19 Burst results for "Jane Eyre"

Hot Pockets Heiress Sentenced in College Admissions Scam in Boston

NBC Nightly News

01:21 min | 10 months ago

Hot Pockets Heiress Sentenced in College Admissions Scam in Boston

"One more chapter in the college admissions cheating scandal unfolded today a snack. Food heiress was sentenced to prison in Boston. Nbc Steve Patterson as the latest tonight after ducking into Federal Court. One last time hot pockets heiress Michelle Janice finally learned her fate the judge sentencing to five months in prison after she admitted to paying three hundred thousand dollars to cheat college admissions for three of her daughters prosecutors naming you're one of the most culpable parents charged. She understands the harm that her choices caused Jane. Eyre to her. Family's multi billion dollar microwaveable snack forge in October. She pled guilty to paying one hundred thousand dollars to fix two daughters. Act Exams and two hundred thousand dollars to make a profile for another daughter as volleyball recruit to USC. Jan is one of nearly two dozen parents who pled guilty to the scandal. So far including desperate housewives star Felicity Huffman who serve less than two weeks in prison. Meanwhile actress Laurie Lachlan in fashion designer husband. Massimo new continue fighting their charges maintaining their payments to. Usc WERE LEGITIMATE DONATIONS NOT BRIBES. Today's sentence wall so much. Be a precedent but it could be something of a benchmark Lachlan's Casey's

USC Laurie Lachlan Eyre Felicity Huffman Michelle Janice Steve Patterson Boston NBC Volleyball Federal Court Jane Family Casey
Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

The Big Picture

10:08 min | 10 months ago

Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

"We have a special sort of conversation. Here we're joined by Mister Robot. Creator the Creator of the film comet The director of Amazon's homecoming. Yes Sam. Esmail saying what's up. Hello how are you? I'm so excited to be here. I'm such a fan. Oh that's very sam. You wanted to play a game with us. I did now. I want to know why you wanted to play that game with us and I also want you to explain the game. Well explaining it okay. I'll let me start by saying I'm a huge film. Learn as I think anybody who listens to the watch probably already gust. And I've always played this game with all my film nerd fans and so I figured one when I started listening to your podcasts. Which obsessed with a huge fan of I figured especially with Amanda Sort of counterpoint? To talk to your thinking Shawn's like I just thought this'll be a fun game to play the game. Basically and again. This is sorry for listeners. Who are not going to be in on this because it's so inside. It's not even that insight. It's but it's it's really not OK okay. I won't apologize here. We go is a good game in and you deserve it. It's the best director per decade and the best director who die who had their debut. That decade does that make sense. Did I explain this? Should we use an example to help people understand it? What's an example that we won't? Won't you trample on the choices that we've made here? Well we look at this decade. We had we had like a number of actually great film. Directors made their debut Jordan. Peele with get ou- Greta Gerwig with Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Man. This favorite with El Camino until nineteen many wonderful. Thanks well actually. Gertler made no thanks. But it's it's it's it's it's. It's good to bring up Vince. As an example because he actually that was his feature directing debut which is all coming up. Now the thing is it's not necessarily not saying what's the best directorial debut? Just the director that we appreciate. The most made that debut made their debut in that decade so I think that there's a couple of semantic complications around now and you know as well as I do that there are student films. Their short film features so. Let's lay the groundwork. Because Vince directed episodes of Britain. He directed the pilot breaking bug which I think was in the prior decade but we're talking feature directorial debut so that seems easy to Parse. It's not as easy to Parse as it seems. Now tell me why well. Are you talking about dual are GonNa be Spielberg is is a particularly complex example? Because of nine or you're talking about nine gallery 'cause that's TV while he made a movie when he was seventeen called firelight for five hundred bucks and is that a film. Is that a feature film even his parents saw. I wouldn't say a featured like a debut meaning. It was released in movie theaters got it. Okay commercially available. Commercially available attack. Those are good ground rules. I'm glad that we established that play into my less later on. I do consider to be because it didn't get released in theaters. Well it is a feature film but it was not this little guy but that is considering his feature debut his first full length movie right what. What's the movie after that? Then Land Express okay all right so yes we'll stick to that okay before we play the game now. The people understand the game I want but just add one other thing the interesting thing about this game and I think will when we go through. We'll see it's where the decades are hard because there's just so many amazing options and where the decades are not A. There's not a lot of options. I just find the conversation around that to be interesting because lanes a little bit about where movies are and where they're doing exactly specifically the nineties which I thought was just a burst of like creative inspirational film makers and then the very decade after the ONS which I struggled I struggled to find. I have some counterpoint to that point but I I wanna use this as an opportunity to pick a bone with you. Oh Wow okay I resent you. I resent your your appearance on this podcast because what I what we need. What this podcast needs is people like you making movies and television shows will but you love movies and you film in a very discreet way. Yes but and I mean I guess we're going to get into it right now. It's gotTa think about think about indie filmmakers. What happened let's say Ryan Kugler? Who Loved Fruitvale? Right mazing what happened to him. After he made fruitvale he went into the machine he went into the machine. And that's what's happening with a lot of these other directors and that. That's the difference between the nineties and now so I think. Pta came out with holiday today. Is he making you know Batman in two years and by the way no not dissing on Batman? I'm excited for When Matt Raises Version of it? Because I'm a fan of his but I think it's just the industry is dictating a lot of what directors are doing now and you know and not to 'em this point that's the machine that we're in right now so and that's more reflective of the decade so t to to get to my TV point. Tv's where you get to make the interesting shit. I don't know if I could have made mister robot as a feature in fact I tried well. That was my fault. Got a little long winded. With how long was that? That forty five. Our film now That feature from I wrote ninety pages of wasn't even into act tune. That's when I realized I was in trouble. Was there a divergent path for you where after comet you could have just doubled down and said I'll stay. I'll continue to stay kind of broke but I'll keep making movies will. Yeah I mean that was the plan I was going to make Mr Buzzing indie feature and got stuck with it and Steve Golan Who You know owns anonymous content who Read the pages of Missouri Button at the time detective had just come out and he just He had just produced. That and I thought women that will this is fucking coal. And I don't need to do anything with this. I don't need to refashion the script that I had in mind and fitted into this to our box and honestly I was just really more. I remember thinking I was way more excited about true detective than I was about anything. Elsa came out there. Trust them into. What are your thoughts on true detective because I have no idea? I don't love thank you. Yeah I think I think I see yes. The first season I think true detective on its face is like a accomplished piece of television filmmaking and also I'm a huge fan of cary Fukunaga always and forever Perhaps not for the same reasons. Assess it to me actually wrap. It was such a turning point. Anything his best thing that he's done. I'm not even going to say Jane Eyre Okay. I haven't I haven't seen that I haven't seen the new Bond movie I but I'm really looking forward to it because I'm also a bond person and also I just you know I think true true detective as this carries best thing. I think that's probably true but my issue with detective is not actually true detective itself. It is the dialogue around your detective. And also I think that's a pivot point in terms of when and how we started evaluating TV in terms of tracking shots and the actual just the athletic like filmmaking as a way to bring the an experience. What is this athletic yet? Flex now and then on twitter people are now saying slaps what what is all? I don't understand that you want to explain the Internet. Let's start with the athletic because Amanda I. I've heard you use a lot and I've I've been on a lot of sets of never heard anyone say the words. I think the first person he was at my friend on the TV critic Philip asking and I think it puts its finger on this idea of money that you bring her up because she wrote this she wrote. It was a harsh. I mean whatever I respect her reviews she dissed my one episode of Mister Robot whereas all one tracking shot. I assume yes is what you mean by athletic because I do think that Filmmaking and TV and everything is more than cameras and more than where the camera is and there is such a absolutely station online. The damore as more aspect of filmmaking and I think that the tracking shot is caption of that and just like. Oh Wow. Did you see what he did. That was so cool. Oh my God. The camera is moving. You know don't you think it but don't you think has a to me every every sort of choice that you make with the camera has an effect and yes to some extent it it takes you out of it and draws attention to itself but to some extent. I really I mean what do you think of the Copacabana Sean? And I and I and I do. Actually I think even tracking protective is effective. But you know we're doing a podcast right now. That isn't essentially about how we talk about. Film and like establishing a Canon of source. And the cannon is so reliant on where do we put the camera and what did they itch on showing us an either. Don't respond to that artistically at some point. I'm just like Yay like fancy camera. Shots you got it. Congratulations to you but I do also think it distracts from the other equally important. I feel making that. Don't get enough credit. I think code is also a specifically athletic is code for Masculinity. You know it's code for this sort of The might of the male filmmaker. Now that's not always true if you watch like strange days for example. Kathryn bigelow is doing a lot with the camera yet. It is unorthodox and cool and might have what would otherwise be deemed kind of masculine energy. But I do think that true detective and largely the dialogue like you're saying was about a lot of dudes being like Yo. This is sick now. Personally I thought it was sick. Oh okay but I I would. I was not a fan of those scripts and I don't think that story is very strong but I thought that was really well

Director Mister Robot Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Amanda Sort Esmail SAM Batman Kathryn Bigelow El Camino Amazon Cary Fukunaga Shawn Gertler PTA Twitter Spielberg Ryan Kugler Mr Buzzing Britain Copacabana Sean
"jane eyre" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Here & Now

"They were people turn to fuel for the american machine and now a lot of people on the list actually wrote in praise of tequila mockingbird and i understood that impulse because that is a beautiful novel and a novel that suggests something quite optimistic about the role that whites can play in battling what coats identifies quite clearly as the inevitability of white supremacy in america and i would just commend those people who loved that novel as i do to kill a mockingbird if you haven't or if you haven't recently go back and read between the world and it's devastating in all the necessary way snappy them together yup okay david foster wallace's considered the lobster and slouching toward bethlehem joan diddy and by that we will have your whole listed here now dot org. I'm lucky enough to teach a class to like journalists or far better journalist than i'll ever be. An these the first two writers give them as diddy and david foster wallace when when we read nonfiction what we really want is to be in the presence of a great mind and heart on the page simple direct language about what preoccupies those right is what keeps them up with feels urgent agent and foster. Wallace is one of those guys who it doesn't matter where you send him. He was going to find the most interesting question to ask about that place. Consider the lobster. The essay for instance is going to the maine lobster festival and asking a very simple question that really stops readers dead in their tracks. Is it okay for human beings things to torture alive animal for their own goose dettori pleasure and i also want to say that it's very funny and far-reaching collection of essays even as it's taking taking on serious terrain okay i wanna make sure that we get to the listeners i mean hundreds of responses but here's a couple rebecca pay mayor the grapes of wrath christina williamson outlander alexander changed the blue castle run dolinsky. It looks like time and again from jack finney. What are some of the jumped out at. You jumped out at me. Robin was the number of people who wrote about novels and i want to give a little list and of green gables came up again in the little women. Jane eyre an all of them. I chose ruby fruit jungle. That's the nineteen seventy-three rita mae brown book about a young woman coming into her own body and her own sexuality. She's a lesbian and it was upon rereading eating an entirely different novel from the one i read when i was twelve years old and did not understand really what it was about twelve. Okay maybe eleven right. You got me. Maybe maybe ten with certain parts underlined but the point is it was a revolutionary book in the sense that it just took on rita may's own experience. We may rounds. It's own experienced back in one thousand nine hundred ninety three it was writing about the way in which it felt forbidden for her to love who she wanted was it was forbidden and i think the reason that there are so many any people choosing anne of green gables little women janier. This kind of book is because it focuses all of those books focus on female characters who are too smart and ambitious for their circumstances stances and who are trying to make their way in a world that criminalizes their sexuality or even more so their ambition and that is the moment we're living in and that's why returning to those novels is a different sort of experience. I think then maybe when you read it when you're a teenage girl. I think that's such a great point. I mean part of rereading eating is you're a different person. I mean as you said with steiner you read it. As a young person you saw one thing in it then you read it as a parent and you saw completely different than try to choose these books that feel very different. I mean in this moment. Lots of women are moving through the world and recognizing that their ambition and even their volition is is being criminalised..

david foster wallace joan diddy rita mae brown jack finney green gables maine lobster festival america Jane eyre christina williamson Robin rebecca twelve years
"jane eyre" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Well, thank you went to message boards to ask for the pedia. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Roles. Just want to get married. The way rabbit. Yes. So she runs off the guy. Plays hamish. Tony bill. Great. Great great. He's fun in this group face. Leo bill. Oh, sorry. Yeah. I'm enjoying all the performances in this for the first ten plus minute. You gotta Tim Pigott. Smith is the the step, you know, the father in law of this a lot. And I'm watching this. Maybe Tim Burton should've made Jane Eyre. But like a straight laced version. But a Mattis maybe you should taken like a gothic kind of strike book and not done a timber version of it. But tried to like, maybe that's how he could have grown if he's out of personal statements. Maybe he has to apply his vision to other worlds, you know. But not the timber take on that world. But but then they because it's true. Because like what you said it's in here. It's like Burton devote the story because he never felt an emotional cry to the original book, maybe let someone develop who has an emotional Taibbi little. But maybe they've got some emotion that will they'll pour into the movie and the first ten minutes. I'm like, this is a decent setup of like, okay. She keeps on since. She is a little girl. She has what everyone tells our nightmares about wonderland. They tell her that was a weird dream, but she's never really gotten over it. Now, it's ten years later six years, later, whatever she's trying they're trying to force her into plate society. She never fits. There's that moment when she's dancing with Leo Bill. He says like where where are you like, where's your head? Right. Now, I was thinking about clouds, isn't it? Bizarre. Singing about painting roses, read, right? And I'm like, this is kind of fun character. And you're setting the mom cook talking about blockages. Yeah. And everyone's told her that she's crazy in that this thing that she remembers isn't true. We say though, elyssa standup set what if men were dresses in what if people could cli- just doesn't really work for me. She's got work for me. Also, it just feels like a little rigid. She should loosen it up made it a jazz set. I think that's what would it really made it saying. But then what tries me crazy. This is when I start to go like what the fuck is this movie doing she falls on the whole the whole looks like a butthole. It's CGI butthole. She's like, yeah. That whole thing sucks. And then immediately. She goes, oh, this isn't real I'm dreaming again. So it's one of those things where you set it for the first ten minutes a character who believes what happened to her. And everyone tells her she's crazy, and you wanna see that care to be vindicated by returning to wonderland getting the affirmation that it's real and and being able to save the place that she wants lived, right? Instead this. He goes, we don't need you. You're g goes, this is a dream, and they go there's vaguely a war happening. But with very little urgency. You're yeah. Exactly. You're you're demanding a story the movie once she falls down the whole. There's no store I'm demanding. They pick a lane because I am totally fine with them making an live awesome wonderland where it's here's a series of yet s- totally fine with this. If they own that, it's vignette thing. And every yet doesn't end with you must clean the sword. It doesn't aim with the fake posturing of we're creating a Lord of the rings style battle. What's weird is that every attempt to give this more of a story ends with like well also has got to fight the Jabber walkie and get the verbal sorts of that rate. I get why you to that. But like what the fuck, you know, vaguely tries to panel like chosen one narrative like prodigal, scroll where she's killing Jabra walkie. Also like, everyone has amnesia. I think the idea this is barely defense. But of them rejecting her is like, I guess to add. Element of mystery to that squirrel because otherwise it would just be like, that's you. You're gonna kill the jab.

Leo bill Tim Burton Tony bill Mattis Tim Pigott Jabra hamish Smith Taibbi Jane Eyre ten minutes six years ten years
"jane eyre" Discussed on Chat Sematary

Chat Sematary

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Chat Sematary

"When I wasn't forced to do it. You know, I did not like reading in high school as just like, I don't wanna read Jane Eyre, or whatever, you know. I don't ever finish crime and punishment. It was assigned. I don't think I ever finished it. Yeah. Assigned reading was never fun. But yeah, I did you did you have this out there. Do you have a are accelerator reader? I don't recall I went to a really nerdy high school. So I think they just had us rating allot anyway, but I don't really like an elementary school. You didn't I went to like weird Montessori private schools, not normal? How who'll so that's really interesting. I wanna learn more about that. Like, we we have one here in town. It sounds interesting. It sounds like I actually might have done really well to school like that. But I definitely can answer any questions you have app on that. If you want to ask those after we donated tangent on the podcast about that. Yeah. Yeah. Maybe someday down the line. If if I ever have a kid, I'll I'll come to you and ask questions, but yet no in my in my public school. We had this program called accelerator reader, and it was like this computer program other schools had it too. And that basically like there is this list of books in this database in this computer program, and you could get these books for your school library, and there would be like a little blue a are sicker. That'd be on the spines. You knew that counted or go get the books from the public library, and you'd read the book, and then you take like a ten question quiz about the book on accelerator reader. So you know, you could you could do as much as you wanted. You just dealing limitation was how many books can you read? And I read a lot books. I think I've told the story on another podcast probably pod chasm. But. I read I think in my third grade year, I read more than the rest of my class combined at least maybe not read as that much. But I had I had enough points that I was like twice everybody else. It was insane. And then the prize at the end of the semester for anybody that had so many points. You know, there are different like prized. Here's and the biggest prize was that you had to take a limo ride out to Burger King or something. And so you were a hotshot because he read so much is that what you're saying. That's what I'm saying. Except that I got chicken pox. And I couldn't go. The star reader, and I couldn't go because I got chickenpox Devon low. Dammit, Devon, but. Yeah. That was a bummer. I did get to go the next year, except I did tell the story podcast. I'm sorry. Not that any of any. For an episode. The probably hasn't come out yet. But yeah, the second year I did get to go. But for some reason, I made the decision to to sit in the front of the limo with the driver because it wasn't a seats in the back. And it was it was it was just a question. Like, anybody could volunteer, and nobody did then like somebody would have just had, you know, put up there. But I volunteered. I don't know. Why like a still never ridden in the back of a limo? Like, I've been in a limo that I sat in the front with the damn driver. And my the only thing that I got out of that was that I got to like choose what was on the radio, but nobody in the backseat cares about what's on the radio..

Devon Jane Eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Book down to your dano pinch hitting for jimbohannon. I've been waiting for this to see where they would come up with PBS. Did this big thing. I mean, a lot of voters and I'm fine with them saying, hey to kill a Mockingbird that is the best loved novel by Americans personal favourite said Meredith Vieira fine with that. But here's the rest of the blaze before we take some more calls. I'm coming to you second-place outlander, Harry Potter pride and prejudice the Lord of the rings gone with the wind. Charlotte's web Little Women the chronicles of narnia and Jane Eyre by Charlotte. Ranta killer. Any of green Gables? The grapes of wrath now, we're talking something a grapes of wrath. Yes. A tree grows in Brooklyn. I recommend that book to you. If you never read it the movie to if you have a chance to see it a tree grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith. The book the fan. The great Gatsby. Torture the help. Excellent book the adventures of Tom Sawyer, fine nineteen Eighty-four. Yes. And then there were none Agatha Christie and conservative book that makes the top twenty. I wonder how much lobbying that took. Atlas shrugged by an ran atlas shrugged by an ran. Okay. And that's the top twenty west. Let's go to Charlotte, endured, North Carolina. Hi, charlotte. Hi there. Thank you very much. Appreciate it. Buying large with the exception of your criticism of the Bronte sisters do think they wrote great things, but I do agree with you so much. Tequila Mockingbird is a splendid splendid writing. Just wonderful. I think it should be mandatory waiting for school children is a great book. But definitely yeah. Come on, Harry Potter and number three. That's insane. I'm sorry. I just you know. Yeah, it's a fun thing. And if it gets some kids to recharge, our I'm fine. But yeah, it's not great literature. It's not the best right? Yeah. It just it is not some of the other Night Live the great Gatsby. I mean, give me a break. Come you sharing that one too good? Yeah. Absolutely. You know, and I'm all for Tom Sawyer. But I'm also by golly, don't go for Huckleberry Finn. Yeah. There's a reason why I don't know about you, Charlotte. But my memory going through school was twain and Huckleberry Finn where the mount Rushmore of American authors. And that was the book when I got to college in all Faulkner was is a lot of wild Faulkner books wasn't interested in but Faulkner right up there never Hemingway person thought, he's another overrated guy's wife was unbelievable. But you know, what I think is a little bit too much the style and people got caught up in that, right? I agree. I agree. But, but you know. It is absolutely obvious to me. Some of these top choices are so politically motivated by miss the era. Oh, yeah. Without a doubt. I mean, we can't even have an honest thing of the books we love in chair that without the.

Charlotte Harry Potter Tom Sawyer Brooklyn Meredith Vieira Huckleberry Finn Faulkner Agatha Christie Jane Eyre Betty Smith green Gables Atlas North Carolina twain Hemingway
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"Really strong novel in of john i remember when you're eating and much folk forty years time but i'd forgotten that she does bring in the business of the big goals pinching the small food little had much reduced then try this coupon goes on she mentions the little had stolen by the big ago everything we didn't have time to talk about and was row head when will she spent much longer than she did the koji daughter's school run by miss learn three sisters and happy expanded she made lifetime friends ellen nessie the fiery may retain a very remarkable story in her own right touchy marry story and they she i acquired independent she didn't much enjoy being teacher there but she taught there for more than three years he earned money look look tire groundwork jane eyre on the one hand she's kind of promoting teaching and then on the other she said going into this fantasy world and see that she has that insight what if i include the frame of discontented teacher discontented she was coined multi getting his announcement in our time with melvyn bragg is produced by simon tillotson it was twilight and bailey was leaked an extraordinary real life story the black woman in the south raises sons grandsons and nephews has a heart strings tied to hanging news be also meyer angelo's memoirs on bbc radio for across the coming year will be a conductor red will well nothing beats a trial but a failure give it everything you got beginning with maya angelou i know why the caged bird sings such for the amazing maya angelou wherever you get your podcasts

jane eyre melvyn bragg simon tillotson bailey meyer angelo bbc forty years three years one hand
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"The more to say about the colonial pick up particularly when we think of jean reece's wide saga also see committed nine hundred sixty six as a story of both really as it were an attempt to put that side of it what what did that bring to studies of jana well it's remarkable novo not least because it's a rare instant so you have a kind of a you know a reworking for prior text that actually in some ways almost seems to rian habit the first text and make you very hard once you've read y sagacity to expunge it from your experience jay three strong both imaginative and critical response to the novel and it in particular in giving a voice to bertha mason and whose munim dantonio crossway in that novel has i think you know it's it's alongside of very famous critical reading of the novel the madwoman the attic by feminist critics from the nineteen seventies season gil bitten say sandra gilbert and susan good bars the correct auto have both made the this sort of scapegoating by one of the attic really key pot about understanding june reese was herself from dominica and she had interfered with the figure of the what creole woman and that novel really does in some sense gives us almost kind of jane eyre like experience of the madam attic we understand her experience emotional privation and so on rebuts springs sort let's spins it out into a wider almo begins to be a global readership probably because of the connections that don't you agree it does been out into liberal readership and has been reprised in so many ways i'm very interested in jane campion film from nineteen hundred through the piano which is a story of a woman who emigrates to new zealand and i think that idea of of of the colonial story in this case of of women displaced and courageous in an unfamiliar to it's just part of that ongoing global transmission of jana i can't can't do this i mean there's so much so much quotable in the book but a pups a most famous line is at the opening line of the final chapter rita i'm married him you got very short time itchy to say that strikes you as a sentence starting with you it's important that it's not the last line of the novel it's the it's the first leg of concluding chapter i think she gets away with it because there's slightly ironic sensitive for manta can build it also shows in charge but what exactly wasn't hooton isn't married him don't that we got married it's also important that it begins reader i married him because at this point do you really do have a close personal relation with jana you know you are addressed as the reader it's a triumphant moment no one gets it and the se convince dear john status is the sort of cinderella figure there's victorian governess she made good well i'm frame you've got to go now the summer's new the program off to and i never want thank you very much dina budge karner brian and sarah lines next week we'll be torn about extremo files an astro biology thank you for listening and the inada podcast get some extra time now with a few minutes of bonus material for melvin and his guests i wish we'd had time real say something about the various adaptations fingers some questioning the screen wilson wells yes that was my first getting back to thank you we were talking about how important it is that jamie plane and so few you can see why so few directors and producers have the courage that show library yes jane ugly duckling logic transformation in the remains strangely loyal yes and if you have tool jane in a film it won't do directors next phase cold he'll put you under the country sit as as l somalia cussing can see why it's so tempting to have some gorgeous feminine reacher in robert it does make such a different story in rochester roaches telling him and he's not allowed to be towlines below middle high that means sure yeah one of sinjin rivers problems and brooklyn is also in the same category that told right about thing to yes in charlotte bronte's fictional world but to be totally missed because let look up to anybody she's redressing of she she was very small just regretting but he seems to fed as well the way all the novels sort of emphasis upon.

jean reece
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"She it's very religious one to be the mo something until religious what your view on that i think it's a religious novel but it demonstrates religion of a very particular kind it's intensely hostile to religious hypocrisy we've already mentioned brocklehurst is an example of that and it is hostile to to the notion of the institutional power of the church it's a protestant model of religious experience that will offered in jane eyre an it's closely allied to the old tradition of the spiritual autobiography john bunyan's pilgrim's progress and important novel to the children in the passages they grow up i think is a vivid presence in jana that journey them pilgrimage through testing experiences it's an inward ness of a relation with gold but is a dynamic relationship which really guides jane that she will be until say so explicit at one point she will be guided by the laws given by god and sanctioned by minutes warm of her motives for rejecting the prospect of becoming rochester's mistress but you could say o'brien at the at the point at pitcher point where she is thinking of marrying john john going to india the voice of rochester comes across the third and says he's in trouble and she goes back him so that kind of love conquers religion it does but also i think religion that kind of religion that sinjin rivers embodies is a religion of total self denial i kind of ruutel ambitious denial of one's passionate brother two sisters is the cousin what she's the man she subsequently discovers his cousin who is this missionary whose characterized as cold to her hot so i think the idea of a religious sensibility that's enabling that allows you to flourish it's very important to charlotte bronte the either religious sensibility which is about selfdenial and translates in that way to sort of persecution of others is not attractive to it is worth remembering i think that's absolutely right about sinjin rivers he'd seen as in a sense one of the male tyrants but the conclusion of the novel its final page which is old takes you back to send john rivers and in a sense also remind you helen some when we haven't mentioned that that the the girl at at low would who had a kind of self denial which parallel to guys yes that's right but syndrome rivers has the final words in the novel and even so come lord jesus it's a biblical reference and it securite echo of that moment where rochester in jane communicate it's joan rivers communicating with jesus and the final word of the novel is actually jesus so it's it's it's it's such a double mobile this so on the one hand that very self denying you might to life denying model of religious experience offered by rivers is rejected by jane eyre but on the other hand she concedes its power going to do is.

john bunyan pilgrim john john rochester sinjin rivers john rivers jane eyre o'brien helen low one hand
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"Twilight he tumbles off his horse hurts himself and has to be rescued jane manages him she redeems him she brings him back to life as of course he does so as that relationship moves through you see kind of balancing taking place and when after the fire the great fire film field in which rochester's first wife is killed rochester emerges as this maimed and damaged creature loses a ham is of course blind jane then returns to him and they have a relationship in which that power balance which is always being there in the novel is resolved in both physical and indeed financial turn because at that point in the novel jane has achieved financial independence so it's a complex business but going back to the point that that that current touched on earlier the rotor schism of the novel which i think is immensely pell an is part of its appeal all the time suggesting that is victorian fifty shades of grey but i can show you but the reason erotic drive and a charge in the novel and i think it does have to do with that sharing a volmer ability and power in a kind of shifting power relationship jane coles rochester muster the the first title of her first novel cheap assistant he calls rochester master and yet there is a sense in which she achieved mastery of him and he says at one point you muster me because you seem to submit current brian in hurley work there's a male note if the professor and then in jana she toes story dot was sarah talked a little about this coming you develop the power that that gives to the no you're absolutely right all of john burnt his early experiments with male narrative voices so this is a dramatic transformation it's important to remember that this is an reiter who's in rating at the age of around thirty looking back nevertheless than rated takes us through this compelling story without disclosing any of the secrets so that we're embedded in the narrative and and there's no hint actually that who the true matrimony attic is going to turn out to be there is a clear sense i think in the early part of the novel of difference between an older woman looking back on a child trapped in this term world of lowered school in the early part of the novel but as she goes through this narrative voice develops and develops this kind of strengthen this ability to absorb entirely in the narrative having said that i think's important to say that there are other narratives in the novel rotas to himself on at least two very substantial occasions gets to tell his story so that we're allowed to see his narrative of his early life in the natron he explains to jane what happened in vaughan failed fire so were allowed to juxtapose one kind of narrative who searingly honest and self aware and in the form of jana and another kind of marita who's a little bit more playful has an emerging sense of maturity and redemption of but nevertheless is not as fully self aware in that's watcher stor sir allies for birth a mason the the roller by the woman the man woman in the attic is roger says married her for her wealth he he was saying sonny wouldn't have the estate and the idea that she presented as being deranged somebody to be kept away somebody's a complete disturbance and she's painted very i was gonna say block let's keep that word and also because imperialistic colonial thing enters into it and so some people think let schallert bond has been very cunning in trying to make her as not only frightening woman but as terrible as a person so that it'll be easier for jane hi to sort of marry a except marrying her husband yeah i'm sitting here i think that there is the logic that both must be unredeemable so that rochester may be redeemable she's really a wholly demonized figure in the novel a sort of a gothic figure gothic monstrosity and in fact he's actually quite hard to form a clear picture of birther in some ways because the novel just invoked so many kinds of terms for her she's a vampire goblin hyena dog bird of prey this is sort of zoological list of.

jane
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"Extraordinary power of the novel i think is often rightly attributed to the way in which frontera kind of braided together the realistic and the fantastic realism in romance we might sale realism in gothic romance and it the reason that has such power is because it shows how real torian social realities whether it's the miseries of school or feeling like an outsider in the family or govern the drudgery of governors thing and so on might be experienced as gothic nightmare or as fairy tale this is clearest in the mid section of the novel where jane persistently and as his rochester in fact speaks of her experience of falling in love with him as the sort of unreal fairytale experience precisely because she experiences the sort of the the socialization is this kind of you know vigilants feeling how how can i the governess be sort of in this position to be marrying this gummer sarah's decrepit and so on and all the way through the social of the the the fantastical dimensions of victorian social realities sort of i think you know is is really cater the novels power and white it has sort of enduring sort of realistic value as well as sort of you know mea kind of fairytale quality gearshift but you we go on with the polly i think because it's so grounded in reality we can sympathize with because of the reality in the opening number but then we talk about dreams coming in the night messages from her mother dead mother and on it goes so it's very that comes in and we just take it as part of what is that we don't say oh stop believing in this well the stage aspect of it because it has this i think it's quite aggressive i voice and yet people don't tend to experience the nation as claustrophobic we go along with it for some reason messages by it although you know me some people actress apple ginny wolf kind of bristled at the intensity of that i voice and i think that's also why the interpenetration of the real estate can romantic in the novel has this persuasive force tube that there's no way to stand outside jane no room for ironic distance or questioning her we we you know we love which who she loves him hater she hates all the way through and she also has a kind of rationality in her to alosha prone to certain kinds of nations envisions that's also i think what makes or gives the kind of persuasive forced to the more extreme more offensive eliminates all saloon tour thinking as strong poetical jewish bring into have rose mm ways of ways of talking about life which have been not not necessarily very rarely in my in my reading bayer rally in pros to that extensive dinah lee relationship between jane and mr rochester first time you meet him he falls off his horse he dresses up as a woman sometimes when not sometimes once once but is it can be a comic figure he's rather unfortunate he's very tentative at first can you tell us how that developed into such a powerful on in long lasting and memorable love affair it pretty double and complex relationship because on the one hand there is rochester who has the power has the wealthy employer and he is dark strong and steady not by roenick model karen was mentioning so it looks as though you're in a very conventional masculine power feminine vulnerability structure but from the very first it's clear that you are not because as you've mentioned the first thing that rochester tones when he encounters jane after on the fairy story entrance only darkhorse you giant hound in the.

one hand
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"Things that she reads nourish nurture this extraordinary collaboration between the four children in the fantasy writings that they developed when they're very young and in some ways kind of compose their own literary world together i know one of the book she i think she collaborated with annan was called angrier well it's actually it's actually a fantasy world she created more with her brother bramble them than the than with an an it's a it's a remote african country which is colonized by the descendants of these these toy soldiers that are patrick bronte given their little children seized on these toy soldiers they gave them the names of public hero figures like the duke of wellington and his sons an out of those two soldiers they created this fantasy countr she called angry which is set somewhere in africa and there's a scene of battles and epic struggles and seduction 's and all kinds of exciting adventures did her do the fall of a good library i'm in was the plenty of verda ru he had he had a pretty good library and he very actively encouraged his children to read he certainly goes into to read wordsworth we do know that john allston wasn't on the shelves and it was only later in life that charlotte bronte came to jane austen was rather disparaging about a but he gave them full access to the range of literary heritage another thing i should mention that she was aware of because they're they had the book read to them was some richardson's novels not pamela and cruiser from the mid eighteenth century i think were an important influence because their novels about a powerful aristocratic men who incarcerate and coerce young women into either rape barnes ultimately and powerless case into marriage and i think that drama of the incarcerated woman in the powerful man is something that very much shaped charlotte's early thinking having humming a teacher and not like that and a governors were not like she went to belgium with a sister and fell in love with a married man and on and that could be said to be the basis of a first novel which is unsuccessful but it needs to be mention she did she fell in love with an ankle cost onto asia who was a remarkable a teacher of english in this belgian school where she worked who was really interested in drawing the writer out if i think he was the first person that really apart from her siblings spotted that inner self in that in flint innis energy and creativity that charlotte had that then became.

asia charlotte flint innis belgium barnes jane austen africa annan writer patrick bronte rape richardson charlotte bronte john allston wordsworth wellington
"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on In Our Time

"The story of an orphan broader by cruel and then sent to the harsh low would school from there she becomes governors at thorne field for the for the ward mr rochester for the ward of mr rochester and overcomes many obstacles in life and romance including the fact that he's still married to a woman he keeps hidden away jerry inequity the became on us popular works in english fiction and remains popular for the strength of the main character giant and the tightly bound teams of personal freedom equality for women and the need for education on the role of religion meet is gus china are dinah birch professor of english literature and pro vice chancellor for research at the university of liverpool karna brian vice principal and professor of english literature at king's college london and sarah lines electra in victorian inter show at the university of kent donna budge what do we need to understand about charlotte bronte's family and early life well she was born in yorkshire yorkshire woman in eighteen sixteen and she was the third of six children born into a happy and thriving family remarkable parents i think one thing we do need to know about is the extraordinary nature and career off her father patrick bronte who was irate born as the son of a poll falmer in cow county down who had worked his way to success in gentility as an anglican clergyman through education he had founded his own school at the age of sixteen which i do think it's very remarkable thing how many sixteen year olds do we know who could found their own school and then managed to get himself to cambridge where he had achieved very high academic honors and qualified himself to become a clergyman he had taught education runs through his life as as a theme and then become perpetual curate at howarth it is an an exceptional story and for shauna he was a hero her mother maria was a cornish woman devoted to her husband saucy pat she would call him there was six children there were however quite soon only full children say take that on coz they went he the guy did at home a number again by an aunt took took the place of mother who died jewish five percent to a school which was for the daughters of clergymen because it was very cheap and it was a fairly cruel and school seemed to be prone to letting the children die i mean a lot of deaths and two sisters dodgers had a big effect on that can you tell us a bit more about that that's going which became lowered school in the novel yes it was the clergy daughter school four patrick's daughters were sent there in eighteen twenty four it was a very harsh regime one of the main problems walls that the children were underfed and there was very little medical care and as you rightly say there was a high death rate it wasn't quite the monstrous establishment that we encounter in the ward charlotte was therefore ten months in all and she is drawing on childhood memory heavily colored of course by the loss of those two older sisters maria and elizabeth the depiction of the clergy otis school account bridge in lancashire in jane eyre is really the one thing that no one forgets whatever you remember about j nair you will remember the burnt porridge the other thing that you are very unlikely to forget is the character of mr brocklehurst who established that they they low would but also establish clergy daughter's school and of course presented in jane a perfect monster off he pot crecy and cruelty he was founded on a man cool william carris wilson and i think it really is the case that charlotte bronte was not entirely fair to william curse wilson in the way in which he projects the character of mr brocklehurst refers versions here noble exactly right now the deal yeah okay kinda brian what would you would charlotte bronte have been reading by the time you wrote china she was reading bunyan's pilgrim's progress she was weeding byron she was reading scott she was reading the bible shakespeare a great many other things besides i think is important to say however that in addition to her reading she was also generating her own kind of literary narrative so famously in an early poem charlotte bronte said that of her and her sisters and her brother we wove a web and childhood a web of sunny air so all of the.

five percent sixteen year ten months
"jane eyre" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on The Canon

"Living newton john is also like that because i get why that images so i contacted a bit she's the hottest fucking thing i've ever seen in a movie when she walks out in but it's a hotness of total confidence and self and self identity and then she says basically what the lyrics of the song is on the surface is right you hear these words like you're the one that i want i need a man both of which i think you know makes it determines that it's like oh she's just like trying to be with he wants her to be but what what what would the lyrics of the song if you dig a little deeper are saying is like you're the one that i want but if you can't keep up with me i'm gonna find somebody else which is so fascinating and she did even at the beginning when she was dating the football totally so she's determining everything she wants he's he's shown this willingness to change for her and she's like i now okay here's what please don't mock me for saying this but it's very much like the end of jane eyre right like the whole the whole your favorite book it is my favorite book and and and and for those of you haven't checked it out recently jane eyre is in love with the the wealthy guy in in one movie played by fast mentor right and but she will she refuses to be with him because the power dynamics are so uneven intil after she dates a boring christian guy and then mr rochester the man who she loves his whole house burns down he gets he becomes crippled and blind and then she shows back at his house and says okay now we can get married like destroy everything but she doesn't she's not responsible for destroying it she's just she didn't want to be in this relationship that was super unequal where he wasn't willing to change for her and he was only are they going to put her on a pedestal or make her a servant and i think the same has happened willing to change it's surprising to me stick changes what's is what's important.

jane eyre mr rochester
"jane eyre" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Yeah it sounds sketchy you know it makes you feel like maybe cowan bridge was low would from jane eyre cars wilson could've been the evil mr brocklehurst and we'll talk more about charlotte's legacy in the next episode but since she was the only sister too come really famous during her lifetime a lot of people took an interest in that connection charlotte herself said that low would was true the wilson camp claimed that charlotte couldn't be relied on for having been a child at the time she wouldn't have remembered things they really were exactly according to frazier their biggest piece of evidence came from a letter signed age which was believed to be the former headmistress and inspiration for the kind miss temple in charlotte's book she claimed everything had been rosie in nineteen seventy five though someone finally bothered to to the math and realize that the real miss temple had actually been dead when she wrote the vindicating letter and the letters author was probably actually the inspiration for the evil mrs scatcherd which doesn't sound so good for cowan bridge all the sudden but with the death of maria and elizabeth in such a short span of time and of course also so soon after the death of their mother the kids were really devastated and remember their house looks out on a cemetery too so there was really no escaping this feeling of death a later gust remember that howarth high mortality rate was really obvious to anybody who was stopping through because the church bell would constantly toll for the dead and then the tombstone chisel or would always be at work you know chipping away at the granite blocks which sounds really horrifying in this context of a family has just lost so many people in such a short span of time so miss bran will became the household educator for the girls while mr bronte would have given extra greek and latin lessons to brand well they also had an inexhaustible supply of reading materials day old newspapers magazines borrowed books methodist tracks and literature of course charlotte and brand well read almost all of byron at age thirteen and twelve the only thing that patrick bronte seem to censor was misbranding.

cowan bridge wilson mr brocklehurst charlotte wilson camp mrs scatcherd maria elizabeth mr bronte byron jane eyre frazier howarth patrick bronte
"jane eyre" Discussed on Bunny Ears

Bunny Ears

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Bunny Ears

"And and the flat earthers were right all along we gotta go to patagonia man we gotta disprove but let's get some yeah let's get some wendy's we'll eat a burger and paddock i'll eat a jew junior bacon cheese at the end of the world is this is this what they call integrated exactly for companies at may or may not ons shots like babe ruth it's like babe ruth you miss half the shock call call keep on pointing for the pedagogy what is your what is the period of history you've always been gored by so funny some stu last night was the crown and i was like i know just anything anything or engine jane eyre howard zinn jane eyre they got fifteen england doesn't do it for me victorian england does charles de that kind of weird child slavery everyone sit on their face england and the muppet muppet christmas carol called africa dark africa like that kind of africa exactly like what what i didn't say you called i didn't say your hitler earlier no that's what they actually called it so podcast it'd be derek bench see we tied it altogether synchronicity gration i don't know i it occurs to me that my history is obviously as i think all of us all of our history is a little spot in places i've never really taken it under my belt to figure out what's you know what happened in the six hundreds and what happened in the seven hundreds i have no idea the greatness yoga of thank you.

wendy jane eyre england africa hitler child slavery
"jane eyre" Discussed on Thirst Aid Kit

Thirst Aid Kit

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Thirst Aid Kit

"Was the real particular childhood character or that you loved so much and and you kind of held owns who is an ideal long after you had outgrown that reading group oh my god yes this feel so personal this is great i'm happy think which of my secrets i'm willing to reveal his clean 'em mm i think probably one of the earliest ones that i can remember is the first mrs dewinter from the book rebecca by daphne d'amour she's she's dead for the whole book you never meet her name the best kinda mary beca come and she's just this you know she's everything that the sort of narrator isn't right like she's larger than life she's demanding she can be cruel she's a lot of fun at parties he sleeps with both men and women she can of plays everyone against one another and she sort of like lives on in this really stern scary like evil lesbian character early coded as lesbian i'll be a ss dan verse and she's just like trying to manipulate everyone from beyond the grave womb and i was just like yes and if you're like me from beyond the grave please classic becky hat what that reminds me of another book from our childhood that you know i think we all have strong feelings about that features a woman kenneth tucked away some players are not here and law is jane eyre jane ma s so necessary to my growth as a human being there is a point where i literally read this book every summer until may.

kenneth mrs dewinter becky jane eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"I'm always fascinating when i talk to authors because it does sound often lake characters just sort of do things on their own you know they say and then the character suddenly did this and i'm always a member you just fascinated how that works thou it's almost like your fingers and your brain do something that you're not aware of aaa plans i also down with an idea but i think i'm going to raid on um characters just won't do it and and you know your character so you know if you're trying to make them do something that's just out of uh no i'm character for them then they just won't do it so what's next he said he just finished a third novel can you talk about that at all sure on this cultivating by the book and it's pretty complex i love this rent from aspects to it the main character on madeleine she owns bookshop insurance book club which is also an author and her first book is about to come out and she's just received uh pretty mediocre too bad review on it and um she gets angry and she writes to the reviewer until ten off but you should never do but it it begins a a correspondence with him and he challenges her the that that the romance in her novels would be better if she actually had more experience which is funny to her because she not only has she's just recently been engaged but her um she was jolted and she's surrounded by guys that are all interested in her but she's just kind of um keeping them all at the distance but with the challenge to give these guys go she starts beating each one of them but she's also like i said has its book club that's going on into the kind of start falling out in uh romance here trope so she's exploring like each kinds of different die son it's it's like a romance primer almost it sounds like did you to experience all the different romance teams yeah so like this and then the reading all these looks like jane eyre and and you know you'd have daviel the rochester type things since i'm susan reverse type or whatever else one i'm excited that sounds great so uh we talked a little bit less time we spoke about pitch wars did were you a mentor for pitchers.

madeleine jane eyre rochester
"jane eyre" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Culture that means that everyone wants to rape you right right i that i said they said you know somebody who has raped and i said yes and they said while doesn't that mean that there is a rape culture we know people who were raped that is a quote wow so how do you how do the win how did the girls feel about men a lot of them a lot of the guys feel very alienated and classes like english in history because they never got any credit for anything and honestly there's there's a lot of bashing on them like when we read jane eyre they were trying to use that actual feminism when it was needed and you know whatever and they were chinese that to justify modernday feminism and they were pretty much bat like one of the questions for our essays was is jenner feminists novel and some of the ss is that they were out completely bash on man and we did group you know peer reviews and stuff and we know a lot of people saw some of these essays and they would like each other highfives over it and you could just see the guy sitting well i i don't even know what to do with myself anymore has so sad to me this is so sad it's utterly sad because a lot of us have boys in school and if there if they're being told and if the teachers are sort of propping up this this stance of it's okay to completely i to completely make men irrelevant uh then then we need to do that to make women more powerful what kind of boys are we raising than what are they going to be like in their twenties and 30s i it's it's this is just so pathetic to me this has got to be pathetic to you well i had it under the time it on your erica this is this is in a goal that has a what they think of the very strong anti bullying dan crowley old student down heard about two blooming i find that could be fascinating we're we're going to drink paradox we're gonna come right back i have so many more quest jones we're talking to.

jane eyre erica jones rape jenner dan crowley