physical observable in this situation would be something like a multiple choice question found on the landing card about the contents of your pockets. Here it is easy to see the danger of the setup assuming you have three times as much value in euros as you do in francs what happens when you get a question. That doesn't include your situation as an answer. What if the landing card asked is all of your change in a euros or be Swiss francs with no other options available? Well this as stated is a completely classical superposition problem having nothing to do with quantum theory. We're you to have such classical question asked of you like this. There would have been no way for you to answer however if the answer. We're on the multiple choice menu. There would be no problem at all and you would give a clear answer determined by the state of your pockets so if the state in question isn't on the multiple choice menu. The classical world is forced to go. Mute is there is no answer determined by the system whereas if it is found on the list of allowable choices the answers then completely determined by the system state at the time that the question was asked. Oddly the quantum world is in a way exactly as deterministic as the classical one just described despite what you may have heard to the contrary in order to understand this. We'll have to introduce a bit of jargon so long as the system now called the Hilbert Space State is on the list of answers technically called the system of eigen vectors corresponding to the question now called a quantum observable the question will return a completely deterministic answer technically called the eigen value corresponding to the State. Iconductor. These are in a sense. Good questions in quantum theory because the answer corresponding to the state of the system actually appears as one of the multiple choice options so if that is completely deterministic while then what happened to the famous quantum probability theory and the indeterminately that we hear so much about what I told you that it. We're one hundred percent confined to the situation. Which classical theory couldn't handle either? That is quantum probability theory only becomes relevant when you ask bad quantum questions where the state of the system isn't on the list of multiple choice answers when the landing card asked if all your changed completely in euros or only francs. The classical system couldn't answer because three times the value of your Swiss francs were held in Euros. So no answer could be determined but if your pocket change were somehow quantum while then you might find that seventy five percent of the time your pocket coins would bizarrely turn into pure euros and would be wilder only turn into pure francs twenty five percent of the time just by virtue of your being asked for measurement by the landing cart in the quantum theory. This is due to the multiple choice. Answers of the so-called observable represented by the landing card question not being well suited to the mix state of your pockets in a super position between euros and francs in other words quantum theory gets probabilistic. Only where classical theory went mute. All of the indeterminately appears to come from asking bad multiple choice questions in both the classical an quantum regimes in which the state of the system doesn't fit any given answer quite honestly. I've never heard a physicist rework the issue of quantum probabilities in just this way so as to highlight that the probabilistic weirdness comes only from the quantum being overly solicitous in accommodating really bad questions for some reason. They don't like the idea of Kalyan observable that doesn't have the state of the system as an allowable answer a bad question but that is precisely why I do like it points out that the quantum is deterministic. Where the classical theory is deterministic and only probabilistic where the classical theory is mute. This is because it is really willing to answer questions that are in a sense that can be made precise bad questions to begin with. That doesn't get rid of the mystery but it recasts it so it doesn't sound quite so weird. The new question is why would a quantum system over compensate for the lousy questions being posed when the classical system seems to know not to answer? So why bring any of this up well? The first reasons that I couldn't resist sneaking personal reformulation of the quantum measurement problem that most people will have never considered but the second reason is that I've come to believe that we are wasting our political lives unjust such superposition questions for example. Let's see if we can solve the abortion debate problem right now in this podcast using superposition as it is much easier than the abortion problem itself. The abortion debate problem is that everyone agrees that before fertilization. There's no human life to worry about. And that after a baby is born. There is no question that it has a right to live yet. Pro Choice and pro life. Activists insist on telling us that the developing embryo is either a mere bundle of cells suddenly becoming a life only when born or a full-fledged baby the moment the sperm enters the egg you can guess my answer here. The question of is it. A baby's life or a woman's choice is agreed upon by everyone before fertilization or following birth because the observable in question has the system as one of the two multiple choice answers in those two cases however during the process of embryonic development something miraculous is taking place that we simply don't understand scientifically somehow a nonsense blast ula becomes a baby by a process utterly opaque to science which has yet has no mature theory of consciousness. The system in Utero isn't changing and progressing superposition tilted heavily towards not being a baby at the beginning and tilted towards being one at the end of the pregnancy. But the problem here is that we have allowed the activists rather than the umbrella gist and developmental biologist to hand us the life versus choice observable with it's too terrible multiple choice options if we'd let the embryologist set the multiple choice question there would be at least twenty three carnegie stages for the embryo before you even get to fetal development but instead of going forward from what we both know and don't know with high confidence about the system. We are instead permanently. Deranged by being stuck with Schrodinger embryo by the activists who insist on working backwards from their political objectives. So does the somehow solve the abortion issue? Of course not all it does is get us to see how ridiculously transparent we are in our politics that would allow our society to be led by those activists. Who would shoehorn the central scientific miracle of human development into a nutty political binary of convenience? We don't even think to ask. Who are these people who've left us? At each other's throats debating an inappropriate multiple choice question that can never be answered well in the spirit of the portal we are always looking for a way out of our perennial problems to try to find an exit and I think that the technique here of teaching oneself to spot superposition problems in stalemated political systems brings a great deal of relief to those of us who find the perspective of naive activism fairly impoverished worldview the activist mindset is always trying to remove nuance elections. That might better match our world's needs from among the multiple choice answers until it finds a comical binary. Do you support the war on drugs? Yes or no. Are you for or against immigration? Should men and women be treated? Equally should embrace capitalism or chew socialism racism systemic problem or convenient. Excuse is China trading partner or a strategic rival has technology stagnated or. Is it in fact racing ahead at breakneck speed. Has Feminism gone too far or not far enough? In all of these cases there's an entire industry built around writing articles that involve replacing conversations that might progress towards answers in agreement with simple multiple choice. Political options that foreclose all hope in general we can surmise when this occurred because activism generally leaves a distinct signature where the true state of a system is best represented as a superposition of the last two remaining choices that bitterly divided us. Handed us by activists so I will leave you with the following thought. The principle of superposition is not limited to quantum weirdness and it may be governing your life at a level. You have never considered think about where you were. Most divided from your loved ones politically. Then ask yourself when I listened to the debates at my dinner table. Am I hearing set of multiple choice answers that sound like? They were developed by scholars interested in understanding or by activists who are pushing for an outcome if the ladder thing about whether you couldn't make more progress with those you love by recognizing that the truth is usually in some kind of a superposition of the last remaining answers pushed by the activists. But you don't have to accept these middle brow binary dilemmas and try llamas instead. Trask a new question if my loved ones and I trust the terms of debate foisted upon us by strangers activists in the news media. Could we together fashionable list of multiple choice answers that we might agree? Contain an answer. We all could live with and that better describes the true state of the system. I mean do you really want open or closed borders? Do you really WanNa talk about Scylla Simon in heroin in the same breath. Do you really want to claim that there is no systemic oppression or that governs every aspect of our lives before long. It is my hope that you will develop an intuition. That many long running stalemated discussions are really about having our lives shoehorned by others into inappropriate binary that can only represent. The state of our world is a superposition of inappropriate and simplistic answers. That you never would have chosen for

Jane Goodall Schroeder Europe Heisenberg Australia Physicist Trask China Heroin Utero Simon Partner
"jane goodall" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

15:05 min | 9 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Walker the PODCAST NUMBER. Ten Sixty two. This is a very special episode. Today is Earth Day that this is going up April twenty second so I am putting up this podcast with Dr Jane Goodall which I recorded yesterday and she. We did video conferencing. She's in the UK right now and it was. It was an incredibly inspiring and meaningful conversation with her. She is such a beautiful soul just turned eighty six a couple of weeks ago and and busier than she's ever been. I think one of the things that so incredible is that when you're talking to her because we could see each other. Obviously it's you can see the empathy that she has for literally all living creatures and you can see it in her eyes and one of the things that she goes back to that we talk about in. The podcast is that she is just lives in the moment. She's incredibly present and you can see the presence and you can feel it and when she's talking to you she's really focused on you and it was. It was really incredible. This will go down as one of my all time. Favorites we Had A little technical glitch at the top because we were trying to for some reason. The software was muted on her end. So you know at the top of the podcast when we're talking about like oh you're you're you're not muted. We can hear you. We can hear each other that that's what that is but she was just so great. She's promoting her new documentary on NAT. Geo which is available now. It's called Jane Goodall the hope and so. Yeah so go go watch that Lydia and I watched the other night. It was spectacular. I mean seriously the things that she has accomplished and you know she just does things. She doesn't when you know when constantly she's taken pads in life if people have said Oh. You can't do that. That's not possible. And she she just does it anyway. She figures it out and she proves them wrong and she does that. Because it's something that's important to her and it's important to the world so I highly recommend you watch the documentary after you after you listened to the podcast and you know we and also she's just so sweet you know we Afterwards we were talking like after we finish the podcast about you. Know I'm I'm GonNa make a donation to the institute. I was inspired to make a donation to our institute after we talked. And by the way if you WANNA learn more about the work. She's doing or the work her institute is doing or the the the program for children roots and shoots that she started. You can go to Jane Goodall Dot Org. So we're talking about pop culture and sort of television and stuff and she said Oh. I don't really don't really have time to go see movies. I if I do watch. Tv It's usually like nature documentary. But if I really want to relax I watch Agatha Christie or Poirot and it just it just seemed so perfect so wonderful and anyway. I sincerely hope that you enjoy this. Podcast as much as I enjoyed having the conversation and that it that it inspires you a in a myriad of ways in the last thing I'll say is that in one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. Yours truly was a contestant on celebrity jeopardy the first question that I buzzed in on and got right. She was the scientist who lived in the forest with the chimpanzees to study them. Who is Jane Goodall? Yes so it all came back around twenty three years later. It's possible I'm reading too much into the connection of that at any rate. I'm very proud to say that this is the ID ten episode number ten sixty two with Dr Jane Goodall Ice Protocol Feverishly Typing. Like maybe it's a preference in a setting or trying to trouble shoot. You got it to work. I'm so glad loves sonny. I've got a thing which was before the aim news so I am not before. That's what I'm used you know. Technology is supposed to make our life simpler. It just complicates things.

Dr Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Dot Org Lydia Agatha Christie UK Walker sonny Poirot
Jane Goodall: We Can Learn From This Pandemic

60-Second Science

02:32 min | 10 months ago

Jane Goodall: We Can Learn From This Pandemic

"Corona virus. The hopeful pingers communities individual together a healthy. How the that is Jane Goodall during a teleconference last week? Wednesday April twenty. Second is the fiftieth Earth Day and on Wednesday goodall. We'll take part in day-long programming on the National Geographic Channel. During the teleconference last week she was asked what gives her hope during this pandemic incredible carnage but the people on the front line. The doctors the nurses with King sometimes losing their lives. And of course we shall get through this and the big hope is that this time we will pay attention to the cause of the pandemic which is all this of nature and the animals on the destruction of the environment forcing animals in the close contact with each other and some of them with humans trafficking the Hunting. The killing the wet mall kids. The intensive forms domestic animals and all of that is creating conditions for a virus to jump. Someone's be another. Good Ole was also asked how she hoped the world might change because of the pandemic hope it will change and how it changes of two different things in this particular case. I think company millions of people especially those living in cities have experience for the first time. What it's like to breathe fresh air and sea the stars at night and even see wild animals at close quarters and I think those people will think other people to have seen this as a wake-up call that we've disrespected NATO. We got to start changing the way that we act. And we've got to rethink the way we never. We've got to get away from this consumerism. Imperialism that PUTS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AHEAD OF Environmental Protection which is damaging the future generations of humans and animals Fia whether this will make a fee change fear is that we have so many political leaders around the world right now and I feel that they will want to get back to business as usual as quick as possible and even double it to make up for lost time

Jane Goodall OLE Nato King
"jane goodall" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:16 min | 10 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Always. I had wanted to go out into the field and study animals on that first day when I looked at the wild and rugged mountains where the chimpanzees live. I knew that my task was not going to be easy in Gombe Bay. Without a college degree Jane began her study of wild chimpanzees at the time little was known about chimpanzee behaviour Jane later wrote. It was not permissible. At least not an ethological circle to talk about an animal's mind. Only humans had minds but Jane observed the chimps had unique personalities with capacity to feel and display affection support joy and sorrow. It was obvious watching them that they could be happy inside. And then the communication signals kissing embracing holding hands patting on the back shaking the fist swaggering. Throwing rocks all of these things done in the same context. We do them in the fall of nineteen sixty. Jane witnessed a chimpanzee squatting on a termite mound placing pieces of grass into the mound and raising the grass to his mouth. Chain discovered that the chimp had been using the grass stem as a tool to fish for termites. It had been previously accepted that humans were the only animals capable of making tools when Jane sent her groundbreaking findings to Dr Leaky he wrote. We must now redefine man redefine tools or accept chimpanzees as human over the course of her study at Gombe Bay. Jane also found that chimps have an aggressive side systematically hunting and eating smaller primates Jane even observed Intergroup violence between two groups of chimps in nineteen sixty. Three National Geographic published. An article about Jane through that piece she connected with photographer. Hugo van Loic Hugo. Jane married one year later and eventually had a son named Eric Lewis. Dr Leaky urged Jane to attend the University of Cambridge where she earned a PhD in theology in nineteen sixty five. She became the eighth person in the history of Cambridge to be permitted to pursue a PhD without an undergraduate degree about a decade after they married in nineteen seventy four. Jane and Hugo divorced a year later Jane Mary. Derrick Bryson a member of Tanzania's National Assembly who died in nineteen eighty. Jane used her incredible discoveries to promote conservation to people all over the world appearing on television writing about her research. Even founding a global nonprofit called the Jane Goodall Institute in two thousand and two Jane was named a U. N. messenger of Peace by Secretary General Kofi Annan in two thousand four Prince Charles deemed Jane a dame of the British empire. Today Jane continues to champion Human Rights and conservation through the Jane Goodall Institute. Jane is credited with challenging long held beliefs about chimpanzees. Her discoveries shifted the ways. Humans see observe and think about primates. Well for me. Animals are part of our world and just because we can destroy our world and exterminate species for ourselves. Doesn't mean that we should do it. I don't we have the right to do it. And we can books and see dinosaurs. I don't want my grandchildren to only know chimps and go relieve some giraffes and elephants from books. So you know we all destroying our own future all month we're talking about explorers and contenders on Sundays. Were taking a break from our normal episodes to highlight women. We've previously covered. Who did amazing things in healthcare for more on why we're doing what we're doing? Check out our encyclopedia. Amanda Newsletter Will Manteca Weekly. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia. Monica and you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny. Kaplan before you go I want to tell you about another show. I think you might like. Do you want to know what really made exceptional original ingenious people take a new podcast called personality? We'll delve into the minds of famous historical figures icons answering questions like what Albert Einstein today be diagnosed with. Add host Doctor Gail Saltz psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. We'll be joined by amazing experts on each episode to understand how both nature and nurture iology experiences shaped their character and struggles her sinology episodes launch weekly every Monday. Listen to personality. Spelled P. E. R. S. O. N. O. L. O. G. Y. Wherever you get your podcasts special thanks to lose. Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator oxygen Sunday..

Jane Jane Goodall Institute Jane Mary Gombe Bay Hugo van Loic Hugo Dr Leaky Kaplan Doctor Gail Saltz Albert Einstein Tanzania Cambridge Derrick Bryson Chain University of Cambridge co-creator Manteca Weekly facebook
"jane goodall" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:47 min | 10 months ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"The humans share more than ninety eight percent of the same DNA with chimpanzees. Which is probably why. There's always been a fascination with them to what we know of them is mostly because of one woman whose name has become synonymous with chimps. Jane Goodall Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today's explorer is one of the world's most famous primatology. She's best known for her decades. Long Research. Wild compansy let's talk about. Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born Valerie. Jane Morris Goodall Nineteen thirty four in London. Her Father Mortimer was a businessman and her mother. Margaret was a novelist who wrote under the pen name Van Morris Goodall from a young age. Jane was fascinated with animals when she was four. Jane Hid for hours in a hen house. Just to observe how hens lay eggs as an adolescent. Jane Dreamt of life in Africa where she could study and work with animals. She finally did move there as an adult she said upon arrival that it felt like coming home in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven. Jane moved to Kenya while there. She met Dr Louis Leakey a famous archaeologist and paleontologist who offer Jana job as a secretary in one thousand nine hundred sixty. Dr Leakey's sent Jane to Gomba Stream National Park in Tanzania.

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Morris Goodall Jane Hid Van Morris Goodall Dr Louis Leakey Gomba Stream National Park Jenny Kaplan Father Mortimer Kenya Tanzania secretary Jana Africa Margaret London
Food Myths

PODSHIP EARTH

06:42 min | 11 months ago

Food Myths

"I stopped by ousting Anna. If her family is originally from France. I thought when I was a kid for the longest time of course I thought it was French which seemed really exciting but I learned learning about my family history that we were actually Russian Jewish radicals. And you're still pretty radical. Yes yes I would say. I'm still pretty radical and I feel like I do come from a pretty radical lineage. Both to me. The definition of radical is that you are curious to go to the roots of the crises. That face us and not only do you go to those routes but then when you discover what those roots are you try to do something to change them so. My parents were both very radical and grandparents. Great grandparents. Yeah. We were sitting here with two books. One is your mom's Diet for a small planet and we'll talk about your Diet Fra Hot Planet. Your Mom Francis was right here in Berkeley. In the early seventies became kind of obsessed with looking at protein and she went to the library and basically came out with this entire theory. That blew away. You know years and years decades of thinking about that. There wasn't enough food on the planet and she was like No. There's plenty of food. There's just not enough democracy in distribution they growing up in that environment. Do you remember those times what I always take away from? My mother's story is both the need for all of us to keep asking those deep questions of why. Why is this happening? And and how do we actually fix it from its roots but also I think a lesson about the power of What Buddhists call the beginner's mind I think about in the story of Jane Goodall there? She was actually discovering what the experts literally couldn't see because they had the blinders of their expertise. And I think the story of my mother is the same thing she was this young woman. Who was discovering these answers to these deep questions by looking at the evidence? And she didn't have the blinders of any expertise around her. And I think that is a really powerful lesson to be. Learned no matter what you care about. The apple didn't for that far from the tree. That was having a conversation with someone who also is doing very similar work to his parents and he said he put it this way he was like. There is so much in the world to rebel against. I didn't need to rebel against the politics of my parents. And I feel that way as well But I will say personally this. This work wasn't what I thought I would do when I was younger. We were almost upon the thirtieth anniversary year of my mother's bestselling book this book diet for a small planet and like a lot of children. I had a really clear sense of what my mother should do with her life. And maybe not such a clear sense about my own and I sat her down New York City and said mom you have to write the sequel to this book. You touched so many lives but you really laughed and unanswered question. Which is that if your core thesis was that the problem of hunger is a problem of democracy then you left open this question of then what is democracy. And what is real democracy? Look like and how do we build communities? Whether is the kind of democratic engagement that will actually create healthy communities where people are not hungry and they get access to good healthy food so we said you should write a sequel exploring that question into that. I'll do this book if you will be my research assistant so I was in Grad school at the time and ended up signing on to work on this book with her and I went from research assistant to then be the CO author of this book together Co Authoring. This book together was for me. The life changing experience that made me realize that I wanted to work for food systems. Transformation for the rest of my life. So what were those powerful like? What was the realization sitting there working on the book with your mom so for that book. We traveled together to India Poland France Brazil Bangladesh and several places in the US and we remain friends to this day. Everywhere we went and everybody we met would have been a life changing moment. Put it all together even more so in the course of a year have this intimate close up view of both the potential around the world to really actually grow food and ways. That's good for communities in good for people but also to see the incredible global reach and impact of US based food companies food and chemical companies to see it all so clearly. You see the spread of a really highly processed diet. That's been terrible for our health that is going global. The other thing we really saw was the impact of US policies trade policies aid policies and develop policies. I know those in between books but the Diet for planet reading it after. Your Mom's book feels very much also like a sequel. I wanted to name it. Di- ever for a hot planet to be very explicit about the lineage of the work and what I talk about in Diet for a hot planet is fundamentally that in addition to the social and economic costs that my mother described Diet for a small planet of a very industrialized food system that's dependent on chemical inputs depending on synthetic fertilizer. That's about extracting resources from nature not working with nature that in addition to those costs that she described almost fifty years ago that there is this other cost which is the climate impact and I started writing diaper planet because I read a study. That blew my mind. It was the first global assessment of emissions related to livestock. It was called livestocks. Long Shadow was done by the United Nations. It found that livestock related emissions. Were responsible for more of the climate impact than all transportation combined and what we see in the food system are the kinds of solutions that would reduce food sector. Emissions are also that are better for farmer health better for our health better for biodiversity better for all the things that we also care about and that by talking about food as part of the climate conversation. We're really have an opportunity to showcase food as a really a key solution beyond have any recipes at the end. Your mom had a lot of recipes. I was I was thinking like I wonder why am I didn't put recipes so funny yes now. There is big debate to the recipes. Go into the not go in and in between these books that we've already talked about. I actually wrote a cookbook with a colleague. Bryant Terry and that has recipes. It's called

United States Mom Francis France Research Assistant Jane Goodall Anna Bryant Terry New York City India Poland France Brazil Ban United Nations Apple Berkeley DI
"jane goodall" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Throughout chimp range in Tanzania now in six other African countries whether chimps and giving people better lives in the way they choose and they become partners in conservation. And if you don't have the local people with you this no point in doing it because it's their country and then having you know being still working on getting the funding for this. What's the point if younger generations on be better stewards than we'd be? You raised an enormous amount of money including including from the corporate sponsors. Yes that's that's it. There are thirty four Jane Goodall Institutes around the world. There's eighty countries with our youth program which is kindergarten university and everything in between an all of these groups are choosing projects they choose them to make the world a better place that people animals Envir- how much how much honey you're trying to raise two hundred fifty fifty million. Yes yes okay. I want to make sure we could try to raise more for you right now. Well the point is is that these young people all over the world and we were right across China right across the US and and other parts of the world moving into the Middle East It's not that they can make a difference. They are and why should we care because we have been stealing their future. Here's he is our intellect taking Tamaz. Here's clever businesses. Here's the new technology era and something's gone wrong and what's gone wrong. Pink is this a disconnect between this clever intellect and that's what separates us more than anything from chimpanzees and other animals and love and compassion. The human I have a couple of quick questions. One is a debate here in Davos about capitalism and giving back and I'm curious sort of where you stand on that given the work that you've done all these years well whether it's working people right I think the awesome individuals philanthropists some businesses and they definitely are giving back Sometimes you can hardly differentiate whether they're doing it Sorta greenwashing shing to look good. It's actually the the passion of the CEO but quite honestly as long as they give the money and it's it's not a corrupt business because we have to be careful. I want to take money from some company. That's completely destroying the environment. Two other quick questions kids these days. You like kids to spend time outdoors Unfortunately a lot of kids. I Dunno if it's unfortunate spent time on screens including my own kids. What do you think of that right now? Well do change change we. We do know that the good psychological development is being proved. Children need to be out in the green world And then final question You travel three hundred days a year. We have a lot of people who watched the show. Who who also are road warriors? What what the trick passion mission just doing what you have to do because you care fair enough Jane Goodall? Thank you really appreciate Squawk Pod. God will be right back. We're back. That's the chauffeur today this week. We're bringing you behind. The scenes content and from our rooftop sat in the Swiss Alps the biggest names in business politics and culture are in Davos. And so are we shoes of the most important thing at Davos. I think thinks socks are actually very important. But everybody's looking at each other's shoes all tourney figure out. Can you make boots. Look good with the suit on squawk doc box is hosted by Joe Kernan Becky Quick Andrew. Ross sorkin tune in weekday mornings on. CNBC at six am eastern to get the smartest takes and analysis from our TV. Show right into into your ears. Subscribe Squad wherever you get your podcasts. We'll meet you back here tomorrow. The clear thanks guys this. NBC podcast is brought to you by TD. ameritrade investing isn't one-size-fits-all. Every investor has a unique style. Well that's why. TD AMERITRADE offers two different mobile APPS. There's TD ameritrade mobile which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined. Simplicity or thinker. Swim Swim Mobile. which gives you tools? You need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td Ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one. That's right for you once again. That's T._D. AMERITRADE DOT COM slash APPs member S._I._P._C...

Davos Jane Goodall Institutes Jane Goodall Tanzania Swiss Alps Middle East Joe Kernan Becky CNBC CEO China Ross sorkin NBC US TD.
World Economic Forum: What to Watch For

Squawk Pod

05:32 min | 1 year ago

World Economic Forum: What to Watch For

"Today's episode. The World Economic Forum in Davos for forty plus years the world's leaders in business and politics had convened in the Swiss Alps for a whirlwind four days of meetings interviews panels and performances Andrew. Have you packed yet for Davos pact. That's actually this. After this project I caught up with Andrew just just before we both boarded a flight commercial to this year's World Economic Forum so Davos is the home of the World Economic Forum which has a long history. This is a group group that started in about nineteen seventy-one so almost fifty years of this global event for people who've never been there before. How would you describe it? What could you expect to see in terms of our our coverage this is the super bowl for business and policy leaders probably the greatest density of CEO's and government leaders in one place all traipsing through the snow together over the course of three or four days and a lot of the business leaders are engaging engaging conversations that are maybe a little bit different than what they're doing from a day to day basis we have a lot of discussions about about capitalism a lot of discussions about environmentalism mm-hmm about poverty around the world What kinds of conversations do you expect to hear? I think the single biggest topic you're going to hear about out this year is the idea of sustainability and. I know that is almost a cliche at this point. And it's a topic that's been addressed before Davos in really started To some degree at Davos however there is going to be a sea change in the way businesses operate and that real cost when when it comes to sustainability. You're looking at companies like Microsoft already that are charging their individual units for their carbon use. And I think you're gonNA see that in a very material way across the board so much of this is actually being led by Europe and some of the disclosure rules. And I think you're GonNa you start to see more and more disclosure around carbon emissions the cost of those emissions what companies are doing on. Es G. and it's just it's the the topic that is being talked about in the boardroom. Is it strange to talk about that. At a at a Swiss ski resort that people have to fly and in some cases take helicopters to get to. What's tell me about that? Disconnect people love to poke fun at Davos and think of it as you know speed dating and over Champagne. And everybody's flying there. I have never been fond of the argument that everybody should swim to Davos or otherwise. They're hypocrites if you really think about how. The dialogue and businesses changed around stakeholders and shareholders and purpose. And all of these things that have taken place place over the last twenty or thirty years they started Indaba. And so you know you can laugh if you want. But I I think that actually really the most meet some of the most meaningful decisions that are happening at the intersection of business and policy are happening there over the years. Joe Becky and Andrew have interviewed the likes of Bano J. P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon His Royal Highness. Prince William the Secretary General Role of NATO and so many more but a consensus favorite for the squawk box behind the scenes team Andrews conversation with conservationist Jane Goodall at last year's event. Here's what Andrew told me about that interview a year later. Can we talk about what might have been my favorite interview that we did last year and that is with eighty five year old soon to be eighty six year old. Jane Goodall Maybe one of my most favorite interviews of my career. Oh that's awesome. I think definitely my most favorite image age. Somebody took a picture of me kissing. Jane's on head. Who took that picture Andrew? I think you did I did. Hey I think you did anyway. it's it's just it's an indelible image. I have long been a great admirer of Jane Goodall. Integrate I've had a great love affair with gorillas and monkeys and The environment and and being able to spend time with her and Talk to her about her own journey and how she sees the world today was really quite something. It was a very charming interaction. Action that you had with her I think that doesn't happen very often. When you're interviewing people especially the CEOS of the business leaders that we talked to in Davos you the other piece of it is? It's very rare and maybe I'm completely jaded but it's very rare. We're sort of starstruck and I was genuinely genuinely starstruck. Buy Jingle Jingle Bells raised about two hundred and fifty million dollars for her foundation for conservation work and environmental concerns and also also education about our planet and about The way we coexist with animals and I thought that message was actually really fascinating leading to bring to a meeting of the global elite. You know I think that what she does. She adds a sense sense of humanity empathy to a conversation among business leaders. That oftentimes missing that piece. Okay this is awesome. Thank you appreciate it.

Davos Jane Goodall Andrew CEO Swiss Alps Microsoft Europe Jamie Dimon Bano J. P. Morgan Chase Prince William Nato Joe Becky
Sally Fox: The Mother of Organic Cotton

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Sally Fox: The Mother of Organic Cotton

"There. Sally Fox who is considered by many in the industry to be the mother mother of modern organic cotton throughout her career. Fox has fought the good fight. She reminds me kind of like the fashion version of Jane Goodall. She kind of looks like her too but she's had middling success in this fight. Conventional cotton farmers in the American southwest did their best to quash endeavors. I mean when she told me the stories in she lives in a trailer and when she told me Over T in her trailer about what. The farmers did to run her Outta town. Bakersville or field and in in Arizona. Crazy Levi's I applauded and encouraged and even contracted her to supply the company with her organic cotton and she was wearing jeans made of if it when I met her but then after a management shakeup in the nineties the company abruptly cut her loose and that led to her bankruptcy eh yet. She's never given up now on Vera. Dita's farm her one hundred and thirty Acre stead north west of Sacramento. She still breeds and nurtures cotton as well as raises sheep for wool and she farms crops to sequester carbon and build topsoil for her. This is the only way forward right now. She said the climate goal for the Paris accord is point four percent carpet sick with station per acre per year we have to get the carbon out of the atmosphere before there's no return.

Jane Goodall Sally Fox Dita Levi Arizona Paris Sacramento
Meghan Markle, Britain And Megan discussed on Phil Valentine

Phil Valentine

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Meghan Markle, Britain And Megan discussed on Phil Valentine

"Hear the eye roll of the day prince Harry reveals that he and Meghan Markle only have two children to help save the planet yeah as everybody's eyes were a whole mine is a glazed over it yeah yeah and says how unconscious bias is causing racism in Britain and white and his wife's vogue spread out there he's revealed in hand up Megan only one two children they can help save the planet that comes from their father by the way you know he's real big on that prince Charles the Duke of Sussex maybe extraordinary revelation in a candid interview with conservationist doctor Jane Goodall as part of his wife's edition of British vogue now my question is one thing the plan why have any children at all why I just wanted to stop having children you get we go there I mean it's not like he's his brother you know I mean this is this is the spare the air in the spare so I mean it's not like you know if the bloodline dies their big wolf

Meghan Markle Britain Megan Prince Charles Sussex Jane Goodall Prince Harry
Jane Goodall, British Vogue Magazine And Meghan Markle discussed on Colleen and Bradley

Colleen and Bradley

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Jane Goodall, British Vogue Magazine And Meghan Markle discussed on Colleen and Bradley

"End of prince Harry he's doing an interview with the doctor Jane Goodall in the news September issue of British vogue magazine which is guess edited by his wife Meghan Markle and prince Harry says he wants just one more sibling maximum for his son

Jane Goodall British Vogue Magazine Meghan Markle Prince Harry
Meghan Markle Is a Guest Editor for British Vogue

Ben Maller

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Meghan Markle Is a Guest Editor for British Vogue

"Meghan Markle is in the news and for kind of a cool reason she has revealed what she's actually been working on for the past seven months she's had a secret project that no one's known about and it turns out she will be the September issue of the British vogue she is the first ever editor in a guest editor basically they're calling her guest editor in chief and so the September issue of every fashion magazine is the biggest issue of the year and so British vogue is of course no you know no different and so she has it should be it's called forces of change and it features a guy a candid conversations between Meghan Markle and a lot of different women that she's interviewed including former First Lady Michelle Obama and she said these last seven months have been a rewarding process curating and collaborating and with British vogue's editor in chief and to take the year's most read fashion issue and steer its focus to the values causes and people making impact on the world today and it's kind of an interesting mix of people this is the first time this has been done in the one hundred and three year history of British vogue the Jane Goodall is interviewed by prince Harry in this in this issue there are a group of actors models politicians authors advocates for for everything from diversity in mental health to climate change voting rights things like that there are also articles written by Bernie brown of course is blowing up all over Instagram right now and on on Netflix people love while listening to her and and motivational speeches Jimmy alleged meal there a lot of others Christy Turlington Salma Hayek lots of names and faces that you'll recognize some that you won't but on the GI Jane Fonda is also listed in there too but lots of inspiring women and that's kind of like the whole focus of it really is just to have all these women highlighted in the magazine in in in a non fashion non model kind of way of a writing background you know Victoria and all that she did for she had a she had a blog that called the Taig and apparently I I wasn't I was not aware of who she was until she started dating prince Harry because I didn't watch suits but apparently she had a cult following on her blog and she would write about food and travel and all kinds of things and and when she shut it down which I guess the the past the Royals mater mater shut it down when she started when she got engaged to prince Harry so this is the first project that she's done that sort of very public like I would make that is just out of put yourself in their room like a fly on the wall somebody who though says the you we don't think it's a good idea to the prince himself say that some now by the protocol Corum or whatever it is huge you know medium medium that you know is in charge of all of that and it makes sense you can't really at I think would be cool if the princess had her own blog where she posted her personal style reliance diaries

Meghan Markle Seven Months Three Year
"jane goodall" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on BrainStuff

"She founded the <Speech_Female> Jane Goodall institute <Speech_Female> in nineteen seventy seven <Speech_Female> which works to <Speech_Female> keep human communities <Speech_Female> and wild Chipenzi <Speech_Female> populations in <Speech_Female> Africa, healthy <Speech_Female> and coexisting <Speech_Female> peacefully <Speech_Female> roots and shoots <Speech_Female> is a program to <Speech_Female> power young people <Speech_Female> worldwide to <Speech_Female> make a difference in their local <Speech_Female> communities <Speech_Female> now at the <Speech_Female> age of eighty five <Speech_Female> Goodell spends about <Speech_Female> three hundred days a <Speech_Female> year, traveling and <Speech_Female> speaking about Africa. <Speech_Female> Chimpanzees, <Speech_Female> the environment <Speech_Female> and her other passions. <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> Although Goodall sees the <Speech_Female> hideous parts of what <Speech_Female> humans are doing to our <Speech_Female> planet. She continues <Speech_Female> to be hopeful about our <Speech_Female> future. <Speech_Female> She wrote in a New York Times <Speech_Female> op Ed in two thousand <Speech_Female> seventeen <Speech_Female> quote, the <Speech_Female> lust for greed and <Speech_Female> power has destroyed <Speech_Female> the beauty. We inherited <Speech_Female> but altruism <Speech_Female> compassion, <Speech_Female> and love have <Speech_Female> not been destroyed. <Speech_Female> All that is beautiful <Speech_Female> in humanity <Speech_Female> has not been destroyed. <Speech_Female> The beauty of <Speech_Female> our planet is not dead, <Speech_Female> but lying dormant <Speech_Female> like the seeds <Speech_Female> of a dead tree. <Speech_Female> We shall <SpeakerChange> have another <Speech_Female> chance. <Silence> In <Speech_Female> two thousand nineteen Goodall <Speech_Female> was nominated for the Nobel <Speech_Female> peace prize. <Speech_Female> She was also <Speech_Female> included on the two thousand nineteen <Speech_Female> time one hundred <Speech_Female> list of the one hundred <Speech_Female> most influential <Speech_Female> people in the world. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> spoke by Email with <Speech_Female> the author of the petition to <Speech_Female> nominate Goodall for <Speech_Female> the prize, one <Speech_Female> Myron shackle, <Speech_Female> a research, associate <Speech_Female> at western Washington <Speech_Female> University's department <Speech_Female> of anthropology. <Speech_Female> They said, <Speech_Female> I believe there's <Speech_Female> no better choice to <Speech_Female> receive the next Nobel <Speech_Female> peace. Prize <Speech_Female> civilization <Speech_Female> is today facing perhaps <Speech_Female> its greatest challenge <Speech_Female> ever, the <Speech_Female> twin puck elliptic <Speech_Female> threats of global climate <Speech_Female> change and <Speech_Female> biodiversity loss. <Speech_Female> Both <Speech_Female> are caused by humans <Speech_Female> and both are <Speech_Female> linked in that boasts <Speech_Female> stem from human misuse <Speech_Female> of the environment. <Speech_Female> No <Speech_Female> one has ever done more <Speech_Female> or better work <Speech_Female> than Jane Goodall to bring <Speech_Female> peace between humans, <Speech_Female> and their environment <Speech_Female> and thereby <Speech_Female> create the conditions <Speech_Female> under which humans <Advertisement> can <Speech_Female> be at peace <Advertisement> with each other <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jane <Speech_Music_Female> Goodall is <Advertisement> the global <Speech_Female> face <Advertisement> for global <Speech_Music_Female> peace. <Advertisement> Today's <Speech_Music_Female> episode was written <Speech_Music_Female> by Justin <Advertisement> shields, and <Speech_Music_Female> produced by Tyler <Advertisement> clang <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brain stuff <Speech_Music_Female> is a production <Advertisement> of iheartradio. <Speech_Music_Female> How <Advertisement> stuff works <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for more on this <Speech_Music_Female> in lots of <Advertisement> other topics <Speech_Music_Female> that

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall institute Africa New York Times Goodell Africa. Myron shackle iheartradio Washington three hundred days
Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Never Gave Up

BrainStuff

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Never Gave Up

"Some people just don't quit. It's okay to quit occasionally, it's best to, but let Dr Jane Goodall be an example, to us, all sometimes you have a far fetched dream and instead of dismissing it, you do it anyway. And when you've cheered what you set up to do, just when you're at the top of your game, your dream might change based on what you've learned along the way your knee dream is bigger and more difficult to realize, but you do it anyway. Repeat into old age never slowing down. And you might even get nominated for a Nobel peace prize. The key to Dr Goodell's persistence, seems to have a lot to do with knowing what she liked from a very young age. And then just insisting on doing it. Her father gave her a stuffed chimpanzee when she was a baby. And she took it with her everywhere, even though it was by all accounts terrifying. She grew up loving to observe and catalog animals, and dreamed of one day living with African, animals and writing books about them for a living. Her mother, who was a novelist herself told. All that, that seemed like a perfectly reasonable idea, even though it was the nineteen forties and not at all. But middle class English girls were expected to do after she finished school. Goodall couldn't afford to go to college. So she worked odd jobs in London for a few years until a friend, invited her to visit her family's farm in Kenya at which point Goodall, immediately quit her job, and waited tables, until she made enough money to pay for the price of boat fair to Africa. While in Kenya. Her friends, justed, she contact the paleontologist, Louis Leakey curator of the corn did museum in Nairobi to discuss. Primates Aliki was interested in studying primate behavior in order to better understand early human species leaky hired Goodall as his field assistant on a paleontological dig and later asked her to return to England to research primates and raise money for a long-term observational study on wild chimpanzees, the gun base stream, national park in Tanzania into live nineteen sixty twenty six year old Jane Goodall began setting up her field station at Gumby, which would become the site of the longest running. Wildlife research project in history. British authorities initially balked at the idea of a young woman doing this kind of work on chaperoned. So Goodell's mother van accompanied her for the first few months Goodall observed, the chip head See's daily for two years before she earned their trust. Her method was just to watch the animals, and imitate their actions, recording everything that happened in a field journal. Two of Goodell's most important discoveries during this period, had to do with what chimps eight and how they went about getting food Goodall was the first to observe chimpanzees killing and eating the meat of small mammals prior to this. They were thought to be vegetarian and perhaps her biggest contribution to our understanding of primates was the revelation that chimps used collected and modified grass stems and sticks as tools to fish, termites out of their nests Goodell's discoveries were so significant Leakey said, now, we must redefine tool redefine, man, and he arranged for her to write a dissertation at Cambridge University on the behaviors of wild chimpanzees. It was accepted and she became one of only eight people ever to graduate from Cambridge with her PHD without first earning her undergraduate degree in nineteen sixty four Goodall married. Hugh on, Loic a Dutch wildlife photographer who leaky sent to record her activity in the field. They had a son in nineteen sixty seven who spent his early life with his parents at Gumby after Goodell in Loic divorced in nineteen seventy four. Good. All Mary, Derrick Bryson in nineteen seventy five who was the director of Tanzania's national parks during this time Goodell published books about her experiences in research at gone BEI, including in the shadow of man, which was criticized by scientists because of good old habit of naming subjects of her research. She called her most famous study subject, David greybeard, but the book was Beilby popular and has since been translated into forty eight languages as she lived and worked in Gumby. She began to notice changes to the chimpanzees habitat deforestation and mining practices forced the animals out of their homes and into spoiler in smaller areas. More than one million wild chimpanzees lift in Africa hundred years ago. But today, only a fifth of that population exists Goodall saw the writing on the wall. Which is why in the nineteen eighties Goodall changed her focus from observing chimps to working to protect their habitat.

Dr Jane Goodall Dr Goodell Africa Louis Leakey Gumby Kenya Tanzania David Greybeard Nairobi Cambridge University Aliki Beilby Hugh London Cambridge England Director Mary Derrick Bryson
California Gov. Jerry Brown casually unveils history’s most ambitious climate target

Ethan at Night

05:51 min | 2 years ago

California Gov. Jerry Brown casually unveils history’s most ambitious climate target

"But let's check in on California politics joining me from politico. One of the authors of the California playbook Carla Marinucci Carlo thanks so much. Good to talk to you today. Hey, good to be with you. All right. So governor Brown did something. I'm honestly, I'm torn on this one because I'm excited, and I'm I'm concerned about what it's gonna cost us. Huge new legacy Bill that he signed. Yeah. That's right. I mean, governor Brown again, you know, what it is really a rebuke to President Trump's administration sign that Bill Monday to great fanfare, basically saying to California's going to be getting all of its retail atrocity from renewable sources by twenty forty five. Now, you know, that's still a long way away. But the fact is he wants to send a message that maybe the federal government isn't going to comply with the Paris climate agreement, but California is and he said that they're going to go. We're going to go down that path. Even by the way. Signed an executive order that also direct straight stage. And she's to figure out how to make the entire economy of the state carbon-neutral that means transportation that means manufacturing that means a whole bunch of other things ether ambitious things, and you know, you you mentioned costs that is one thing that some of the opponents of this action said, what's it gonna cost consumers, and the fact is we don't know. But but Jerry Brown to say, look, this is a literally kind of a do or die effort that we've got to start addressing climate change in California really hasn't been on the forefront. Here forget gauge and intends to continue to to be on the forefront to combat global warming. So big move from Jerry bound on the eve of this massive climate change conferences starts tomorrow in San Francisco at Mosconi tenure. Yeah, I've been getting, you know, PR emails on that. Of course, joining me on the phone is politicos, California playbook Carla Marinucci, but this clogged global global climate summit. Of course, that's happening here. I mean, it's just that's natural. But what what is this kind of a summit when we're talking about climate mean what what is the goal. What are we gonna learn from from this coming up? It's a good point the news. You know, some of the critics are saying, well, this is just a show, Jerry. Jerry Brown swan song. And so forth. But the fact is you you've got some of the world leaders on this subject, including New York City. Mayor Michael Bloomberg. You've got former Vice President Al gore, who of course, won the Nobel prize because of his original, you know, warnings on on this Jane Goodall, you've got a number of celebrity types coming and a big CEO's like Salesforce, CEO Mark Benny off. And when you bring all these folks together, not to mention you're going to have a lot of protesters as well. 'cause there are a lot of people who were very upset at Gerry bound when it comes to issues like fracking and so forth. But the fact is you get a lot of these world leaders, and they're putting their heads together on some really complex subjects and trying to come up with ways in which basically states can go around the inaction from the federal government. So the California keeps sort of setting a bar higher on this and not just with the Bill. Signed yesterday. But you know, they looked forward to other ways they can contain greenhouse gases in California. You know, we've got some major issues here in California with the seat like the sea level rising. And we're going to have to address things like, you know, embarcadero. Seawalls and so forth. There are some issues that are sort of immediate and need to be dealt with. So I think with all these folks coming together, it's going to be all eyes are going to San Francisco this week when it comes to the issue climate change, so Carl I have a question for you. Carla Marinucci is joining me on the phone politicos, California. Playbook is anybody gonna ask how many of them flew commercial versus? Nobody's gonna ask. I'm not going to be able to be there to participate. But I this is something I it's hard core. Environmentalists. And there's nothing that ticks me off more than the ultra wealthy oligarchs coming and telling me how to live my life, and they flew a private jet, and it's just defeated the whole purpose here the lineup of Lear jets. Right. We'll be a testament even very very good point here on this one. And that is some big should ask in the press conference today. I will try to do that today. I am so sorry. I thought was tomorrow almost as we speak in San Francisco addressing a climate change group this morning. He's doing a lot of stuff related to the. So he is in San Francisco this morning. But you know, it the actual kickoff of the conference starts tomorrow. And yeah, you're absolutely right. I that that question does need to be asked. Because the oligarchs say here just through and it's like come on. All right. You want? I totally support making changes and all these things, but don't tell me that while you're doing something the opposite. I think that's an excellent point. I will make sure that to tell them that you asked I'm happy to by the way. I mean, you Lonzo already blocked me on Twitter because I asked hard questions. Is it really I think so yes, I would put it at a status symbol your badge blocked by. That's my little bio on

California Carla Marinucci Governor Brown San Francisco Carla Marinucci Carlo Jerry Brown Federal Government Twitter Amazon Playbook Michael Bloomberg Vice President Al Gore New York City Ethan Bearman Carla Nobel Prize President Trump Executive
"jane goodall" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Jane goodall it was the full moon very clear sky and coming shooting out were lights i it was a so it was a fi what coming out a single firework and then the b one two three four and then it would come from the other side and then it would be quiet for a bit then this splayed started up again it was absolutely extraordinary and nobody seems to know what it could be from the full moon from the full moon it was completely amazing i was awestruck so here's what we know so earth the planet plows through several hundred tons of meteors a day almost all of it burns up in our atmosphere soup because we have an atmosphere and this is a protective blanket for us the moon has no such protection there are places in our orbit where the amount of this debris is more than other places this is what takes us from a meteor shower to a meteor storm if you if we're plowing through this extra heavy debris section of space and they're hitting the moon nothing stops it from go all the way to the surface and goes to the surface and all of that energy has to go somewhere because the things stopped moving you can get explosions off the surface of the moon which in your case i'm thinking it would have happened on the answers of the moon so that you can see the sparks coming out it was coming outta the end out.

Jane goodall hundred tons
"jane goodall" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Word grass i'll well they're slim slim's center wrestle leaner long body from from eating grass grandson thin because anybody who eats grass won't be for sure i mean electra now well council just machines we invented to turn grass into stake as shows so my wall i never heard that that's what that's what it is with that is awesome i'm starting at own creation bill wild state cows wandering of milk cows terrorizing got just see now she has some grass you look delicious okay so for jane goodall to study chimps in the way she did right she had to figure out how to get close enough to them to make these observations something other people hadn't thought to do figured out was necessary and so something that had never been done before so i asked her how she did it so it's check it out if i were champ and i saw you coming event way run away what what is the what was your tactic i found a peak and with my binoculars i sat there and i could actually begin learning quite a bit about tim's from the food set of different cold sabre making a could see how they bent over brunches to make steepen pet foams onus night gradually the chimpanzees used speaks i wasn't frightening them i will the same colored clothes every day didn't try to get too close too quickly and eventually they realized i wasn't a scary as i had thought and then came the scary bit for me because having realized i was some scary they treated me a little bit as though i was accountable and they tried to chase me away as as if i was a leopard screaming at me and waving branches and charging positon you know about ten times stronger than me so i just pretend.

jane goodall tim milk
"jane goodall" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Very cool as a we'll be relying heavily on your expertise because as you know we're featuring my interview with living legend jane goodall oh yes of course yes yes she her field work is is understand the foundation of all modern primate science jed overstating it or is what i don't think so i think she she's a rockstar rockstar okay justifiable rockstar well in my interview i asked her how did her path into science begin at all because we all have a story she's got a story all right let's check it out it began in a hen house when i was four and a half years old we went stay on a farm in the country and i always loved animals and we lived in london at the time so mom and i went to this foam popa foam where animals are in the fields and hens up trucking around in the foam yet and i was given a job to collect the eggs so i don't remember this but apparently i was asking everybody but you know here's the wiz the whole on the hen which is the come on and nobody could tell me wouldn't tell me so what i do remember distinctly is this hen brown one and she's going into this little hen house and the witness books around the edge so i must have thought us she's good till and crawled off to her and apparently was gone for i hours and the family had no idea where i was the even called the police and yet when mom sumi running towards the house.

jane goodall london
"jane goodall" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"jane goodall" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Became an epic epa tell we ended up having to we built a 7'1 mixedage at our office and we brought in a sound editor before we brought him picture editor two years ago and we what we did was we acquired through the jane goodall institute 55 years worth of audio recordings and then began the inevitable task of of of trying to treat synchronized chimp sounds for for the phone and how close where you getting every when you were it would yet access these audio recordings did you have audio recordings of specific chimpanzees that match the chips in the fill we didn't have like flows voice per se but they were the film went was after we did our work the technical people came through and were like states tough on spa boy i had this financially to hire a sound at her for two years is lake it's really money if money so i got really liking hired some kitty just graduate from sc and paid him really nothing but it was his first job meant he had this fancy seven one room and he was stoked than settlement for two years and and he just put it food and under sifted some bananas and that i remember wade we hired the film was a we brought in the sounds energy recently disobedient the bees and he's a big hollywood guy and i was assuming he was going to sort of redo all the stuff at once he is high on the city's like you know i think we should keep josh on the project in maybe i'll just give him all the chip so getting access to jane goodall herself is not that easy thing she's a busy woman i told she's benz three hundred days a year on the road carry out the causes of her jane goodall institute and maybe via this film wasn't as big a deal to hers it was too you can you talk about what that interaction was like getting her on board the project i think anyone haruna makes films knows that it's a lot easier to make a film any film as a cleberation between the subject in the filmmaker.

epa editor wade josh jane goodall jane goodall institute two years three hundred days 55 years