19 Burst results for "Jane Eyre"

"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

04:43 min | 3 months ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Isn't caused by the wife in the attic but she still victim to it so the not worse. Yeah it's like it's a. It's a lot like what that was like. The big part that didn't fit for me is that in janier bertha in the attic is kind of this larger than life character. Yeah there's a lot of law we can talk about in there so much. Like feminist literary writing out there among how we can read bertha in this trope of like the crazy crazy woman. So there's a lot more we could get into their. But at least in the world of jane eyre it's like kind of way out there in in spooky and whatever but fits Making modern day. It's either if they kept the mental health issues and this woman needs support not to be locked up by herself but then to change it and make it like a brain dead situation. It's like than this end of life like life support conversation. That just didn't happen in the book. Yeah in the novel. At least that. I remember. I read it in one sitting because it was a good graphic.

janier bertha bertha jane eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Yeah and she's making fun of it and then in like modern day in ten years ago when twi that was coming out in the movies are coming out. It was like childish. Teenager like wasn't taking seriously either. While i'm not gonna get one hundred percent behind twilight and say like it is a must read for everyone who is serious about literature a you don't have to read it a the i enjoyed reading it when i was younger and actually read disappeared years ago and was surprised how much i still enjoyed it and like i was ready to rip it apart and was like i actually don't mind. I enjoyed reading up the first book series again. But i do think there are things that don't translate in the gothic like maybe it's part of the reason that it can be looked down upon or considered not serious 'cause they are some very extreme elements in older nineteenth century gothic literature in present day literature. Yeah so. I don't know. I thought we could maybe get into like what doesn't translate in the gothic specifically jane eyre to modern times Shot feels very in the moment. Gothic literature to me feels like the result of the social structures of the time. And like when you're a young like like to be in that time young educated woman to be eighteen years old. You basically have nothing. You can't use your education for anything unless you want to be alone for your whole life like a lot of times if you became a governess than that was like your fate like you couldn't really get married after that and no one was really interested in what women thought or what they had to say like the the literature that came before this. You know the novel very much developed. Four women women were the ones who are reading it happened it started off mostly as histories and romances but the more dramatic ones were the ones that did better because it was built in. Really extreme escapism. I've like women. No one was interested in their interior life and they literally did nothing except raise children like run run a home to have novels where there is this world where everything had a deeper meaning. Everything was more meaningful than there were symbols everywhere and like there were mysteries to be solved you know. There's sort of puzzles and depth and meeting hidden around every corner and sensitive weight and history to it as well. I think yes that that kind of longing for escapism arising out of patriarchy still exists. But it's quite different like if you think about twilight. They have the elements of gothic literature. They had to manufacture this whole other world of vampires and werewolves in order to have those same elements and then in order to have a guy who's really old but also in high school.

jane eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

02:21 min | 3 months ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Older he's more. Well established very very grumpy and she moves to this creek. Creepy creepy creepy old house. That sounds like it as a ghost in it and everyone tells all these ghost stories and she's hall and all these weird things happen things catch on fire and people get stabbed. And it's like what. And she and mr rochester. Developed this very bizarre dramatic connection. Eventually they decide that they're going to get married and at the last possible second. She finds out that missed. Rochester actually has a wife in his attic who has lost her mind and is like homicidal so john runs away into the moors and collapses and his crying in the rain and she's found by this clergyman and his sisters and they take her in and she kinda gets to chill and hide away and she starts teaching a little girl school and then eventually after she's become independently wealthy through a variety of circumstances. She goes back because she hears mr rochester's voice on the wind calling her she goes back. He's been blinded sweet. Signed me up. And they get married also notably. His wife died in a fire. Yes yeah he's no longer married at that point yet. Very important detail. Yeah that's the story. It's a great. It's so dramatic depressing creepy. Great so if you don't get anything out of this episode. Just remember all the memes and references. You hear about like a crazy woman in the attic. They come from jane eyre. yes yes absolutely. I always filling so in the know when i see references.

mr rochester Rochester john jane eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:09 min | 3 months ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"As in jane eyre known. The reasoning is much more dramatic rate than novel. ultimately died as a result of complications of his addictions at the age of thirty one man. Everyone died young. Yeah none of the brought. His sisters lived past the age of forty. Emily man died from tuberculosis also called consumption at the time. And it's not in this list. But i read other where other places online brand while emily an all died within like eight or nine months of each other lost all of her siblings is like boom boom boom so she lived all of them. She only lived to be thirty. Eight years old she married in eighteen. Fifty four very quickly became pregnant with her first child but she tragically died in eighteen. Fifty five. The cause of her death is disputed. Her death certificates has to louis but many historians point to specific condition that some pregnant people have that causes like consistent nausea and vomiting which will lead to malnourishment dehydration urgency. So all the broncos past young there from that direct line of the family has done the kids so yet. It's kind of devastating once again. Another person that you're like if only they add more time when in news in that's a little bit about charlotte bronte. Thanks for indulging me in reading the extras From harper team. Yeah the addition. I didn't even know this was like like a separate publishing imprint. it was. I didn't realize harper collins had a separate harper teen imprint. Yes but they do. And this book is one of the things that they printed which is very funny to me. Yeah so this hyper teen. Addition it was part of a collection of republished classics. Were heights. romeo and juliet pride and prejudice sensibility the iconic british romances of multiple centuries. And they're all reprinted to like very similar to a book that was very popular at the time. This is a the jane. Eyre is a black cover with a pink and red peony in shadows says love conquers all at the top in renaissance curlicue. Yeah in something like a book that stephanie. Meyer mader yet suspiciously like twilight. The whole series of those books have a black background and some sort of red flower or red object and then the font is like almost exactly the same as the font that she's on her books and like sometimes a red and white is well the flowers and it was published in twenty eleven. Like ray like two years after the last twilight book came out but it was while the movies were coming out. Yeah so breaking dawn. The first part came out until eleven all came together. They did this. Release these re releases of classic twilight twilight popular but also the new jane. Eyre movie came out into a love. It yeah at the time. It was the newest one is is still the most recent one Ten years. I know there there do for another one. They are due for another one. I don't think they've made one sense. But i could be wrong. bbc adaptations. I feel like they just they have. They make the same five films on a ten year. Rotation cicadas or something. They're just like all right. It's time for brandon prejudices back near brewed outside screaming right now. So i'm sure most of you know the story but i will summarize so we can get into why the book looks like twilight and why that's interesting..

jane eyre harper tuberculosis charlotte bronte Meyer mader Emily emily harper collins Eyre broncos vomiting nausea louis juliet romeo stephanie ray bbc brandon
"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:06 min | 3 months ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"I'm million to fund fax to has an endless array of pop culture knowledge eaten overall. I would say something about the way. She writes really concrete and immediate. Who is the fan. Why is he a costume. Why did he drop his weird like pew like t's some juicy about the creation of the spark. This is again what victoria by not. Like what is important about these people. What story there. We can tell ourselves year to welcome to book with julia in victoria. We are two former roommates and lifelong friends. Who read a book and talk about it. Each episode this podcast where we explore new perspectives and he's books as a tool for personal and community growth this week. We are reading jane eyre by charlotte bronte and this book has been around for hundreds of years but there will be spoilers so if for some reason you haven't consumed any jane eyre content and don't want it spoils This is your official warning yet. But if you are open to. Spoilers is here for two so welcome to the show party. Welcome and i are remote recording. I of forever twenty not forever. I'll come visit you in. We'll records memphis says in person again. Absolutely.

victoria jane eyre julia charlotte bronte memphis
"jane eyre" Discussed on G.I. Joe: A Real American Headcast

G.I. Joe: A Real American Headcast

04:15 min | 5 months ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on G.I. Joe: A Real American Headcast

"Adolescents. This generation have no respect and are far cry from my sweet jane eyre and her friend. Helen burns why just this afternoon. I was stoa and and you know what men to will us like the tragic mr rochester and teaches talk. They're all like the villainous. Mr brocklehurst yes. Thomas as much as i enjoy indulging your insanity a we have a promo to record and what might that be. That is you and i telling everyone that we have a brand new podcast out there. It's called required reading and stella once a month we will take a look at a single work of literature. Discuss it analyze it and determine if it's worth its place in the canon. That sounds delightful. Oh i'm sure it will be and you can find us on the to true freaks network which chew freaks dot com l. Yes required reading with thomas style. Why can't it be stellan. Tom rolls off the tongue better. Okay well that was easy so required reading with tom and stella future freaks dot com next year contributing to the promo there. You did a great job you are so you are receiving transmission crock. Pot upload pending.

Thomas next year jane eyre Helen rochester Tom thomas brocklehurst future freaks dot com this afternoon once a month tom dot com single work stellan stella
"jane eyre" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Need to get going. So Ah, did you fish? They Yeah, Absolutely. I wasn't right now. Okay? You know, we had a We had a good bike we had. We had a good bite on some really nice fish the last few days or actually, for about the last week. We've been sort of fight. First of that. Bright sun and flat water. And good morning by the tapers off trout today, But today they bit good off all day long and great quality fit. 22 2 24 inch fish. Oh, boy, that's like we're close to £5. Yeah. And just over in some cases, the fissure deceptively heavy right now. I mean, just big, fat, full fish. And pulling hard. I mean, it's it's It's what we're here for. It's a good time to be here. Yeah, now, you know, you know, even without the cold weather, Brian, the fish were Even though they weren't close to shore. They were in relatively shallow water, meaning the lot that pop 10 ft. So I wouldn't expect that to have changed. But how deep were you? And what were you pull him? Well, we were we were pretty much Ali's son version of Jane Eyre flies The time of year basically top line just below the surface with those You know, today we were working water from about 5 ft. To about 12 30 ft. Deep. And And that's where we found all our yesterday. We actually got on a few nice single fish later in the day, surprisingly shallow or for a half feet of water. But But you know, one couple every mile or mile and a half shoreline. You work, but the quality was fantastic. So big fish you sneak in. And, uh yeah. Enough for Linda. That's Brian Rickert. You sorry for that he was he was coming out of Spaulding is very poor cell service there, But basically that last bit he was tech talking about was that Uh, they didn't catch numbers, but they caught a couple of big trout over £5 in like 4.5 ft of water. And it's like they're a loner, which means the real thrill to me efficient Eagle Lake is fishing from the bank. I get my waiters on I go out. I fly fish. I've been waiting out quite a ways and actually on the back cast. I've hooked fish when the when the line is get the water on the back Cast in, like 2, Ft. Of water. Unbelievable. So when fish like that come into the shallows, you've got a chance to get him with your fish with a barber and a jig or a night crawler or whatever. That is the thrill of legal Eagle Lake because You will not be in control for quite some time anyway. Brian's number 5303701001 After the break, we'll get a report from Comanche. On the winner is gonna take a while. Everything just stopped for the very latest staying connected. Sacramento's news 93.1 kfbk. It was just to get together. No big deal. Everybody felt fine. But now I'm super sick. Everyone is sick. I just wish we had been more careful. It would have been easier than this. So wear a mask. Do what you can outside. Keep 6 Ft of distance Because some things you just can't take back. Do your part to lower the risk. Learn Maura Cove in 19 dot see a dot gov brought to you by the centre at Sierra Health Foundation. There's an.

Brian Rickert Eagle Lake Maura Cove Spaulding Jane Eyre Sierra Health Foundation Ali Linda Sacramento
"jane eyre" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Hi Katie Hi Olivia. I have a very important question for you. Jane Eyre or weathering Heights Jane. Eyre why are you so wrong? Wrong wrong on every weathering heights. Obviously on here. If you're a teenager what is there better than weathering heights. It is music teenager. I read Jane Eyre in junior high and I loved it well. How old were you when you rub weathering heights have heard your vote is invalid. I know you know why because the cover of your book it was. It looked like a romance novel terrible so it turned me off so I never read it all. I love them both but when I was a librarian to high school students were assigned to read either weathering heights or Jane. Eyre they could choose so students would come in and ask US often. Like which one should I read and it became this comedic running battle with another woman who worked the front desk together. Usually team Jane Eyre well. You need to read weathering heights. I can't the cover still haunts me bringing a different I've watched the movie. I'm going to go find a good addition weathering heights. Okay I mean if I can sit through the worst musical written which was based on weathering heights and still love wondering heights. Get over a cover. I'm just saying I don't know I don't know. I think this is really fascinating because what makes this battle. That is a pretty common argument. Yeah in English literature is the fact that these two others who wrote sort of iconic pieces of Gothic literature. Our Sisters and so picking a book isn't just picking a book. It's picking a sister. Yeah in this. Very fraught famously. Dramatic family So what do you know about the Broncos? Oh you know. They had a narrow will brother who sucked away their fortunes so they had to become writers in order to make ends meet And their dad is like this aloof person. Who's not really engaged with the family? And they lived in like this romantic personage in northern England and Moore's and dark cloudy landscapes and something about Whitby Abbey Best Dracula but yeah that that exits right this right Moody swept. Moore's and troubled sisters scribbling away in the dark net dramatic and romantic and depressing right. Yeah there's the Bronte mythology now talked about the brother. He talked about sisters. You talked about the Father. Who's missing in the story the mall well? She's dead isn't she? Yes she's missing from this mythology and we have done several stories on the podcast about women who are mostly famous for being mums. Mariah Bronte is famous for not being there. Absence is the most important thing about her story. The way that it's been told. She is the missing mom whose absence leads her. Remarkable children to the life that they eventually lead..

Jane Eyre Broncos Moore Mariah Bronte US Katie Whitby Abbey England
Hot Pockets Heiress Sentenced in College Admissions Scam in Boston

NBC Nightly News

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Hot Pockets Heiress Sentenced in College Admissions Scam in Boston

"One more chapter in the college admissions cheating scandal unfolded today a snack. Food heiress was sentenced to prison in Boston. Nbc Steve Patterson as the latest tonight after ducking into Federal Court. One last time hot pockets heiress Michelle Janice finally learned her fate the judge sentencing to five months in prison after she admitted to paying three hundred thousand dollars to cheat college admissions for three of her daughters prosecutors naming you're one of the most culpable parents charged. She understands the harm that her choices caused Jane. Eyre to her. Family's multi billion dollar microwaveable snack forge in October. She pled guilty to paying one hundred thousand dollars to fix two daughters. Act Exams and two hundred thousand dollars to make a profile for another daughter as volleyball recruit to USC. Jan is one of nearly two dozen parents who pled guilty to the scandal. So far including desperate housewives star Felicity Huffman who serve less than two weeks in prison. Meanwhile actress Laurie Lachlan in fashion designer husband. Massimo new continue fighting their charges maintaining their payments to. Usc WERE LEGITIMATE DONATIONS NOT BRIBES. Today's sentence wall so much. Be a precedent but it could be something of a benchmark Lachlan's Casey's

USC Laurie Lachlan Eyre Felicity Huffman Michelle Janice Steve Patterson Boston NBC Volleyball Federal Court Jane Family Casey
Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

The Big Picture

10:08 min | 1 year ago

Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

"We have a special sort of conversation. Here we're joined by Mister Robot. Creator the Creator of the film comet The director of Amazon's homecoming. Yes Sam. Esmail saying what's up. Hello how are you? I'm so excited to be here. I'm such a fan. Oh that's very sam. You wanted to play a game with us. I did now. I want to know why you wanted to play that game with us and I also want you to explain the game. Well explaining it okay. I'll let me start by saying I'm a huge film. Learn as I think anybody who listens to the watch probably already gust. And I've always played this game with all my film nerd fans and so I figured one when I started listening to your podcasts. Which obsessed with a huge fan of I figured especially with Amanda Sort of counterpoint? To talk to your thinking Shawn's like I just thought this'll be a fun game to play the game. Basically and again. This is sorry for listeners. Who are not going to be in on this because it's so inside. It's not even that insight. It's but it's it's really not OK okay. I won't apologize here. We go is a good game in and you deserve it. It's the best director per decade and the best director who die who had their debut. That decade does that make sense. Did I explain this? Should we use an example to help people understand it? What's an example that we won't? Won't you trample on the choices that we've made here? Well we look at this decade. We had we had like a number of actually great film. Directors made their debut Jordan. Peele with get ou- Greta Gerwig with Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Man. This favorite with El Camino until nineteen many wonderful. Thanks well actually. Gertler made no thanks. But it's it's it's it's it's. It's good to bring up Vince. As an example because he actually that was his feature directing debut which is all coming up. Now the thing is it's not necessarily not saying what's the best directorial debut? Just the director that we appreciate. The most made that debut made their debut in that decade so I think that there's a couple of semantic complications around now and you know as well as I do that there are student films. Their short film features so. Let's lay the groundwork. Because Vince directed episodes of Britain. He directed the pilot breaking bug which I think was in the prior decade but we're talking feature directorial debut so that seems easy to Parse. It's not as easy to Parse as it seems. Now tell me why well. Are you talking about dual are GonNa be Spielberg is is a particularly complex example? Because of nine or you're talking about nine gallery 'cause that's TV while he made a movie when he was seventeen called firelight for five hundred bucks and is that a film. Is that a feature film even his parents saw. I wouldn't say a featured like a debut meaning. It was released in movie theaters got it. Okay commercially available. Commercially available attack. Those are good ground rules. I'm glad that we established that play into my less later on. I do consider to be because it didn't get released in theaters. Well it is a feature film but it was not this little guy but that is considering his feature debut his first full length movie right what. What's the movie after that? Then Land Express okay all right so yes we'll stick to that okay before we play the game now. The people understand the game I want but just add one other thing the interesting thing about this game and I think will when we go through. We'll see it's where the decades are hard because there's just so many amazing options and where the decades are not A. There's not a lot of options. I just find the conversation around that to be interesting because lanes a little bit about where movies are and where they're doing exactly specifically the nineties which I thought was just a burst of like creative inspirational film makers and then the very decade after the ONS which I struggled I struggled to find. I have some counterpoint to that point but I I wanna use this as an opportunity to pick a bone with you. Oh Wow okay I resent you. I resent your your appearance on this podcast because what I what we need. What this podcast needs is people like you making movies and television shows will but you love movies and you film in a very discreet way. Yes but and I mean I guess we're going to get into it right now. It's gotTa think about think about indie filmmakers. What happened let's say Ryan Kugler? Who Loved Fruitvale? Right mazing what happened to him. After he made fruitvale he went into the machine he went into the machine. And that's what's happening with a lot of these other directors and that. That's the difference between the nineties and now so I think. Pta came out with holiday today. Is he making you know Batman in two years and by the way no not dissing on Batman? I'm excited for When Matt Raises Version of it? Because I'm a fan of his but I think it's just the industry is dictating a lot of what directors are doing now and you know and not to 'em this point that's the machine that we're in right now so and that's more reflective of the decade so t to to get to my TV point. Tv's where you get to make the interesting shit. I don't know if I could have made mister robot as a feature in fact I tried well. That was my fault. Got a little long winded. With how long was that? That forty five. Our film now That feature from I wrote ninety pages of wasn't even into act tune. That's when I realized I was in trouble. Was there a divergent path for you where after comet you could have just doubled down and said I'll stay. I'll continue to stay kind of broke but I'll keep making movies will. Yeah I mean that was the plan I was going to make Mr Buzzing indie feature and got stuck with it and Steve Golan Who You know owns anonymous content who Read the pages of Missouri Button at the time detective had just come out and he just He had just produced. That and I thought women that will this is fucking coal. And I don't need to do anything with this. I don't need to refashion the script that I had in mind and fitted into this to our box and honestly I was just really more. I remember thinking I was way more excited about true detective than I was about anything. Elsa came out there. Trust them into. What are your thoughts on true detective because I have no idea? I don't love thank you. Yeah I think I think I see yes. The first season I think true detective on its face is like a accomplished piece of television filmmaking and also I'm a huge fan of cary Fukunaga always and forever Perhaps not for the same reasons. Assess it to me actually wrap. It was such a turning point. Anything his best thing that he's done. I'm not even going to say Jane Eyre Okay. I haven't I haven't seen that I haven't seen the new Bond movie I but I'm really looking forward to it because I'm also a bond person and also I just you know I think true true detective as this carries best thing. I think that's probably true but my issue with detective is not actually true detective itself. It is the dialogue around your detective. And also I think that's a pivot point in terms of when and how we started evaluating TV in terms of tracking shots and the actual just the athletic like filmmaking as a way to bring the an experience. What is this athletic yet? Flex now and then on twitter people are now saying slaps what what is all? I don't understand that you want to explain the Internet. Let's start with the athletic because Amanda I. I've heard you use a lot and I've I've been on a lot of sets of never heard anyone say the words. I think the first person he was at my friend on the TV critic Philip asking and I think it puts its finger on this idea of money that you bring her up because she wrote this she wrote. It was a harsh. I mean whatever I respect her reviews she dissed my one episode of Mister Robot whereas all one tracking shot. I assume yes is what you mean by athletic because I do think that Filmmaking and TV and everything is more than cameras and more than where the camera is and there is such a absolutely station online. The damore as more aspect of filmmaking and I think that the tracking shot is caption of that and just like. Oh Wow. Did you see what he did. That was so cool. Oh my God. The camera is moving. You know don't you think it but don't you think has a to me every every sort of choice that you make with the camera has an effect and yes to some extent it it takes you out of it and draws attention to itself but to some extent. I really I mean what do you think of the Copacabana Sean? And I and I and I do. Actually I think even tracking protective is effective. But you know we're doing a podcast right now. That isn't essentially about how we talk about. Film and like establishing a Canon of source. And the cannon is so reliant on where do we put the camera and what did they itch on showing us an either. Don't respond to that artistically at some point. I'm just like Yay like fancy camera. Shots you got it. Congratulations to you but I do also think it distracts from the other equally important. I feel making that. Don't get enough credit. I think code is also a specifically athletic is code for Masculinity. You know it's code for this sort of The might of the male filmmaker. Now that's not always true if you watch like strange days for example. Kathryn bigelow is doing a lot with the camera yet. It is unorthodox and cool and might have what would otherwise be deemed kind of masculine energy. But I do think that true detective and largely the dialogue like you're saying was about a lot of dudes being like Yo. This is sick now. Personally I thought it was sick. Oh okay but I I would. I was not a fan of those scripts and I don't think that story is very strong but I thought that was really well

Director Mister Robot Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Amanda Sort Esmail SAM Batman Kathryn Bigelow El Camino Amazon Cary Fukunaga Shawn Gertler PTA Twitter Spielberg Ryan Kugler Mr Buzzing Britain Copacabana Sean
"jane eyre" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on What'sHerName

"And this is a narrative written by this prominent abolitionist? Harriet Jacobs and that the truth is is probably much much bigger than even what is here. is really sobering to think so normally starwood end here. She is free but this is Harriet Jacobs and she he is not done. She is working in Alexandria in Washington. DC organizing food and shelter for refugees from MM slavery and from civil war. As more and more formerly enslaved people travel north as the civil war goes on and as more and more people are emancipated. Eh or self emancipated. They are flocking into Virginia into Washington. DC into all of these areas with nowhere to go no support network generally the clothes clothes on their backs and she is hugely instrumental in organizing housing food. Work for all of these people. Yes Harriet they also realizes very quickly that her experience of learning to read and write are unusual and that so many of these formerly enslaved people have had had no education at all and she starts teaching she starts a school her daughter. Louisa eventually joins her and they dedicate their lives to educating tasting formerly enslaved people eventually they raise enough funds to have a building and we have a photo of that school on our website. It's an amazing photo. They're teaching children during the day. They're running classes for adults night. Wow they're dedicating so much time and energy to this project but but Harry Jacobs is also working on an activism front in so many other areas she is raising funds and insisting on proper medical care for black people raising using huge amounts of money to assist with massive devastating smallpox outbreaks. Where all of these formerly people have almost no resources to combat? These things and many doctors refused to treat them and she is making sure that every bit of care she can possibly find and provide is available to these people. Wow she is fighting and for the rights of black soldiers who fought in the civil war doing all of this with no one realizing who she is. They are not pudding. Harriet Jacobs the activists together with the author of incident in the life of a slave girl. Wow the book ends with the lines that I quoted at the beginning of this episode. which for those who know nineteenth century literature is a perfect perfect brilliant in version of a very classic nineteenth century trope for finishing up a novel the most famous example Being Charlie Brown tapes? Jane Eyre. They're the last line of Jane. Eyre being reader. I married him here. She is acknowledging what her readers are going to expect at the end of a story and how it differs. My story ends with freedom. Not with marriage She's again invoking vocal VAT aspirational ideal withheld from enslaved women. She's also destabilizing that ideal in the moment she's using it. It's such a fascinating way to end her story. I think it's especially poignant that as she wrote these words the civil the war has not happened. The emancipation proclamation does not exist so many people are still suffering what she suffered and she hasn't been given a chance to accomplish any of the incredible work she is going to do after the civil war. This is how Harriet Jacobs chose to end that. What part of her story? It has been painful to me in many ways to recall the dreary years past in bondage I would gladly leaf. Forget them if I could yet. The retrospection is not altogether without solace for with those gloomy recollections. Come tender memories of my good old old grandmother like light fleecy clouds floating over a dark couple.

Harriet Jacobs Jane Eyre Louisa Harry Jacobs Washington Virginia Charlie Brown smallpox Alexandria
"jane eyre" Discussed on Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

"Harper back. That was kissed me theme of Blue. Mary ranged changed from fatal. The're fatal fury three arranged that was composed and arranged by Yuki Fumi Makino credited did as mackey an official lesson K.. Release yes it was. My first thought was like mackey and Pinto which she's a character from twinkle Star sprites which is another game. That's right yeah took us fun. You introduced to that. Yeah it was good. Jane Eyre played that Ed I have not. Oh man look into on the switch too so yeah it's accessible. It is a shoot-em-up mixed with a puzzle. Game makes the versus versus fighter. That's all the right buttons from. Yeah so it's definitely a super colorful and like really bright and cutesy so it's a lot of fun cool I know yeah So that was theme boom. Mary arranged I really like arrange tracks at really go off into a completely different direction and this one went off on like a weird like jazz. This jam for like six minutes. It felt really improvised like it felt like follow the theme of the of the original song but I felt like they just it allowed them. It's a really put their own personalities into it the performance it was really cool. Yeah I think trump solos here in their felt like a traditional jazz like where everyone sort of like looking and each other and then taking their turns and they're going around I like so I think you want similar on this one Kinda did kind so I ended up going with also some blue. Mary jams Both Blue Mary Jam Blue Mary J.. This tragic particular is is Blue Mary. Blues full band rendition. From the Game King of Fighters Ninety seven done by show regulars the consuls. A had they go with it though. Because it just sounded so great..

Mary Blue Mary mackey Yuki Fumi Makino Harper Pinto Jane Eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Bronte best number the classic tale Jane Eyre will be sold at auction in Paris later today yes written in eighteen thirty one celebrants he was just fourteen the tiny manuscript messes around one inches by two inches and features three hundred ten stories one of which describes a murderer he was driven to madness when he is haunted by his victims right Bronte S. six of these little books were produced five survived for our at the parsonage museum in their home town of house in Yorkshire so this is the last one that's why the museum is keen despite a price tag that could go up to half a million pounds lots of fundraising on the way exact director of the Bronte postage museum Kitty right joins us now Kitty first of the fascinating story behind this what were they they sound like dole's house books what would they produced full a good morning the word of reason to document the imaginary world of the the young from two children so the three famous sisters and they brought the brand well and they was sparked by a gift to brand well from his father Patrick Bronte of a sense of choice soldiers and each of the children's seized upon a soldier and named him and then together they went on to act out little plays with the soldiers and then graduated from that two rushing the events of the stories in these little teeny tiny hole and I've been having a look at that a look at them and they are actually sort of autograph they are written not they in time any Letras sleigh on the harm size this so small teeny tiny writing and this small because they were meant to be small enough for the choice so just to read so the set the the the magazine were trying to acquire two days now to the a series called the young men's magazine so shallow wrote them as a set of magazine so you have you have sorry to interrupt you have as I understand four of them one is missing do we know where that is no that disappeared sometime in the nineteen thirties we haven't given up hope that it might soon for something to look out so this this one and you've come close once before can you tell us a little bit about why it's on the market now of it was so it came to life in twenty eleven and sounds of No Way Out of no way yes as I understand it and we went to the auction but unfortunately and you know desperately for us we were out Bijan the magazine the the manuscript went into a collection in Paris and then that connection the the museum it was in has closed down due to financial difficulties so it's back on the market so astonishingly we've got a second chance one hour and it was it was an investment or was it actually put put there for the public could could people see it it was it was displayed in the museum in Paris yes we have we know and has the price going up since you missed it sadly well we're we're preparing to go into the auction with as much as we can in our pockets to put herself in the best position you had amazing support from people many of whom had Judi Dench for example the head of one of the societies and so on I sing presumably a lot of charitable money as well is that it is the government of stomping up who pays for this kind of thing we've we've of we do have some money from trusts and foundations people have come to to us with that including the national heritage memorial and and but also lots of lots of individuals from all across the world and I'm just a final question could be easy you places the bid I'm not person friends who does that for you we have what we have an auction agent he's very experienced in these matters and he'll be handling that for us but some but as I say we've had people from rice across the world the stories on known everyone what a fantastic story best wishes I have to say as well could be right to the bone to Bosnia museum thank you.

Jane Eyre Paris million pounds one inches two inches one hour two days
"jane eyre" Discussed on Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

"Now. Let's get back to our talk about reviving ancient ales with beer archaeologist travis rupp. We'll travis. We were kind of curious here. One thing we saw in addition to all the beer archaeology. Is it your professor of classic literature so which classic literature is the busiest yeah. That's a good question especially. When you talk about classic literature to people often they're like so what reads like jane eyre and stuff like that what the heck's talk about right so yeah with teaching classics yeah kinda teach all things classic doc oriented which means anything greek roman egyptian as well as some near eastern precedents and roots in there as well and honestly so far <hes> of my research search which i've been working on now for almost seven years is the egyptians are certainly the most open with their conversation of being beer consumers and beer producers along with some of the near eastern empires interestingly enough though the greeks and romans. They don't talk about bureau that often. They always you know they poo poo. It is is terrible measly plea vian thing that's only for the impoverished while they're always drinking their wine but i assure you as i've been digging into this and doing a lot of traveling in spent a lot of time in europe especially in greece in italy over the last couple of years <hes> daydream quite severe. They don't talk about it. There's beer lovers. They're absolutely how would they not be. I would think they're like having these weird orgy parties and they've got their rooms and all that of course drink some beer. Somebody brings that in. They're involved in orange either eating all the food like yeah. Give me a little beard. Say why not you are absolutely correct and i think like one of the one of the things it's really kind of interesting diving into these various cultures alters in having spent the vast majority of my life working in this area of the world oslo didn't expect to find myself as being a beer expert in the region when i started down this track a long time ago but but the egyptians are much more open about it because they saw this is that they stop here is as drink of the gods and it was it was considered the the best gift to give to the pharaoh and we consider the fact that the egyptians are the source of their culture thrives off of the agrarian capabilities of the nile delta. Talk a lot of barley and wheat being grown and you can convert that in alcohol pretty quickly. You know it's not say the egyptians didn't make wine they did it just wasn't nearly as prevalent megan agin into the greek and roman culture and one thing. I like to even remind my students often is that we read these plays by euripides. We read material from plutarch ktar gore or <hes> plenty the elder from <hes> the roman world in they always talk about wine wide and they kind of again damn beer to a degree in these are really affluent wealthy guys right in. I tell my students can you imagine if we left it up to the upper one percent of our population to write all all of our history you know what are they gonna say about us. When are they gonna say about beer and that's essentially what it comes down to it. The greeks and the romans is only about one percent of population was literate. It's always material..

travis rupp professor jane eyre vian europe oslo nile delta greece italy one percent seven years
"jane eyre" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on LadyGang

"Electricity. Right on writing to be lived. Okay. Not for me bad for brab. It's a Brad for me too. I love sh- an unshaven thing. Then when I eat gluten, you can't see my baby to God. Same you guys? I went to sugar fish for lunch. And sometimes it's like sometimes I feel like there's no gluten in it. And sometimes I feel like they put burst of child hit spring has not been as consistent as I would like it to be. I agree is very happy. It's not about sugar fish right now. It's back to the game. Like this. Outta sometimes I just get sushi diarrhea like instance, like what I wish I did like a parasite is in in its to expel it immediately. I'm going to shoot diarrheas real real. And it never know when it's coming, and you know, it's been bad. That's the worst part about it is no you've had about sushi immediately. Do you think it's bad sushi, or do you think that's just your body rejecting something that's not cooked? 'cause are we really like do we really breakdown rice too? But here's the problem is I could go to sugar fish. Oh, my God is this. I can have explosive diarrhea from eating the same thing. I know that what I ate. It was not as fresh, right? That's right. Name the last time. I went I was fine. This time. I like rap. Five four three two. Route. Okay, eighties Princess, Diana shit. Oh, Brad all the way. Anything brad? Okay. Last one extra long hair extensions. Oh, my dream. What's? So Brad really do on me. Oh, I have already wigs. Ooh. Yeah. But like what if one of your clients came to a fitting, and it was like. Hey, right. I would die for it. Yes. Erica, Jane Eyre. Erica, jane. I'm I'm definitely in for love it. It's bad for me. Right purse to be rich. We've all seen on fat burger. We've all seen the girl Fatburger that her natural texture is waves and her extension. Texture is silky straight. Oh, I. Burger. No, really. Yes. She. Goes to my happy play. I we you love to talk about my balance. She's getting diarrhea glued. Okay. Well, that's we have to move on. Because this is taking too long, Jack when we come back Brad's gonna help fix your life. Although now it is questionable. If so if you're anything like me, you've really good intentions when it comes to eating healthy. But you're really effing lazy. That's right. That is me in a nutshell. Daily harvest has transformed my morning. So I wake up I have my coffee, and I do a simple little thing, which is called reach in the freezer. Grab out a.

brad diarrhea I. Burger Erica Diana shit Jack Jane Eyre
"jane eyre" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"I mean, I would sit there, and I would I would make that pitch about any person like sitting towards the finals of why they were threat to win. And I do think that every single person had grounds to stand on and played beautiful games. They're just different games. It's any given at any given moment in any given night jury values a different thing. And our jury took this jury duty very seriously, hence, why had closing are closing point. Dr Elson win. You're not extolling the virtues of survivor and not watching TV. What do you do in your spare time? Yeah. I actually love to work out. I think this was part of the thing that like even led to my threats ponderous, I was working out. And I remember Natalie seeing me working out and be like the doctor is intense. If you saw the doctor working out you wouldn't wanna go against her. But I really love cycling and balked box. I had visit me recently and all ever want to be trained by because she's so bad ass, but I love boxing, and then I love reading I was in English major in nerd, and so what do you read if you give me, well, obviously, Harry Potter any any sort of nineteenth century, British literature. I could talk about Jane Eyre and pride and prejudice all day long. And then I read a lot of fish back is more your guy for that. Okay. I thought so. Nineteenth century American literature guy myself, I love that too. And I'm currently reading a read a lot of medical oriented fiction or or autobiographies, and I'm reading the emperor of all knowledge now, which is a must read for every single colleges out there. Yeah. Dr L boring person. Like, wow, I read it, I workout. I have. Worked out you go to work you help people going through the most difficult times of their life. It's it's a lot. It's a lot. It's a lot to handle the and I love traveling and truthfully now that I have maintained friends across the country as I just love getting to see my survivor family. Okay. You talked about your brothers your sister. How how many siblings do you have? Well, I've only this is part of why the freaking glass, I'm one of five kids the fourth of five and one of the things that they always wanted me to talk about was my family, and in particular, the head agree of my family. But I just felt uncomfortable with that cell, which is this. I'm not from a pedigree. Both my parents did go to college. Obviously my dad went to med school. But my I'm not from some place where you had to go to an Ivy league. It just turned out that many of my siblings did end up at leagues and college sports and on paper. It sounds really impressive. Well. Doc, charleston. I had a lot of fun going through all of this stuff here with you today..

Natalie Dr Elson Ivy league Jane Eyre boxing charleston Harry Potter Dr L med school
"jane eyre" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Movie Crush

"She's definitely lost his him down Elian. She becomes the hero his hero on. But I don't know when you wanna stop spoiling. But let's talk about because what you were saying about the set is really interesting because it had Alfred Hitchcock models in it. And yeah. Well, the lighting the camera work in this once they get to that house like it. I like Monte-Carlo. Yes. Which is a stage set in Los Angeles throwing but when they finally get to this the interiors of the set are just unbelievable and the way the shadows and the light fall. Yeah. It's just gorgeous. And next here is a model is it. It's a model. Yeah. Down the lane 'cause Hitchcock always used models. Uh-huh. And they're funny but good like, they always work. But there a little bit like Hitchcock. It's so funny. He'll put in things that are a little bit fake looking just to be. Yeah. That hit me a couple of times. But all the like old school filmmaking tricks or on display here. Yeah. So if you're a fan of like, practical effects and early, you know, Matt paintings and model and stuff like it here. It's so good. And it wants anyone that's Matafi to was the only other kademi award at one outta think. Like. Yeah. Ten or eleven George Barnes. Yeah. He did spellbound. And he also did Jane Eyre, starring Joan Fontaine and Lauren. I'm sorry. Citizen Kane guy, Orson Welles. Thank you. Sorry. I know who it is. The second worse than wells. So that's very anyways. Yeah. It's beautiful the way that he works with black and white and lighting. It's it's so. Like Noir film, making it is sort of this gothic, nor in the house is at once like like, it's kind of a character in the film. But it's it's it's kind of creepy and for boating. But also this beautiful place..

Alfred Hitchcock George Barnes Orson Welles Elian Los Angeles Citizen Kane guy Matt Matafi Joan Fontaine Jane Eyre Lauren
"jane eyre" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Do you think there's something to the idea that audiences would react more favorably to a story about an Asian family written by a white writer is it just bad luck that that happened in DC any contemporary parallels to that today? Oh, golly. Here like dislike do some landmine hopscotch. Hallway? For the record. I love that book. And I know it's a controversial thing to say. I know Asian American writers who hate that book. I don't care. It's a really beautiful book. And I think Pearl buck was actually a very good person. And she cared a lot about biracial Asian orphans who weren't fed and she spent a lot of her life taking care of very poor people that Asian people had discarded. So for me, I see her as an ally. That said I think for young hill Kong to say that it's unfortunate for to have two books come out about Asians. And therefore the reader only had space for one. I can see why he would say that. But I actually think that Moore's more if people like pachinko, they're going to beat another create a book about Koreans. It's a really dangerous thing to walk around feeling like there's only space for one person of. One group. Well, nobody ever says all we can't read the great Gatsby and Ernest Hemingway novel because we only have room for one idiot syncretic weird white guy on the syllabus. Right, right. Nobody ever says that you know, it reminds me of the first line of pachinko, which is you know, there's like collections of great. I lines in novel history. And I think this has to be one. The first line is history has failed us, but no matter and there's an interview with the guardian where you explain what you meant by that, especially as someone who you know, you yourself. You have an undergraduate degree in history. You said I believe history has failed almost everybody who is ordinary in the world. Do you think the same is true of our literary canon is literature failing ordinary people or is literature the remedy for that failure? I think it's both. I think that it has failed us in many ways. But I think that it can remedy us. And maybe that's romantic for people like us to believe, especially if it has failed. It's like to keep taking the same cough medicine. I'm not sure. But I guess I have to believe that literature can repair us because maybe what we need is multiple books. Like when Arbi Jane Eyre, I think about how much it healed me as a girl who believed that she was very plain and on loved, and that's not to like feel sorry for me. I think most people feel plain unloved, it's not a big deal. I walked around with that sense of consciousness, and when I read that book, it was really important to me. But would it have been more lovely in some ways to have had other create Americans and their stories. Sure. So when I was in college, and I read Kim run young, and that's a pen name for somebody who wrote a book called clay walls to historical novel, and she got no attention at all. And now, it's sort of included in the canons. But I think the thing that you, and I are trying to grapple with is how much space. Do we give for the other in the syllabus? Right. Right. Right. Is it one and knowing that there's an infinite multi. Implicity of otherness right and everybody wants to be able to see themselves in a book. Everybody wants to be able to see themselves in the world. And and feel like they're not alone. But that requires a multiplicity of. Well, that is all my questions for you. Is there anything that you wanted to make sure we talked about? Well, I wanted to tell you from the very beginning that I was really so pleased that you wanted to talk about young hill Kong because he is the OG of Korean literature in America. And it just made me really happy. So thank you. Oh, thank you. It makes me really happy. And we're so glad that you're able to come on. And I hope that a lot of people are going to go out and read his weird books after this. They're actually they're really fun. There's a piker usque aspect to. It's it's really fun. And you just learn so much about what it must have been like at that time..

Arbi Jane Eyre writer cough young hill Kong Kong Ernest Hemingway Moore Gatsby Kim America
"jane eyre" Discussed on Chat Sematary

Chat Sematary

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"jane eyre" Discussed on Chat Sematary

"When I wasn't forced to do it. You know, I did not like reading in high school as just like, I don't wanna read Jane Eyre, or whatever, you know. I don't ever finish crime and punishment. It was assigned. I don't think I ever finished it. Yeah. Assigned reading was never fun. But yeah, I did you did you have this out there. Do you have a are accelerator reader? I don't recall I went to a really nerdy high school. So I think they just had us rating allot anyway, but I don't really like an elementary school. You didn't I went to like weird Montessori private schools, not normal? How who'll so that's really interesting. I wanna learn more about that. Like, we we have one here in town. It sounds interesting. It sounds like I actually might have done really well to school like that. But I definitely can answer any questions you have app on that. If you want to ask those after we donated tangent on the podcast about that. Yeah. Yeah. Maybe someday down the line. If if I ever have a kid, I'll I'll come to you and ask questions, but yet no in my in my public school. We had this program called accelerator reader, and it was like this computer program other schools had it too. And that basically like there is this list of books in this database in this computer program, and you could get these books for your school library, and there would be like a little blue a are sicker. That'd be on the spines. You knew that counted or go get the books from the public library, and you'd read the book, and then you take like a ten question quiz about the book on accelerator reader. So you know, you could you could do as much as you wanted. You just dealing limitation was how many books can you read? And I read a lot books. I think I've told the story on another podcast probably pod chasm. But. I read I think in my third grade year, I read more than the rest of my class combined at least maybe not read as that much. But I had I had enough points that I was like twice everybody else. It was insane. And then the prize at the end of the semester for anybody that had so many points. You know, there are different like prized. Here's and the biggest prize was that you had to take a limo ride out to Burger King or something. And so you were a hotshot because he read so much is that what you're saying. That's what I'm saying. Except that I got chicken pox. And I couldn't go. The star reader, and I couldn't go because I got chickenpox Devon low. Dammit, Devon, but. Yeah. That was a bummer. I did get to go the next year, except I did tell the story podcast. I'm sorry. Not that any of any. For an episode. The probably hasn't come out yet. But yeah, the second year I did get to go. But for some reason, I made the decision to to sit in the front of the limo with the driver because it wasn't a seats in the back. And it was it was it was just a question. Like, anybody could volunteer, and nobody did then like somebody would have just had, you know, put up there. But I volunteered. I don't know. Why like a still never ridden in the back of a limo? Like, I've been in a limo that I sat in the front with the damn driver. And my the only thing that I got out of that was that I got to like choose what was on the radio, but nobody in the backseat cares about what's on the radio..

Devon Jane Eyre