35 Burst results for "Jane Arraf"

Rights group says Egypt has freed 3 of its arrested staffers

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Rights group says Egypt has freed 3 of its arrested staffers

"By lower courts. Egypt has released three human rights activists from prison after they were arrested last month meeting with European diplomats. NPR's Jane Arraf reports on their case. Lawyers for the three men say the prosecution agreed to release them pending investigation. The director and two other officials from the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights are charged with belonging to a terrorist organization. And spreading false information. The arrest followed a meeting in November with European ambassadors and other diplomats. On Thursday, they were released from Tora prison where at least one of them had been held in a cell with no heat were warm clothing. Western governments and movie stars called on the Egyptian government to free them. Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el Sisi has overseen an unprecedented crackdown on human rights and freedom of speech, jailing thousands of activists Jane Arraf,

Jane Arraf NPR Tora Prison Egypt Egyptian Government Egyptian President Abdel Fatta
"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:32 min | 8 months ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

"A mass grave in October, NPR's Jane Arraf was there. In the village of Salo. Yellow tape ropes off what used to be a fish farm attached to a technical college laborers and investigators dressed in white suits and masks are carefully digging and sifting through the Pachter. As I walk up to take a closer look at one of the man is shoveling the dirt into this. Big rectangular sifter and then Fine pieces of dirt come out, and he flips the gravel over. The other one is now going through it by hand, trying to make sure that they don't miss any of the bones. Investigators have found at least 17, mass graves so far in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq. This one is known as the mother's grave, and it's believed to contain the remains of dozens of pregnant and the older women. Isis decided it didn't have any use for including the mother of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad. And game ideas. I wouldn't cross t Sarah Hallion off their career is born on this land, Buddy McGirt her brother Side. Murad is among the Yazidis who have come here in 2014. Isis rounded up and shot almost all the men and older boys. And they're morons Village of coach. Oh, Sayid was wounded Overlooked among all the bodies he managed to escape. He could have moved to Europe is a refugee, but he doesn't want to leave this land where there's been so much tragedy, or did they come in? I shall remember of these easy And now for the dish they come up with. That number was born. I come and get it passed you if you're not getting my mother was the most peaceful, charitable person in the world. If she saw a poor person and we had only one piece of bread, she would cut it into half and give it to him. No idea, And I didn't get enough time to spend with her. We needed to have her with us longer. He takes off his dark sunglasses and wipes tears from his eyes that see body movement. Quote with isn't an olive green uniforms, a fighter now with Yazidi paramilitary forces. Here in cinder. It's taken years to even begin to exhumed bodies to identify them. Some will likely never be found. Stayed returned here after US backed Kurdish forces drove Isis out. It was a year after the massacre, and some of the remains were still lying on the ground. They got hot team Mama heredity. Nasty and Before salads when they came back, and so this I was very depressed because I could see their clothes and bones. They all disappeared. I don't know who took them. Maybe animals got them or some group of people took them away. When we came back after that, we didn't see their bones. People leaves that, along with his mother's body. The grave contains the bodies of his aunts and his uncles and cousins, wives against the backdrop of so much horror and loss. The only consolation for many of the survivors has to be able to find the remains of their loved ones and bury them properly. A community center still under construction in the village of coach Joe Yazidis have gathered to give DNA's samples. The International.

Isis Nadia Murad Jane Arraf US Salo Pachter NPR Joe Yazidis Europe Sarah Hallion Iraq Sinjar Nobel
U.N. Investigators Help Yazidis In Iraq Find Bodies Of Loved Ones Killed By ISIS

All Things Considered

06:44 min | 8 months ago

U.N. Investigators Help Yazidis In Iraq Find Bodies Of Loved Ones Killed By ISIS

"Region of Iraq. It has now been six years since the ISIS genocide against the ancient ancient Yazidi Yazidi religious religious minority. minority. And And yet yet survivors survivors are are still still trying trying to to find find bodies bodies of of their their loved loved ones. ones. To To that that end, end, U. U. N. N. Investigators Investigators began began X X Hume Hume ng ng a a mass grave in October, MPR's Jane Arraf was there. In the village of Solo yellow tape ropes off what used to be a fish farm attached to a technical college laborers and investigators dressed in white suits and masks. Carefully digging and sifting through the Pachter as I walk up to take a closer look at one of the man is shoveling the dirt into this big rectangular sifter and then Fine pieces of dirt come out, and he flips the gravel over. The other one is now going through it by hand, trying to make sure that they don't miss any of the bones. Investigators have found at least 17, mass graves so far in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq. Things. One is known as the mother's grave, and it's believed to contain the remains of dozens of pregnant and the older women. Isis decided it didn't have any use for Including the mother of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad. And game ideas. I would frosty Sarah Holly in all areas born on this land, but in bigger Snus is her brother Side. Murad is among the Yazidis who have come here in 2014. Isis rounded up and shot almost all the men and older boys. And they're morons Village of coach. Oh, Sayid was wounded Overlooked among all the bodies he managed to escape. He could have moved to Europe is a refugee, but he doesn't want to leave this land where there's been so much tragedy, or did they come in? I shall remember of vision. And now for the dish they come up with. That number was born. I come and get you if you're not getting my mother was the most peaceful, charitable person in the world. If she saw a poor person and we had only one piece of bread, she would cut it into half and give it to him. No idea, And I didn't get enough time to spend with her. We needed to have her with us longer. He takes off his dark sunglasses and wipes tears from his eyes as he body movement quotes whatever he's in all of Green uniform, a fighter now Thea's Edie paramilitary forces here in Sinjar, it's taken years even begin to exhumed bodies to identify them. Some will likely never be found. Sayid returned here after US backed Kurdish forces drove Isis out. It was a year after the massacre, and some the remains were still lying on the ground. They got hot demand. Mama, where a ditty Rusty and Beef Acela's when they came back, and so this I was very depressed because I could see their clothes, some bones. They all disappeared. I don't know who took them. Maybe animals got them or some group of people took them away. When we came back after that, we didn't see their bones. People leaves that, along with his mother's body. The grave contains the bodies of his aunts and his uncles and cousins, wives against the backdrop of so much horror and loss. The only consolation for many of the survivors has to be able to find the remains of their loved ones and bury them properly. A community center still under construction in the village of coach Joe Yazidis have gathered to give DNA's samples. The International Commission of Missing Persons based in The Hague started working to identify victims and mass graves in Bosnia. 1996. There's still not done there. It will likely take years here is well. Woz Abdullah Bas, the commission's deputy Iraq director walks me through the process we start. Take the information. Take it. In our record. There is any missing formation. After that, we shift Do the second table just on here. He would give a blood sample. Ideally, each missing persons with $3 on it's better to be, you know, Close one. So mother, Father Sir. Planes. You know, parents, six year

Sinjar Hume Hume Ng Ng Jane Arraf Nadia Murad Sarah Holly Isis Iraq Sayid Pachter Murad Thea Europe Joe Yazidis International Commission Of Mi Green Woz Abdullah Bas The Hague United States
What Does  A Biden Presidency Mean To US Foreign Relations?

Morning Edition

07:39 min | 9 months ago

What Does A Biden Presidency Mean To US Foreign Relations?

"Might Joe Biden's presidency mean for US foreign policy with us, now three of NPR's international correspondents in some of the regions that are most consequential to the United States? NPR's Emily Fang is in Beijing. Lucien Kim is in Moscow and Jane Arraf is in Erbil, Iraq. Hello to you all. Good morning. Morning. So, Emily, let's start with you. The relationship between the U. S and China right now is quite tense. How was news of of President Elect Biden's win received in Beijing. Well, there wasn't much news because two days after the election results were called noticeably Absent is any official reaction from China's leader, She Jingping, He's not put up a message. By contrast in 2016. She congratulated Trump hours after the race was called this year. Foreign Ministry has dodged every question we've had for comment on their views about the election, and the silence is not because China prefers bite in over Trump, Trump of replied, And it's more out of an over abundance of caution because Trump has not officially conceded. Seven China's view It does not want to take a side if you will, and until someone is definitively inaugurated, and Trump still has more than two months left in office so he could put significant pressure on China. Still, if he's provoked Okay, So China's taking a wait and see approach Lucy and there was all of this concern about Russian potential Russian interference in this election. We didn't see much of that. How is Moscow, reacting to the prospect of a Biden presidency? Well, it's interesting. It's very similar to the situation in Beijing here. The absence of any congratulations from President Vladimir Putin has been noticeable today. His spokesman told reporters that Putin will wait for official results because Trump has not conceded and wants to dispute the the count in the courts. One prominent Russian who did congratulate Biden, his opposition leader, Alexei Navalny. He's recovering from a poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin. The day after the U. S election. Navalny went on social media to say that the suspense about who Would eventually when the race was evidence that America's elections are real, but officially on state TV. The main message is that this election was marred by irregularities and fraud. So in a sense, not that different from Russian elections and the messier the transition of power is in the US, the better it is for the Kremlin because the US stops looking like a model democracy. Well, that's interesting. Jane, China and Russia both taking a wait and see approach did Iraqi leadership say anything this weekend? They did. They generally welcomed Biden's election. And, you know, there's not expected to be really a dramatic or immediate change in policy. One of the big issues here is withdrawal of US troops and Biden like Trump is in favor of those, But I gotta be honest Officials here are breathing a sigh of relief. You know, one of them put it. Will no longer be one tweet away from learning of major foreign policy decisions. And then there's the fact that Biden you Noah's head of a CZ, a member of the leading member, ranking member of the Of Senate Foreign Relations Committee and then the point man on Iraq. For then President Obama knows the leaders here and he knows them well, and that will make a difference. I spoke to one senior Iraqi official who said he's dealt with them in years for years. Sorry, and and the thing that stands out is Biden's essential decency, he says. Decency. OK, Lucien Joe Biden known for his decency, Yes, but unlike President Trump, he does not seem primed to like Vladimir Putin or to soft pedal things with Russia. How might his election change the U. S Russia relationship? All right. There is no expectation here at all that Biden will be easier on Russia. I spoke to one of Russia's leading foreign policy experts fielder Lukianoff about what he expects from a Biden presidency. They don't think that many people at Moscow believed that the U. S will be able to be back to the old good days of liberal order as it was in 90 Sorento Seldon's, But the rhetoric will be ah, muchmore like Obama or even Clinton spirit. So in other words, the expectation in Moscow is that Biden will bring up human rights and democracy and also take a greater interest in what happens in the former Soviet Union. There is no love for Biden in Moscow. He met with Putin when he was vice president and has been very critical of the Kremlin. But those negative feelings aside, there is also a certain trump fatigue in Moscow. There were really high hopes for years ago and today U. S. Russian relations are at their lowest point since the Cold War. So there is some hope in Moscow that Biden will be more predictable and be able to start a sober professional dialogue on pressing bilateral issues of the first one that comes to mind his arms control. More predictable. Emily might also be interesting or helpful to China, right because it's been four sort of madcap years of trade wars and overnight tweets. And yet Beijing's position in the world is different now than it was when President Trump took office, isn't it? Yes, it's gone from what was then A developing regional power, too, in the U. S has eyes and this is accurate. A global competitors and that growing more negative view has led the US over the last four years to sanction Chinese officials, major Chinese companies and to limit the number of Of Chinese people who study and work in the US, But within China, you have the inverse of this negativity. China's had this surgeon self confidence since 2016. It's controlled a corona virus pandemic. It's produced some truly global companies, and that gives Beijing a sense that this is China's time to shine. And right now we're at this hugely uncertain moment in the relationship trumps refusal to conceive means that there's even warn certainty because Beijing cannot decide what its next move is going to be right now. Okay. If China is under the impression that it is, it's time to shine economically makes a lot of sense. Does a president Biden change that in any way? He could. Biden is expected to continue to push China and human rights issues such as Hong Kong civil rights Xinjiang, where hundreds of thousands of people have been detained. Remember he called cheating Ping a thug during one of the last presidential debates. But many in trying to hope us under Biden will temper the relationship and cooperate on things like trade and climate change. But Biden could also have a much more multilateral approach and that could actually put pressure on China. And Jane. Lastly, I want to reach back into history. Joe Biden once suggested that Iraq would be better off his three separate autonomous regions Kurdish, Sunni and Shiite. How was that idea held up? Yeah, so he was suggesting autonomous regions, but still with the central government and here in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, they very much welcome that support for increase power to the regions, but in other places it was seen as fuelling Iraq's sectarian divide. And there's still a bit of concern about that idea. But a lot of it has moved on to concern about Iran. And on that one he's seen as not being quite a cz obsessed with isolating Iran. So even some militia leaders here have welcomed his election. Okay. NPR's Jane Arraf in Erbil, Iraq, Emily faIIing in Beijing and Lucien Kim in Moscow. Thanks, everyone.

Biden China Donald Trump Moscow Beijing U. United States Jane Arraf Lucien Kim Emily Fang President Elect Biden Russia Foreign Ministry NPR Alexei Navalny Navalny Vladimir Putin Erbil Iraq Senate Foreign Relations Commi
World leaders congratulate Biden on projected win, but some await “official results”

Morning Edition

07:41 min | 9 months ago

World leaders congratulate Biden on projected win, but some await “official results”

"Joe Biden's presidency mean for us foreign policy with us, now three of NPR's international correspondents in some of the the regions regions that that are are most most consequential consequential to to the the United United States? States? NPR's NPR's Emily Emily Fang Fang is is in in Beijing. Beijing. Lucien Lucien Kim Kim is is in in Moscow Moscow and and Jane Jane Arraf Arraf is is in in Erbil, Erbil, Iraq. Iraq. Hello Hello to to you you all. Good morning. Morning. So, Emily, let's start with you. The relationship between the U. S and China right now is quite tense. How was news of of President Elect Biden's win received in Beijing. Well, there wasn't much news because two days after the election results were called noticeably Absent is any official reaction from China's leader? She Jingping, he's non put up a message. By contrast in 2016. She congratulated Trump hours after the race was called this year. The Foreign Ministry has dodged every question we've had for comment on their views about the election, and the silence is not because China prefers bite in over Trump, Trump of replied, And it's more out of an over abundance of caution because Trump has not officially conceded. Seven China's view It does not want to take a side if you will, and until someone is definitively inaugurated, and Trump still has more than two months left in office so he could put significant pressure on China. Still, if he's provoked Okay, So China's taking a wait and see approach Lucy and there was all of this concern about Russian potential Russian interference in this election. We didn't see much of that. How is Moscow, reacting to the prospect of a Biden presidency? We'll enter. It's interesting. It's very similar to the situation in Beijing here. The absence of any congratulations from President Vladimir Putin has been noticeable today. His spokesman told reporters that Putin will wait for official results because Trump has not conceded and wants to dispute the account in the courts. One prominent Russian who did congratulate Biden, his opposition leader, Alexei Navalny. He's recovering from a poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin. The day after the U. S election. Navalny went on social media to say that the suspense about who Would eventually when the race was evidence that America's elections are riel, but officially on state TV. The main message is that this election was marred by irregularities and fraud. So in a sense, not that different from Russian elections and the messier the transition of power is in the US, the better it is for the Kremlin because the US stops looking like a model democracy. Well, that's interesting. Jane, China and Russia both taking a wait and see approach did Iraqi leadership say anything this weekend? They did. They generally welcomed Biden's election. And, you know, there's not expected to be really a dramatic or immediate change in policy. One of the big issues here is withdrawal of US troops and Biden like Trump is in favor of those, But I gotta be honest Officials here are breathing a sigh of relief. You know, one of them put it. Will no longer be one tweet away from learning of major foreign policy decisions. And then there's the fact that Biden you Noah's head of a CZ, a member of the leading member, ranking member of the Of Senate Foreign Relations Committee and then the point man on Iraq. For then President Obama knows the leaders here and he knows them well, and that will make a difference. I spoke to one senior Iraqi official who said he's dealt with them in years for years story and and the thing that stands out is Biden's essential decency, he says. Decency. OK, Lucien Joe Biden known for his decency, Yes, but unlike President Trump, he does not seem primed to like Vladimir Putin or to soft pedal things with Russia. How might his election change the U. S Russia relationship? All right. There is no expectation here at all that Biden will be easier on Russia. I spoke to one of Russia's leading foreign policy experts fielder Lukianoff about what he expects from a Biden presidency. I don't think that many people at Moscow believed that the U. S will be able to be back to the old good days of liberals order as it was in 90 Sorento Seldon's, But the rhetoric will be ah, muchmore like Obama, or even Clinton period. So in other words, the expectation in Moscow is that Biden will bring up human rights and democracy and also take a greater interest in what happens in the former Soviet Union. There is no love for Biden in Moscow. He met with Putin when he was vice president and has been very critical of the Kremlin. But those negative feelings aside, there is also a certain trump fatigue in Moscow. There were really high hopes for years ago and today U. S. Russian relations are at their lowest point since the Cold War. So there is some hope in Moscow that Biden will be more predictable and be able to start a sober professional dialogue on pressing bilateral issues of the first one that comes to mind his arms control. More predictable. Emily might also be interesting or helpful to China, right because it's been four sort of madcap years of trade wars and overnight tweets. And yet Beijing's position in the world is different now than it was when President Trump took office, isn't it? Yes, it's gone from what was then A developing regional power, too, in the U. S has eyes and this is accurate. A global competitors and that growing more negative view has led the US over the last four years to sanction Chinese officials, major Chinese companies and to limit the number of Of Chinese people who study and work in the US, But within China, you have the inverse of this negativity. China's had this surgeon self confidence since 2016. It's controlled a corona virus pandemic. It's produced some truly global companies, and that gives Beijing a sense that this is China's time to shine. And right now we're at this hugely uncertain moment. And the relationship trumps refusal to conceive means that there's even more uncertainty because Beijing cannot decide what its next move is going to be right now. Okay. If China is under the impression that it is, it's time to shine economically, makes a lot of sense. Just a president Biden change that in any way. He could. Biden is expected to continue to push China and human rights issues such as Hong Kong civil rights Xinjiang, where hundreds of thousands of people have been detained. Remember he called cheating Ping a thug during one of the last presidential debates. But many in China hope us under Biden will temper the relationship and cooperate on things like trade and climate change. But Biden could also have a much more multilateral approach and that could actually put pressure on China. Jane. Lastly, I want to reach back into history. Joe Biden once suggested that Iraq would be better off his three separate autonomous regions Kurdish, Sunni and Shiite. How was that idea held up? Yeah, so he was suggesting autonomous regions, but still with the central government and here in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, they very much welcome that support for increase power to the regions, but in other places it was seen as fuelling Iraq's sectarian divide. And there's still a bit of concern about that idea. But a lot of it has moved on to concern about Iran. And on that one he's seen as not being quite as obsessed with isolating Iran. So even some militia leaders here have welcomed his election. Okay, NPR's Jane Arraf In Erbil, Iraq, Emily faIIing in Beijing and Lucien Kim in Moscow. Thanks, everyone. Well, thank you.

Biden China Donald Trump Moscow Beijing Erbil U. United United States Emily Emily Fang Fang Lucien Lucien Kim Kim Jane Jane Arraf Arraf President Elect Biden Iraq Russia NPR Foreign Ministry United States Alexei Navalny Navalny Vladimir Putin
"jane arraf" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:30 min | 10 months ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"And the tracing part is so important because communities of color had been disproportionately affected by this, Pelosi said. Although she's hopeful a breakthrough is forthcoming, ultimately quote it depends on the administration. Barbara Sprint. NPR NEWS The number of new cases of the Corona virus continues to rise in the U. S, especially in the Midwest. Hospitalizations air rising to record levels. Other countries are also experiencing a surgeon infections. NPR's Jane Arraf reports from northern Iraq there No Countrywide lockdowns Iraq as one of the highest infection rates in the region, and if you go around a little bit, you can see why there's very little social distancing there. Very few people wearing masks, hugging and kissing are still very much the done thing. NPR's Jane Arraf, This's NPR news. Anti government activists marched the Straits of Mince the capital of Belarus Sunday. Tens of thousands of people demonstrated despite a threat by officials to use firearms against protesters there, demanding that President Alexander Lukashenko resigned. After 26 years in office. They claim his reelection in August was rigged. It was another day of protest Sunday in Thailand, Protesters committed continuing efforts to get the military backed government to step down. Michael Sullivan reports Sunday marked the fifth straight day of protests by thousands of pro democracy demonstrators. Despite a government ban on Thursday that prohibits them. The largest crowds on Sunday were at victory Monument and the ASAC interception in the heart of the city, even as authorities stopped public transportation. In an effort to keep people from attending the rally spread on Sunday to at least 18 other locations around the country. The weekend protests were peaceful, and police made no attempt to intervene as they had on Friday. When they used water cannon to disperse a large crowd at the pop him one intersection. Human rights groups say at least 80 people, including many of the protest leaders have been arrested so far. For NPR News. I'm Michael Sullivan in Bangkok. Negotiators for Britain and the European Union meet again in London Monday in an effort to negotiate Britain's exit from the European Union. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said there is no point in continuing talks and it's time for Britain to prepare for a no deal exit when current agreements expire at the end of the year. I'm Nora Rahm NPR news..

NPR News NPR Jane Arraf Michael Sullivan Britain Pelosi European Union Iraq President Alexander Lukashenko Barbara Sprint Nora Rahm Belarus Boris Johnson victory Monument Midwest Prime Minister Bangkok ASAC
Washington D.C. Museum Of The Bible To Return Looted Artifacts To Iraq

All Things Considered

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Washington D.C. Museum Of The Bible To Return Looted Artifacts To Iraq

"Opened around three years ago. The museum of the Bible here in Washington, D. C has faced several scandals over the way it obtained antiquities somewhere looted, even fake. The museum says it has corrected the problems, but it's been a complicated task. NPR's Jane Arraf reports. The museum now plans to send some artifacts back to Iraq that it didn't even know it had The Museum of the Bible was founded by billionaire Steve Green and evangelical Christian whose family owns the Hobby lobby Craft store chain. He wanted to show the book's history and impact. But he didn't know much about antiquities or the illegal market for them or show much concern. Three years ago, the US government find hobby lobby $3 million for lack of due diligence. The company returned to Iraq, thousands of clay tablets and other items. That had been shipped a hobby lobby from other countries. Some marked ceramic tile samples. Now, the museum's chief curator, Jeff Claudia, tells us they're packing up more pieces to return to Iraq because they can't tell whether they were looted his paperwork and very vague paperwork. So I don't know if he's purchased sight on scene or be reviewed before they were purchased. Flow has referring to what the museum now realizes, or more than 8000 clay tablets and other artefacts and acquired from dealers in the US, the UK and Israel. They're believed to have come from Iraq.

The Museum Iraq Hobby Lobby Hobby Lobby Craft United States Steve Green Jeff Claudia Jane Arraf NPR Chief Curator Washington Israel UK
Egypt Sentences Women to 2 Years in Prison for TikTok Videos

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Egypt Sentences Women to 2 Years in Prison for TikTok Videos

"Has sentence five women to two years in prison for tick talk post, The country says violate family values more from NPR's Jane Arraf. The women include two social media influencers and three women who helped him with the posts. One was accused of encouraging young women to post videos for money. Another was accused of posting indecent photos and videos of herself. Her lawyer says the videos have been posted by her estranged partner. A sentence, which includes almost a $20,000 fine each is being appealed. Human rights activists called the arrests of violation of freedom of expression. I say it's part of a wider crack down on freedom of speech that includes stifling women on social media.

Jane Arraf NPR Partner
Iraqi military says 3 rockets strike near Baghdad airport

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Iraqi military says 3 rockets strike near Baghdad airport

"The Iraqi military is reporting no casualties after three rockets struck near the Baghdad International Airport earlier today here's NPR's Jana Raff Iraqi security officials say the small Katusha rockets were fired early this morning they say they found the rocket launcher and a timer used in the strike Iran backed militias are usually responsible for the attacks this one comes amid increased tensions over an attempt to put together a new government to potential prime ministers of tried and failed to get approval from political factions for new cabinet the third and most of all called me is expected to submit a proposed cabinet to parliament this week the caretaker prime minister announced his resignation last year after anti government protests in Baghdad and across the south Jane Arraf NPR news Amman

Baghdad International Airport NPR Iran Prime Minister Baghdad Amman Jana Raff
"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

"Jane Arraf in Amman Jordan Jane thanks so much thank you and it is time now for StoryCorps on this Friday Tyrone Hampton and Frank to hay Seuss or New York City bus operators to date they've lost at least thirty fellow bus workers to covert nineteen in all more than eighty New York City transit workers have died in this pandemic Tyrone and Frank had a remote conversation using StoryCorps connect Frank begins my father was a bus driver and he would take me to work with him on days that you have no baby sitter and I just remember that I will sit there right by his feet and he would give me the microphone and he would sell me say Lexington in ninety six street coming up next so you hit me in my little baby voice Lexington in ninety should free up legs and I loved it I thought it was the best job in the world as a kid so I'm here because I love the job zero you take a test every day with snow storms traffic you know people right in front of bus through all the trials and tribulations we do like doing what we do for New York City we do we have a driver's heart yeah but now how it is being tested there is one helluva tests every day that we stepped foot on that bus we can come home with the possibility of not expected ourselves only by our loved ones you know the brothers die a lot of co workers lose their life behind this attack what gives me the most hope right now I have a girlfriend and I see little rolls of caution tape and every bus that passes by he's running in and taping all the C. right behind the bus job making sure nobody says day some of the ones I got on with them and I help them do it faster and every bus that came on we did it you know once you're against a wall the only way you could go was forward I want you know you've got a brother to me for life now you.

Jane Arraf StoryCorps Tyrone Hampton Frank Lexington New York City Amman Jordan Jane hay Seuss
"jane arraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Reports of explosions in Iraq's green zone and NPR's Jane Arraf reports she heard raid sirens from the US embassy we'll have an update on this later in the hour in response to last night's missile attacks on US military bases in Iraq president trump says the US will impose punishing new economic sanctions on Iran and peers Asia Roscoe reports trump says the US will never allow Tehran to gain a nuclear weapon under his watch president trump says no Americans or Iraqis were killed in the attack and that it appears that Iran is standing down he called on the international community to forge a new nuclear agreement with Toronto and we must all work together toward making a deal with Iran that makes the world a safer and more peaceful place trump pulled out of the deal reached by the former administration claiming it was the fact of I would not keep Iran from developing a nuclear arsenal he says around can negotiate an arrangement that allows a country to prosper but that sanctions will remain in place until Iran changes its behavior ice Roscoe NPR news Washington Carlos Ghosn the former Nissan chairman who fled house arrest last month from Japan tells reporters that he's trying to clear his name I want the opportunity for the truth to come out and to have my name being the key to my reputation restored I did not skate justice injustice the situation persecution former the former Nissan chairman says the decision to escape to pass where he was due to stand trial for alleged financial misconduct at the eight automaker was the most difficult time of his life you are listening to NPR news from Culver city California and this is W. NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd legalizing marijuana trimming Medicaid and improving of mass transit topics will Ole and dominate the political agenda that governor Cuomo lays out in his state of the state address today W. N. Y. C.'s Fred mogul reports looming over twenty twenty are two things a six billion dollar budget deficit in the upcoming elections both are expected to make this six month legislative session a modest one the one exception could be legalizing marijuana for adults which came close to passing last year and has Cuomo's tentative support otherwise Democrats want to deepen their recent majority in the Senate by winning over more middle of the road voters in traditionally Republican areas so many say it's important this year to curb spending and close the budget deficit without raising taxes we'll hear more from Fred mogul live from the capitol in Albany and the five o'clock hour of All Things Considered the trump administration has lost its latest bid to implement a rule that would make it more difficult for low income immigrants to get green cards a court of appeals has denied the government's request to let the public charge who'll take affect until full arguments on a national in junction take place this spring legal aid society attorney Susan well over says the department of homeland security anticipated the rule could harm legal immigrants DHS itself conceded and issuing the rules that it would have devastating effects on public health that would cause people to disconnect from benefits that they need and that they're eligible for immigrant advocates and New York Connecticut and Vermont all sued to block the public charge rule the trump administration claims it needs to prove it needs the role to prevent low income immigrants from becoming permanent residents and in New Jersey the chamber of commerce says it will ban hard alcohol for its annual walk to Washington lobbying event after report found that women were raped and sexually assault it on the trip the star ledger and NJ advance media spoke to twenty women who said a toxic culture of harassment was the norm for the walk to Washington the chamber says it will also increase security and create a direct phone number to report arrest meant but state Senate president Steve Sweeney says the reforms are not enough and that he will not participate in this year's walk a reminder that New Jersey governor Phil Murphy will be taking.

Iraq NPR Jane Arraf
 Jamal Khashoggi: Saudis sentence five to death for journalist's murder

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Jamal Khashoggi: Saudis sentence five to death for journalist's murder

"Saudi Arabia has sentenced five people to death in the murder of columnist Jamal Khashoggi as its consulate in Istanbul last year but as NPR's Jana RAF reports the sentencing leaves a lot of questions the Saudi attorney general's investigation found there was no proof the Saudi crown prince's former top adviser was involved in the killing the US though believe south del half Downey was involved in his place sanctions on him so the court also ruled that it's consul general in the scandal was innocent and freedom from prison the consul Muhammad al Otaibi is also on the list of US sanctions in connection with the murder casualty was a Saudi citizen and US resident when he was killed and believe dismembered at the consulate his columns in The Washington Post and other publications were critical of Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin some on the U. S. Senate has passed a bill that would require the director of national intelligence to reveal what he knows about the killing Jane Arraf NPR news

Saudi Arabia Murder Jamal Khashoggi Istanbul NPR Jana Raf United States Downey Muhammad Al Otaibi The Washington Post U. S. Senate Director Attorney Consul General Prince Mohammed Jane Arraf
Egypt's former President Mohammed Morsi dies in court

90.3 KAZU Programming

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Egypt's former President Mohammed Morsi dies in court

"Deposed gypsum president mohamed more see has died after collapsing in a cairo courtroom the government says he fainted after addressing the court during a retrial on spying charges morsi was the country's first democratically elected president in two thousand twelve but he was asked to by street protests and the military been jailed during a sweeping crackdown on his muslim brotherhood along with thousands of others n._p._r.'s jane wrath joins us now from cairo hygiene hi there too so the circumstances under which muhammad morsi first came to power so absolutely story ke one winter widely considered free and fair elections right after the arab spring you remember those peaceful protests than in egypt brought down thirty years of dictatorship house name bark he was as you mentioned the muslim brotherhood's candidate that's a group that's now banned so the thing is he didn't govern very long and he didn't govern very well in twenty thirteen just a year after he was elected there were huge protests and the army led by general named abdel fattah el-sisi who is now president stepped in and forced him out he was jailed along with thousands of muslim brotherhood supporters and he's basically been on trial for centrally much of the last six years he was actually convicted and in court today he was undergoing one of the retrials and what can you tell us about what exactly happened in court today pretty dramatic the public prosecutor says that he was given permission to address the court he said he wanted to speak so he stood in a wooden cage with the other defendants the way they do and he spoke for about five minutes we don't know exactly what he said but one report says that he said that he had secrets and then he fainted and the public prosecutor says he was taken to hospital but was dead on arrival he had been suffering from health problems which is family and human rights watch says had been untreated over the years while he'd been in hospital while he'd been in prison and how are people reacting to the sudden unexpected death so there's been a wide range to some people including turkish president for instance ridge type one he has become a mortar muslim brotherhood officials and other countries are accusing the government of basically killing him by denying medical treatment and otherwise mistreating him in prison and we spoke to fanny who's a historian at the university of cambridge in the u._k. here's how family describes his legacy he would be seen by the millions of followers of the muslim brotherhood as a nearly tragic figure who beat of any heavy kyw's full playing according to the democracy but he would be seen by millions of egyptians as a head of kansas tyne organization that didn't see as the best interests of egypt in mind so really very polarizing figure infamy who is says the government here basically holds people so long thinks prisons as places of exile he says they don't sentence people to death basically they send people to die they do in fact also send people to death but the mood here is subdued there surely are people who are mourning him many who are happy that he's dead but even if they wanted to live supporters of his they're afraid to protest the government isn't expected to allow public funeral n._p._r.'s jane arraf speaking with us from cairo

President Trump Cairo Five Minutes Thirty Years Six Years
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio. Because. Cinder mountain radio denied took song requests, read the new hosted a food program to people. She worked with her scattered now Iraq, Germany, and the US and cinder. They're still mass graves being uncovered more than two thousand is these taken captive or still missing. And there are dozens of women and children believed to be still in hiding in a hole camp. Tonight, doesn't want to talk a lot about what happened after she was captured. She was held and guest houses for ISIS fighters in Mosul. And then in Syria, you've by debate sometimes with other girls sometimes alone by myself in a room. There weren't many ISIS coming to the room just the men who angry vide- nab legislated, that good. Then Maneka visiting Fave, Danny Naveh deca. See him, Jim spoken to her family for four years, when she called, tell them she was free at B Q, Anna. My father was crying. It was very sad to see him cry like other ZD's from singer. They're living in a camp for displaced people in. Iraq deny still has her hair covered compulsory ADR ISIS. But something young is these don't do I ask if she thinks he'll keep it that way. Maybe not. But now, I'm so tired, too tired to make decisions about what she'll do with their future. She'll have to wait days, maybe even weeks for the border to open between Syria and Iraq. And then she wants to rest and spend time with their family. Then she'll think about the future. She thought she might never have Jane Arraf, NPR news in northeastern Syria..

Iraq Syria Cinder mountain ISIS Danny Naveh Jane Arraf ZD Mosul NPR US Jim Germany four years
 France seeks to save IS jihadis from death penalties in Iraq

All Things Considered

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

France seeks to save IS jihadis from death penalties in Iraq

"Araca, sentenced, a fourth French citizens death for ISIS membership, as NPR's Jane Arraf reports the trials are controversial. The men are among a dozen accused French ISIS fighters extradited from Syria to face trial in Iraq on Sunday court in Baghdad sentence. Three of them to hang and four on Monday. France opposes the death penalty. But it didn't oppose their extradition like most countries. It says it won't bring back accused fighters to try them at home. It's worried that it wouldn't have the evidence to convict them in France. But Iraqi trials aren't considered up to western standards and those convicted of belonging to a terrorist organization, often receive death sentences sentences will be automatically

France Isis Araca Jane Arraf Baghdad Syria Iraq NPR
 Iraqi court sentences 3 French members of IS to death

TED Radio Hour

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Iraqi court sentences 3 French members of IS to death

"The Iraqi government today. Sentenced three French citizens to death for being members of ISIS. NPR's Jane Arraf has more from northern Iraq. The three are among at least twelve French citizens handed over to Iraq by Kurdish Syrian forces after being captured in Syria where the last piece of ISIS territory was liberated in March. It took four hours to sentence, the three men who were convicted of committing crimes in Iraq as well as Syria in the trial, witnessed by NPR, one of the men admitted to fighting with ISIS and the Syrian Kurdish city of Kabbani to other said they were ISIS members ereck sweeping anti-terrorism law imposes the death penalty on a wide range of offenses, France has no death penalty. But, like most countries, it has refused to bring back its since for

Isis Iraq Syria NPR Iraqi Government Kabbani Jane Arraf France Four Hours
Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

13:10 min | 2 years ago

Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

"Syria. Islamic state is a state no longer earlier this week, the Jihadist group which at its peak controlled an area of Syria and Dirac lodge of Austria and imposed its brutal rule upon eight million. People was chased out of its last pocket of territory by goose a town on the frightens river near Syria's border with Iraq in losing its territory is Lennox state lost many of its fighters, but it didn't lose all of them. Thousands of the caliphates foot soldiers are presenting themselves and their families at refugee camps and presenting the countries from which many of them hailed with a considerable political legal and ethical pickle. Which is basically this. What is to be done with them? There have been some calls for an international tribunal. But it is surely impossible to put so many people on trial. They cannot simply be abandoned, and it would be a brave politician willing to bet their career or a society willing to bet it safety on these. Jihadists returning home as altogether reformed characters. This is the foreign desk. Hot is pre programmed to think of every defeats as a test in. There will never see anything in as permanent defeat because it has already pre-programmed into their minds mindset and into their psyche. If you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death sentence. The tendency that we have in western Europe amendment to say, it's not out problem. They left us. They took up arms against us. We want nothing to do with them is all very well by the peasant doesn't cease to exist. So I think it behoves the society which broken up to consider why has this Cussing taken on against us? And what should we be doing about that not with the individual concern? Sent only but also with society as a whole. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller today will be hearing from a former director of global counterterrorism at M I six and from the full member of al-qaeda to look at what can be done, and what should be done with defeated jihadis. But I for a view from the ground from Syria on joined by Jane, Arraf international correspondent with NPR. Jane, stop by asking you to set the scene forest where he speaking to us from exactly what have you been able to see over the past few days. Well, I am in a which is one of the cities in the sort of a ton of Mus Kurdish region of Syria. And this is also where some leadership the Kurdish leadership is these officials who are trying to persuade other countries that they should have an international tribunal here in this northeastern part of Syria and been able to go to a couple of the camps where they're holding foreign his wills Iraqi. And Syrian ISIS families, and I've also been able to speak to one of the foreign fighters. Those foreign fighters have been apprehended by Kurds and the US coalition the US led coalition in many cases, they've been in US detention in Syria detention centers, actually, run by the US, and now handed over back to Kurdish forces, do you have a sense of what kind of numbers we're talking about in terms of the ISIS fighters currently being held by the codes. And that's all of the Iraqi Syrian and foreign there are said to be about seven thousand of them. So that is mostly Syrian and Iraqi about a thousand of them eight hundred two thousand or said to be foreign fighters accused foreign fighters, we have to make clear that they haven't actually been tried or convicted yet, but they are suspected to be foreign fighters. So that's all the way up from eight hundred to about a thousand is the estimate you generally get from US military officials as wills occurred. In what sense you able to get a what kind of conditions that being held in? Well, compared to what they came from which was almost certain death as US air strikes in waters attacked the last bit of their territory. It's, you know, not bad the conditions of interviewing these fighters preclude either asking for getting detailed answers about how they're being held in where they're being held. But one of the ones that I interviewed he was a Canadian fighter had been held in solitary confinement for quite a while. He also said that he was having trouble getting medical care. Clearly was well enough to do an interview. But certainly medical care seems to be an issue, but having said that, you know, having covered this battle against ISIS the war against ISIS over the entire ISIS territory. It's much better than the fate that befell a lot of them which was basically being obliterated by air. Yikes. Mortars and in other cities, if we boil this entire story for the moment down to this one Canadian fighter. What sense were you able to get all of his views on gun to assume it was a he his views on now on the subject of the ideology. He joined up to fight fo did you get the sensitize east had much in the way of a rethink? Yeah. Pretty much all of them have. And this was really interesting because I found this as well. In the case of the women who were married to ISIS fighters. They have now been for several months at least in detention with either Kurds or Americans, this particular foreign fighter told me that you know, he'd had a lot of time to think, but not only that he'd had a lot of interactions with the Americans who interrogated him and with the people who are holding him and with the Kurds. He said, for instance, but one point the Americans had given him novels to read one of the women. I spoke with told me that she had. Been aware. And I'm not sure if this is true, but she said she hadn't been aware of that ISIS held slaves. You know, they took thousands of UCD's from the tiny ziti religious minority as slaves massacred, the men and took the women and girls as sex slaves. She said she'd never met one until one of them was brought to the detention center to talk to them. And she said, and that's when I realized it was true. It wasn't just rumors. What they did to these women. So yes, in many cases, certainly in the case of this Canadian fighter. I it seems to have had an impact another foreign woman who is married to ISIS fighters told me that she was happy that she wasn't sent straight back to her country. She was from the Netherlands, and she said had she been sent back. She would still have been radicalized. But as it was her views of changed a lot. She said in being held for months and months by the Kurds because the biggest question, I guess the overarching question that we're looking at in this episode is with the ideology. Of ISIS will survive the destruction of the caliphate that the whole selling point of Islam state, and there was a clue in the name was that it had conquered territory. It was building a nation. It was building a homeland. If it is seen to have filed in that central enterprise. Do you think it's still going to be able to recruit people who might be inclined towards jihad? Or is it you'll sense from talking to the people you just mentioned that they kind of starting to realize that they might have back to lose a well there are a couple of things here. One is that in terms of ISIS being able to recreate a territory the caliphate had held which ranged for seventy thousand square kilometres, roughly and encompassed major cities. No one really believes they'll be able to do that. Again. In part of the reason, it's very apparent in Iraq. For instance, the people of Mosul, which is the second biggest city in Iraq. At first, many of them will tell you. They welcomed. Isis five years ago when ISIS came in because they so hated the Iraqi government and security forces, and then they realized what ISIS actually was which was indescribably brutal. The also they will not make that mistake. Again. They know what ISIS is now they know the dangers. But having said that there is a real fear that there is another ISIS in the making because we're talking about roughly in the case of Iraq thirty thousand members of ISIS families. Now a lot of those are children. So let's leave aside the children because children are children. But if you take the adults in those families, the women, for instance, a lot of them do still believe in the ideology, there is nothing that has changed their minds since then as for the foreigners. You know, a story I hear over and over and talking particularly to these foreign women is I didn't know what I was getting into. I don't understand Syria. I married. The sky might boyfriend told me to come. So those ones seemed to have had an awakening. And those are certainly the ones that want you to know they've had an awakening the, you know, I think we also have to realize that there are lots of those people in detention in these camps who are not talking to us because they believe were infidels because they still believe in the ideology and in the coun- recently in L hall camp, which now has more than seventy thousand people in it in northeastern Syria, some of the people running the camp told me that there are new arrivals all the time. And it's those new arrivals who are the most still radicalized that they've been saying in some cases that the head of ISIS abo- becquerel daddy ordered them to come to the camp that they will stay in the camp. But then Baghdadi and ISIS will take them out of the camp. So there is no one who does not believe that ISIS is still a threat those ones who will. Speak to you. Then what do they want to happen now, especially the ones who have come from outside, Iraq and Syria have the old discovered. A sudden enthusiasm for democratic G prosise. Yes. Well. It depends where they come from. So there was a group of women. I met Dutch women they want to go back. And some of them said we understand we broke the law. We want to stand trial. But it's our children were worried about they wanted their children to be handed over to their relatives. In many cases. These are very small children toddlers, really young the others. It depends again depends entirely where they come from a I met quite a few women from eastern Europe. And there was a Chinese woman. They are all terrified of being sent back to their countries because they believe they would be executed not only that they're even afraid to contact their relatives because even by contacting their relatives their relatives would end up in jail. They say so the ones who come from western countries tend to want to be sent back there. But as you know, the problem is these countries don't want to take them. They don't want to take them mostly for two reasons. One is it's really not clear how much evidence would carry over. If they were to stand trial in their own countries. And then the other thing is they could actually pose a danger if they can't be put on trial. They can't be prosecuted for things they may have done here. Then they will have to let them go, and they will be free in their own countries. So it's a dilemma you mentioned that there is some enthusiasm among the Syrian Kurdish leadership for the idea of an international tribunal have they talked at all about what they see as the scope of that they can't realistically intend to put tens of thousands of people on trial on the they can't know and by its very nature and international tribunal would have to be set up by the international community. And there isn't a whole lot of appetite for that for one thing the Kurdish leadership here is not internationally recognised. That's a big deal. And then these things will take years and years. There has been a move to send some of these fighters in any case from countries that don't want the. Back to Iraq and Iraq can prosecute them. If they've also been in Iraq because a lot of these fighters did come from Iraq from Mosul the foreign fighters, even when they were driven out of Mosul, they came to Syria, so they could be prosecuted in Iraq. Now, the problem there is those are not transparent trials, they're not run, according to international standards, and in a lot of cases, they do end up with the death penalty. That's one thing that the Kurds keep saying if you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death

Iraq Syria Isis United States Mosul Iraqi Syrian Europe Syria. Dirac Austria NPR Iraqi Government Al-Qaeda Jane UCD Andrew Miller Netherlands Eastern Europe L Hall
"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Exactly. What did President Trump? Meanwhile, the remark about US troops in Iraq. The president gave a long interview to CBS over the weekend. He may be pushing to withdraw US troops from Syria. He said he is not though pushing troops to get out of Iraq, at least in part because of the country next door, Iran. He said he does not plan to invade Iran from Iraq. But he wants u s forces to watch Iran NPR's, Jane Arraf joins us from Baghdad either. Jane? Hi, Steve, what with the logic be of US troops in Iraq being there to watch Iran. Well, that's a great question. So I suppose he's referring to the fact that Iran is Iraq's neighbor. Although the base that he's talking about the big expensive base as he puts it which happens to be an Iraqi base, by the way with American forces inside it is closer to Syria. But I suppose it's proximity. Although it doesn't really help watch around because the watching mostly that the US and others do is. Of course, is signal intelligence, it satellite images that does not require a base of that kind. So that part has baffled people a little bit. You're saying that it's hard to see how US troops on the ground would be used to watch Iran. You would do that with other assets. But this is what the president said in this interview. What Rockies think now that that? Thought has been expressed out loud. Okay. So President Trump's comment about that. Probably couldn't have come at a worse time because there's already tension here about US forces, and what in fact, they're doing here. Now what they're doing. According to the agreement between the US and Iraq is there helping Iraqi forces fight terrorism. So the president of Iraq was speaking at a forum this morning in Baghdad and he said that's not what US forces would be used for. They're here to backup Iraqi forces, and he said they're going to explore how many forces there are here what they're actually doing whether they're fulfilling their mandate. And then there were other speakers as well. As I spoke after the form to the head of one of the major militias here who said that they were going to have vote in parliament. And when we're talking malicious there also into politics so vote in parliament possible move to get rid of US troops. And then the militia leader said, and if the US doesn't do that then we have ways to make them leave. No, we don't think it will come to that. But it's a measure of the. Anger here over this. Well, let's remember some history. Jan raff US troops left Iraq once before in two thousand eleven the Obama administration didn't seem to mind that much at the time. There was some Iraqi resistance to keeping them also. But things didn't work out very well, the Islamic state took over a large part of the country in the years after that are Iraqis serious about the possibility of leading US troops go away. Again, they were absolutely serious. Having said that a lot of the Iraqi politicians the Iraqi government feels the need for them to stay the Iraqi military for the most part wants them to stay their training soldiers. They're advising soldiers and the Iraqi army still has not really come back to what it was. So there is a significant part of Iraq that recognizes they say that there is a need for them. But the popular sentiment really is there to get American forces out. And it's a sentiment that's growing in in part fueled? By comments like those of President Trump NPR's Jane Arraf in Baghdad thanks so much. Thank you. It was on that it was off. And now that the government shutdown is over at least for the time being President Trump state of the union address is back on again, the government shutdown because of the debate over a border wall with Mexico, which President Trump is still pushing for so what do Americans make of all this NPR's? Don gonyea has been talking to voters in the Denver suburbs. This state was once considered a classic political battleground, but it's been going more and more democratic in statewide elections are first stop Aurora a sprawling suburb just east of Denver year. Bob, Nelson stopped to talk outside a local supermarket. He described himself.

US Iraq President Trump president Iran President Trump state Jane Arraf Baghdad Iraqi army Iraqi government Steve Inskeep Syria Rachel Martin CBS Don gonyea government Rockies Denver Jan raff Obama
Saudi coalition launches airstrike against Yemen separatists

TED Radio Hour

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Saudi coalition launches airstrike against Yemen separatists

"Saudi led coalition has launched airstrikes in Yemen. For the first time since a ceasefire plan was agreed to last month for the key port city of ho Dana as NPR's Jane Arraf reports the strikes targeted the capital Sinaga about one hundred forty miles away the coalition says it was targeting a military base in drones at Santa's international airport. The rebel-held. Government says the strikes hit a food factory near the airport and the plastics factory. Let's despite talks in December in which the two sides agreed to a plan for a ceasefire. And the withdrawal of forces from the Red Sea port of who data who's he rebels earlier this month dropped bombs carried by drones on a military parade near the government held city of Aden, killing at least seven people, including military intelligence chief Yemen, civil war started five years ago when rebels captured the capital the fighting has killed tens of thousands of civilians. The UN says more than twenty million more. People are at risk of

Yemen Santa Sinaga Jane Arraf UN Saudi Red Sea Dana NPR Aden Five Years
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Week. I use my auto by sick days that I have that in his only January. Meanwhile, the shutdown could also impact the US jobs picture the closure will likely complicate the government's January employment surveys and employment rate currently stands at three point nine percent. But that could go higher this month. House minority leader Kevin McCarthy says action will be taken against Republican congressman Steve king for comments. He made about white supremacy to the New York Times and pure, Shannon. Van Zandt reports. The New York Times reported king said he does not understand why the phrases white nationalist and white supremacist our offensive and that he supports imigrants entering the US legally, if they assimilate to an American culture based on European white values house minority leader Kevin McCarthy, condemned king's comments on face, the nation that language has no place in America. That is not the America. I know. And it's most definitely not the party of Lincoln. He said I'll have serious conversations with king on his future in the Republican party. King has released a statement saying he in fact, rejects the labels and ideology of white nationalism and supremacy Shannon sent NPR news Washington. Iran's foreign minister as arrived in Iraq, just four days after US secretary of state, Mike. Pomp, Heo visited Baghdad on a tour aimed at isolating Iran. NPR's Jane Arraf has more from Baghdad. The Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif arrived in Baghdad with a large trade delegation on a multiday, visit Pompeo visited Iraq earlier this week for talks that included trying to persuade the Iraqi government to go along with US sanctions against Iran Iraq's foreign minister said he and Zarif discussed the unilateral sanctions. The Iraqi Foreign Minister has had Iraq does not have to adhere to them Pompeo though, during his visit pressed Iraqi leaders to stop importing around the and electricity and fuel wreck is trying to balance relations between the US and Iran its neighbor in one of its biggest trading partners. The Iranian Foreign Minister plans to take the trade delegation to the Kurdistan region and to the south of Iraq during his visit Jane Arraf NPR news, Baghdad it's getting cheaper to fill up your car. The average price of the gallon of regular gas is down twelve. Percents over the past three weeks to two dollars thirty one cents a gallon Lundberg survey says that's down sixty six cents over the past three and a half months. This is NPR. From kqed news, I'm Brian Levy, a federal judge in Oakland has temporarily blocked a Trump administration policy that would let more employers opt out of birth control coverage for their workers. He cooties Caroline champion reports. The policy was set to go into effect on Monday, and what have expanded existing exemptions to provide contraceptives under the Affordable Care Act to private companies said object on religious and moral grounds. California and thirteen other states spoke in front of judge Haywood Gilliam on Friday, arguing that the policy is discriminatory in his ruling Gilliam agreed with the state's saying it could have dire public health and fiscal consequences. The parties are expected to meet later this month to work towards a final resolution. I'm Caroline chaplain. K acuity news..

Steve king US Iraq Baghdad NPR Iran Iraqi Foreign Minister Kevin McCarthy Pompeo Jane Arraf Shannon Mohammad Javad Zarif Republican party Caroline chaplain Haywood Gilliam Van Zandt Iraqi government America
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Time is thirty four minutes now past eight it's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm David Greene. It's been about two years since he took office and last night, President Trump gave his first primetime address from the Oval Office. He wanted to explain why he wants a wall on the border with Mexico. This. This barrier is absolutely critical to border security. It's also what our professionals at the border want ended. This is just common sense. President said there is a humanitarian and security crisis. He spoke about drugs coming over the border. Also Americans killed by people in the country illegally. And we are fact checking the address on the program this morning, we're going to turn right now to the other side of the border to see how the president's message was received NPR's Carrie Kahn is in Reno, sir. Mexico and Kerry what does that right at right across the Rio Grande from Texas. Right. Yes. Right across the border. So where did you watch this presidential address? And and who you're watching with I was at a migrant shelter, and it's right on the banks of the Rio Grande, you could actually see the lights of macallan, Texas right from the shelter. There's people from all over Central America there, and there were many deported Mexicans to their the director asked the women and the men and women if they wanted to watch president. Trump speech in about twenty dragged folding chairs into a small office and line them up in front of a big screen TV. They don't have cable at the shelter. But they were able to get a broadcast signal from across the river and watch the speech with Spanish Spanish interpretation dubbed over on the US network Univision into interesting to watch it from from that side of the border. So how are people reacting? They were pretty stone faced during President Trump's speech. Many check their heads disapprovingly when the president said more of his disparaging comments about immigrants, especially when he talked about illegal aliens bringing drugs and committing murder and violent crimes in the US. But when the Democrats spoke there were more, audible responses, and then at the end, they when they finished they everyone broke into applause one woman, a fifty one year old woman from Honduras, maryelle fired. Oh, she was really struck by the president's comments about violence women experienced during the trek north, especially in Mexico. She said she was a crime victim in southern Mexico. And if the president understands what she's gone through to get to the us. Why doesn't he have compassion for her and lower into the country? She said she's fleeing violence back home and death threats and will come into the US legally. Nobody's but. Get in trouble. But she said she has proof of our asylum claim and she'll go through the port of entry here at mcallen, Texas. You mentioned that Nancy Pelosi Chuck's humor giving the democratic response. And also accusing the president of keeping the government in the United States shut down over this which has been so much part of the theme in the conversation here in the US has that come up in Mexico, or or is this whole issue seen in a different way. I think some people understand the politics going on across the border. But you know, they're just looking at it through their personal experience right here right now after this long track they've made to the border. They many just expressed dismay. They kept saying why the president so against Hispanics as they put it. They don't understand all his rhetoric. They say they're just coming to work and not cause harm. I spoke with several Mexicans who've been deported for various reasons and want to get back to jobs and families. They've had the us. You know, there's one man was deported after twenty years living in Tennessee. He says he himself was a crime victim and just wants to go. Get back to good construction job. He had there any other moments stand out to you in the president's address. I give repeated claims of crime and drug smuggling by immigrants stands out, especially since historically the number of legal immigrants coming across the southwest border is at an all time low if you compare it to like a decade ago. Yes. The number of families with kids from Central America is on the rise. But historically, the numbers just don't show this huge crisis here. And like you said our own fact checkers at NPR dot org. Breaking down those numbers. Now claims also the ones about crime NPR's Carrie Kahn in Mexico. Thanks, carrie. You're welcome. Secretary of state, Mike Pompeo visited Baghdad today. He is touring the Middle East to reassure allies amid shifting US declarations of its plans for Syria. NPR's Jane Arraf joins us from Baghdad either. Jane? Hi, Steve, I guess we should note that President Trump over the holidays just visited US troops in Iraq. Who did Pompeo say so Pompeo so pretty much everyone because when President Trump came here any bypassed Baghdad and the Iraqi prime minister that kind of ruffled feathers because that's not the way it's normally done. So here he saw the prime minister he saw the Iraqi President who has a ceremonial role. He saw the foreign minister he saw the speaker of parliament, and he also met Kurdish leaders because of course, Iraqi Kurdistan plays a big role in a lot of issues of US interest here so pretty much everyone in the short visit. And let's just remember there's a war against ISIS. Isis was active in both Iraq and Syria was largely driven out of Iraq is still president parts of Syria. And President Trump has been talking about getting US troops out of cereal though. They've recently added some conditions. They wanna meet I do. Iraqi officials seem to understand and support the US approach to ISIS. Well, there's a question. I guess they don't really understand what the US position is completely towards ISIS. Everyone agrees that they want ice defeated. But I think officials here have been puzzled by statements that US troops would pull out of Syria. Isis, of course, is an Iraqi preoccupation at one point it held one third of Iraqi territory, it has as you mentioned been pushed out of the cities, but Iraqis with US air supporter are busy fighting ISIS along the borders as we speak along that border with Syria that runs for hundreds of miles. So part of what they were talking about today was how they can continue that fight against ISIS. No matter. What happens? Should we assume that? Iran came up. Yeah. We should assume that Iran came up. No, iran. Whether you know it spoken in a vote or not it's always in the backdrop of everything Iran is Iraq's ally and Iraq's neighbor. So Iran, of course, is also one of Pompeo's preoccupations, perhaps the preoccupation countering a run an influence in the region. But here's the thing Iranian forces helped push back four years ago and Iran has been one of the biggest trading partners. So one of the things that Pompeo discussed was held Weiner rack away from Ronnie and 'electricity because rack has been sending millions of dollars many millions of dollars to Iran for that electricity Pompeo mention he was plaid that Iraq was finding alternate sources and Iraqis are open to that. So these are really divided about Iran, you know, but everybody wants good relations with all their neighbors. That's that's kind of a given. But at the same time, they also don't want to get drawn into another regional conflict of Iran against other regional allies. So one of the big issues here is whether US forces will stay, and of course, Iran and running back groups would also leave, but they did emphasize during this visit that there's an appreciation for those troops here truly awkward, Iran friend of Iraq, which is a friend of the United States, which is an enemy of Iran. Jane? Thanks so much. Really? Appreciate it. Thank you. That's NPR's. Jane Arraf in Baghdad which secretary of state, Mike Pompeo visited today. This.

President United States President Trump Mexico Iran NPR Mike Pompeo Iraq Syria Isis Texas Jane Arraf Rio Grande Baghdad Steve Inskeep Carrie Kahn prime minister Oval Office
"jane arraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some twenty one thousand federal workers in New York and New Jersey, including those in the US coastguard. There are not many legal limits. If President Trump tries to invoke a national emergency. But there are political and procedural hurdles emergency powers are not supposed to be used just to implement policy. Preferences, certainly not to get around the will of congress and the documentary surviving R Kelly scoring record ratings. Now, it may also be sparking new criminal investigations. It's Wednesday January ninth and this is morning edition on WNYC. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. It's day nineteen of the partial federal government shutdown over funding for southern border wall. President Trump made a speech about it last night from the White House and congressional democratic leaders gave a broadcast rebuttal after he finished. The president will continue pushing for the wall later today. NPR's Roscoe reports he'll make a visit to Capitol Hill. Trump is meaning what Senate Republicans because he's trying to keep members of his party from jumping ship on the issue of shutdown later top lawmakers from both parties are going to meet at the White House for talks, but it's still not clear what kind of compromise might be feasible NPR's Asia Roscoe the White House. Visit by congressional leaders is set for later this afternoon as the government shutdown drags on hundreds of thousands of federal workers are going without pay. So our government contract workers. They'll all miss their first paychecks on Friday, many federal work. Workers are required to stay on the job without being paid such as the coast guard and TSA workers airports. House speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer have urged President Trump to accept their funding bills. Reopened the government and separately negotiate the border wall. Joshua tree national park in southern California will close its gates tomorrow due to the government shutdown from member station. K VCR Benjamin per has more Joshua tree will shut down at eight AM Thursday to allow park staff to address damage cost to the park over the past few weeks in a press release, the National Park Service says that people have been creating new roads and destroying the park's namesake Joshua trees during the shutdown. Understaffing has also led the reports of overflowing toilets and trash bins. Park. Officials say Joshua tree will remain closed until appropriations are put into place to reopen. But that they hoped to restore access as quickly as possible to avoid any negative impact to the local economy law enforcement Rangers will patrol the park, which is larger than the state of Rhode Island. To enforce the closure for NPR news. I'm Benjamin per secretary of state, Mike Pompeo is in Baghdad. It's part of a Middle East tour that's aimed partly at reassuring US allies in the region NPR's Jane Arraf has more from Baghdad Pompeo arrived in Baghdad from Jordan. According to Iraqi state, TV Iraqi officials said he met the foreign minister and prime minister Matti as well as Kurdish leaders, this is the first high level meeting since President Trump flew in to see US troops at an Iraqi airbase here at Christmas that visit was controversial here because Trump didn't visit RAFI leaders while he was in the country Abdelhadi in response to an NPR questions said on the eve of Pompeii was visit the talks would be aimed at deepening Iraq's relationship with the United States. They continued fight against ISIS following a planned. Withdrawal of US troops from neighboring Syria was also on the agenda. Jane, Arraf, NPR news bag. You're listening to NPR..

President Trump NPR Baghdad Pompeo US Joshua tree White House Joshua tree national park president Baghdad Senate government National Park Service New Jersey New York Jane Arraf congress R Kelly
"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:24 min | 2 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KCRW

"About it. He says he still holds the US responsible for Iraq's descent into violence. But he says that was a different era. Out in the crowded square in Iraqi musician comes up to rent forth, then plays a song. It's inspired by the team in civilization which sprang up three thousand years ago. What is now Iraq? Musicians. Welcome to the US general is inspired by Iraqi hospitality, sixteen years later. You must forces aren't occupiers anymore. They're invited. If still controversial guests, Jane Arraf, NPR news back down in Yemen. Tens of thousands of children have starved to death in a Saudi led war that will soon enter its fourth year. Another fourteen million half, the country's population are at risk of starvation, thousands of civilians have been killed, but in the backdrop of this bloodshed and destruction is another tragedy the looting of the country's history. It's precious antiquities plundered by criminals and violent extremist joining us now to talk about this is Deborah layer, the founder and chair of the antiquities coalition. She co wrote an op Ed in the Washington Post with Yemen's ambassador to the United States. Deborah. Thanks so much for joining us. Great. My pleasure. Thank you for having me. Can you give us a sense of the scale of what's being lost in Yemen right now? What's already been lost? It's very hard to quantify because we don't even have legitimate numbers on the legal trade, but we can say is that Yemen was a very rich historic country. It was one of the centers of the spice incense trade. And in fact, developed one of the Manhattan of the desert as a major trading centre with the first skyscrapers from the sixteenth century. And one of the first major dams in the eighth century BC, all of these have been targeted for destruction. And then we're losing significant amounts of what really was very rich history to these thieves and then with the illicit digging going on who knows what treasures have been lost so sad because you can't get this stuff back. You can't bring history back. Right. And you've lost the context that we may have lost information that could lead for example, could lead to the proof of the Queen of Sheba and her existence. So who's selling these antiquities, and how much are they benefiting from it where what are they getting out of this with the illicit trade? What we have tracked is their exit points in Yemen. It's through Djibouti is one of the main points in Egypt, for example, a winter, Israel, Iraq and Syria was going through Turkey. They meet with sophisticated middleman, and there are being bought by collectors and others in major western markets. Some of it is even showing up in the United States, and these monies are going back and being used by Hutus and other terrorist organizations in the region, so Al Qaeda, Al Qaeda. Yes, we have have evidence of al-qaeda raids on some of the museums in Yemen. And we have evidence of in Europe, even in Brussels dealers who have done selling Al Qaeda's sponsored antiquities is there any evidence of ISIS benefiting from. There's definite evidence of. Isis benefiting in fact in a special forces raid of one of the complex of essentially the person who was the chief financial officer of ISIS. We found receipts of about five million dollars worth of antiquities over the course of a year that they had sold, and they had a very sophisticated pattern and actually a ministry of antiquities just to deal in this illicit trade. So what are you in the ambassador proposing, and what you proposed in the op-ed to try to stop the path to stop the the market for their international rules that govern how we can actually stop the US from being a target market. But it requires that countries are signatories to a UNESCO. Convention in nineteen seventy s invention for antiquities. Unfortunately, Yemen is not so we have to be creative in the measures that we take and we also need immediate action because of this crisis going on. So what we have proposed is that treasury extend the emergency powers that they have. Have under the emergency act and other legal means that they have to stop say in a case of emergencies already with Yemen. They can stop the import of oil that they expand that to include antiquities because these items are being used as sponsor terrorism. See, you know, some people might say, well, you know, people are starving to death in Yemen, people are dying, and there's no end in sight really to this war. So why should we care about these material things this history when right now, there's really a humanitarian crisis. He said there's no question that there's a humanitarian crisis, and it's very tragic loss of life and displacement that has taken place, but these items these symbols really represent their rich history, their religion and quite honestly their economic future. Where Yemen is a source of tourism. And all of these are being taken away the robbing of the past is really robbing them of their future. Deborah layer is the founder and chair of the antiquities. Coalition. Thank you so much for talking with us. Great. Thank you for having me. listening to weekend edition from NPR news. It's the beginning of a new year, and for many people that means it's time to set their intentions. So we have Jessica door a psychotherapist and a tarot card reader here to help us with that she joins us via Skype. Thanks for talking with us. Thank you so much for having me. So Jessica tell us about what you do. Exactly, I'm psychotherapist, and my interest has been using cards in more of a therapeutic way as opposed to forgive nation or fortune telling which is kind of marked traditionally how they've been used. So why tarot cards? Well, metaphor is something that is used a lot in psychotherapy and tarot cards are kind of rich with symbolism. And and, you know, lots of metaphors that can help people understand the relationship between thoughts feelings and behavior, which is really what we're trying to do in therapy as well, helping people make those connections. So you chose the card that you felt would be the best to describe two thousand nineteen and I have that card in front of me to can you tell us what we're looking at. So I chose the six of swords, which is in the image of the Cardi see a person in a boat, and they're moving across a body of water. Right. And in the boat. They have six swords that are sort of surrounding nominee tarot disorders represent kind of psychological wife, so mental events so like thoughts and feelings. And so those swords are sort of representing, you know, some of those more challenging mental events like, anxiety and fear and guilt. Am this person is moving across his body of wire they're moving toward change moving toward a new life in a way, and they're bringing those those feelings of fear anxiety or guilt or grief along with them. And so this is that in order to have change we have to be willing to feel some things that we might not rather. We might rather not feel you know, there's been a lot of uncertainty and fear and anxiety in the year that we just came out of. And we were starting two thousand nineteen at least as a nation with a lot of uncertainty as well if you look in DC, and I'm sure that's happening also on the individual level. What do you tell people when they're looking at this sort of c- of uncertainty ahead? Yeah. Well, I mean, definitely starting with clarifying. Values is is a huge one. A lot of times. People are not super clear on what's important to them. And they don't take the time to sit down and clarify those things in that. It does become more challenging I also think that social support is super important. And I mean on one hand we have a sense of being connected constantly through social media. And that can sometimes be sort of illusory. But on the other hand social media allows us to connect with people who are going through similar things as we are. So for instance, you know, if you are having to have difficult conversations with family members or something like that like there's surely a community online some of their social media forum that that can kind of help you and give you some tips for that being social support is incredibly important, and knowing that there are other people sharing the experience that you're sharing and offering tips for kind of how to get through and sharing ideas. I think that's could be very helpful. Jessica door is a psychotherapist and tarot card reader. Thanks for speaking with us. Thank you so much for having me. Weekend edition is a production of NPR news, which is solely responsible for its content to find out more about.

Yemen United States Iraq NPR Jessica door founder Deborah ISIS Jane Arraf Manhattan al-qaeda Washington Post chief financial officer Brussels
American General Walks Around Downtown Baghdad For First Time In Years

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:32 min | 2 years ago

American General Walks Around Downtown Baghdad For First Time In Years

"Although President Trump is pulling the US military out of Syria, the US troops next door in Iraq or expected to stay put there are about five thousand of them, and they keep a relatively low profile mostly sticking to US bases. In fact, it has been years since an American general strolled around downtown Baghdad well that change today and NPR's Jane raff was invited along for the walk. She joins us now from Baghdad. Hey, jane. Hi, mary. Louise, so how significant is it for US commander to be out and about walking the streets. Baghdad Email, it's pretty significant. Because really it hasn't happened for very long time. This particular commander was Brigadier General Austin Renfer, and he's deputy commander of US forces in Iraq. So he was taken along by his ranking counterpart to three star general named Jalil by now Iraq for the past three years. It's been busy fighting ISIS. So it hasn't been really as safe as it is now and all. Also, you know, the Iraqis aren't so keen to have US generals walking around their streets because they're Iranian-backed groups that think all the US troops should leave. There's the legacy of the war. So to help him walking around amid thousands and thousands of people was kind of a big deal. And did he have a huge security entourage with them? I mean, how he being protected he did have security entourage. He had a personal security detail, and they were armed, and they were certainly keeping watch. But you know, at one point we were having tea on this kind of raised platform in the middle of the street. And there were literally thousands of people who are jammed into these narrow alleys doing their shopping going to the pet market. He himself was wearing a marine uniform. No body armor, very relaxed foulest kind of the most surprising thing that in the midst of all this chaos, which you would normally think would be potentially dangerous. They didn't. Seem to feel there was much of a threat. And you got to talk to them shell we're out and about walking. What did he say about what he was seeing? And how he felt about it. So we have to remember that. This is a guy who has been through Volusia, you know, the battle for bluejean two thousand and four which was absolutely horrific. This is not his first time around. Here's a little bit of what he had to say the be here right now and see the city centre thriving. It's like an open market if you didn't know any better, you'd swear you're in any major city in the United States any major city in the United States. Jane, I'm going to be skeptical there did it really feel like Boston or LA. Maybe not. But I think what he's comparing it to is all the other times he seen Iraq. And that's what a Rockies compared to as well. But still it's not exaggerate Baghdad has quite a lot of problems. But for the first time in sixteen years since Saddam Hussein was talking when you talk to most Araki's, they say, this is the safest they felt in years, which he getting double. Takes from Iraqis in the markets and in the streets. What what was their reaction that was so interesting because you know, I would have thought that he would. But either people ignored him which kind of indicates they've moved on or they wanted to take selfies with him. There were a couple of people who yelled at him about the American presence. But by far most of the people were either bemused or seemed quite positive to see him walking around listening to you. And clearly, this is progress clearly this is something that could have happened even a few years back, but also feel so telling that it is still quite such a significant thing sixteen years after the us led invasion for US commander to be able to walk the streets evacuated. Absolutely. In one of the things. It says to is that even though ISIS has been pushed out of the city's Ren fourth and his Iraqi counterpart are very clear that does not contrary to other conceptions mean that ISIS is defeat. Waited. You know, I it takes a lot of effort by the Iraqi military in new us advisors to keep it as safe as it has been so all of those thousands of people. They're also backed by immense efforts that go into every Friday holiday making sure that attacks don't happen. They're very aware still that ISIS could still be out there, and they're not letting their guard down. Thank you. Jane? Thank you. That's NPR's. Jane Arraf reporting from Baghdad.

United States Baghdad Iraq Jane Commander Jane Raff Jalil Jane Arraf Brigadier General Austin Renfe NPR Araki President Trump Volusia Louise Saddam Hussein Selfies Syria Rockies REN
2018 in Review: Election Highs and Lows

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:57 min | 2 years ago

2018 in Review: Election Highs and Lows

"Unsurprisingly all things considered the citizens of many countries decided that it was time to put someone else in charge in two thousand eighteen but did they make the right choices on nonstop net. Extra jet that award hundred. I should is a military scientist author and research associate at so SS South Asia institute, she considered the decision of her country Pakistan to elect former cricketer Imran Khan as prime minister. He has really brought about a new generation of supporters and voters who are very grateful. Very intolerant. To give you an example in Karachi, Imran Khan recently made a speech saying that, you know, people in job who support Nevada schrief donkeys. And then what is body follow? As did the got hold of a real donkey in Karachi and beat it up to death. So it's violence. I mean, they're very Gresley. If you watched them in social media the foul he's foul mouth. So it's almost kind of fascism that he's bringing a new fascist flavor. That is bringing to politics. That's what's different. I don't think that the taste will change is just that a new make belief world has been. Created through media through narrative management, and in this the military has a large and to play giving the view from Mexico where voters bucked international trends by electing a left wing populist is Andre Rosenthal. A former deputy foreign minister of Mexico ambassador to the UK and Sweden Representative to the UN and now international consultant on Latin American affairs. I think the first thing new president Mexico has to do is to tell the truth campaigns are one thing, but once you're in office, and once you know, what the situation is regarding the checks and balances that you have either on the legislative side, or in the media or civil society, you need to tell Mexicans the truth. If you continue to promise all sorts of impossible things like free education for everybody know exams to get into university selling off the presidential air airplane fleet traveling by car everywhere giving up the president's residence and and living in his house or renting. Little house near the offices things like that those are very populist promises, which resonate with a group of people. But they are things he will not be able to fulfil. And therefore, I think at the end of the day, his first speech his first act as president elect, even before he takes office needs to be to begin to tell the truth one of the main themes of elections this year, wherever they were taking place was an increasing disconnect between the public and the politicians. It was no different in Iraq, which was long overdue. He is NPR's. Jane Arraf, people are incredibly disillusioned with politicians and not just politicians. The interesting thing is they're disillusioned with tribal leaders. They're disillusioned with religious leaders. So there's a lot of skepticism we've seen that reflected in the turnout results in the Iraqi election, for instance, and really a lot of cynicism about whether this group of politicians will. Be any better than the next group. Even though they talk a good game. And also in Iraq Renauld monsoon academy fellow with the Middle East and North Africa program at Chatham house. Well, it's been fifteen years and the Iraqis are asking fifteen years, what have these leaders done, the political tribal religious leaders? What have they done in terms of basic services in terms of employment and the answer they're coming up with is not much? And so the bigger gap in Iraqi society today isn't the gut between Kurds and Shia which is sort of defined post two thousand three Iraq. The biggest gap is the gap between the citizens and the elite between the rulers and the ruled many sort of people from bustling all the way up to slay. My NIA have very similar demands. So what you're seeing are the Shia protesting against their own leaders and Kurds protests against on Kurdish leaders. They're tired of identity politics. They know that any Iraq since two thousand and three Kurds Sunni and Shia leaders have all become wealthy at the expense of the majority of the population. Those are the citizens. But to go back to where we came in and to try to conclude review of two thousand eighteen on a note more positive than being mealy. Glad it's all over is it possible that the tunnel down, which we all traveling has a light at the end of it. And is it possible that that light has been illuminated accidentally by the most unlikely Pathfinder more presidential than any president that's ever held this office that I can Amy pope is associate fellow at the US and the Americas program at Chatham house and former deputy homeland security advisor to Barrack Obama. So she's not quick to jump to President Trump's defense. But is the even a glimmer of good news from his presidency? So far, I think it is the role of women in society. It is the election of so many women to congress, and it's the conversation that has been going on since his election about the metoo movement about the exploitation of young women beh-. Savior is that had pretty much been accepted for decades as long as women have been in the workforce are now front and center. And that's frankly in large part due to him the access Hollywood tape and comments about how he was treating women galvanized a conversation galvanized commitment from women to engage in public life. Women. I know who had no interest in politics are now organizing fundraisers getting out getting out the vote writing speaking. That's a great thing. And that is not that we've been trying to crack for many many years. And so I suppose hats off to Donald Trump for bringing the women to the table before to UCLA, Geoffrey Howard, Jeff any optimism for us. I think the way in which Trump may be an advertently making America greater again is by getting Americans to think seriously about the role of moral values in politics. And I think there's a long standing. Tenancy to think that when you go to the voting booth you're just going to vote for your own pocketbook devote for your own self interest. And I think that assumption is is under pressure and people are once again as in all the great moments of American history in the great moments in the history of any democracy taking seriously, the idea that the purpose of politics is to provide for certain basic rights and opportunities for all. And when our institutions are subverted in when they are not being dedicated to that proper purpose, it's important to hold political leaders accountable. So if the president is able to inadvertently reawakened in people a sense of moral commitment in passion in public life. That would be a terrific inadvertent achievement.

President Trump Iraq Karachi Imran Khan Chatham House Mexico America Donald Trump South Asia Institute Pakistan Jane Arraf Nevada Prime Minister Deputy Foreign Minister Scientist NPR UN Congress
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me thinking my children, and my wife is dubbing before. In front of the Dozo. What he's saying? There is when Israel comes with their bulldozers, he and his wife and kids will stand in front of it. It sounds as though this is a very emotional and potentially explosive issue. What do we expect in the next couple of days while speaking to a thirties here, I understand that? We're not going to be seeing demolition tomorrow or the next day. And even though the residents here seem resigned to the fact that this demolition is going to happen. There is very vocal international opposition and for years Israel hasn't carried out demolition. It's made its way through the courts, and the final say is with Israel with we really don't know that is NPR's Daniel estrin in the West Bank. Daniel thank you so much. You're welcome. Now to Iraq where the Kurdistan region held elections today. The first in five years for the regional parliament and new Kurdish government will face serious challenges. It's emerging from the battle against ISIS and tensions with the Iraqi government as NPR's Jane Arraf reports from the Kurdish city of Sulaymaniyah the voting had its own challenges. This was half an hour before the polls closed at a voting centre and swim in the region. Second biggest city group of men showed up with election officials decided we're fake ID's. They were told to leave and they weren't happy in another polling center there were shots fired outside polling stations and some of the villages. Volunteer security forces stood watch with rocket propelled grenades with voting over. Election. Officials watched by party observers began counting the votes cast here fewer than half the eligible voters turned up. Prestigious..

Israel Daniel estrin NPR Iraqi government Dozo Kurdistan Iraq Jane Arraf West Bank Sulaymaniyah five years
Iraq's Kurds hold elections for regional parliament

To the Best of Our Knowledge

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Iraq's Kurds hold elections for regional parliament

"Polls open in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Where voters are electing a new regional parliament NPR's. Jane Arraf has more from the Kurdish city of Sulaimaniya. These are the first provincial elections in the Kurdistan region after difficult five years Kurdish forces fought ISIS, the Kurds held a referendum supporting independence from Iraq. And they lost territory when the Iraqi government sent in troops relations with the Iraqi government are still difficult, and there are other problems, including an economic crisis, which left civil servants unpaid for months, the two main parties that have controlled the Kurdistan region. For decades are expected to get the most votes, but there are also smaller opposition parties and religious parties. One of the big worries in this election is fraud and the possibility that voters have so little faith in the elections that a lot of the bother

Kurdistan Iraq Iraqi Government Jane Arraf NPR Fraud Isis Sulaimaniya Five Years
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was my everything. Politics here in Kurdistan is still very personal. Jane Arraf NPR news Suleimaniya in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Final segment of all things considered is just ahead. And then KiKi weedy newsroom ahead at one o'clock with tweets do right here. Inside Europe comes your way at three o'clock, the European Union and Iran agreed during the week to create a special vehicle to facilitate trade and financial transactions between them thus sidestepping US sanctions against Iran. He's Walker of inside Europe. We'll speak with the correspondent from DWI's Brussels bureau on the background to the US sanctions on Iran that story and other news from the European continent is ahead at three o'clock followed by world affairs it for it's the second part of a three part series on climate change in this program. You'll hear an examination about communities that are often left out of the conversation. Women as the primary caregivers and providers of food fuel and water and much of the global south women are especially vulnerable to the challenges that climate change presents. Let's hear more on world affairs ahead at four o'clock followed by weekend edition, which begins at five Saturday. Unweakened.

Iran US Kurdistan Europe NPR Jane Arraf European Union Iraq Brussels
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin. We're going to turn out to a rock and the political unrest in the second largest city of Bosra. It's a port town near huge oil reserves. Anti-government protests have been going on there. All summer last week. Protesters set fire to political offices and security forces killed several people. And here's Jane Arraf is in Bosra and she joins us. Now. Jane, can you just start off by telling us what's behind this? Sure. I think the thing we have to know. I is that BUSTER is really Iraq's economic lifeline. Most of the oil exports go through here, it has the main commodity port. But it's also been battered by successive wars neglect for decades. So after the US invasion in two thousand and three it fell under militia control there was rampant corruption. And now you have a situation where it's summertime a hundred and twenty degrees outside their electricity cuts. No jobs, and you. Turn on the tap and contaminated water comes out, so thousands of young men have taken to the streets. Who are they directing their ir? Pretty much everyone government leaders foreign countries, particularly Iran, which is surprising because Iran is a very strong ally. Iraq, if you listen to some of the chance from the protests here, you'll hear them saying they want all political parties out of Iraq. So.

Iraq Jane Arraf Iran Bosra Rachel Martin NPR David green US twenty degrees
Security forces deploy in Iraq's Basra following violence

Snap Judgment

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Security forces deploy in Iraq's Basra following violence

"The Iraqi government is trying to restore order in the southern city of Basra NPR's. Jane Arraf reports security officials have imposed a new curfew on the city the day. After protesters stormed and set fire to the Iranian consulate Basra's international airport said rockets were fired at the airport compound, which is close to the US consulate. They said there were no casualties and the airport was still operating the US embassy in Baghdad said, it would not comment on the attack prime minister hydro about who's struggling to keep his post in a new government being formed fired. The Basra security commander and appointed a new one protesters have been demanding jobs basic public services and an end to Iranian control of militias and political parties in

California Basra NPR Jane Arraf Jeremy Siegel United States Catherine Osborne Barack Obama Iraqi Government Federal Government Baghdad Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson Daly City Captain Zaida Prime Minister Jerry Brown Brazil
Sweden, Iraqi Government and Iraq discussed on Investing Sense

Investing Sense

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Sweden, Iraqi Government and Iraq discussed on Investing Sense

"That's the reality. Swedish government says the usual weight is more like an hour, though that still longer than most Europeans are used to that the issue that comes up more often than any other in this crowd is crime few people. Here seem to have been personally affected by violence, but many describe feeling unsafe or something happens your call to police. You don't have a chance to police coming. Attack. It's not safe. I live on the countryside crime statistics are tricky Sweden by almost any measure is an extremely safe country. But the overall rate of crime has been slowly rising for more than twenty years gang violence is a real problem in some neighborhoods, and there's been a recent increase in cases of sexual assault, though, that may be partly due to changes in

Sweden Iraqi Government Iraq Iran NPR Jane Arraf Basra Patrick Johnson Mikhail Sundstrom Miguel Sundstrom Erbil Iranian Consulate Denmark Assault Malmo Lund University Scientist Ronnie Europe
"jane arraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is primary interest was what he thought the campaign wanted which was what Russian officials together with United States officials to work on some better relationship with Russia. Bob, Dobelis apologized for his actions telling a judge he had made quote, a dreadful mistake and was eager for redemption. Protesters have set fire to the Iranian consulate in the southern Rockies city of Bosra as NPR's Jane Arraf reports it's the latest attack as anti-government demonstrations, turn violent protesters set the consulate on fire after security forces. Detecting, the building withdrew earlier this week demonstrators set fire to the offices of a major Iran linked militia in Iran backed political party, the anti-government demonstration started two months ago, but they've been fueled by anger this week. After several protesters were killed by live ammunition fired by security forces BUSTER has suffered for years from corruption and militia control protesters are demanding an end to Iranian influence, and an Iraqi government that will create jobs and deliver public services. Jane Arraf NPR news air Bill in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Hiring is still very strong US employers at a two hundred one thousand jobs in August. The Labor Department also says the unemployment rate remained at three point nine percent. That's near an eighteen year. Low paychecks are also getting fatter average hourly wages rose two point nine percent higher than they were a year ago. Wall Street lower by the bell. The Dow down seventy nine the NASDAQ down twenty s and p five hundred down six you're listening. To NPR news. This. This is WNYC in New York at six O four. I'm Jamie Floyd. Next week's primaries will be a major test for eight New York state senators who once belonged to what was known as the independent democratic conference. These breakaway Democrats face heavy criticism for voting with Republicans in Albany in district thirty one which represents the west side of Manhattan from Chelsea to Inwood incumbent Mati Sola cantata is defending her record after she joined the IDC. I don't think that a year and a half and the IDC my entire life work have done. I'll cantata says that if she's reelected she'll back the Senate Democratic leader. But her opponent Robert Jackson says that's no guarantee given all cantatas voting history. I've raised my right hand have taken a pledge that I will always be a democrat and never sleep with the Republicans in order to further their agenda and new. New yorkers. We've got.

Jamie Floyd Jane Arraf Iraq Democrats NPR IDC Manhattan Iran Bosra United States New York Bob Robert Jackson Russia BUSTER Iraqi government Dobelis
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Iranians and if they are to continue to submit to the very onerous and intrusive inspection and oversight of their nuclear program making absolutely sure that there is no way they can ever return they do want to see some economic benefits so we have to make sure that it is possible to maintain this balance between these two elements which are at the core of this deal you said quid pro quo ken iran now declare that the us has violated the terms of the agreement and resume production of nuclear fuel what then well i think that that is the outcome that none of us want because we want to keep iran inside this do we want to keep the ability of the international community to monitor and to oversee iran's activity to make sure that under no circumstances as they have committed to under the terms of this deal will they seek to develop or to acquire nuclear weapons in this context they also have to see some benefit from the deal and that's where we're going to be working now in the next few weeks the transpacific partnership that paris climate accord now the iran deal is the us still a reliable ally for diplomatic agreements well i think when you have a change of administration you have a change of policy this has to be we understand this president trump was elected on a certain platform and the rest of the world has to take that into account and to expect that there will be some changes so yes when in democracies when you have a change of administration you also have some inflection of policies and this is something which is the normal part of political life ambassador david o'sullivan is that you embassador to the us thank you for speaking with all things considered thank you on saturday iraq will hold its fourth parliamentary election since the toppling of saddam hussein iraqis have paid a heavy price for the freedom to elect their leaders now though many are so disillusioned with their previous governments that they say they won't vote this time around npr's jane arraf reports from baghdad to get to the friday book market in baghdad you pass by streets filled with iraqis selling their stuff on the side there are used clothes kitchen odds and ends warn plush toys each for less than twenty five cents one of the.

ken iran us trump david o'sullivan iraq npr baghdad iran paris president saddam hussein jane arraf
"jane arraf" Discussed on Up First

Up First

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on Up First

"Dependent on a rocky security security forces i mean the us spent billions of dollars training training these same people these same iraqi security forces after it disbanded the army back in two thousand three after toppled saddam so what is the state of iraqi forces right now well a lot better than for years ago when they actually collapsed entire divisions they've proved now according to us military commanders that they're willing to fight they have taken literally thousands of casualties and defeating isis so they need to recruit new forces and continue training but the key is that commanders here the american ones believe that after those very painful years iraqis are now ready to take over their own security again jane arraf from baghdad thanks so much jane thank you u n security council delegation is just back from a visit to bangladesh and myanmar we were working on a plan for how to repatriate the nearly seven hundred thousand ranga muslims who fled to bangladesh last year after me and mar military crackdown that some us and you unofficial 's call ethnic cleansing we've got reporter michael sullivan on the line has been covering this issue from both bangladesh and his base in thailand michael what can you tell us about this visit by u n officials who they meet with how these meetings go it began in the refugee camps in bangladesh they heard awful stories from the rohana there then they met with bangladesh's prime minister shaka sina who implored the delegation to get me and marta take back which he called its citizens but of course doesn't recognize the best majority of rohan goes citizens and that's really the problem yeah then the delegation left for me and my to meet.

us saddam jane arraf myanmar michael sullivan bangladesh shaka sina rohan baghdad reporter thailand prime minister
"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"jane arraf" Discussed on KQED Radio

"An update now on a persecuted religious minority in the middle east the zd people in northern iraq they made headlines in two thousand fourteen they've been killed forced to convert to islam and the women and girls have been held in sexual slavery thousands of others who survived the isis rampage fled to the nearby journal cold and hungry desperate to get off the mountain refugees are enduring horrors trapped on a mountain and they need a rescue fewer dispute that should be an american rescue the us responded with air strikes against isis on the ground kurdish guerrilla fighters protected the is now those protectors are withdrawing leaving the zd's vulnerable npr's jane arraf was recently in northern iraq and joins us now hi jane i sara jane set this moment up for us who are they and why are they so persecuted so they're tiny and eight ancient religious minority they're mostly found in northern iraq they believe in god and they also believe that he interested the world to cast of angels so it's a closed religion and quite secretive and because of their beliefs they've been persecuted for centuries isis considers them infidels and when they came in as we heard they killed hundreds of men and kidnapped thousands of women as sex slaves one of the worst things as well was that the easy say it was some of their neighbors in the arab villages surrounding them were helping isis and so these kurdish fighters who've been protecting them remind us who they are what's their role in protecting the cds so these live on this huge mountain mount saint jars wells other places but that's one of the cd homelands and it's quite remote and it's right up against the syrian border they have been protected by kurdish peshmerga forces attached to the kurdish regional government but when isis came in those forces retreated and they left the zd's defend for themselves so as they were being slaughtered the pk k came in now the pk is also kurdish but they're from across the border in turkey and they've been fighting the.

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