19 Episode results for "Jane Addams"

Jane Addams Hull House

Haunted Places

41:29 min | 1 year ago

Jane Addams Hull House

"Due to the graphic nature of this haunted place listener discretion is advised. This episode includes depictions of body horror illness and domestic violence. We advise extreme caution for children under thirteen know artifact deserve to be forgotten especially the really old ones. Those were Derek's favorite. He loved working. Salvage Rescuing Beautiful Items from obscurity. Thanks to his keanae restores imagination. He was overjoyed to be asked to help excavate the mansion known as Hull House after its odors declared bankruptcy remnants of the homes. One hundred twenty two year history were strewn about the attic their particular joy in building a tiny pile of all the salvageable antiques porcelain jugs plates old clocks threadbare petticoats evidence of a vibrant past. Someone cleared their throat behind him. He turned but there was no one there. He called out to the next true assuming he had competition silence their shrugged and went back to work. But then someone coughed right next to his ear a chip porcelain plate slipped out of his hands. He managed to catch it before it hit the floor. He excelled carefully placing it at the top of the pile. He'd nearly sorted everything when he felt a tug toward the bottom of his jeans. Derek shocked to see a little boy had appeared at his feet. He had a dirty face whether it overalls and looked up at Terek with frightened eyes. Derek asked him what was wrong. The replied that came from the boy's mouth was incomprehensible a lilting and ancient sound. The boy pulled harder a Derek's pant leg and pointed into a dark corner of the attic. Derek shushed him gently and walked over to the corner. He peered around but he didn't see anything as he turned to explain to the boy that he was perfectly safe. He felt rough hands. Grab him from behind. They pulled him into the darkness. There sharp nails ripping through close digging into a skin. He called for the child to get help. But the boy only smiled with shockingly white sharp teeth then he knocked Derek's priceless pile of antiquities to the ground. Welcome to haunted places. A podcast original. I'm Greg pulsing every Thursday. I take you to the scariest. Most haunted real places on earth. You can find all episodes of haunted places for free on spotify and every Tuesday make sure to check out urban legends. These special episodes of haunted places are available exclusively on spotify at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network? If you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening this week. Join me on a supernatural journey to Jane addams whole house a mid nineteenth century mansion the birthplace of one of the earliest social work organizations in the United States and discover why to this day. It's haunted after the great fire of eighteen. Seventy one. The near West side of Chicago became a ghost town once the home to opulent mansions of the city's nouveau riche. The severely damaged neighborhood became a haven for both sex workers and newly arrived. European immigrants Italian German Jewish Greek Polish and Czech these neighborhoods had few legal protections than even less social support. The crushing capitalist machine of the Industrial Revolution frequently left a Dennison's of near west side broke sick and suffering. This is the environment that Illinois heiress. Jane addams decided to spend her life in Adams was a dedicated supporter of the settlement movement. A group of affluent social reformers who rented property and low income areas in order to provide refuge for their impoverished neighbors from political advocacy to trade classes to free meals and daycare settlement homes existed to fill the gaps left behind by the growing income disparity in the United States when atoms and her friend. Ellen Gate Star went looking for a suitable property of near West side in one thousand nine hundred nine. They discovered whole house a palatial mansion. On halsted street. The home was named for its original owner Charles Hall who had entrusted it to his cousin. A social reformer named Helen Culver after his death culver was thrilled to contribute directly to the settlement cause but when Adamson Star began to set up operations they noticed sense of amongst their neighbors would adams asked what was wrong. They struggle to explain in terms. The wealthy heiresses would understand. There was in the attic. They said something that wasn't Human Liana. And Arkady where relieved to finally find a place they could afford. The House had once belonged to a wealthy family. And while it had lost the trappings of wealth. The foundation was solid. It seemed as good a place as any to live as they fought against. Yuliana sickness consumption had taken a hold of her every hour. She felt closer and closer to the doors of the Almighty but she was strong. If anyone had a fighting chance against the great white plague it was her. They moved their paltry belongings in quickly and ULLIANNA spent two straight days setting up house. Arkady tried to encourage her to rest but she was resolute. She wanted to prove that she had some life left in her bones. She slept soundly at the end of the second day. She woke to the sounds of heavy footsteps coming from the floor above she could have sworn there landlady had told her no one lived in the attic. What you never knew when a relative might seek a little extra space away from their in laws in lesser-used part of the building still. She was tired so she grabbed her broom in wrapped twice on the ceiling. The footsteps stopped but she still couldn't rest as soon as she lay down. A cent tickle turnovers powder and roses growing stronger the more she noticed it what it started as an almost pleasant aroma quickly grew accurate and musty. Flowers left in a place with very little air. She sniffles turning her head to the other side of the pillow. The sent only crew stronger something sticky squirm dinner throat. She coughed trying to clear his airways. Liana sat up spitting to her hand. Small red flags dotted her palm. Got Up from bed and made her way to the bathroom as she turned the water on the stench of Stale. Roses faded away. She could breathe clearly again. Liana wash the blood off her hands and shut off the tap but the century turned the minute she entered the bedroom in the darkness she saw the gleam of white teeth will the on a call to Arkadi desperate to wake him. He was up in an instant but the teeth vanished as soon as he was by. Her side are coty kissed her head and told her she was worrying too much. It wasn't good for her condition. Whatever the cause the scent was gone. Liana kissed her husband. Goodbye as he headed off to his night shift then returned to her bed. Moments later. A cry of rage cut through the silence. Liana jumped backwards the herring arms standing on end. The summit had been too close to be their neighbors and her husband was a soft spoken. Man in unseen. Stranger was in the room with her and they weren't happy she didn't want to sleep. She was scared that whoever was in the house would find her but eventually her disease and exhaustion caught up to her she succumbed to a shallow and unpleasant slumber. She did not stay in the apartment long. After she awoke she knew that are coty. Would be working for several more hours enter. Isolation made her nervous. She went out to the shopping just to be around people. Then trudged home fighting the urge to never crossed the threshold again. She dropped her keys twice in the hallway. The House the metal rattling violently in her shaking hands. Liana listened carefully as she took one small step into the apartment. There was nothing but silence. Then she took another then. Another really honest breath started to even out. She was alone. She placed belongings on the table and went into the bathroom. She barely recognize the woman in the mirror. Hollow Cheeks Sunken Eyes stared back the lack of sleep and consumption carving deep unpleasant grooves into her face when she came out she found a woman in a pale silk dress sitting on her bed she was beautiful white powder cling to her face with a hint of Bruges. Her hat was decorated with fresh roses. The woman reached for early on her form flickering candle. But the drafty window. Liana backed up into the bathroom. Her cry of alarm dissolving into a coughing fit. She searched the sink for a weapon finally setting her eyes on the empty basin. She hefted it over her head and threw it watching the object fly rule with the other woman and shadow against the bedpost. The woman promised only on. The death would be painless. It was coming for her anyway. The trying to respond to the coast. But her hacking coughs returned she just as her lungs were being torn out. She coughed until throat was raw. Her heart straining enter chest. Her body screamed for air for an end to her pain. She reached out to study yourself against the wall and slid to the ground. When Liana finally rose to her feet she felt lighter. The other woman gripped her hand firmly the two of them turn to stare at early on corpse the bloody handkerchief covering half her face for the first time in years. Ullianna could breathe fully again. The woman smiled at her. As if to say see. Isn't this better. She totally on but been so long since she'd had a friend. It was so nice it really Hannah to China her Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Stars tenants kept a large water pitcher beside the stairs to the attic. They explained that the pitcher was to be used as a means of creating running water which spirits could not cross. It was an easy defense against the ghost in the attic. More women arrive to live and work as aid workers at Hull House and the other tenants moved out to make room. It is said however that the pitcher remained by the attic stairs until the settlement took over the second floor entirely a precautionary measure against a ghost. That didn't care about the new residents noble ideals up next the skeptical Jane Addams has her own experience with the supernatural. Podcast listeners. If you enjoy stories about murder mystery and the unexplained you'll absolutely love the new podcast original series supernatural with Ashley Flowers it's hosted by crime junkies Ashley Flowers and you can hear new every Wednesday. We all know that most mysteries can be solved by looking at the facts but sometimes the facts don't lead to a logical explanation. The truth lies somewhere in the unknown in supernatural with Ashley. Flowers Ashley takes a deep dive into the strange and surreal to explain some of the world's most bizarre true crime occurrences each week. She'll dig into a different crime or mystery where the most fitting theory isn't always the most conventional from exercises to unsolved murders to alien abductions. Ashley will take on. The tails challenged the unexplained and dissect the facts with a heavy helping of skepticism and rationale. So are you ready to get to the bottom of history's most peculiar events? Follow supernatural with Ashley. Flowers free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts now. Back to the story Jane. Addams was not yet seven years old when she first noticed the income disparity that would grow to characterize her beloved Chicago when driving through the town of Freeport with her father. She observed the squalid conditions of the neighboring tenements. When her father explained that the workers couldn't afford to live in better places. She told him she would give them mansion of their own to live in. She got her wish with Hull. House when she moved in the building had fallen into disrepair Pale and partially burned shadow of its former Grandeur Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr quickly set to work restoring the mansion so it could best serve the needs of the surrounding immigrant community it seemed that most of the remnants of the halls opulent life had been stripped in the twenty years since the fire but one supernatural mark of the homes previous history remained. Charles Hulls beloved wife had passed away in the house in the very room where Jane addams planned to live Jayne. Didn't sleep enough ellen. Culture so her family told her so the bags under her eyes told you so but there was just so much to do. She constantly worried that she was missing an opportunity letting the visitors and residents of Hull House down but she had to rest sometime eventually. Her body insisted and she would practically collapse into bed. Barely getting out of her starched close before her face to the pillow. She was usually a heavy sleeper but this time she will to the rattle in clump of a carriage making its way down. Halston street when the hoof beats faded into the distance. She closed her eyes again. Ready to return to her dreams but then her ice snapped open again. Gene couldn't move. The darkness seemed heavy holding her place. She told yourself to take deep breaths but even breathing hurt. She tried to close her eyes but our lives didn't respond is fixed on the ceiling. Strange shapes began to dance in front of them was shapes sinister amorphous and unsettling sometimes human looking sometimes not gnashing teeth knives clause. Jane's body shuddered with primal anxiety. She stared paralyzed at the frightening vision for what felt like ours. She tried to call for help but her body wouldn't respond to anything just as she thought she would lose her mind in the cold silence but quite was replaced by whispers hissing. Moving as if something was roving about the room stepping close to her ear. Only to fly away again into the shadows. Jane tried once more to scream. But all that came out was a slight whimper. She tried to move with all her might miraculously and without warning she was able to do it. She turned her head to the left. Finally letting out a sigh of relief she was free but there was someone in the bed. Beside her decaying form quivering with rasping breaths and coughs chain gasped and pulled away tumbling out of the bed and onto the floor. Her side hurt where she'd smacked against the Hardwood but full movement had returned to her. She scrambled to her feet to look around. There were no whispers. No dark shapes on the ceiling or in the corner it was just her room another carriage clattered by outside. There were no more frights that night. Jane slept in fits and she was bleary eyed the next morning when she came downstairs to cook breakfast for the residents and they're visiting neighbors. Mrs Graviano a woman who was helping out of the day care center as chain. What was wrong. Never ashamed to ask for help and Jane told the woman the whole story. Mrs Graviano tutted softly to herself. Then turn behind her to call over. Mrs Bear a small Jewish woman with round Brown is Jane repeated the tale. Mrs Bear blinked alledgedly at her. It was the terrorists. She said ethically Jane needn't worry. Sometimes the Mahdi and mind did not agree and the mind made such a stink about it. Just breathe edenly. Mrs Barra said and all would be well. Jane was relieved to have a reasonable explanation once again. She was learning more from our neighbors than they learning from her. She was actually excited to go to sleep that night confident that she had the tools to defend herself but when the darkness came again it was different when she awoke this time she was able to move her head but only slightly. She curled a chin toward her chest to bring her gaze down from the ceiling. And to the edge of the bed there was a featureless dark shape. They're waiting chain wasn't sure what to do. It just stood studying her with a slightly tilted head but then the head tilted further than it should slowly but surely Jane managed to bring her trembling hand to the lamb. She clicked it on sure that the light would banish the shadow. The figure was still there it's head lolling on a broken neck in front of her. It was a woman deathly Pale. Her dress was blue almost white shimmering the soft light Jane wondered fomative. This was the same corpse from the night before but she was awake. She was sure of it. This was no dream. Jane watched the figure intently. She was usually an excellent reader of people but she had no means of understanding the thing that stood before her if it mentor harm. She was finished gene. Brace yourself for the worst trying to find refuge in her faith then as if slightly embarrassed the woman raised her head snapping your spine back into place. She locked eyes with chain her gaze. Not Threatening only sad devastated. Spent gene suddenly called something. Miss Culver headset in passing. Mr Hull had never really felt comfortable in the house after the death of his wife in one of the rooms Jane was no stranger to death. Many of the women she counselled had lost infants or relatives to various wasting diseases and it was common for the police to find debt drunks in the gutters of the near West side. She and Ellen hope to change all that but this woman was beyond helping even if she was indeed Mrs Hull. Jane ventured the question gently trying and failing to keep your voice from shaking. The ghost did not open her mouth to answer but chain could've sworn she gave a slight not heartened. Jane gave the spirit the warm she could muster under the circumstances. She asked if she could help in any way. The ghost just stared. Unblinking Louis. Jane asked if the spirit wanted to move on once again. Nothing unsure what to do next. Jane stepped forward to call for help. The ghost move to block her path. Chains heart nearly stopped the movement. She found her voice as best she could treating Mrs Hall Lake any other distressed member visiting groups to the House. There was no need to worry. Jane reassured her forcing her voice to stay steady. It was all in hand. They would find a solution together. It was clear to chain that the spirit did not want her to leave so she laid back a bit in bed. The ghostly woman floated a bit closer softening ever so slightly. Jane Smile tightly again thanking Mrs Hall for Allowing Her to get her arrest. She turned off the light and closed her eyes. Potentally aware of the Ghost's presence beside her now. All she could do was attempt to sleep. Perhaps the spirit meant well and didn't mean to be a bother. Maybe Mrs Hall even intended to watch over chain to keep her safe in a room with darker forces at work. Whatever the true motivations were. Jane never slept in low again. Jan Adams told several people about the ghost of Mrs Hull. She described her as a woman in white sad but ultimately benign according to her. The Pale woman never left the bedroom so it was easy to keep her away from the more nervous residents of the house. But it's rumored that a pitcher of water was still left on the threshold just in case though. She appears disinterested in interfering with the affairs of the living. She is known to watch people closely both from her open door and the edge of the bed when guests are sleeping coming up. We explore a whole houses. Most sinister supernatural story a dark and demonic secret hidden in the attic. Now back to the story Jane addams almost casual accommodation of the ghost of Mrs Hall cemented her reputation as a force of calm. A problem solver. It's no wonder then that the influential reformer would become a legend of her own among Chicago's Italian and Jewish immigrants. The rumors of whole houses haunted addict persisted in those communities and the residents soon found themselves having to turn away several visitors a day when they admitted they only wanted to see the attic. The visitors said that they heard that Jane Addams had gone a bit too far in her charity. She had taken in a demon baby. Confining him to the highest floor of the House the more. The residents denied the assertion more powerful. It became visitors to the home. Said that they'd seen the unfortunate child themselves barely living to tell the tale nearly everyone who crossed the of Hull House carried a heaviness about their shoulders. They struggle to meet. Your is the first time it cost them a great deal to be here asking help in a world that had given them so little Sarah was used to coaxing them into the building slowly using accepting language and approaching with caution. She kept her demeanor as Kalman. Open as she could. The settlement was not charity. She liked to say it's a home and we want to welcome you to it. The woman on the other side of the door looked almost feral young two young Horizon Worldwide. Dousing wildly to the left at that right. Her clothes were torn. Trails of dried blood traced every crease in her skin her scalp shown through in different spots of her head were her hair had been torn out. Had she not been trained by Jane addams herself? Sarah would have gone straight for the police. Gene had taught her to ask first so she ventured a hello and gentle offer of help. But the woman. Lena didn't want help. She wanted one thing her child. Sarah asks the woman to come with her into the house. Lena greed dragging her snow covered feet out of the Chicago night and over the threshold. Sarah Escorted Lena to the sitting room. She kept a benign smile in place as she led Lena to their daycare center were a few of the little one's still waited for their parents. The children's stared blankly when she walked into the room bewildered. Sarah drew the nervous woman back out into the hall. She demanded an explanation. Was Lena's child supposed to be here? Lena's reply was barely a whisper. She said there was something wrong with her husband. He had once been a prince among men leaving a trail of good fortune behind him but struggling to find work at hardened him he grew callous. Enjoyed hurting people for her neighbors had suggested that he'd been possessed. She hadn't believed them but a thump accompanied the way he walked now. He said he'd been hurt at the factory but the neighbors thought his feet had become hubs. He stopped going to church it. They're convinced that God had abandoned them in their time of need. She wanted to ask him who. He Clung to now for faith but the hardness in his eyes had scared her still. She did she. Must Women must honor their husbands after all and she wanted to be a good wife where he was course she was soft or he was rude. She was kind. It took a toll on her. She wasn't sleeping. They couldn't afford to eat anymore. She fainted at work several times. Her boss was starting to talk her pay but came the pains sharp knives dabbing through her abdomen. They lasted for months. She would wake in the night to the strange feeling of tiny footsteps inside her stomach several times that kicked so hard but she thought it would break through the skin this child forcing itself into the world prematurely mercifully the Labor was quick. She waited for the cries but her too harsh screeching sound instead. When she took him into her arms his skin felt strange. Her child was covered in orange scales. Sharp and warm like Kohl's. His eyes were bright red. Eddie smelled like smoke. Shadows sprouted from his back. It couldn't be wings. Her husband ripped the baby out of her arms. She screamed and protested but he pushed her away. She never saw her baby again but she heard whispers from her family members. All Children of the devil or brought to Hull House. Sarah had never heard of a devil child being brought into the house or any child being brought into the House to stay permanently what? She didn't want to contradict Lena. It was clearly very real to her. Lena wanted to see the attic. The whispers said that Hull House kept its demons on the top floor. The young woman stared at the key around Sara's neck. She whispered but she was prepared to do what she must reach it. Syra calmly explained that. There were no locks on the third floor and guided. Lena slowly up the stairs. The woman overtook her. Only flop rushing forward calling for her child. Sarah followed cautiously. She could see large bruises. Blooming across the back the woman's neck the remnants of a strong cruel grip. Sarah had heard other stories of men who were secretly beasts women that hid their witches brooms and closets children who had been haunted by monsters in disguise. It was a way of putting veil between them and the horrors they'd seen monsters after all were easy. Twenty stand easy to kill if you knew their weakness black and white good and evil. They made a terrifying world makes sense. There was no demon baby in the attic but what Lena might learn. There could be worse. Lena lost her grip on the stairs. Sarah Carter asking if she was sure she wanted to continue. Lena's dark eyebrows rose. But she was resolute. She gently pushed away from Sarah and continued to ascend the stairs. Sarah opened the door wincing. S IT CREEK. Moonlights spilled in through the loan window attic. The air smell faintly of the mold and ash from an ancient fire. Lena sniff dare and proclaimed that her son had been there when Sarah turned back she saw figure hunched in the corner. She felt her breath catching or thrown. It looked almost human curve Ted and a squad body. Her eyes remained on it as it dwindled. Back INTO THE SHADOWS. Serious heart raced. She couldn't move is fixed dark waiting for that horrible shape to reappear. She slowed her breathing. Telling yourself to remain calm. She was made of sterner stuff than this but then something flew out her face. The two women screamed dropping to the floor as a dark shape moved over their heads. Something slammed into the window smashing through the glass and out into the Chicago night. All was quiet again Sarah and listened to the stillness of the night breathless relieved but fearful that some thing would break the silence again. She made her way over ten. Lena on trembling legs drawing her to her chest. The woman came to life in her arms thrashing and sobbing banging your fists against the wooden floors. Sarah released her but state close placing a gentle hand on her back. Lena's movement started to still but she continued screaming. She could not stop herself. Finally she was quiet. Lena pulled herself up slowly. Clutching closed fist chest. At first Sarah worried that she injured herself in some way. But as Lena's fingers slowly parted Sarah understood there in her hand was a clump of black feathers and glittering orange scales. The story of the devil baby of Hall House has several versions to match the various ethnic and demographic groups telling the story in the Italian version. A cruel husband damages is pregnant whites portrait of the Persian. Mary saying he preferred to have the devil in the house over a depiction of the blessed mother. The couple is then of course punished with a horned and constantly cursing child who they offer Jane Addams Center staff for Safekeeping in the Jewish version. A man with six daughters tells his pregnant wife that he'd rather have a devil in the house that another little girl. His wishes granted and the desperate couple takes the child to whole house. The story appears to derive from old wives. Tales brought over from the old world by hall houses Clientele and the early rumors of the potentially haunted attic. There's no substantiation of disfigured or disabled child being hidden away in the top floor of the settlement house. This didn't stop many citizens of Chicago from knocking on the door of the aid organization demanding to see the child while Adams staff patiently denied the existence of the devil. Baby the US the story to begin conversations with their visitors gently broaching the subject of Monsters. They might be facing in their own. Lives the fable of the cruel husband. Bringing down divine punishment on his family resonated most with women who had survived domestic abuse or destitution due to their husbands struggles with addiction while women were the primary sources of the devil tail groups of men sometimes stopped by as well. Jane addams believed they came for similar reasons to the women reminding themselves of the dangers of straying from the right path as she wrote in the Atlantic magazine in one thousand nine hundred numbers of men came by themselves one group from a neighboring factor on their own time offered to pay twenty five cents a half dollar two dollars a piece to see the child insisting that it must be at Hull House because the women folks had seen it to my query as to whether they supposed we would exhibit for money. A poor little deformed baby if one had been born in the neighborhood they replied sure why not and it teaches a good lesson to they added as an afterthought or perhaps as a concession to the strange moral standards of a place like Hull House. The use of the urban legend as a vehicle for therapeutic technique was typical for Jane Addams. She was a pioneer when it came to her priority to listen to the poor and abused instead of condescending to them providing resources to build self-determined communities that persist to this day. It is these people first principles that became the basis for her work as the first woman president of the National Conference of social work and as a supporter of the founding of the ACP and the ACLU many haunted places are visually ominous and inherently tragic. Derelict abandoned the sights of horrific murders. Are Tragic suicides. Hull House is none of those things while it appears on several Chicago ghost tours. The building is now affiliated with the University of Illinois Chicago Museum to the legacy of Jane. Addams enter work at Hull House. It's a legacy that should be celebrated the advocacy and services at Hull House led to public policy changes on a state and national scale when it comes to Public Health Education Fair Labor practices and children and Immigrants Rights Jane addams herself was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen thirty-one. Adams was a true innovator when it came to helping the living but even she couldn't help but dead. Thanks again for tuning into haunted places. We'll be back on Thursday with a new episode and don't forget to come back on Tuesday for our urban legends series available. Only on spotify for more information on Jane Addams House amongst many sources. We used we found the Jane addams papers project extremely helpful to our research. You can find more episodes of haunted places and all other podcast originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already. Have all your favorite music. But now spotify making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcasts originals like haunted places for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream haunted places on spotify just open the APP tap browse and type haunted places in the search bar. Several view of asked how to help us. If you enjoy the show the best way to help is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. I'll see next time. Haunted places was created by Max Cutler. At as a podcast studios original executive producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound design by Kenny. Hobbs with Production Assistance Byron Shapiro Carly Madden and Aaron Larson. This episode haunted places was written by deridder and Jennifer Rachet with writing assistance by Greg Castro. I'm Greg pulsing listeners. I hope you remember to check out the new podcast original series supernatural with Ashley Flowers every Wednesday take a deep dive into the strange and surreal to find the truth behind some of the world's most bizarre crimes. I can't get enough of this show and I hope you feel the same search for supernatural with Ashley Hours in the spotify APP and listen free today.

Jane addams Jane Hull House Lena Sarah Carter Chicago spotify Liana United States Jan Adams Charles Hall Derek Jane Addams House Jane Addams Center Mrs Hull facebook Greg Castro Ashley Flowers Terek
032 Hull House, Jane Addams, and the Devil Baby

Ghostly

1:44:59 hr | 1 year ago

032 Hull House, Jane Addams, and the Devil Baby

"Welcome to ghostly is Hull House haunted as always we're your host. I'm Pat I and I'm Rebecca. Today we have a special guest with us. It's our Chicago Person Mondo Hello. How's it going not too bad anything going on? No no telling us how busy you are just work but about what the tunes coming out on I tunes Things have been a little slow that way when I get busy at work. It's a little harder. If it's hard to be creative then yeah 'cause you're creative in your job so yeah here. This is so exciting. We haven't had you here for a little while. The listeners are going to be very happy they are definitely going to be happy today. we're going to be talking about whole House and Whole House has a lot of history and legends and all three of US visited last year and we all agreed at. This would make a great episode. So we've been waiting and the reason why we're releasing this episode. Now is because December tenth is Jane Addams uh-huh Day Gene Adams is synonymous with whole house and So is the devil baby. But we'll talk about that soon right. Yes definitely Did you have any song for us. This time Mondo Oh no well. There's is a lot of songs I guess that could be done for. There's a Lotta Song won't let we'll let you prepare think about it and if it strikes you at any moment you just you just hit us up with it. Okay whole house in the middle of you. I see whole house down the street st from a good Italian beef which the Italian beef place holders else. It's right down the street on Taylor and actually seniors manny's beef. That's not far. That's just to the east of there with the name of the Italian ice place and Taylor. Oh no you know everything. You're our man in Chicago. I know I always wait in the car and my wife or my son. Go 'cause there's long lines This this is a an interesting Italian Italian ice place. Across from Al's beef it is. Yeah like Danny's or something that's that's it. How did I know that? And why have I never been there. Oh because it's too good to see you might become an addict addict. The line is too long it is long is really live especially on a hot summer day. Well then let's not go on a hot summer day. Speaking of hot summer days. I think we have some listener manual. Yeah great transition keeping this is. This is hot off the presses. This is amazing. Fifteen minutes ago like fifteen minutes ago listener mail All about our previous episode on the Clown Motel so This is really exciting. I had something else planned for Listener Mail but we will save that for some other week because we've got An anonymous Lou a request to be anonymous listener mail. Wow Yeah all right so you guys ready I definitely am ready. Okay Mondo you haven't heard this okay. You did hear the con- Motel Episode Right. Did okay okay okay. Mondo does his homework he does. He doesn't come unprepared. No He's always prepared. Okay all right listen to every episode twice twice twice. Is that why our numbers are so good we have at least two downloads per episode. Then right right all right. So here's the message which in regards to the clown motel. I've been saying there since it was thirty one dollars a night. WHOA hold on thirty one dollars a night? I know I know so. Oh a couple of things but please keep this anonymous K.. So per chetty was not a doting motel tell owner. He's slum Lord who owns a lot of the town and US poor people to do maintenance which is why screws holding in laminate flooring are are baseboards etc to suffer a second. So screws holding in laminate is that bad Yeah that's where you get squeaks and all that oh no boggling buckling and things like that. Laminate floors are supposed to float. You know they just click together but there's actually nothing that's holding them down so if you take a screw and then you screw it down then Eh. CAN'T CON- would naturally expands. But it'll buckle interesting squeak interest. Now this is not the current owner. I just want to emphasize that that he's talking about so you're talking about her. Owner seems really cool. It is updating a lot of stuff so I don't WanNa go it's okay to go in. A person has a relationship with Tony Pause while this person would know right person yes. I'm so sorry I skipped US A. Ah Please keep us anonymous because I do work in Tonopah at times he said okay The clowns were out there just as a kitch kitsch it opened oh as kitsch. It opened when theme motels were big and kids would want to stop there. Finally it's not haunted. The maintenance crews for years walked the property nonstop so those footsteps maintenance knocks you hear three three doors down you hear actually heard three four three doors down there pretty good okay go ahead. I'm sorry The the cemetery haunted. Perhaps little known. Fact is that's not the full cemetery. The map was read wrong so so where the fence is is just a portion of the bodies that down a hill slope up under the abandoned barn structure up the hill all bodies. They are going into leave there. Because the cost to relocate at name is to our to locate a name is too much Finally we'll tell you or at least told me the clowns never removed and the lady in red is at the Mitzvah a hotel and not a school and was a prostitute chained to a radiator. I believe the story goes. Wow so that's a correction there at the end but yeah so he basically saying that the previous owner is like not haunted. Wow I wish we would ahead this for the episode might have won the polls. Well I guess it is time for the pulse. Oh No we don't need to do the polls you know we always have to do that. I mean I I think. That's kind of an outdated thing that we do on the podcast and I we should he wish you think I think we should do the pulse. Mondo what do you think you have after the polls and it just has to happen. I'm sorry we know how this is going to an hurry. And it's like a band aid ripping off. Okay do it right okay. Okay so here here. We go and the latest episode. We talked about the Klein Motel. Yeah and the polls were really close all week. People were like lobbying online line. Like you gotTa vote for like it was really there. Were people lobbying for you know. No actually they were lobbying for you for me and they were like pats right. We gotTA GIVE PAT the win. What I know they're like this is obviously just a gimmick to get people to come to the motel? There's no way it's haunted. You were very very supportive. So you're believers I even in some people that are typically believers were saying so in the end in the end it was a one. Vote Difference Mondo did you vote. I didn't ah I always do but this time I I just didn't what would would you voted. I actually would have voted for you for whom I would have voted for for the. The place is not haunted. Oh really yeah I lost by one. Vote Man I'm going to be so upset with you. That's it now. Let's just be careful folks. I want to step away from the like voting for PAT versus Rebecca. Because you know there are hey I mean there might be times when pat thinks like no. It's totally haunted. I mean that could happen. No I'm sorry if I if I didn't like I just meant for believers ever said that he's on yes I understand I just want to say that Okay okay so in the end it was fifty one to forty nine so close. No no what the knows one. I right one. Yes yes you one again. The knows one. That's me I'm no. I'm the king of the nose. UH-HUH I one. Yes see. I told you we need to do the polls every single episode your important that. They're using their fake. Where's the confetti weaving through so let the record show from now on no matter who wins the poll? They are valid because I do not always win. Well he's not always win. I mean minions are definitely a lot better than That's not also that's the other her sister Anna Anna by Chris Kristen Bell Who's one of my favorites and of course autism chameleons minions are cool. Whatever on is awesome? I mean look at the minions he even has a hat on his hair. Oh he has hair on like a shark or something like that on squirming. Yeah exactly so as so as ANA so anyways okay okay all right wow this oh wow there's a lot of talk about the clown motel again. Yes and I really enjoy doing that. Episode it was one of our shorter episodes because there wasn't much history. What a newer things that we've done? It was like the eighties five eighty five today. We're that's not going to be the case. No today's going to be a longer rep assode so I hope you guys all have your pop tarts in your doctor pepper ready. I do things here. Christmas cookies Christmas cookies. He's Christmas is coming. Christmas is coming the most ghostly as time of the year. Yes definitely you ready to tell us the story about. WHO's Yes? Okay you guys ready Yes yes. We're not allowed to talk during her during her ghost story. Sean listen you make sure that when she tells her make believe story that we are not allowed to talk because it sets the mood. Oh yeah yeah no I have to tell me twice all right. You're the only one that's weirded out by that. Okay you and your friend have a mission find a house suitable to house your idea to serve the community and help bring people together and improve the lives of women and children the neighborhood so you show up to a place. You're pretty sure is going to be the one the agent gives you a tour of the downstairs and it's amazing this. The large property has many rooms. That will work really well for the services. You envision but the agent Balks at showing you the upstairs you questioner dinner. How can you know if this property will work for you? If you can't even see half of it eventually she relents and takes you upstairs. Everything looks beautiful beautiful except there's just one weird thing. There's a pitcher of water sitting in front of the door to the attic. When you question the agent agent she tries to laugh it off and director attention elsewhere? But you just can't let it go. It's so odd. The agent finally relents and tells you the previous tenants claim that the spirit of a woman haunts the attic and she would come downstairs and be seen wandering around so they put the water out in the belief that spirits could not pass over running water. You'll laugh at the silliness but after leaving you start to wonder why the agent was so nervous about showing you the upstairs. And why didn't she just remove the pitcher so this is like a second hand. Go story coming like this is. You're you're envisioning Jane Addams uh-huh in this story. I am yeah so gene Adams is talking to the agent. The real estate agent is kind of person and that person has a ghost story so coming from that person to Jane Addams to okay and this is a real this is based on again a real thing. Yeah Wow wow. So we'll we'll learn more about it later. Yeah so we have a lot of history coming up so maybe we should take a quick break. I I like and then we will come back to the history sounds good a true believers. It's Dr David nickname that's right. I'M A legit PhD. Anyway there's still a ton of truth out there so we're coming back for season three. It starts February twenty eighth twenty twenty twenty twenty s a leap year so February twenty ninth day. We don't dare post on that day because as you know leap day. He's the sports. Once quadrennial laundry day it gets messy. Any he'll frequently week season three very twenty eighth. Elizabeth will be there too All right so we're back in our GONNA talk about the history of whole house whole house. It's it's history. He is really really great. I mean a lot of great things happen in that building. Yeah and we're not just talking about hall houses the Charity No. I know you're talking about. Yeah we're talking about the building and everything that happened in that building Although whole house when it became more when it became became a settlement was up to thirteen buildings but we're talking about specifically the Charles Holes Mansion. which is the place is that we saw yes last year? Only place still stand. So whole house was one of America's most famous settlement houses. The people that owned whole house were some of the most I am mazing in PHILOTHRANPIC Filat philanthropy philanthropic philanthropic people in. Chicago's history. This is more of a history of three people in a house. So we have Charles J halt. We have Helen Culver. And we have Jane Addams so we're going to start the story with Charles j hall as we should He. He was born in eighteen twenty and died in eighteen. Eighty nine and I couldn't find much about the original owner and name Giver of Whole House. But I found his obituary and thought it summed up a good man's life and thought I'd read it here. If that's okay with you guys. I like that we have some kind of primary source material. Yes episode. It's pretty good. Yeah absolutely so I do WANNA state. Though that this was written in a very different time this was written in eighteen. Eighty nine and the language M- may now be kind of offensive in some areas. I think the intent of the writer was not to be offensive. It was to show that he helped many people in his life to show that Charles. Yes yeah not the writer writer. The writer might have I don't know so. CJ is dead. That's been sure in the well known Chicago millionaire dies at Houston Texas the remains of Charles J hall who died at Houston. Texas Tuesday are in route to Chicago and are expected to rise about Friday noon. I like how it's like about. They don't know for sure but about a cousin. Cousin of the deceased Miss Helen. Culver has gone to meet in return with the body and to her are left the arrangements for the funeral and burial. Hello Charles J hall had for the last forty years been prominently identified with business interest of Chicago. He was born in the little village of Manchester Connecticut in Eighteen Ninety eighteen twenty eighteen twenty. I'm sorry that's it's an old newspaper clipping it's hard to read There was nothing. There was nothing in the poor and lowly surroundings of his youth calculated to stimulate the ambition which even at an early age he began to inspire him while yet a boy his father died and he went to live with his grandfather. who was was a proprietor of a small hotel in central on New York? Here he acquired an education such as the common schools of that day could could give one about twenty years of age. He he taught in a district school and in eighteen forty six he. He came to Chicago and studied law subsequently he entered the Law Department of Harvard from which he graduated so he's a Harvard graduate. Yeah Yeah He again returned to Chicago because he loved Chicago and Practiced Law and engaged in real estate. Business it was to the ladder that he that he paid the most attention and was one of the first to inaugurate the now general system of subdividing and planning cladding suburban properties and selling into installment selling them into installment plans. He was successful in this work and in a few years accumulated considerable wealth but he with many others suffered in the financial crash of eighteen fifty. Seven there's always financial crisis in in every lifetime. It seems got. Yeah when when the panic was over he was one one million dollars in debt well in eighteen fifty seven. It's like a billion. Yeah definitely though this guy a millionaire at the time. Yeah Yeah. It's just insane but he lived to see the day when every penny of it was repaid. So he didn't just file bankruptcy Z.. Year something like that he he repaid it well After the war he went to Savannah when he introduced his idea of providing the working class class and Negroes with homes on the installment plan. It's a that's cool so he basically the idea of you don't have to have all the money upfront witch. I mean in those days being poor was a death sentence. You would die of poor. Yeah well I think it still is. Sometimes uh-huh no but there's like welfare and stuff like that it wasn't Jane Addams was one of the people that started that system going where the poor didn't it wasn't a death sentence necessarily early. You're just something to overcome but like to help people to to be able to be property owners and yeah that's exciting. Yeah so it. It proved a success. Success there as it did afterwards in Baltimore Jacksonville. Florida Houston Texas Lincoln Blair and Ashland Nebraska and Cairo Illinois where he put the planet execution in a letter from Savannah to a friend he said our enterprise is is not a land speculation we are endeavouring to distribute the land adjoining certain large cities among the poor. If I succeed in carrying out our ideas to its legitimate results the question of what is to be done with the proper. The outcast in the criminal will be solved so Mr Hall was a man of indefatigable energy but he did not cultivate these these qualities to the detriment of others higher. He was a philanthropist. He was one of the founders. And the first president of the Washingtonian home a trustee trustee of in a liberal donator to the University of Chicago an active worker in the cause of prohibition the convicts of the Baltimore Penitentiary Century remember him not alone for his many acts of of benevolence but for his weekly Sunday visits and talks for years. Every Sunday Sunday. He gave a talk to the inmate of the of the bridewell in Chicago. Any devoted much time to the question of prison reform. He was ever active tip and just prior to his departure for Texas upon business he boasted of having never taken a play day in forty years. I take plenty of play days. He leaves no immediate relatives. His wife died some thirty years ago. That might come up later on thirty years ago and and his three children since that time his wealth is estimated to be between four million and five million dollars in eighteen eighty nine. Wow how wow. Yeah that's that's amazing. More people need to be like Charles Hall. I mean just think about that. I mean how much he traveled to. You mean he w- he didn't just. It's so this. This is amazing because I think we always think of whole house we all think of Jane. ADDAMS WE'RE GONNA talk about her and all the amazing thing she did. Yes us but we don't realize that she chose or things were named after this man. It's a house I I always thought it just smet some like it had a a meaning that had to do with helping the poor something that I just didn't know I didn't realize it was named after person. Yeah And so this is so great to learn about and it started human. I mean think of all the things that he did in that in that house all the decisions that he made to help the poor uh-huh and then to think about you know. Helen Culver came after him which also was flint oppressed. We're GONNA find out and then Jane Addams. I mean this. This house is symbolic of good. Yes definitely and the name house is a says should be synonymous with good cut absolutely so the building. It's at eight hundred South Hall said Street in Eighteen Fifty six so the way that this was written. I got this from the wikipedia page. I wonder if the address has changed. Oh I don't know so I don't remember exactly what it is but it says in eighteen fifty six so it made amy think that either that or it was just talking about because it was built in eighteen fifty six. The building was located in what had once been a fashionable part of town. So a the picture I took when we got there the address as eight hundred South Halston. Okay so it just has to do with the idea that it was built at that time in eighteen eighty nine nine. When Charles hold died it was not located in the best of areas so It was partly due to the rapid an overwhelming influx flux of immigrants into the near West side neighborhood So we were talking before the show me. Amanda were talking before the show and this was this. This was a couple of blocks north of Maxwell street right correct so I remember Maxwell Street growing up it definitely was not one of the best neighborhoods. No but so. I felt safe there. For some reason. You ever go get a maxwell street Polish at like three in the morning and you feel safe. No no yeah I. I got a Polish. At that time I did not feel safe. I had somebody asking if I wonder by hubcaps and tires. Did you buy the hubcaps. No I got my Ooh my food and got out. I'm not sure where the hubcaps Harris. Yeah an interesting story about that areas. My mother was driving home from job on the north side and she was coming home at about three in the morning and what they would do is they would take pieces of tires. The people I mean that that whole area for people that aren't from Chicago have to understand it. was you know just a a real bad area. There were people living in shacks. I mean mean this is twenty years ago and people lived in shacks out there long hosted street but also when people are talking about like Chicago Blues. Yeah that's where it started Maxwell Street right right. Yeah well what they did. is they put a bunch of nails in peace. It tired and they threw it out there. My mother got a flat between three and four in the morning. Oh man and she just stayed in her car and she said the the car directly behind her happen to be a tow truck like oh how convenient it actually was was. The guy lived a block away from US and he said Lady I gotTa get you Outta here. took her away. Oh thank brought her home lab. I always felt safe. Because of you know people bartering and stuff like that over the prices and stuff I I don't know I just like it was a predominantly black neighborhood and I felt safe is a white guy just standing in this neighborhood. It was really weird to me. Yeah I mean I I never had any issues where somebody bothered me or anything like that. It's just you know it. Just the rest of the city was kind of cleaning up and it just seemed like a forgotten dot area at the time but you had mentioned people living in shacks and that is exactly the kind of area that Jane addams wanted to go into true so now you guys are talking in the past tense. That it was it was that. How would you describe this area today? Fine it's beautiful. I mean it's amazing what it looks like. Now there's townhomes all the high end restaurants it's it's nightlife and you would never suspect at that. But that's very anti Jane addams though I would say I mean Adam's didn't wanNA keep bad neighborhoods bad neighborhoods. But she wanted all of us to Meld together into one right before the. Yeah on the plus side I it. It's just there are a lot of student dorms. They're they're also so I think thank you. I see is whole houses which is two blocks. North of Maxwell Street yeah UIC moved Maxwell Street right. The House of I mean the home of Chicago Blues the home of getting a good deal on hubcap. If you bought those hubcaps man. You would have loved them. I probably just would have bought the hub capsule that the guy would leave me alone. Maybe hang on. The Wall isn't Memento. Don't go out at three in the morning. Just reminder but those Polish sausage man they were good. They're very good they're worth it definitely will say. USC IS EXPANDING A lot. It's it's it's grown a lot. They're building a lot in that area. So so Charles Hall gave the House to his cousin mentioned in his obituary. Helen Culver all firm. And I'm GonNa talk a little bit about how in culver to Helen. Helen Culvert was living in dekalb Illinois. Not Too far from US know and we have at least one listener that lives in that area that some of our listeners may be familiar with it. We're not GONNA name names. Yeah we can't name names because we don't want no people to go to decouple looking for him in eighteen fifty three. She started a private school in Sycamore Illinois in an abandoned schoolhouse and taught at the Dow Academy. I like us. She took over an abandoned school. House was like nope. This is still a schoolhouse. It's not abandoned in eighteen fifty. Four more she moved to Chicago and served as a teacher and principal in various Chicago schools. And when Charles Holes Wife Died Helen Culver and Charles Hall became closer. Helen eventually started teaching Charles Holes children as well so she was like a private teacher for his children. She was a nurse during the civil war. She started working with her cousin Charles Hall in eighteen sixty eight and continued until she died so she became an official employee of his in eighteen. Sixty eight GOTCHA. Even though she worked with them before that she inherited not just whole house but Charles Business after his death so that four million five million dollars inherited. At least the lion share of that well She was a philanthropist as well and donated whole house to Jane Atoms as well as much as well as much needed. Start up money. And at first she just rented Hall House Jane Addams for no money and then eventually gave her the house well. Helen covert died in nineteen twenty five and again that kind of goes with Charles Holes Plan it sounds like like where he was all about. You know trying to help people get to a place where they could own something. Yeah you know absolutely early so it just kind of carried out that mission yeah so You know what Rebecca. Why don't you do the Jane addams portion? Because I know you're a huge Jane addams Adams Fan. I I am I you know I in doing my research for this episode I. This is one of the Times I felt sad that we only have this two weeks to do our research like I. I really wish I I need to go find a book. I need to find an author. So she she wrote actually about the whole house. Oh well that would be better twenty years. It's like I think it's called twenty years of the whole house band. Yeah that in a biography Fee and I just need to read a lot more about her because there's so much more to her than even just whole house he's a fascinating definitely was part of the suffrage Fridge Movement GonNa get. What's the name of the book? Twenty years I don't know I'm Oh that's me trying to remember of the countless things that I've seen in research okay. Gene Adams wrote a book about Whole House twenty years and it had to do with twenty years of whole house. I don't know if that's the exact title the good the bed and the baby twenty years of whole house by Jane Addams. Wow look at that man. My memories good today is this is going on my list for The holidays all right all right so this is definitely a high high level overview her life fascinating again all we can do is just mentioned some the highlights and hope That inspires all of us to to learn more better sh- yeah so fascinating so she was born in and was buried in Cedar Ville Illinois which. I don't know where that is. Is Anybody know mental. I do. It's west okay. Yeah it's it's One one county from Iowa Oh okay yeah. Yeah that's that's over there. It's North West. Okay okay. All right that works And she she was many things in her in her life She was a settlement activist. Obviously we will learn more about that. She was a reformer. You're a social worker. A peace advocate An sociologist a public administrator. As you mentioned an author actually for jet as far as social workers go she is sometimes known as the first social worker. I could absolutely see that. Yeah I could see that you know we have a lot a lot of Students School I work at a college over GATT where There's I just WANNA help people so help people and you know social social work public advocacy socio sociology. Those are all great fields to go into. That's what you're interested so All right so she was born on September sixth eighteen sixty. She was the youngest obey children by the time she was eight four four siblings and her mother had passed. Wow so yeah I mean again and back then this was you know it was just. Yeah you had a lot of kids. 'cause they didn't always make it so She actually herself had to burke yellow sus the spine pots disease not to be confused with regular tuberculosis. 'cause I've heard I've heard people in a couple of youtube videos that I watched about about her talk about that. She had to Urculo Sus. It was not the same thing parts disease a little bit different. Yeah because this. Is You know tuberculosis. You think of his is coughing and it's kind of a different thing but yeah so this was a cost her spine to curve and it was just an ongoing issue for her throughout her whole life. Any pictures you you see of her. You'll see her kind of you know hunched over so she had a limp and she kinda thought herself ugly especially as a child She Eh remembered not wanting to embarrass her father when he was dressed in his Sunday. Best by walking on the street with him she's Kinda felt about that she. She idolized her father to absolutely Italy and her father John H atoms Was One of the founding members of the Republican Party in Illinois And he was a state senator and so therefore friends as with Lincoln which was kind of like the family's claim to fame. is she jane growing up. That was a big deal he helped can get get elected. Yeah exactly yeah I mean if I mean. Lincoln was part of the founding of Republican Party. So that was a whole big big thing And Yeah Basically I. This fact is mentioned in every thing I've right about her is always like an our father was friends with Lincoln. That's no one skips that point She became interested in helping the poor When she read Doc Dickens Charles Dickens so you know if read about any read any of his novels it's always about Kinda have pletikosa Sir. Can I have some more. You know. He's very No but he's he's a famous famous for kind of exposing the poor. Yes and so that kind of you know. Even though she didn't grow up in a city she was able to Kinda see that. Well we turned a blind. We always turn a blind eye to people less fortunate than us. We walk right by them in the streets. I try to get to know the homeless people around. You know where I work and and stuff I I talk with them. There's They they don't listen to the bide cast. I don't think they don't even know about the podcast. But there's James The homeless guy that never remembers me. He thinks I carry money with me all the time. I have to tell them every day. I don't carry money James and One time He he asked me for for a dollar and I said I will give you the dollar if you tell me my name and I just introduce myself to him yesterday the day before that in James was like your name is Robert like no your name is James. Your name is not counted. He Yeah listed about ten names and then I gave from the does is GonNa say please tell me gave him the dollar but I like held it over his head. A little bit numb I gave him. The dollar. James is cool. Okay Mondo are you friends with any almost people I have been I I hear that but but the hubcaps we weren't. We weren't friends long after that conversation. You know it's like the friendship is we. Were we were very. We were on friendly terms at that time and it was like yeah so nobody should ever try to sell you hubcaps. No that's a Shirley to unfriendly us. Yeah I'm waiting in line for food. Come on you want you want your Polish sausage. Yeah that's all nothing against. Yeah nothing it gets the hubcaps but yeah okay so unlike some of us As a child Jane addams wanted to be your doctor so she could work with the poor like I have to say. I was not that altruistic as long as an adult. I've I've definitely changed my career path so I can Hopefully be of more help people but I wanted to be a saint. Oh there you go. I wanted to be when I grew up here. It's not too late still could happen. No it's too late uh-huh too late that doesn't happen till after you're gone you know so they could. You could do some amazing thing. Look there's there's a reason why I'm not going for president when the when the obituary obituaries written Patrick Harrington is dead as died. Put all kinds of Nice things in there could be. Nobody will ever know. They won't go. I'm sure they all right Okay so this is She was one of the first generation of women in America to graduate from College. She graduated in the top of her class from rockford female seminary in eighteen. Eighty one so she was this new generation of college educated independent women that historians call the new women so it was a seminary isn't that for like nuns I mean I think that's kind of the old school term but I don't I don't think that necessarily I think it may be that it was kind of a religious focus education but it was still college She herself I didn't put this in here where she herself wasn't necessarily Super Uber Christian. Okay like she was Christian in the fact that like she's crocheted but like she kind of was bothered sometimes by the extreme Christianity. That would be out there so she cut a shied away from that but I think part of that was actually going to school there. Greenberg correctly Her father died unfortunately when she was in her twenties of appendicitis she inherited fifty thousand dollars. which was the equivalent? This is what I read of one. Point three million in today's money so now let's backtrack a second. If Charles whole that knows in the billion five million right that's billions right. I just So she moved to Philadelphia with some family members and begin to go go to medical school which was her dream Unfortunately she needed to have a spinal operation because she had that to work yellow spine and basically kind of all of this this the the stress of being a medical school It just do caused her to have a nervous breakdown basically yeah like she I think again father Father Dying family dead. You know but also physically struggling to do the work but also I think for her. It was much more about she wanted to help. Yeah yeah people not necessarily the medical part of it absolutely you know and so this combined with her stepmother getting ill meant that she just she had to stop going to school medical medical school and she Did not become a doctor and she moved back to Cedar Vo so for the next few years she travelled on and off but in eighteen eighty eight she visited had her friend Ellen Gates Starr London. The pair visited Tone Abi Hall which was a settlement on the city's east end that provided much needed services to poor industrial astro workers and Adams basically vowed at that point to bring the model to the United States And I think you had said You told me this that she actually had read about settlement limit houses before as well this was just her actually seeing it in action. Yeah and you said two. She travelled to some other places as well without without star. Yeah just just to see them how they worked. Yes so basically. That's the reason why she went to Europe was to visit the settlement houses. It was for nothing else. uh-huh vacation no. She had planned out all of these places to see and to bring this new concept to America. Yeah this is. She's like this is it. This is what I want and so I thought it'd be helpful to have a definition of a settlement house which by the way I think she had her own kind of variation on this But for her a settlement house was a place that tried to lower the boundaries between culture class in education can like what you said earlier. She wanted to bring everybody together. It wasn't that she just wanted to help the poor. It was more like we need to all get to know each other. We all work together and I want to help everybody. Even even you know people that have money still have issues news. You know just like everybody and so there could be a community art center and social service facilities again just kind of bringing needed again not just about like I'm going to give you money. You know but it was like I'm going to give. I'm going to have a kinder- kindergartens gardens in preschools and training for people and you know and also just to get in place for us to hang out and get to know each other so that we're not strangers. You know absolutely absolutely so they can learn from each other one another and seek common ground and then go into action in now because maybe then these women that have money meet these these people and realize they're good people at great ideas but just don't have the money to facilitate these ideas. So that's all that I have is money. I don't have have great ideas. So let's out to that person and yeah exactly So in one thousand nine thousand nine. After Charles Whole Past Adams Alan Gate Star co-founded Whole House September in Chicago in September. The house was Anita prepares upgrading. Jane would pay for a lot of the repairs until the People Chicago started. Chipping in so once it started to become like a bigger thing. Then she started to get money for and as you said also expand beyond just the original house The wealthy woman of Chicago including Helen. Culver as you said donated but she also gave money to up the grading and yeah fixing up. The whole house was the Center for Research Empirical Analysis so again that's where the sociology in the social work comes in it was science. So you know it was about getting data that you could then use to justify programs. studied debate as well as a pragmatic center for living in and establishing good relations and with the neighborhood so again people did live there. It was epic it also came there at daily basis or weekly or a monthly right. It was some place some people just by some people just brought their children there for kindergarten. Yeah exactly that. The aim aims of the house was to give privileged educated young people contact act with the real life of the majority of the population. So I think also too again. I mentioned the the new women's rights. There's this group of educated women that come from money and they want WanNa do something with their life they don't just want to like from the you know the first in Europe and if you hundred years before it would just be about tea parties and you know living your fancy lay. I like finger sandwiches right exactly but but now not that they still. I didn't do that but They wanted to have more meaning than that whole house. Was this opportunity. If like a safe space that you could go and meet people At help people same thinking of the neighborhood that it was in after Imia Mondo were talking about the Maxwell Street. It really fits into that neighborhood. I don't think it could be in a wealthy neighborhood and have the poor come into the neighborhood to to live. I think that the rich people would have been upset right right so you go into a poor community and have rich people move in. They love the love that so so again. Not all of them but they're actually were residents the whole house that were well educated. You know what I mean. It wasn't just like a place where poor people to live. It was a lot of immigrants to move there so they all showed a commitment to labor unions unions the National Consumer League and the suffrage movement. Yeah so lots of work with that Starting Adams developed three ethical principles for social sediments to teach by example to practice cooperation and to practice social democracy that is egalitarian or democratic. Social Relations Across class lines whole house wasn't just it's about helping women. It also stressed the importance of the role of children in the Americanization processes for new immigrants so They had several programs for children. Children Art drama kindergarten classes boys and girls clubs language classes reading groups. College Extension Courses Along with Public Baths Gymnasium Labor Uber Museum and playground all with free speech atmosphere. She was also an advocate for children in nineteen. Oh seven. Adams was a funding member of the National Child Labor Committee which played a significant if a role in the passage of the Federal Child Labor Law. Yeah Thousand Nine Hundred Sixteen. Wow Won't Mondo I know that you were part of a union at one time time and you know a lot about the history of the unions right. Yeah they give you a book actually. They had us read debt. And some of the pictures and the with the Haymarket Yeah yeah the haymarket. You remember the year that I don't know off top my head Once eighteen fifty something no eighteen eighties eighteen eighteen. Ucla and it also showed pictures of kids standing in line waiting for their wages with no shoes on. Yeah there was a lot of child labor AH IN CHICAGO EVEN around Maxwell Street. Oh yeah that was. A part of it There was a video. I watched where somebody was talking about. The first time mm-hmm that they drove down halstead. which was Maxwell Street? You know at that point and Saying how there was So you know there was a bunch of crime and child labor everywhere yeah. Eighteen eighty six eighteen eighty six so it was a relatively new idea than that they were. They were in support of but I mean without that we wouldn't have vacations. We wouldn't have sick. Pay Eight hour days you know. Yeah where did you guys Either of you part of a boys club like a boy or girl club. Whatever like I don't know I was involved with the Y.? Yeah Edwin I was in the boys club. Yeah there was a helpful to keep you on track. Yeah Yeah I mean where else can you go in the middle of winter and you know they had had a woodshop or go swimming and things like that after school and crafts for kids and yeah it was fun. Yeah I was. I was a Brownie for like two two years. I was never made it to girl scout cookies. I just didn't care for it. Thank it wasn't my thing you don't want to be around other people too cool for that uh-huh okay all right so a lot of the things that that we enjoy today and I must say that she started all of those but she definitely brought a lot of them to the Chicago area for sure I was just thinking of that could there have been a YMCA MCA without a Jane. addams could there have been a boys and girls club without Jane. addams I I don't I don't think so or wouldn't be the same that it that. It is today Rhino where there are safe places for children to go after school. Yeah absolutely yeah that's big absolutely eh So some other things just a few more again. She had a big life even beyond whole house. She was president of the National Conference of charities and corrections from from nineteen o nine to nineteen fifteen the first woman to hold that title and became active in the women's suffrage movement as an officer in the National American Women Suffrage Association and Pro pro suffrage columnist. She was also among the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People the N. Double ACP. So what is the suffrage movement. Can you sum that up. Yup well the suffrage movement is all about women's right to vote okay. Next year is going to be the one hundred year anniversary of the passage of the EH twentieth amendment. So I'm super excited because like when you say like pro suffrage it sounds like it. Sounds like the pro people suffering. Yeah isn't just about women. Voting Rights all voting rights suffrage movement was specifically focused on. I know women I know a lot of it was like it's no we are women. We have a different perspective on the world and therefore we should vote right absolutely is that we were the we run the household. We raise the kids and so we should have have a voice in how those how things are governed. Yeah it makes a lot of sense. I don't know why people didn't see it before but yeah well that's the episode. Have some other podcast. We're not on. You gotta get to the ghosts people. We're not at the Gold Coast here. This is just we're just talking. There's there's so many things to talk about yet okay. Inspired by Tolstoy Jane. Jane addams was a devout pacifist. She was a huge She spoke out against world. War One And here's the thing about World War One that I learned wooller one was actually a lot more or like Vietnam than World War Two when it comes to whether or not people agreed. We should join we'll because they didn't attack America right. Once you attack America. That was our way of getting into plus which by the way. What was it yesterday or day? Before was the anniversary of Pearl Harbor Harbor. Yeah yeah the six they think right yes so seven thirty sevens yes or the fifth or the sixth seven. Sorry sorry older people. Sorry but the idea though that you know it wasn't a universal thing because because we're one was so like well this treaty says that if they attack you we gotta go you know like it was just a different thing but anyways but people were upset with her it did ding her popularity for a little bit at the time but she for her really it was more. It wasn't about that war. She just hated alwar she just was someone that was like. No the only way that we can we can solve. These things is with talking. You know we don't need to go to war But basically it led to her being the first American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen thirty-one. Good okay so this last part is a little bit more personal and is a matter of debate among historians people. This some of it is I mean some of these things are facts is just how you interpret those facts. One one word of what you're going to say is debatable. Yes but important word so Jane addams was Romantically tied with only two partners. That's the word that's the where the romantically part so so again. We're just you know I. We are two thousand. Nineteen we're going we're going forward and will interpret this in baby away that they wouldn't have back them but she was Linked with Ellen Star who we remember was who she went with originally to London and all of that yes And then later Mary Rosette Smith which actually would have Would have not been a part of history if not related the gene atoms we we actually forgot all about Mary Smith and she was a major contributor if not the biggest contributor to whole house not was doing a lot of the work while Jane was going off in giving speeches. off-side yeah so. Mary Smith and Adams live their life basically kind of as if they were married right. Well they said they said how you interpret that again you know. They remained together until Mary died in eighteen. Thirty four Jane Colter Dearest One. It was said that Marietta Mary Smith became and always remained the highest and clearest note in the music that was Jane addams personal life. Aw oft very sweet Early in nineteen thirty four. Jane had a heart attack and Smith nurse sure at home neglecting. Her own illness So Smith succumbed to pneumonia. Yeah fell into a coma and died on February twenty second nineteen thirty four. Wow so she put herself she. She helped Jane to the detriment of herself. Yes so I thought it'd be appropriate to Read a poem that Jane addams wrote to Mary Smith. Okay okay because you know I like poetry all right. One day I came into whole house. No spirit whispered who was there and in the kindergarten room there sat upon a childish chair. A girl both tall and fair to see to look at her gives one a thrill but all I thought was would she be best fitted to lead club or drill. You see I had forgotten love and only thought of Hull House. Then that is the way with women folks when they a attempts things of men they grow intense and loved the thing which claims from them a smile or tear like mothers who work long and late to rear their children fittingly follow them only with their eyes and love them almost pityingly so I was blind and deaf those years to all all save one absorbing care and did not guess what now I know delivering love was sitting there. is very touching. Yeah I was written by Jane. addams J madams. Wow Yeah She died on May Twenty First Nineteen thirty five at the age of seventy four of cancer those like year after after. Yeah Yeah when she died she was the best known pub. Female public figure in the United States House and the Peace Movement are widely recognized as is the key tangible remnants pillars of her legacy December tenth as you mentioned is Jane Addams Day and celebrated in Chicago. There's a park located near Navy appeared Chicago named after her as well as an entire tollway. Jane addams Memorial Tollway. That was more recent. That was pretty recent. Isn't it the Ronald Reagan. And is that the Reagan one eight right it's eighty eight. Yeah I'm pretty sure Mondo Mondo or Chicago guy it. I'm getting to the point where I just tune it out when I hear it on the radio every morning driving a chain well it so work as it could to be like the same road but they call it different names and different sections and Chicago can be really confusing. I still I'm. I'm just that person that likes. Go by what I know. The numbers senators and fifty five. It's not the Eisenhower the to ninety even and I do the same thing with all of our trained Sir Chicago two. We have the red line. The orange line the green light will they used to be the Howard. Line the Ravens. Would I still think that way. I don't think that way I think of them as the red color. Yeah Yeah what do you think of Ogilvy. Do you think it's still. What was the mattress station? Northwestern North Western station. I've all I've switched toby. Yeah okay all right all right moving on Oh Jeez okay so we are finally onto the one of the biggest stories and the reason that people associate this with haunting yeah. It's a shame that we that we take all all of this greatness and people when you say whole house this is the story that they bring up Yup pretty much. So there's it's one more bit of history that we should talk talk about when we talk about whole house. And that's the devil baby ever obey the devil. The Devil Baby. Oh Yeah Oh all right. I don't have a song but I don't have a song either. Thanks for giving me time to think of this Dave obey ban. Just your URA era. So the devil baby legend was a local story that immigrants and deeply religious people especially Catholics wchs started to tell it was in nineteen thirteen and a Catholic woman married an atheist right. The man refused to have a picture of the Virgin Mary on his wall saying that he would rather have the devil in his house than a picture of the Virgin Mary that can be arranged. And there's there's very things people say that he ripped up the picture other people said he just was like Nah. I'm good. I don't want that. The baby was born with cloven. Hooves pointed ears in a tail. It spoke in profanity as soon as it was born. The baby comes out and it's like yeah so as soon as he was born he ran around the table shaking his finger at his father in some stories say that the baby snatched a cigar from his father's lips the fathers soon caught him and took him to whole house supposedly Jane Addams kept him in the attic and denied his existence to anyone that came to the house. Some stories say that Jean Adams Baptize the baby and other stories say that when they tried to baptize him he ran away as a baby. And it's a baby was never seen again and their stories about devil baby went to. Oh it was someplace in bridgeport really. I'm serious it's what it was. And he grew up and then later headed dance on in a ballroom and jumped out out of a win. Yes yeah crazy story. Yeah after five weeks of people talking about it. The newspaper finally did an article on it. They didn't take get serious until they just kept talking about it for five weeks. This story might have influenced the Italian bride story that we told an episode two of ghostly having having listened to that we reference devil baby. Yeah we do. And it's honestly one of our favorite episodes. I enjoy that one. It was the research was weird and yeah I'll l. after his corpse cheese. Yeah go check it out. That was you're you're you're saying. I will say though that Gene Adams and everyone wanted whole house refused the this claim that there was a devil baby but they received a lot of visitors over years. Oh yeah people. We'll just show up in phone calls. Yeah and demand like show me the devil baby. Yeah so there was a great article that was written in the Atlantic in October. Nineteen sixteen. Sixteen that we will link to our show notes all about the devil baby. So where do we stand on the devil baby do you. Are you a Believer Mondo. Oh I'd like to see the devil baby. I mean you know it's interesting. I would have been one of those people that knocked on their door. Show me the baby I heard. Yes so I mean seeing is believing course but but just hearing this. Do you think it's possible. Oh yes yeah come on. Yeah okay. Rebecca we're not necessarily I believe in this one Do I think that there could have been a baby. Born that maybe had some deformity or something and then like the midwife or the nurse that was in the room like what home it was cool there was started telling stories and then those got changed and whatever but I know I do not believe that this just because it's too who it's too out there and it's to folk taily like there's not enough based in cigar wearing running away like like I do I think if the double was born as a baby it would see his his goal would be to be raised as a regular baby so that we know yeah no that it was the devil candidate Damien. kind of like Damian. Are It so. My mother was a histology east. And she worked with the pathologist. So my mother would make slides slides for the pathologist to to look over and stuff you know whenever whenever they would do like a dissection or anything like that or like a biopsy app see or something she would make slides of that and so growing up. I asked her one day. I said what was the. What was the weirdest thing you ever saw in? She talked about a frog baby. A baby that looked like a frog. Yeah so there could be a devil baby but it's not the devil it's a deformity. Well did the baby live. No sorry. Wow spoiler alert hat frog frog. Babies are not meant to walk around this earth. Maybe looked like bb. Yoda no huge. Yeah Mondovi if he's seen have yeah he's awesome. Have you watched the show this little three finger force thing but let as Mando Mondo because he was in the last episode. They kept calling Amando Right Colin. I thought of you know. Yeah all right okay. Okay so so so. There's a reason that we included double baby in the history and not the ghost. Yeah Yeah because we don't think it's true except for Mondo maybe Mondo can keep on believing the devil baby that went to bridgeport. Yeah yeah the connections there now. I understand so once you mentioned that it was like blew my mind. Believe it Jodi was told me about that. Yeah yeah so anyways after Jane Addams died whole House kept going until it was displaced by the urban branch campus of the University of Illinois in Nineteen Sixty episode. Blame you vie as at Depaul graduate I say we blame you of I for the Sure even after that the social service center role was performed throughout the city at various locations under an umbrella association did Gene Adams Whole House Association Association until twenty twelve so Rebecca. You said You saw by department. Yeah no but I. There's Lincoln Park somewhere. I've swear. Remember walking by something and it was. I said you know Jay Dunham's whole house and so I just assumed that was the that was it. That was the one location. That was my not understanding As a college college student but yeah so today though where we stand so today whole house is a museum to Jane Addams and although the work that she did is not happing continued. It's still inspires many people to do great things it is located on the USC campus. They have classes there every once in a while. They have have lectures there. It's more lectures than anything else. Especially lectures that have to do Women's history and The I watched a video of of By the Chicago lab where they went to a Mandela speech. Or something like that. They're Mandela wasn't there but it was author of a book that wrote about it and got to see inside in the lecture hall where the kindergarten was and cool. Yeah that's awesome. So that's that's where we're at with the history well so we need to break. Yeah we nail. Yeah all right so we'll be back in a minute okay Hey Pat fall is in the air who yeah yeah it is yeah and that means cooler weather football and of course shopping shopping. Yeah School shopping. Starting College shopping got a new job. Shopping new season shopping. I like shopping shopping. Okay Okay I get it. Change means time to get some new stuff and I bet our listeners would like some ghostly gear. Oh yeah great idea. What kind of gear we talking about? I don't know how about some grossly t shirts and sweatshirts. Yeah and not just once but the ghostly slee logo because those those are really cool but How about also Hashtag team but lever to really show our team colors And Hash tag team skeptic of course so we've got men's and women's styles and even kidding baby sizes so cute. It is very cute and I also edit a phone case and a water bottle title dice. Where can our listeners? Get this great ghostly gear That's pretty easy. If you WANNA get go sagir just go sleep. PODCAST DOT COM and click merchandise up at at the top perfect ghostly podcast dot com and click on merchandise to get your great grossly gear Whole House in the middle of the street hall? Ha Ha it is owned by you. I see all right. We're ready to do this Yeah so now for something completely different. It's time to talk about ghosts on ghostly. Ghost ghost exciting. Well I think the history is giving us a good foundation foundation. I think we needed that. It's an important history. Yeah it is and I learned a lot. I'm almost ashamed that we have to bring up go stories about such a lovely flee place well James Sell Jane addams herself talked about at least one of these ghosts tuberculosis center spine then later. See Ghost when they talked about I. I've never heard to particular to the spine so it just made me think I mean it was was to break yellow person. Something from an you know. He discovered these different theater now. The history of tuberculosis and I mean to Bricusse is a disease disease of the lungs but this time it manifested in the spine and it's called something else because of that. It really doesn't have many of the same similarity so I don't even know why they would say that. I've never heard of that kind of thing before walking with a limp and it's like oh you got to Berkey loose in the knee. Yeah I know I think I've had to burke yellow so the brain a couple of times and it's caused my brain to cough and not be able to debate properly separately. Okay interesting saying all right. Let's talk about some science now first of all so we did talk about the devil baby but just is there anything anything else. We want to bring up above the devil baby. We kind of discounted that I've discounted it at longtime ago. We only one person here here. That has a belief in the devil. It's the most famous paranormal story. I don't even think it's really a ghost story. It's more kind of a paranormal all devils Bob after dark topic. Yeah that's true all right Bob. I`Ma Bob Devil Baby Bob. Yeah well after our discussion would be given a number to the devil baby a Su are ghostly ranking all right you want the first one zero to ten zero ten no Yuka. I you always go first. Oh Oh I do yeah. Zero okay zero percent that the devil manifested in baby took a cigar ligthart. I started running around the table. Swearing at him pointing his finger. was He holding a cigar if he's pointing his finger at him I there's a couple of different versions. Yeah there's also a story for Jewish people of the devil baby at help us at all house so that's another reason why whenever there's multiple stories for different the people there is no truth to it. I Zero Zero for Pat Mondo Rebecca. Why don't you no all right? All right I'll I would give it a zero I am. I'm also going to get into the club. Yeah yeah well just this once I've converted no no But this one it just does seem really farfetched and Not Not real after you read the Atlantic article where they talk about all the phone calls and the The people stopping by and it was just kind of this weird cultural the thing that people glob onto and Jane addams denied it. You're exactly and she also talked about as I'm GonNa talk about in a moment here other ghosts too that she saw So it wasn't like she didn't believe in paranormal things. So hey you know if there was it I think she would have said something. All right what are your. What's your ranking zero to ten? Well you know I grew up in bridgeport and we had the story of the guy that jumped out the ballroom that head who founded ended up for feet and landed in the concrete and he ran off to so they always run off. You know everybody from bridgeport knows that story and yeah you just just solve the mystery man it was. It was Jodi Joe. No major connection between the adult. The baby came from Joe Tony that the baby went to bridgeport. Whoa yes Jodi did it? Long Jodi Jodi. He's bridge border and yeah. Yeah in a raiders fan and yeah so could you give it a two. I'm going to give it a ten. Yeah it's a lot of people talked about it and maybe it was just a deformed me I don't know I heard from old people not just. Jody yeah I I I heard a story from somebody that lives two doors down from the ballroom into. She believed it but you know she was maybe in her seventies and she told me that. And I'm I are you kidding but okay hold on. Let me that. That's the grown up version of the IT. It just makes so much sense. Now it started started over there too soon. neighborhoods over. The Little Kid ran off screaming pointing his finger would a cigar he ended up to neighborhoods over where he probably many he lived in one of those shacks now far away maybe under the bridge in Bridgeport and one day he found a suit got a suit went to the ballroom. Dance jumped out the window. Yeah now okay it all makes you are rating. This on is based upon the idea that there could be a hoofed person but is that person the devil. Oh is the devil. The devil become a baby and Dan do all these things I guess not. So where would you stand on that with rating zero to be different. If there was an old man story you know there was old man. We're close we kind of foul it but Park area okay. It's so I guess. Ah Sorry everyone out there it was. I guess. It wasn't the devil. It was just some little breath that had deformed feet that's where would you give the devil. Evil the devil zero zero two so you went from ten to zero just on the idea of what we are talking about. And that's a lot of times what this this is is. We're talking about two different things sometime. Okay all right. So let's get into some of the real ghost stories. The ones that fake ones. Now the real ones that she'll here when you go on a ghost tour and visit whole house. which is something we did? Okay so our favorite props to Tony Props. Tony's a blouse key for being an amazing tour guide and telling us so much awesome information as Chicago. huntings Chicago Haunting Stewart. Yeah Yeah Okay. So the devil The Devil Baby. You know the the whole house has its own woman white on no known as we know you've got to have a woman in white she's back As a second floor ghost So this is the second floor for the most part. I'm just saying we're classifying. Classifying them as first floor and second floor goes on the second floor. So here's the thing. People claim that it is the wife of the late wife of trolls. Ho Okay. So the so I was reading Charles when he built the house moved into the house. Whatever it was us with his wife she died after just a few years of them being in the House with two small children and that's when the cousins started coming and helping out all of that So she did die in the home and people claim to see her you know throughout the time Of the house And maybe even still She haunts the main bedroom in the northeast corner but there are some stories kind of the attic or just different places around around kind of the upper upper floor The previous tenants of the house before Adams rented it said that they had saw the spirit for it so it was a couple of different things. it was like an elderly home for the elderly and they had furniture and stuff and there was just different. It was just a couple of different things in the little bit of time before she rented it But they were the ones the previous tenants that put the pitcher of water out. The only thing I have with that is they talk. Talk about being something about running water but pitcher isn't really running water so anyways But that that is a real thing And Adams actually actually originally slept in the room. Where Mrs Hall died and where her spirit allegedly was While she was there Adams did claim to see. See Mrs Hall a few times But she figured she really didn't think she meant any harm. She was a woman who lost her. Life didn't get to raise her babies. He's just haunted. The place Despite all of that she did decide to move to another room and They didn't close off the room though so right away they did have guests. Stay there Mrs Louise Bowen was a lifelong friend of Jane addams and she stayed there. Allegedly saw this ghost Cannon Bear Bar Net. Sorry I just found this one this morning and his wife supposedly also saw that when they were staying there So Oh and Jane and Mary Smith of themselves as mentioned claim to have seen a woman in white glide away pass through a locked door. there's a lot of sightings of this woman in white basically the kids that were there thought they saw her And she mentions this in her book the twenty years when you didn't the one that I didn't read but I put it on my Christmas list. But supposedly in her book she mentions these ghost stories. Okay so what do you guys think Mondo go first. Yes the guest let seems like a lot of people saw the same thing And for them to put a pitcher of water out there you you know that was because of something that they believed. I mean you know they did that for a reason you know. And I guess it's documented amended that they put the water the pitcher out there so I mean aside from that why would you just do that right. You know so. It's not like it it you know but there. There's this little kids that saw it. There's older people that saw it. So yeah so okay I'm going to say first of all. The pitcher of water for is because people believe that ghost cannot go through water. which would debunk a lot of her previous stories? Like the Toco fire fire and stuff like that. I mean these people died in the in the lake and the ghost somehow got up there right. They came from the person so they had to go through the lake. So but that's a belief that there was I believe this is founded in superstition. And I believe that it was superstition superstition. They've they heard that someone had died in the house so they did that just for superstition and because of that superstition because of that pitcher of water it than it made everybody see or think that they saw something or expect to see something and when anything happens it could to be The lighting's really bad. We were one of the first cities to have lights Electric Lights in You know we. We did that in eighteen ninety three so this eighteen eighty nine when Jane addams moved in there there was not electricity in there and there probably wasn't for many many years. So this is all being lit by candlelight in oil lamps guests leading gas lighting as a precursor. Yeah so it could be gas. It could be guess could be. I mean you guys are laughing but the idea is that it could be something else and the the idea of ghost is that you have to prove that there is ghost. I don't have to prove that there isn't ghost burden of proof. The burden of proof lies upon on the supernatural. Not on natural. Okay well I get are proof. Is that many people reported similar things over the years I will also state I again. found this. I had her. I read this in that. I forgot about it. Mrs Bowen who saw ghost also claimed that three separate occasions she had to put out fires. Upstairs is that started for no known origins. Singed nothing and would just go out by themselves. No known origin except for Oil Gas or candle. Hello anything like so. The Jane eventually just turned this into a storage room and addressing the theatre later on you know I just think too. Many people were complaining leaning. I just think here's the thing we do have a lot of people that Supposedly saw this but there were a lot of people over the years that lived at whole house a lot more than just five or six people so to say that a lot of people if you put it into perspective this was in a normal house. That would be a lot of people because it would. It'd be most people saw it in this particular thing we're talking about a very small percentage of people that would have seen this ghost. Well I actually. I don't know that I mean that's that's just what I found. I don't necessarily know how many people I got to read the book. I believe it starts from superstition and it carries through from that in any little thing thing that happens would be attributed to this and they all have heard the stories of the person before I have another thought but I'm a save it for save for federal arguments. Okay okay save it all right. Geez all right okay. So then Another thing that we heard about on our tour and I didn't find a whole lot about this. I'm going to be honest. This'll will be short There's the fountain girls. There's a small Park with a fountain that's just outside of the house. Where supposedly the girls Sorry the spirits of the three girls play you can hear their laughter and feel a cool breeze when they run by you. Apparently they used to play chase around the fountain and continue playing it to this day. I again I only found a couple of references to this but I do remember them talking about it. I have a picture of the Fountain area. that I took on the tour I don't know do you remember hearing anything about this or Mondo or no. I don't feel anything when you were there. Anything happened. NOPE and I walked around it. I walked around the house. Basically you could go all the way around it. But I didn't get any sense or feel for anything in orbs or anything. Not We know how much you liked the ORB so not. They're not they're no well. It's tricky because you we couldn't go in the house so like I have pictures and and they look like there's things in them but there's not because it's going you could only look through a window so I can't say that there's anything in there from my pictures but there's other pictures okay. Then I'll put on the thing. Is there any pictures of the three girls now. Not that I could any video three girls that I can find. It just seems Kinda suspicious. Their van right. There's all these stories about the three girls that play at the fountain right but we have no proof of the three girls that play at the fountain right now did you. You said you had a story about about phone girls or did you not want to tell the story with. Oh my God. You don't want me to tell that story but we don't have to sell the story that's fine you just you met some girls at once. We'll just leave it at that while under the influence. Yeah now I just remembered. We didn't do we WANNA do ra Ra rankings for the woman white and then we'll do the phone girls and then I've got one more women in in white. I'm going to give it a one. Okay woman away does a one four PAT For minded. You WANNA go next. You want me to go to sure. I'll see eh. I'll say a five because lots of people saw it and they put a you know an object there. You know the water to if I would mean that you have a lot of doubt still about about it so where where does your doubt come from this. What is your? What is your questioning? Okay I'm just asking I'll move it up then I have less dealt and more believe I'm not trying to influence your your number. I just want to know that your attempt to Syrupy more doubtful as increasing. All right so I suppose to eight to destroy them not join them Star wars quote. Yes thank you. Yes doing a rewatch right now. Getting Ready I am also giving eight for the weights. Yeah it's pretty strong. No how about the fountain girls then. Zero Zero for Pat Okay zero that they are ghost. Okay playing in the fountain Gotcha might have overheard little girls playing in the fountain in or something like that but they were not ghost okay. I'm going to also give. It didn't feel anything I haven't heard anything myself off you know about that so it's not like some okay to why would it. That have left an impression that the three girls were running around the fountain. Yeah what was so you know show about that. Yeah that would have left some type of an impression. I'M GONNA say they didn't see anything they just heard laughter and they felt felt the cold breeze. I'M GONNA give it a three. Just give a little bit of something to maybe. Some people saw some stuff there whether it was little girls. I don't know but there's obviously out the heard not not seen right. Well Yeah so how do they know. It's three girls to well. I don't know maybe there were three girls. They used to like to play there or something. I can't go back and say like there were three girls. They used to play here. I I hear voices now. Those are the three girls. You can't do that. 'cause you're actually you're you're getting your own your own experiment so the last one is this one. I remember hearing hearing There is a photo But I haven't found a good version of it and it's kind of But I will put it out on our show notes There is a the ghost of a male that appears on the stairs. Also sometimes you can see from the window and actually it's a has a monk like appearance. Looks like a monk but they people see him slowly moving up the main stairs from the foyer to the second floor where maybe he meets the lady in White I. I don't know I know. But they basically people claim also to see the chandelier move for no apparent reason. All right you WANNA go next about the monk and I mean maybe that is the impression that was left of the guy that brought. Uh I won't say devil but brought the baby upstairs. Maybe he was a monk. He was an atheist that man that was really south side. There's WHO's in east. Yeah I'd say that's exactly who it was. That was the guy in the role that brought the baby. Didn't want anybody else to see it. So that's what it is well given that. I don't believe the devil baby was there. I I don't believe I don't believe that. A baby with was dropped off there either because Jane addams and all the rest of the people there denied it and they were answering phones for months afterwards answering answering the phone going there is no devil. Baby there is no devil but I would say the same thing I mean. People are knocking on the door. And you just want them to go away. Don't you call out the news and be like. Hey Hey I have this devil baby here. I'd like to introduce them to you. Guys ran away. He's while they tried to baptize them. I wouldn't even tried to baptize devil. Baby all right so as far as this goes I have seen the picture of the man. It is an outline picture right. Yes that's actually. I've seen a better picture picture than that than the one that you're showing me right now. it is an outline distorted picture. It has no center in it. It just is an outline. I can see hands hands. Okay but maybe it's the outline of the hands that you're seeing not necessarily the hands. Can you see like wrinkles on the fingers ghost okay but but I'm just saying it's an outline picture no it doesn't look like an outline picture. It looks like a like you can see a figure. Okay well yeah you could see a form form of figure. But that's what I'm saying you don't see anything in the center you don't see is you. Don't see and I haven't looked at your picture much. I'm talking about the picture that I've seen and from what what I my first impression of it was it looked really cool. It was standing at the base of the stairs. The never saw it anywhere on the stairs in any of the pictures or anything like that so movement I I would question and therefore I'm thinking it's just some kind and of effective the camera or the lighting. That's there now the chandelier moving. That's kind of typical of an old house like that. It's GonNa Creek. It's going to move things are going to settle. It's going to happen like that. Chandeliers can move they can. They're not bolted down on all sides. So it's not that weird there dangling piece that if any weight was to if anything touched the bottom of the Chandelier Malir it moves the whole chandelier. It doesn't take much forced to do that so it could be the wind. It could be anything but if people feel like they're saying we didn't feel all gust of wind or any reason and it's I'm sure this is not just our little chandelier in our house like he did that. I did that to prove a point. I barely touched this. Show leaving. Should've let you believe actually moving right. I look down at my phone and then I looked. The Chandelier was moving. That's what happens when you don't pay attention but this is like again again chandelier in this big again. Maybe it was a situation like Mondo. Maybe maybe they weren't paying attention and all of a sudden they look up and it's moving but they didn't see me they're pushing it. I'm just saying that just because there is is this outline of a of a figure doesn't mean that there's a figure there could be. It could be an over exposure of the camera. It could be a like a duping Kinda the thing in. Although I've seen several pictures of it it makes me think that maybe there's a lighting thing it's always in the same spot that I've seen in the picture. People have also seen seen the figure like walking up the stairs. I mean this happened to be. They got a photo of it. But there there's been other sightings of this which you're acting like just because someone said something thing it's fact you don't take all that I say is fact everything that I'm saying is is debunking may but you don't believe it just because I said it. You believe everything everything that you hear other people say about something supernatural. But you don't see it. It's their word that he said that they saw. There's a confluence influence of evidence. I mean again if it several different people saw something he don't use those fancy worthless and so it's like like security guards would see the figure of the monk in the window or you know different people so it's not like it's just one time and I'm just not just totally believing one person in what they I saw was I would I believe is there's not enough evidence to say that this is a ghost or that this is a figure that's moving around. I'm saying that it could be because they took the pictures through the window could be because lighting was at the bottom of the stairs there because every picture that I have seen is from that exact spot well. I think it's just the one picture. No there's A. There's a picture in color while some of my colorized we'll see an. I'll have to look at that. I'll have to look for the color version. Yeah but I will definitely put these up Monday. What are you thinking well number? or He hasn't really said too much bad. Yeah did you you. Didn't you know the No. No no no go ahead someday. Wanted to say something that goes against the believer side just to fill people in because I was there and I looked in the windows. Does the windows were hazy. Yeah so I could easily see how a photo that somebody's taking from the outside through the glass. would easily get a reflection in. It looks like this picture was taking from the other side of the door to cause those stairs our stairs. You could see right when you're looking looking in the door right. Yes yeah so for me. That's the same perspective as what I'm seeing in that picture. Yeah they doorways yourselves. That where you just see you know. They're kind of outline. Yeah and that looks then. It looks as if it superimposed. Yeah that's that's photos from nineteen eighty still windows in one thousand nine hundred. I know but I actually. I don't know this is from a pretty famous. Dale Carr's Merrick. He's a pretty famous ghost hunter in Chicago. We've reference and some of his stuff before I would just to meet this. This particular photo doesn't look like it's through the window. There are others that definitely do and I would agree. There's definitely though they just look more hazy hazy and not as good again for me. It's not just based on the photo of all right. It's a numbers. Well actually I would like to invite that photographer photographer or that ghost hunter to come on the show and tell us what he saw. Okay because we have no perspective into what he saw just a picture that it's it's true was zoomed in a picture we see on the picture paints a thousand words but they're not all coming from the person that took the picture true we we make up our own interpretation of what a picture is and what goes on around the picture our brains automatically make make up these kind of things that happen we make our our own stories. Hey it was an orb was an orb. I wasn't sure it was previous episode code. Saint Valentine's Day massacre talking about at the site of the Valentine's Day massacre Mondo took a picture of a light inside one of his pictures pictures that moved didn't just move it zigzagged and just motion. Yeah purposeful Moshe but again human like motion Shen like like somebody's because we build around and spring the to the right and see that part. Yeah okay well I want you to look at it again. It is under Youtube Channel. If you want to check it out yes all right all right. So what what number arena give the Mail apparition and the stairs. Monk figure. I'll give it a one. Give it a one all right. We stepped it up a little bit zero zero. All right. What do you think yeah? I'm I'm not going to discount the per- you had a good point about the guy that took the picture But I have my belief about the hazing the window but I will say that the clothing that it appears that the guy has on does not look like it's from the eighties. You know it does look much shoulder so I'll give it a three and actually supposedly there's even multiple figures. I only see one but some people say they more than one in that. I don't know I'm GonNa give this one a six six six okay not as high as the woman in White But definitely still in the believers side all right okay. Where are we ready? Yeah I think we should do our closing arguments to this time all right so rebecca. Why don't you go first so this brings us to? We're closing arguments. This is our last chance to convince you to vote our way. We are each given one minute of uninterrupted time. We will time each other on our cell. Phones is to keep each other honest. I will time you rebecca if you would then time Mondo in me. I can do that all right. Let me get my timer up here. How you feeling about this? You feel like you're GonNa win this one. Guess what. Guess Wow. I was about to give you three minutes. They're all right one minute. Are you ready. Yep Go I believe if that whole house is haunted. Not by a devil baby not by the little girls necessarily running around outside but absolutely by a woman in White Charles Charles Holes late wife who died tragically while her children were very young. Several people have reported over the years. Different people people that did know which other and one of those people was Jane. ADDAMS her self right. Everyone that was a part of that house saw this figure at some point or another. Jane made changes because of it and wrote about it in her book as something. That was true so I think Jane it was an amazing person. I think she had a good head on her shoulder. She went to college. She was educated. She dismissed the devil baby as a thing and so if she believed if there was a ghost in that home and that she saw the ghost than I believe. There's a ghost in that home and that she saw the ghost it's haunted all right. That's your time time man. I just need can we copy and paste just altered a voice a little so it sounds like mine everything except the devil. Baby Mondo you ready. I'm ready all right time on. You asked me to Thaddeus I'm ready okay. My tight minute. Okay as he likes to go over. Oh okay all right. Are you Freddie. And the only reason I go over is because I agree with everything that she said she set it all. But it's true I mean it's a ah well the way I feel is that Gene Adam sought so you know I believe that she wouldn't have made it up in her every resident at how L. sought so they were putting the water They you know there were. It was a place that helped helped people. There were a lot of people that went there so I think there's a very good chance I mean. A lot of people went through there a lot of chances impressions to be left and yeah the devil baby. He's real maybe not the devil but yeah Israel basis for those stories. Yeah and I don't believe about the girls run around. I don't believe that they left any impression whatsoever. Your minute has been over over for like five minutes just ended right now but you interrupted. I did I'm sorry. All right all right. So are you ready. I've been born ready. Check Mr Pat Mr Betcha having been are you what are you ready. I'm ready on your obituary Patrick O'Hara has guy ready ready ready for anything. Thank all right and it's time to go now so we have this old house this old house. That obviously has had a lot of good things happen in it but people get creeped out by old stuff. People always believed with that old stuff is haunted. They tried so hard to make this devil. Baby be the haunting of Hall House. It's not nothing thing is it's an old house the the issue that I have with it is it. All of these things were taken at a time long ago go. None of these stories are recent stories of of this stuff happening inside whole house of this woman white all like none of these college kids that have gone there for lectures or for classes have said anything about that and if they do. It's only because they researched it and heard that there was a possibility. The of it and I'm going to say devil. Baby is absolutely fake. Thanks so mine. Do I wanNA thank you so much for coming back on ghostly. Thanks for having me Sing your song one last time time. No I didn't mean to say Zombie correct that I was saying I meant to say it should be Sung like Rob Zombie in the style. Bree I was thinking of the whole house in the the middle of the street whole house around the corner where you could get a good Italian beef. Yeah and there's corn beef on your side but at nine I did want to mention something I forgot all about it forgot. I just remember. You talked about flames that started and then do you realize that it's only a black black and a half away from where the Chicago fire starter. I wanted to mention that and it was not touched at all right fire. Yeah yeah well it's one of the only there's like three building things that that were untouched by and it was that close to it. Yeah that's right man. The rankings just went up the numbers number is up. Oh Yeah we didn't really do give our overall haunted. We just do it for the individual stories and we did do it for the individuals. So do we need to do it for the overall ours. We can all right. What what is your number Rebecca? I my number seven all right Mondo. Okay seven I'll agree with you. I mean though the fire thing is almost up to an eight. Yeah yeah that changes says everything really. Yes okay changes. Nothing and I'm going to stay at like a one. That's pretty low for you. Yeah he wants to believe that everybody. Everybody was overcome by the gas fumes. And that's what they saw. Yeah guestrooms from the lighted absolutely. So do you have anything going on. You'd like to talk about no no. No you gotTA stop working. Yeah Yeah I've got a convention coming up this week for work and I've just got let's work work. It becomes my busy season. So it's coming up you're going to be on TV shows. Oh man it well. If you guys watch you've seen the star worst anyone. Yeah and you mentioned being here. I've heard that if I were to suit I could look like Mando. Oh Yeah you could. Yeah I would resemble him if I were to suit. That's just my name. It's cost play thing for you. Are you going to. I should be there. Yeah we're going to be there. Yeah we're going to be their ghostly we'll be at sea to make your plans now and February early March. Yes Oh thank you so much for listening please. Share with your friends and family as word of mouth is our best advertisement retirement. And if you haven't yet hit that subscribe button if you're listening on Youtube. Make sure not only to hit that. Subscribe Button but hit that little bell next to the subscribe button and so you always get notified of new episodes. Remember everything is free. Everything is free. Nothing costs money. Yeah you can listen anytime for free. Well it costs me money. Money doesn't cost them any money. We'd love for you to rate and review us on Apple. podcast if you have the ability to do so and you love ghostly Yeah we love to hear hear what you think. And Yeah. If you've got that five star rating for us and if you give us a five star rating from now on we might even read it on the show. ooh Oh yeah there's an actual review. Yeah we might have a review section. That would be so right. That review We are still figuring out what we're I'M GONNA be doing for our Christmas episode but that will be coming out on Christmas a Christmas Day so dismissed dare trying to think of something fun last the last year Mondo came in and told stories and everyone believed my story. Yeah that's how I won another pole. That was the last time. It seems like it all right guys until next time. Stay ghostly

Whole House Jane Addams Chicago Gene Adams US Tolstoy Jane Helen Culver Mondo America Hull House Charles Clown Motel Jane. addams Charles J hall president Helen covert Jane addams Memorial Tollway Charles Hall Charles j hall
Feminists: Jane Addams

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Feminists: Jane Addams

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca. If you've been listening for awhile. You know that on encyclopedias were Monica. We're making every month women's history month but in honor of March the official women's history month rededicating the whole month to talking about feminists women who fought for gender equity. We have a bunch of really exciting content planned so stay tuned to the end of episode to hear more are women if the day was an activist and reformer who pioneered the field of social work contributed to the study of sociology and advocated for the inclusion of women in the public sphere. She was a suffrage EST and philosopher who co-founded the ACLU and was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize. Let's talk about Jane. Addams Jane was born on September six eighteen sixty in Cedar Ville Illinois. She was the second youngest of nine children in a very prominent family. Her father was successful. Had friends in high places. Including Abraham Lincoln. Jane's mother passed away when Jane was just two years old from an early age Jane was determined to do something to make a difference in the world. She attended rockford female seminary and graduated in eighteen. Eighty one after that. She decided she wanted to become a doctor to help. Serve the needs of the poor. Jane attended one year of Medical School at the University of Pennsylvania before dropping out due to illness. Her career and medicine was dead. But Jane's desire for mission driven work was still kicking. It was an era of social reform and activism in eighteen eighty nine Jane and her friend Ellen Gates Starr decided to visit a settlement house in London called Twain. Bohol in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries settlement houses were created by people who offered educational services and attempted to combat poverty particularly in neighborhoods with high immigrant populations in industrial cities. These centers provided space for people from very different backgrounds to interact and exchange ideas as such settlement houses were breeding grounds for new social reforms. Jane and Ellen were so inspired by twenty hall that they decided to create their own settlement house called Hull House. In Chicago's West Side House provided lots of different services to people in the industrial neighborhood including adult education and job training kindergarten in daycare job placement acculturation classes and cooking. There was a Community Center Art Gallery and a gym with success of Hull House. Under her belt Jane became a very active and well known speaker and reformer for a wide variety of causes. She successfully called for juvenile court system lobbied for better sanitation and factory laws and advocated for Labor reforms. At the core of her work was the desire to improve the lots of women and children at the University of Chicago. Chain helped establish a school of social work and thereby opened a new career field predominantly served by women. She also made significant contributions to the academic field of sociology and was a charter member of the American Sociological Society. In an essay entitled Utilization Of Women In city government Jane compared the government to a household. She argued that certain functions of the government fell under the traditional women's sphere. She said women have more knowledge and ability to make decisions on things like sanitation educating children and should therefore be given the right to vote. Jane was an officer and the National American woman suffrage association and was one of the founders of the N. W. C. P. Jane was also unavowed pacifist when World War One began. Jane attempted to convince. President Woodrow Wilson to serve as mediator for the warring factions. That obviously didn't work out. When the US entered the conflict Jane protested and was branded dangerous. Radical Jane travel to the warring nations with a group of fellow protesters in an attempt to bring peace at the end of the war. Jane argued that the Nineteen Nineteen peace treaty was so harsh on Germany that it would lead to another war. Her prediction proved savvy that same year. Jane helped found the women's international league for Peace and freedom. She was president of the Organization. Until nineteen twenty nine and honorary president for the rest of her life in nineteen twenty. Jane also helped found the American Civil Liberties Union in Nineteen thirty one. Jane was the first woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her work. Promoting world peace for years later on May Twenty First Nineteen thirty five. She died she was seventy four years old. Jane addams legacy lives on the fields policies and reforms. She helped to shape as promised at the beginning of this episode. Here's a little more information about what you'll be hearing on encyclopedia a Manica for the rest of March this month. We'll be focusing on feminists from throughout history. We've covered feminists in every theme. So far what differentiates this month is that we'll be looking at women who are particularly important. The women's rights movement the suffrage movement and or modern feminism and feminist theory. This month's group is not an exhaustive list by any means. We're sticking to a smaller time range in our regular weekday episode so that we can really focus. In on weekends we're going to be highlighting favourite feminists from past months chosen by other podcast hosts be love and we'll be talking about modern feminists brought to you by our sponsor this month. I've ever this month of Encyclopedias. Manteca is brought to you by fiver an online marketplace connecting businesses with freelancers who offer hundreds of digital services including graphic design. Copywriting web programming film. Editing and more fivers mission is to change how the world works together. Five or platform gives everyone no matter their gender race religion or sexual orientation an equal chance to build their business brand or dreams on their own terms. That's something we can certainly get behind this women's history month and year round as we call for more industry leaders to join with fiber and make strides in creating opportunities for all fivers marketplace helps the world's feminists get more done with less. Take Five and show your support for fivers. New Store at F. E. R. R. dot com where they feature over one hundred of the platforms. Top email talent that's F. E. R. R. dot com slash women for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our new Encyclopedia Amana newsletter. Special thanks to lose Kaplan Abra sister and co-creator Talk to you tomorrow.

W. C. P. Jane Jane addams Addams Jane American Civil Liberties Union Manteca Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network Hull House rockford female seminary President Woodrow Wilson Monica Abraham Lincoln official University of Chicago Chicago American Sociological Society University of Pennsylvania president Kaplan Abra US
#788: She Dies Tomorrow / Boys State

Filmspotting

1:21:20 hr | 6 months ago

#788: She Dies Tomorrow / Boys State

"Over the years Josh we've been very proud to have some crossover with slate podcasts including the Great Dana Stevens. She's appeared here on film spotting many times, and we have often sung. The praises of several slate shows were here to do that again with their podcast working every week Ramana Lomb Isaac Butler and June Thomas Talk to creative people to answer questions like how does an opera singer learn a new role? How does an actress find the perfect accent for her character? What does the director of a TV? Drama do all day. These are questions Josh relevant to us as people who are interested in these industries and these professions, and in particular the creative process. Yep. The nitty gritty behind the scenes production stuff. If you listen to working in, you'll learn how writers outline novels, for example, or how composers get jobs and get paid, and even how Youtube creators learn to look into the camera lens very tricky to get that, right. So listen to working from slate every Sunday on apple podcasts spotify or wherever you listen. Support for this podcast comes from state farm with surprisingly great rates. State farm is the real deal when it comes to home and car insurance state farm agents in your neighborhood. Ready to help personalize your insurance and you can manage your coverage, pay your bill or even file a claim right from your phone with the state farm mobile APP visit State Farm Dot com today to get a great without sacrificing great service that State Farm Dot Com when you want the real deal like a good neighbor state farm is there What kind of show you guys put on here today we're interested in. Going to do this thing conversation. From Chicago this is film spotty I'm Josh Larsen. Dr. To wear the helmet Yeah. Definitely very important to wear the helmet You know these things look like big toys but at the end of the day, if you hit anything too fast and too straight on the sink and flip over. I'm. GonNa, Die Anyway. That's Caitlyn. She'll in the new film, She dies tomorrow comes from Director Amy Saimaa. It's and it's a movie that was made well before the covid nineteen pandemic but does it tap right into all of this year's anxieties it really does along with the review of she dies tomorrow we've got recommendations for several new films boy state I used to go here and beyond says, black is king that more ahead on film spotting. Thanks to express VPN for once again, supporting film spotting you probably don't think much about Internet privacy on your own Home Network Express Vpn will secure your privacy and protect your information visit express VPN, dot com slash film spotting, and you can get an extra three months free on a one year package. That's three months free just by visiting express VPN dot com slash film spotting. Welcome to film spotting. So if you're the kind of person who used to stay on top of new releases, maybe you saw two or four or even more new movies every month this new paradigm that has new releases popping up on various platforms with little or no warning can be frustrating. Probably, it is hard for us even Josh to keep up with isn't it miss the days of the studio release calendar that was nice. Never thought we'd say that that being said while the world waits for major titles like tenant or There are smaller films being released all the time every weekend. Later in the show, we're going to get to a few of them I though I review of a movie that had its own unique release plane drive in theaters for a week before becoming available on demand on August seven. How? Can you come over? Are you. Okay. I. AM going. Mar.. Is Not Marin for me. All right listen I'm really freaking right now. I feel like you put this idea of dying in my head can can you just call him back? Adam as the title suggests she dies tomorrow is about death. This is the second feature from writer. Director Amy Simon She's probably also familiar to send a files as an actor in the likes of upstream color and wild nights with emily and here she is specifically focusing on characters who come into let's just say a heightened awareness of their mortality caitlyn she'll plays amy a woman in. The wake of break-up who we watch and the opening section of the movie spending listless lonely night trying to unpack in her new home at one point in the evening, a pulsing blue and red strobe. Light effect seemingly invades the space casting amy under a spell. When she comes out of it, she calls a friend played by Jane Addams and tell Sir I'm going to die tomorrow. Now, that's a line or at least a variation on it that characters might speak in many of your favorite films atom fair to say mortality is a pet theme of yours You and Matty did a top five movies about mortality list back in two, thousand, eight, all that jazz wild strawberries. Those films were among your choices so I couldn't help lender after watching. She dies tomorrow. If you found the movie satisfying in the way, it explicitly presents plays with the idea of our impending deaths. Does it deserve retroactive consideration for a top five list of movies about mortality in terms of subject matter and the way it's explored regardless of my personal reaction to it, you'd absolutely have to consider it for such a top five and. I think about Jane addams character in the movie she's a friend of Caitlin shields, amy, and this is a film where almost every character in the movie not all but almost every character has the name of the actor portraying them just in case you were wondering whether or not. There was meant to be any crossover into the personal lives of this cast in the film makers Caitlyn. She'll is playing amy right named after. Presumably. Amy Siamese and whenever Jane is confronted by dubious when she starts her spiel about how she too is sure she's going to die tomorrow. She has a habit of trying to express what she's feeling that certainty with examples right there's multiple times where she says things like it's like when you're going for a walk and something happens and I'm GonNa follow her lead here Josh to start every single one of us knows. We're going to die right we walk around with that knowledge on some level every day but that doesn't carry the same terror with it as those times when it does really hit you for whatever reason you're just laying in bed at night maybe it started back when you were in college or before that or it still happens. Now for whatever reason it just hits you're like Oh God someday, I'm going to cease to exist and you really try to reckon with that for a minute or two if you can. The reality is, of course, you couldn't function day to day with that terror and I'm going to give you a personal example both my dad and his dad died before they were sixty around the same age. So throughout my life as my dad did I've consistently joked about having a similar expiration date. and. That is a joke when you're fifteen or when you're twenty five and honestly looking at sixty. Even when you're thirty five, it's still kind of funny. But when you're about to turn forty five. It's not funny anymore, and there are times where that terror is really intense and it can be momentarily paralysing. All you can do is dismiss it and move on with your day. Because again, you couldn't function carrying around that terror. Dies, tomorrow presents a scenario where dismissing it just isn't an option carrying the terror is the only choice you have, and that is a really heavy, really unsettling space to exist in even as a viewer even who who isn't in the world that these characters inhabit righty experience of it is one that is deeply unsettling and you mentioned while strawberries. One of my favorite movies about mortality I think the ultimate cinematic touchstone for death for me and for a lot of people is Bergman and I think starting there actually is a really good place to start with this movie in terms of just trying to wrap your head around it because. It's it's out there I think that's fair to say, and if you took the overwhelming dread and the feeling of futility Bergman's characters often exhibit I'm thinking primarily of his trilogy that includes winter, light and the silence here but then added in the absurdity in the Irina. S of David Lynch, I'm thinking a lot of the score and the sound design of twin peaks but then had that that horror element and to go with a more contemporary comparison. It's hard not to think about a movie like David, Robert Mitchell's it follows when you watch this film but I'm also thinking a lot or I was I was watching the movie about Peter Strickland in his barbarian sound studio and the Duke of. and Use of color. Especially, you touched on Josh what those those lights, the red and blue and the effect that has on these characters and us as viewers that use of color especially does reflect an influence the the psychological state of the people were watching on screen. So I bring those up again to try to wrap my head around this movie if you like those films and haven't seen this one yet then. Maybe it's one to seek out if you like she dies tomorrow and haven't seen some of the other titles I mentioned. Then maybe those are some good blind spots to fill in. But again, just to try to ground this conversation about a movie that is fundamentally about characters who are completely or coming completely ungrounded I bring those other titles up and I don't think it ever feels derivative I would say to sign. That she can make something that has all of those elements, but it does still feel uniquely hers and I do so appreciate the craft of this film, the very tricky performances and definitely the boldness of the experiment. Now the question is, does it amount to more than that experiment cinematic sensory exercise in portraying existential dread in a heightened way? The does as I suggested reflect what I imagine is a universal human experience. I'm I'm not sure it does and and maybe that experiment should be enough I. Guess I'm curious. Was it enough for you? Yeah. That's the crucial question for this film that that I do WanNa get to and the potential influences. I think you're right. It's almost like this is this is a movie with the themes and concerns of Bergman, but the the style of. Of Sci, Fi and horror, and that's what that's what lends it. Its unique sensibility right is combining those sorts of things and I think for the most part it stays in its Sifi Lane and sticks to this without explaining exactly what is happening here it sticks to this scenario. This contagious anxiety I guess we could call it and then cleverly that also allows the. Movie. To become many other things that can stand as a metaphor for things beyond just you know thinking about our mortality, I think there's a lot here about the nature of depression just contagious -ness of general anxiety. That's where some of the residents for what we're living through in two thousand twenty comes in and I think there's a lot here about loneliness. To sort of the existential angst of loneliness. So so there is a lot that this movie could be I think it does want to be essentially in this brings us back to the craft question which I appreciate it as well. It wants to be this heroin experience of exactly what you described when you can't shake those middle of the night terrors about mortality right because. A lot of times whenever those do arise whether it is just because of our racing minds in the middle of the night whether it is because of an older family member aging and makes us think about. When will be at that point in our lives we can get rid of that. Some of US may be get rid of it quicker than others, but we can distract ourselves with something else we can rationalize it away. This movie wants us to, as you said, experience what the characters are experiencing when that feeling cannot go away. And it uses the central seat to do that I. Think it's very effective in communicating how the characters feel that, but it sounds like I might be with you in that. I never feel the terror fully myself and I get the sense that the movie really wants us to, and some of this has to do with the shifting perspectives. I wanted to talk about that the movie does offer because it's definitely aligned at the beginning with a the CAITLIN shield character her perspective the first shot is her close up of her I right and so we are seeing what she's seen eventually experiencing this night alone through her mind. But then there are other moments where the movie and the score signifies this jumps out of her head. When we're inner ahead, there's this dreamy atmospheric music this heightened experience when we're out of her head, I think of the moment when she's drunk driving. At, first, we see here in here that music and we see how she sees. This is almost like a spiritual experience, but then the music cuts and we get the camera from behind her head from the back seat and it's kind of sad and desperate. There's another perspective we get though Adam and that is the perspective of this light source itself. The first time that amy comes under this. Light, spell the camera is looking at her as she approaches she's blurry and indistinct, and eventually she comes closer and she looks right into the camera and in that moment were this source of despair, right? That's our perspective and I felt all of those things but I never had the the. infectiousness infect me as a viewer and I think the movie with those strobe lights with the music really wants us to feel like that. I still felt at the end of the film that I was an outside wist witness to what was happening. I wasn't a I don't know victim is the right word to use but but I wasn't really a victim and so it did leave me at the end of the movie as much as I did appreciate it in the ways you're describing sort of as an experiment as a successful on. A conversation starter than my own metaphysical experience and that's a lot. That's a lot to ask of a film that's high by right leg. We're talking about Bergman and Tarkovsky. So the movie that's a high bar for itself and if I if I feel like I'm experience that alongside film like Celaya say. Here I'm almost witnessing the movies characters, experience it. So it's one level of remove that I had with she dies tomorrow. Yeah I feel exactly the same way and I'll try to explain why here in a second but I did want a second year astute point about the camera and the use of perspective here there is always the sense of us observing especially amy we assume we're seeing something. From her point of view and there's a scene for example, where we've just watched her looking at something then cut to the interior of a room and as the camera starts to tilt up, we assume were aligned with Amy's point of view only to find that she's actually submerged in the dark of the doorway and she she's kind of just slowly emerging into the frame and it's it's creepy. Anyway just because you barely see the still figure in the dark all of a sudden, but it is also disconcerting because you think you are in her head and then all of a sudden you find that you are not and so there are those kind of abrupt uses of the camera of editing that keep us feeling very disconcerted throughout think about how many times Siamese cuts from a very. Intense heavy situation someone might even be mid line expressing something and we just cut right out of it to something that's just every day. So there those examples throughout that are really effective but I think part of my disconnect and you were getting at it in terms of talking about the red and blue light and what the character is, what the actors are going through part of my disconnect. This is a movie that very much I think you'd agree wants to cast a spell magno. And that's the sound design. That's the use of the lighting. It's the perspective point of view all those elements coming together some of these different genre elements even coming together but that's spell can be broken or at least was here for me and I do want to get to a question, which is how funny ultimately you felt the movie was because watching. It, there became a point where I started to feel a little bit like I was watching 'em night shamans the happening all over again where the mole people similarly feel a compulsion to death only of course day that actually take their own lives rather than just being overwhelmed with the feeling but maybe the happening crossed with an SNL skit and this is. Really probably a terrible example, but it's the only it's the only one. I can think of I. Don't know if you ever saw the one where Adam Sandler hosted a year or two ago, and they did a bit where it was the Sandler family reunion and the guy comes up to give him his beer and says, hey, how do you come up? With all your characters and Sandler basically says you know, I guess they just come to me. But then as we go through the party, any meets each relative that he hasn't seen in a while. The whole joke is we realized that they behave exactly like one of his famous movie or s character. So he's he's just been cribbing from his life he had. Acted just like that, and he just imitated them and that's how you get Adam Sandler that the experience of watching that skit. Is a matter of anticipating who were going to see next and how they'll behave and about the time we got to Chris Messina as the brother to Jane, addams character. All I'm really focused on as he's as he's standing there in his kitchen and we get that close up. You know the red and blue lights come and you're thinking, oh, it's going to happen here it comes. We get the score cue we get the colors we get him looking off into the distance and we know that he's experiencing some kind of vision of his death or whatever those colors signify. I'm not thinking about in that moment what the character is experiencing. Honestly, Josh or the ramifications of it I'm thinking about Chris Messina the actor in that moment, I'm thinking about Oh. What is his variation on this same thing I've seen three or four other characters do going to be it's almost like, oh, it's acting school time. You know it's someone is behind the camera saying, okay Chris you're feeling confused and you're angry in you're sad and now you're stunned and the full weight of your mortality is just crushing down you show it to me give it to me so. How does an actor tilt his head? What does he do with his breathing? What does he do with his eyes? Are they are they twitchy or are they still like that's that's what I was experiencing as a viewer. I was just watching Chris Messina the actor and from then on I was almost only connected to what the actors nominee characters were doing and where it got legitimately hysterical and I'll tell you I. Think Simon is in on the joke. Well, that's what I was going to ask you I think she is. Here's here's my evidence is there's a scene where. and. I'll just say I won't spoil the surprise. I guess of the actor who plays the role but Jane addams character again goes to see a doctor and she's expressing, of course, what's on her mind about her impending death and? We're watching the doctor and he skeptical and he's dismissing everything she sang and so then you're watching it, it's the Adam Sandler that you're going. Okay. When's it going to hit? When's IT GONNA come here it is, and he starts to say it's not really my specialty I could refer you and he says we're for you and he stops mid sentence and he size but this. Deep Sigh and he looks away and it's this look on his face and this little maneuver with his mouth that suggests while I've really got an upset stomach right now or I've got a bad case of the you're GonNa die and we of course that it's the you're GonNa dies and that dread music that score that comes up every time the lights often when the lights. Q. As well. It comes in just for a moment and as soon as he composes himself and he tries sound like Dr. again. That's the moment. The music actually stopped. So in that in that scene and when that use of music there, it's like, okay. Simon's absolutely knows what she's doing. She knows that we're waiting for that to happen to him and we're watching that very closely as a viewer and so when when he sort of feels the weight of it for a second the music. Comes in. It's like it's like the shark is appearing in Jaws and you get the Donda but then as soon as the shark goes away, you take it away. That's what happens there in that scene I. really do think she's playing with us there in a pretty clever way and that was another thing rustling with throughout though was okay she's winking at us but. This is supposed to be actually intentionally funny. How much of it is unintentionally so and I recognize sang all of that that part of the beauty of this film ultimately is everyone having a different personal experience with it and they're not being one right way to watch this movie but the humor was something that really did stand out to me. Did you feel that way at all? Well, I can't say I expected the happening and Adam Sandler skits to come up with this review contain multitudes. Maybe a that's my way of saying, no I thought this I took this. Deadly serious throughout I'm trying to think now as you're describing even that scene in particular, how it might work. There there is one sequence that did strike me as tiptoeing towards camp, which for me would mean unintentionally funny and without giving it away I'll just say there is a I'm going to die tomorrow montage and it's it's kind of it's not what you're talking about where we're waiting for that build up in waiting for the moment to calm it's like we get three or four right in a row. ATV At night montage when she rents an all-terrain vehicle. Nights the it's that's when I started to feel like. Okay. You know this is pushing this button this particular button pretty high and I think that's one of the tools to to get to immerse us in the experience that these characters are having. The movie has basic tools and we've talked a lot about a lot of them, the lighting the music, the editing one of the tools is that declarative statement I'm going to die tomorrow we hear it so many times and I think it does either lose begins to lose its power or it's just not enough to infect me it never infected me and I gotta say going back to a feeling that this movie wants me to be infected I don't know. What putting in those sort of humorous tweaks would do to help that, which makes me feel like the comedy might not be intentional whatever comedy someone might find in this because I really do think that would undercut. Of what a lot of the very serious things this movie is concerned with those things I was talking about depression loneliness anxiety the Mu another movie that came to mind for me was annihilation the Alex Garland picture which touches on some of these themes as well, and is also on one level, a work of science fiction, but also very psychologically rooted and so for me I. Can't say it struck me as funny while watching it that one moment again that veered toward camp stood out to me I. Think that would undercut what the film is trying to do. So I don't know I don't know if any did in my case Josh did undercut ultimately that oppressive feeling of dread that no one really as a viewer probably wants to sit through that is the fundamental. Drive it seems of this film. It is to immerse you in that overwhelming experience, and then there were all these times where I was drawn out of that and that scene at the hospital with the doctor was a very clear example of that for me. I'm just thinking about that scene in particular and that's the one where particularly the loneliness aspect. Came out to me I, I think Jane even says something about him being so handsome and there has been a scene with Chris Messina Plain Jane's brother who Jane goes to his house with his wife and. Jane and the the Wife sister-in-law do not get along at all and there's A dichotomy there between Messina's you know domestic tranquility he supposedly has and Jane's Loneliness. Jane is artist. When we see her she lives alone she works in her basement on her art. And so I think there is something going on there about the loneliness that for me, the doctor seen that's kind of what that was about. Because there's a very strange interaction with them. I don't want to Spoil Jayne the doctors. Well, that's kind of it's doing. What the movie does does well, I think is is blurring lot of these lines between what's pure Sifi speculation what is basic human experience that we can recognize share and how does it relate to these characters who are at the same time trying to wrestle with the notion of their mortality now that it's right here in their face so so yeah, the the humor element I'm Gonna I'm GonNa say not intentional. Well. To that scene, honestly, the music is so subtle there that it could be easily missed but I promise if most people had a chance to watch it and rewind that scene I think they would see the Hebron it in that score just popping up for half a second and then all of a sudden going away that's the filmmakers hand. They're very clearly a work shirt kind of needling us a little bit. Teasing us with teasing teasing us about the pattern that's been established. I can see that for is ing that we as viewers by this point recognize the pattern. Yeah. So I, I think you're right though. About the loneliness and that's the personal part of interpreting this film. What is the metaphor me just like with? It follows the big debate around that movie afterwards was okay. Well, it's as if it's a sexually transmitted disease, we got that but it ultimately leads to death. So what does that really representing and here it's all about death in it's so on the nose, but is it meant to represent other things not only loneliness but? Alcoholism and battling addiction and you talked about relationships and loneliness and I do think that wherever you come down on this film, whatever you think it is ultimately getting at or weather the brilliance of it is that it's about all of those things can be. Two other really universal aspects of the human experience are covered by the film and portrayed in. What happens to each of these characters once they are imbued with this overwhelming sense of their mortality and one of those is they feel immediately the need to express it. Right. So I think that gets back to almost this this Meta narrative element where you realize that this is probably amy sites and her way of dealing with this dread is making a film like this that allows her to express all of these different feelings but including the recognition of her own mortality, we as humans feel compelled to be miserable I. Suppose in knowing that we're GonNa die someday but then we have to share it. We can't just keep to ourselves and that's exactly why this spreads in this film. The other thing that's related directly to that is, of course that once you have. been infected with this not only do you wanNA share it with other people you want to express it but you? Want, to feel it with them, you want to experience it together. We see multiple times where people than feel the need to go be around others right? Like if we're all in this together, then I actually need to spend my final moments with other people whether they're people. I'm close to and I love or people that I don't know at all and there's a third aspect I suppose I would throw in that I think Siamese is flying with here, which is the idea that if we all came to terms with our mortality as clearly hand as troublingly I suppose as every character in this movie does then we would actually become more honest people. We wouldn't be lying to ourselves anymore and. It's almost as if the movie is saying every day overdoing trying to deny this fundamental reality of being human, and maybe that's why we partly lie to each other so much because we're in a constant state of lying to ourselves that camus quote and I read a bit of Camus in college though I can't place it. But that was the stuff I was drawn to. There's a quote from him. That is reference at some point man is the only creature that refuses to be what? He is now get I. Don't know exactly what material that comes from I'm not going to try to speak on it fluently or with a ton of intelligence, but it's suggests to me this idea that we know what we are but we are in a constant state of trying to pretend we're something else that we're not an animal. It is representing that kind of Split State we are always in as human. So it occurs to me that Simon seems to almost point to that as. The. One byproduct of this whole troubling scenario that maybe actually could be a good thing. People start actually having honest conversations with each other rather than going through the motions with their girlfriend or their boyfriend they actually express. Josh exactly what they're feeling. That paints a little bit more hopeful of a picture than I think we actually get in this film though maybe with one character, we do get to that point and it kind of leads me to I had to spoiler questions I wanted to ask you. So I don't know if we should save that maybe for a little bit later or touch on. A. Few other things and then jump into them. But yeah, we stopped the review proper here I think Josh and then get to maybe some spoiler questions. So let's do that. She dies tomorrow is out now and available to rent on most platforms if you see it and agree or disagree with our takes, we love to hear from you feedback at films spotting dot net. WORRIED ABOUT CATCHING Bad's going to happen. To. Participate So this is you know if you've already seen the film you'll, you'll maybe be wondering this as well. I had a basic question of whether or not. November, twenty five, that's the date that is mentioned by Craig. Who is Amy's boyfriend we briefly at the start of the film and then later in a flashback as far as we can tell in that flashback, he receives the first message. Let's call it from the pizza delivery guy comes. Josh. Also, kind of funny. What there is another like funny kind of like low level funny seen the quote comes from Jane when she's visiting her brother, the Chris Messina character, the dinner party, and that scene is kind of like cringe humor I'll give you that But yeah. So the pizza delivery guy gives Craig this the pizza and the message Craig walks back to the table where is sitting in mumble something about November twenty fifth. Question is is everyone going to die on November twenty fifth or? Tomorrow and tomorrow meaning the day after they received their revelation I i. kind of had the impression that Craig was told we're all going to die on November twenty five because. A lot of time passes right between Aiming Craig and the Pizza Guy and then amy's night alone in her home. So I feel lake time has passed and then that night alone in her home is November twenty four. That was kind of how I read it. But I'm not one hundred percent sure of did you did you have any I have to be honest Josh I don't remember the specific mention of date. So for me none of the experience of watching it or thinking about what is happening to them revolved around a specific date I definitely did think about it in terms of tomorrow being whatever tomorrow would be that person but the timeline even though I see what you're getting at in terms of. It could be a fairly wide gap of time because we don't really have those signposts. I did feel like most of the action occurred in a fairly compressed amount because. Once that once that pizza is delivered. We know that at some point, amy and Craig do separate right but the Craig stays there. Yes and what we don't know exactly how much time passes between her moving into that house and her leaving the home that she and Craig were visiting together. We we don't really know but I feel like that might have been a itself because then later that night she basically goes back out to that place and isn't the implication that we see his body. Yes. SUIC- his bloody body else he's he's decided that he. I suppose can't live with this knowledge and so takes his own life and actually doesn't Jane have kind of a similar. Response as well and that we do see her. Getting that's getting to my second spoiler Clugston but I, but I would say to my mind I, think more time has passed because an early phone call between amy and Jane Jane says to her you know I think that was a good move to buy the house basically which to me implies a longer. Passage of time and so I never been in operation for awhile positively. But. As like her response to breaking up was to buy a new home start a new life. and. Then you know as far as Craig Craig may have returned to that House on November twenty four knowing it was his last. Day. If November twenty five but maybe a listener who seen it you know no notice more has a theory about the date but the other thing I was curious about has to do with Craig I agree with you I think we're spent to assume that he committed suicide. In that home and so. It's interesting. Does anyone die naturally in this movie? so by that I mean. You know. Some sort of metaphysical caused that they could not have prevented or does everyone die by a human hand because they have this information? So either? Their own hand by suicide. I think we clearly see that or isn't the implication that the Christmas character and his wife Kill Jane. Because she's in, she's in the basement after she gives that talk about fearing about home invasion and we hear creaking steps and she looks up to the to the floor above her and says, is this how it happens something like that? Yeah. Now that I think is a great story choice that they would actually do that. But that was my impression. So so by I guess my point about this is if it's only by a human hand that these people are dying. and. This goes back to your self deception point. Yeah. Then they've been deceived in some way, they've either been deceived by this light or their victims of their own disparaging their own despair and kind of makes movie for me even more troubling. Yet? No, it doesn't explicitly state. What does happen to anyone the next morning we see the next morning in some cases and we see Chris Messina and Katie, Aselton playing his wife have a very enigmatic vague conversation that does suggest the did something nefarious than four They are expecting to die that morning. Yeah. Say about their daughter should we wake her? Should we wake up and then one of them says No. It's probably best if it happens while she's asleep right now I assume that what they were talking about what they did had to do with their daughter though it does seem like she's still alive in that moment and they didn't do anything to her that they should have done but you're right. Maybe they maybe they did do something to Jane and these are the kind of elusive. Abstract elements of this film that either really make you want to dive back into it and dissect every frame and try to understand it or it's all a little bit too clever in two confounding for its own good and I'm I'm Kinda right in the middle on it on rush. I can see that I'm I don't think I need these answers to enjoy the film As I said, these aren't really quibbles and if I kind of decide on my own answers and follow my own path which I think the movie does encourage you to do quite a bit I think I can find a way where it's it's as I said, even more disturbing an unnerving in a way that's provocative that that's not that's not a negative experience just Yeah I think it's it's a movie that really is going to unsettle. You intellectually. But again, going back to where we started kind of I don't know if I felt the deep seated despair that the characters did that I think the movie did really want me to feel. Well, if you felt that despair, express it, let it out. Tell us how you felt and give us your theories feedback film spotting dot net. If she dies tomorrow doesn't sound like you're speed. We have reviews of three more new releases ahead I used to go here boy state ambience as black king plus will play a little massacre theater stay with us. RUSSAIN WATERED-DOWN GROWING Grounds. Schumacher. But. Blast. Sale. Adam. As you know, we recently made a move to a new place did a little downsizing and were still adjusting getting things set up and I'm still tinkering with the Internet setup here in the home to make sure the kids have the Wi fi I have the wi fi so we can record but the one thing I did the first thing I did and is still running strong is to use express VPN to make sure that our. Internet connection is secure. Basically, express VPN set things up so that your ISP can't see what sites you visit. Instead your Internet connection is rerouted through express VPN secure servers they encrypt a hundred percent of your data with best in class encryption that way your information is always going to be protected, and then you can go ahead and use the Internet with confidence from your computer from your tablet or from your smartphone it works on all those devices. You just have to tap one button and there you are. You're protected express VPN it's the fastest and most trusted VPN on the market rated number one by seen at wired the verge and more. So you use it I, use it and not only that I think with your account, you get up to five devices you can put it on. So I've got to myself Sarah Sophie Holden all using express VPN so it's a family affair with this. Product and probably would be for you to if you give it a try, you can protect your online activity today with the VPN that I trust. Josh. Trust to secure our privacy visit our link at express VPN DOT com slash film spotting, and you can get an extra three months free on a one year package. That's E. X. P., R. E. S. S. VPN DOT, com slash film spotting express VPN DOT com slash film spotting to learn more Based prime. keepdriving. Sure. I'm. Admires. Do when I tell you don't make no fast moves are a lot of dead heroes back there get nervous a menacing William Talmon there as the economists hitter in Italy Pinos the hitchhiker next week on the show, we kick off our overlooked tours marathon with lupinos nineteen, fifty, three film noir, and since the hitchhiker is a short and I'm I'm GonNa Guess from that menace Josh not so sweet seventy, one minutes we are going. To pair that with three short films from Experimental Film Director Maya Deren. Yeah. Those three shorts I think around fifteen minutes each. So we felt like we could handle that Adam the titles of the shorts meshes in the afternoon at land and ritual in transfigured time they were all made in the nineteen forties and we're going to do this marathon chronologically I think. So that's as far back as we'll go the forties and then. We'll jump to Lupinos the hitchhiker from fifty three all those films, those shorts, and the hitchhiker they can be found online. We started this marathon or were inspired to start it after going through the exercise of thinking about a potential spotting madness. The still very well could happen at some point in the near future that just looks at a bracket of films all directed by women, the sixty four greatest films directed by women and. As I looked that so many lists and different titles these are seven or so plus those shorts of the movies that just came up over and over again that we're blind spots for myself and for you josh and we wanted to remedy that with this marathon. So truly overlooked oh tours maybe some of them overlooked by sinophile though I'm not sure that something like John deehan qualifies as overlooked it does qualify as overlooked by uh-huh. I'm excited to see all of these films and we hope that you will participate with the Marathon, the full lineup and links to those shorts. They can all be watched online and you can also see the hitchhiker you can get that on demand as well. We will link to those titles or the various platforms that you can get the movies on over film spotting dot net slash marathons again, just click on marathons right there. At the top of our page, if you go to film spotting Dot Net and you can get that full lineup, see what's coming see what homework you have to do, and where you can find the movies. Next week on the show, we will also have an interview with the legendary documentary director Barbara Coppell. I'm really excited to talk to her for the first time. She's the Oscar winning director of Nineteen, seventy seven's Harlan County USA One Thousand Nine, hundred, American dream, I will say Josh that when I was looking at her IMDB page, the other day I was kind of stunned to see that I think maybe I'd forgotten it if I ever knew it all the both those movies won the Oscars and you think about how many times throughout history the wrong documentaries have won the the film that all of us to as the quintessential documentary of that year. If you look back almost without fail, it's not the movie that won the Oscar but hardly USA and American dream that would not be the case I was really happy to see that in those years the academy got it. Right. Coppell also directed shut up and sing. That's about the artist formerly known as the Dixie chicks and she made Twenty Fifteen Miss Sharon Jones, her latest desert one is about the nineteen seventy-nine mission to rescue. Hostages being held in around at them. I will forever be grateful to Kabul for introducing me to Sharon Jones. She has been in rotation ever since I caught that documentary. So you know peice long thanks when you interviewer okay I will definitely do that and I'm excited to talk to her about desert one, which is a really good film opening next weekend here August twenty first I think is when it comes Out also next week on the show, we will have results from our current film spotting poll a couple of weeks back we were looking ahead to the August released calendar. We wanted to gauge your interest on a few titles you simply which of these films you're most excited to see the options we gave you included two titles will be getting to later in the show boy state and I used to go. Here she dies tomorrow which we just reviewed also among the nominees and we had a few more Josh project power is another option this stars Jamie Foxx in Joseph Gordon Levitt that is on Netflix. This weekend Tesla is another option stars Ethan Hawke as the famed Nineteenth Century scientist and inventor described as an unconventional bio-pic those are the kinds I usually like and it's directed by Michael Alma Ada that one is On vod August twenty first another option for us, the personal history of David Copperfield from writer director, Armando IANUCCI adapting, of course, the Dickens novel. It Stars Dev Patel Tilda Swinton Ben wishaw and Hugh Laurie and it comes to video de August twenty eighth. How about the sound of metal this was originally scheduled to come to this weekend now though it's off the schedule entirely one of those frustrating titles that is A bit elusive, it does star is amid as a rock drummer who begins to lose his hearing. So those are your options with, of course, the other category we will give you. You can vote in that poll and leave a comment over at film spotting dot net. We a few weeks ago Josh had a very exciting giveaway had some new copies, four K. copies of the BLU ray edition, the fortieth anniversary. Blu Ray edition of jaws and we're back with giveaway for Japanese new film King of Staten Island which I did give a recommendation to here on the show Josh. I don't think you have caught up with a yet. Is that true? I have not? Well, it's of course, the newest film from Jet Appetite it Stars S. and L.'s Pete Davidson and it is now available to own on digital and on Blu. Ray and DVD August twenty fifth it's got over two hours of never before seen bonus content including alternate endings and deleted scenes and I did praise the cast your I think Davidson's really good in the film and I really liked the supporting players as well. Mercer May as his mom bill. Burr as moms new love interest in the great belt Palley who plays Davidson's character's love interest as well. Steve Buscemi he. Only appears in the movie briefly as a fireman, but it's Debu semi, and of course, he's great every moment he's on screen. So we're going to give I think five copies of this away the king of Staten Island this new Blu Ray that comes out August twenty fifth all you have to do is email us feedback at film spotting dot net subject line apple, and tell us what's your favorite jet apple film. It's all you gotTa do and we're GONNA pick five winners at random. So I have to see King of Staten Island so I can finally rank Appetite. Because I've this is the only one of his I haven't seen. I'm trying to think if I. have a favorite, not having set down and done that exercise right hard to go away from you know the early ones for yield virgin or knocked off now. I I'm telling you trainwreck train wreck might be up there for me I really like that one. Yeah I do too and now that you say I'm going to be distracted the rest of the show. While you talk I'm going to go to letterbox and do my appetite ranking shouldn't take too long again that's all you gotta do email us with appetite on the subject line and tell us what your favorite jet apple film is and you could win a copy of the King of Staten Island on Blu Ray. We will announce the winner will read your picks next. On the show again, feedback at films spotting dot net. We also wanted to take a moment to thank all of our family members over on. Patriot patriot dot com slash film spotting one way you can support the show you get ad free episodes you get early downloads, you get emerged discount live show, pre sales, and discounts when live shows are going to be a thing again and you know. What they're going to be a thing I don't know when. But whenever we can do that whenever we can all get together as a film spotting family, it's going to happen. We still have standing reservations in New York at the Bell House yes. We do at the downtown independent in La so it's coming at some point. If you're a family member, you can get a pre sale in discount on. Those tickets and of course, monthly bonus episodes we had some good stuff including last month are July content was a blind spotting review for me of Akira Kurosawa was the seven Samurai we said that if you're a family member and you help us get to the goal of nine hundred patrons, we would do a virtual watch party and I think we announced it on our last show we had hit. Nine hundred we were over at maybe like ninety six or something Josh. So we thought it was smooth sailing, and then the first of the month hit and as does happen with patriotic for various reasons, some patrons say you know what not ready to be onboard for another month I'm going to rescind my donation. This happens to all people brands all podcast whatever you want to say who are on. I, let's be honest. I think it happens when you express a particularly idiotic opinion we just the patrons just fall away. That's hole every month ranking ranking seven Samurai is Chris eighth best film that was what cost us this patron that might of been all accept it all except that. Josh. So we actually dipped we dip below we went to like eight. Fifty six or eight, fifty-seven come August I. But you know what? Because of our listeners were backup over nine hundred again and that means we're GONNA have the Virtual Watch party to clarify something or to correct something a while back. We said that we were going to do this Virtual Watch party on August twenty first we told our family members save the date We've had to change that and the new date is going to be Saturday September nineteenth, and we're excited this this Saturday because that will allow us to start earlier maybe as early as sort of four o'clock central time, which means we know we've got some family members in the UK and other that are not the United States or our time zone Josh, and we'd love to accommodate them as well and get everybody involved. We don't. Want anyone to feel left out especially family members now, and we think between you me and producer Sam van. Hallgrim. That we have settled on the three titles that we are going to give our family members to vote on. In fact, by the time you hear this family members may have already had the opportunity to vote share their opinion on which film we should watch as part of this virtual party with our family members but. It may also be influx we can't seem to just totally focus just when we think we've got three great titles you start thinking about well or they on the right streaming platforms. How are people going to watch them? Are they gonNA have to rent it or they have to put a DVD lot of variables here play Josh, but we think Rizzi rowing in it's better process we're almost there. Yeah Patriot Dot com slash film spotting. If you WANNA get all of those films fighting family benefits, and if you want to be part of that Virtual Watch party on Saturday September nineteenth, we wanted to give a quick plug to our sister podcast. The next picture show this week they have part two of Reicher way pairing. So they're looking at Kelly Reichardt new first cow alongside twenty tens meek's. Cutoff that means first cows the discussion. This week features not only irregular host Tasha Robinson Scott Tobias Keith Phipps and genevieve Kaczynski but Elissa Wilkinson of vox has joined them for this parents. So that's very exciting. New episodes of the next picture show post. Every Tuesday. You can find it wherever you get your podcast and you can find more information at next picture show dot net of course if. You Josh have not had your fix of Kelly Reichardt after listening to that pairing from the next picture show. You can go back to our last show. If you missed it, my interview, our interview with Kelly Reichardt her second time here film spotting a fun discussion talking about I cow that's available wherever you get your podcasts or you can go to film spotting dot net and Click on interviews. With all that business taken care of let's move onto massacre theater the part of the show where we perform a scene and you get a chance at winning film spotting t shirt a few shows ago adamant massacre seen what you there. Old. Cheese. and not just any cheese. That would beautifully with my life rape. And Rosemary Rosemary up with Oh maybe maybe a few props from this week. On the pile guess and then we'll don't want. With the garbage. A we're supposed to return to the colony before sundown her dad's meal. There are possibilities unexplored here we got cook this now exactly. This is the real question. That was Patton oswalt Remmy Peterson as a meal two, thousand seven's Ratatouille written by John Pink Kava Jim. CAPOBIANCO and Brad Bird and directed of course by bird along with that massacre, we had a review of the best film of the year so far though Kelly Reichardt does just want us to proclaim it the best film of the year and you know what Josh it might end up being that first cow and as I mentioned, we had that interview with Kelly Reicher. Why that scene then from Ratatouille well, our listeners did get the connections James. Ward in Carbondale Illinois says almost immediately recognized the dialogue I've heard dozens of times watching Brad bird's masterpiece ready to realizing the similarities between remmy and cookie, and I put a smile on my face both character share not just a passion for cooking but a reverence for cooking and both characters misunderstood by the people around them. Nicely done. James. Here's Bruce Bachelor glazier from Milford. Ohio. It seemed fairly easy to recognize the culinary art of Remmy, the rat Ratatouille and compare it to the pioneer Gusto of oily cakes and I. It was a first class, all the way around and Josh Nail The persnickety precision of the talkative rodent. Why thank you? It's still makes me laugh when I think of the scene and I I would cookie gives the pastry that extra touch of dob of honey and shaved cinnamon before handing it over in his grimy hand I'd still prefer bakery from an itinerant cook the food served by a team of rats, rats not wearing face masks. That is one of those touches I very vividly remember from first cow and one of those just quick asides almost where you recognize what our previous Listener James had mentioned that passion that true passion for cooking that it's not just a product in order to make it the best artistic creation he can no matter how grimy dirty his hands are. He's GonNa add that touch of honey and cinnamon yeah. It gives you those tactile sensory details that right guard is always so good at emphasizing and here's Professor Sam Miester. He's at millikin university that's just kinda down the road from US Josh. In Decatur, he says, one gourmet delights from unlikely sources and I suppose clandestine efforts to bring those delights to the. Hungry high risk high reward well, said, professor I believe ready to remains at or near the top of Michael Phillips list of the Pixar films and Michael weighed in on your recent Spielberg decade rankings despite being the most wrong about raiders of the lost Ark as any critic has been ever number three Kelly Reichardt in the recent wave of recognition for outstanding female filmmakers ties into that nozzle in his recent work on the fantastic HBO doc all begun in the dark based on his wife Michelle McNamara's excellent true crime book and superbly directed by Liz Garbis and host of other talented women women have been crushing lately making some of the finest films of the past five years says, your impresses raw josh. Yeah. Record has been at the forefront simultaneously the rising interest in true crime and the recognition of how many women make up that fan base has me wondering if and when Reicher notably fixated on the serial killer Laden Pacific Northwest will take on a serial killer picture. I'd love to see that maybe that's hoping too much but true crime slash feminists cinema fan boy can dream. Yeah. That does sound promising. So Josh, we did get a lot of entries. It must've been your persnickety precision I. Love that. As Patton Oswalt remmy people knew it people love Pixar Ratatouille a lot of entries very brimming film spotting hat not unlike the one cookie wears and I cal it's a little dirty but I want you to reach in and pick out this week's winner and the winner is Jeff Boyle from Pittsburgh. Congratulations Jeff email feedback at film spotting dot net, and we will set you up with your very own film spotting shirt. Think Dallas. To let why the hell and she just standstill to Stansted wandering all over the. Supposed to be looking for your soul not an ashtray. Well, as we move onto this edition of Nascar Theater, we're GonNa see if I can bring the Energy Josh I'm not sure I can match anything like what you did a few weeks back I certainly can't match the emotion of this performer Bun I'm GonNa do what I can. It's a different sort of high energy that you gotTA. You gotta go for here and me I've got a I've got a pretty much geraint energy away I think that's true true. We'll see how this goes. We're going to hopefully see your range Of different kinds of precision you have to bring to this performance. Now we are as we usually do taking out one reference of a name so it doesn't make it too easy and we are also going to change something that would be really a dead giveaway for anyone who is familiar with this film really whether you've seen it or not there reference twice to. Something, we'll just say a phenomenon and we have we have inserted something different that will well, it'll make it hit a little more close to home for the two of US Jewish I think so okay I started off you're going to give me the action. and. Action. Not a word. You didn't say one word about this to me. Don't you think you. Only. That don't you think that you might respect me enough to at least consider what I'd say. I N. Y you're inter. About it. Well, I'm worried. How you paying for all that I got home improvement law from the back. How could you do that without talking to me? You know the expenses we have coming up, you want to waste money on a stupid podcast I'm doing I'm doing for. I. Know You don't understand you're right I. DON'T UNDERSTAND I don't understand half the stuff you've been doing lately. I don't understand you putting red outback I'd understand you stay up all night and that's stupid podcast studio. You don't come to bed half the time you leave you don't tell me where you're going explain that to me. please. Tell me something. That helps me understand. Why you're being like this. is nothing to explain. See. I don't I don't remember Marlon Brando. With the nuts in the side of his mouth. Even this film Josh I think I'm going to regret that this is the first time I fear like somehow that actor might hear what we've done. Oh. Yeah had come after me. I. Think you deserve it. You know what film we just massacred email feedback at film spotting dot net meanwhile, the hysteria you brought. Your already hysterical when you. You're right higher i. kind of had nowhere to go have the training that this actress does if you know it again, tell the movie's title name and Location Feedback Film spotting dot net your deadline is Monday August twenty sixth does second takes on Massacre Theater. The winner will be selected randomly from all the correct entries and announced and a couple of weeks. where I am where in carbondale welcome back right David Kirk Patrick brought me down to read. Kate was on my very. Positive as professor how's Your Bhutani? Our Hope. Would you think? About Teaching Teaching here. Openness to. have. That's Jemaine Clement and Gillian Jacobs in the trailer for I used to go here from. Chicago director. Chris. Wray Jacob Stars as a thirtysomething writer whose new book has just been published to little fanfare. Climent is the former professor who invites her speak at her Alma Mater, which is actually set at southern Illinois in Carbondale. For purposes of the film is called Illinois University. Now you saw this and I thought well, maybe I should see it too. I didn't have quite the same reaction as you which is why I'm going to let you run with this Josh because you can recommend a used to go here. Yeah. I had fun with this film it it was you know we kind of put it on and started smiling pretty soon and just kind of kept smiling throughout the whole thing. I think maybe it's part of the the local atmosphere that you referenced had to love seeing you know I think a couple of Revolution Brewery Beers. That characters are drake a and I have to say as someone who also did not get a book tour. Bike hub but has done a lot of book talks. They nail some details here and and some of them at the expense of the author I love when she walks up and sees the poster board. Of Her picture before her talk on campus and a kid walks by and goes hey. Yeah say. That, I could relate totally have been there. So So yeah, there's a lot of knowing details in this that I think Chris Wray, includes that make it Pleasurable experience and I think it has fun noodling around in that space as as Kate, returns to college meets a bunch of creative writing students and. Recalls that idealism she had at that age right as as not only as a writer but just as a person and kind of wants to reclaim some of that also realizes the realities of adulthood that she's living with and so the movie just nicely sits in that space I think it's there are. Never goes over into farce even though it flirts with it with like a break in sequence I. think There's some Nice editing work here that undercuts some of those moments and doesn't let them drag on too long but instead cuts the farcical elements and gets to something. That's a little more. A little more knowing and relationship based with these characters and so it kind of makes a nice move from anxiety to acceptance for a lot of the characters that is well handled and I enjoyed watching this character just kind of get to that place feeling a little bit more secure, just a little bit more secure about where she is as a thirty something in the world compared to these these college students that she meets. But but yeah, I did see young letterbox STA, you're enthused. So was element that held you back or I mean I think it's two things for me. One is that despite the blazer line which may be the most knowing detailed, the film gets right. There are a lot of scenarios I thought the movie understood or pulled from real life that people in similar situations have experienced but I'm not sure that overall I really bought any of the other details like I'm not. I'm not convinced by any of the other interactions or the character relationships in the film I did not buy into any of them and also I think big part of it is the other thing that didn't work for me Josh, you said, it didn't cross over into farce. Maybe we have different. Gauges on that spectrum for me it always went for the joke. And The jokes almost never landed. In fact they were always exactly the joke I think any of US could have predicted. It was going for there was never a joke that surprised me in the film and and honestly when I think about when I think about I used to go here. What I will reflect on the moment I like maybe the the only moment in the film that I really thought was kind of a knowing detail was near the end not a spoiler here at all there's an interaction with a character and those are some of the scenarios that I didn't think the humor really work but there's an interaction where you realize that that person, all that character wanted was. A little bit of companionship and to feel necessary. Yeah. That character wanted to feel needed and that was finally a moment for me where we're something in the film really connected it was only too bad that it was about seven minutes left. So I know exactly you're talking about it's the bed and breakfast hostess right and that's I. think that's an example where is talking about the transition that a lot of these I, found a lot of these characters made from antagonism rings, -iety to the sort of acceptance and you're right. It's exactly because this is this gesture which we won't spoil is all she really wanted to do. and. The movie brings both her and Kate to that point I. Think there's something similar we get to meet one of the college students. His mom who lives nearby on campus and there's something there's farce in the sequences with that character but I think that also leads towards something more relationship based. So those those relationships did work for me and I see what you're saying about the humor. You know there's nothing that entirely took me by surprise but I do think that that's why those hired cuts in a couple of the instances like the break in scene just when it's kind of like ratcheting up to where we expect some big sort of confrontation to take place. It cuts away from that and jumps ahead so that it doesn't deliver kind of that joke. We might expect and gives us something a little bit different. So yeah, well, I struggled with I used to go here but Josh, good experience with it and plenty of other critics have if you look at rotten tomatoes I, think it was in the eighties as far as percent of positive reviews. So give it a shot if you haven't seen it already, it is currently available to rent on most platforms. I will skip the part where Brag for three minutes about how great and cool I am seeing as we are all qualified young men of skill and character people liked that stuff people like that stuff a lot. That's from the trailer for the do documentary boys state. It's directed by Jesse, Moss and Amanda mcbain and documents the annual Texas Boys, state, program this is when a thousand teen boys from the State Descend on Austin to learn about American democracy by building their own representative government. Boy State had its debut back in January at Sundance did well, they're won the grand jury. Prize and I believe Adam has also won your approval, right? Yes. Yeah. Big Fan of boy state and Navy. In this way only it connects back to our initial review of she dies tomorrow and that that's a movie that is very much open to interpretation and your personal experience with it and I think boy state can provoke a similar reaction and why I say that. Is I was just googling it today to look up some detail and I saw those kind of three top boxes that pop up on Google and they were reviews of boy state and one of them was from the San Francisco Chronicle and the headline was boy state is a good documentary that makes you despair for humanity. So I stopped I stopped there because I? Still hadn't gotten all my thoughts down yet and I didn't want to really dive into it at that point. But I'm not shocked at that takeaway and of course, I do want to say it's just a headline and probably the column or the review itself gets into a lot more nuance than that suggest but there's definitely plenty about voice state then they'd shake my head. Made me concerned about the future now, I will say granted this is Texas and is covered multiple times in the movie that most of these kids come from a very conservative background but judge every political debate in this film. And I. Say debate in quotes because they don't really ever get in fully to the substance of it it's about abortion and guns. and. That's pretty much it. You get a little immigration thrown in but these really difficult really nuance philosophical political discussions all have sort of the the rhetorical depth. Of. What you would expect from a bunch of seventeen year old boys and forgetting my own aside, my own political disagreement with some of those views I was mostly just aware of the brilliance of. So many of these kids especially the kids that the filmmakers choose to follow but also just the ignorance of youth the brashness of the seventeen year old boys, the certainty of their convictions they're so young and there's so much at that age I remember what it was like very vividly being one of these idiots seventeen year old boys it might have extended into my eighteens or beyond Josh and you just don't know enough about life or about yourself to have that kind of certainty and all I could imagine. was even two years removed from this these boys watching themselves on screen and shaking their own heads right it's not even going to be five or ten years there seventeen just a couple of years from now they're gonNA look back and see their own immaturity. But I I say that because that that notion at least expressed by that headline that you watch this good documentary despair for humanity I, had the opposite reaction I came through this movie at the end really quite hopeful and the problem is I can't express you why that is without spoiling where the movie goes and what happens to some of these characters specifically and what the what the results are and results is an appropriate word here because. The biggest complaint you hear a lot of people lob at the media covering politics and covering elections is that they're only interested in the horse race. Right? It's just about the polls. The gaffes WHO's winning losing? It's never really about the politics. It's never about the debates, the topics, the platform, the positions themselves, and when you watch boy state, you realize that it's not really about debating complex issues and finding common ground the stakes are you have two parties as three big elected positions including the highest office governor and the film was about which party is going to win? It's really not about democracy. Except in the form of how we elect officials to govern effectively or not. So boy state, the experience is perfectly setting these kids up for what American democracy is. It's about winning and losing it's about your party's success and public service, and what's right can be damned and boy state the movie as a chronicle of that experience is accurate then and that it's about winning and losing, and it's almost as if moss and mcbain the directors realized they needed to make it seem a little more consequential than it is and not just be. About the horse race because near the end of the film, we get a montage I think it comes really before the big election results are revealed that show some of the kids are following having thoughtful interactions with people that they disagree with and listening really closely. But it is a montage. We get voice over the kind of neatly sums all this up and it it feels a little bit obligatory. So that was something I was wrestling with where I wanted it to actually showcase a little bit more of the thoughtful conversation and listening. But I'm not sure that actually took place at Boise State, and likewise I'm not sure that actually takes place in any part of our American democracy at the moment. So the filmmakers probably accomplished exactly what they ultimately set out to do I was really impressed by all four kids they follow. There's one Stephen Garza who I think is probably for most viewers going to be the star of the movie and I think we can have a fun discussion about why That is his story and the filmmakers and what their feelings towards him are. But there was another kid named Robert in the movie WHO's the most Texas of any of the kids we see you know in terms of his accent and his demeanor and he drives the pickup truck and a lot of ways reflects kind of stereotype of a Texas high school kid and at first he really wows you with his thoughtfulness and intelligence and then he completely disappointed me. And then he wanted me back with his self awareness and his genuine acknowledgement of the compromises that politics require. So there's a lot of really nice individual journeys the dupleix out over the course of this movie that do coalesce into something that I think is pretty profound and I watched it withholding and Sophie my son Holden who as you know just went off to college and wants to be a history and police major and loves all of this stuff and is fascinated by elections in particular he watched it and was just giddy the whole time. In addition to also feeling so disappointed that he didn't have something like this could have participated in this would have been the greatest week of his life. Had he been able to go to boys state meanwhile my daughter Sophie she can't wait for girls state. So it's sounds There is a more nuanced portrayal of these kids. At least eventually. Okay. Because when you were initially describing it and I'm kind of thinking well, yeah. Then I guess what is what is the point if it's almost nihilistic depiction of? On comes in, but it does it does bring around to a little broader look at their lives and their backgrounds. So which makes its on March rigging to me for sure highly recommended. It's currently playing exclusively on apple plus finally Josh beyonce as black is king. You're a resident the on say expert here on. You always toys when they come out, you always have something to say it's another visual album in the tradition of lemonade, which you were very fond of from a few years back. This one uses last year's Lion King remake inspiration which beyond say provided the music for it's currently on Disney plus should all of us with Disney plus subscriptions seek it out well, first of all, I am going to point you to a couple of beyond say experts. Of which I am not before I've done here. So you can do do some reading and get maybe a a better opinion on the film. I will just say that yeah, as a fan of lemonade as a fan of homecoming the concert documentary, which is a different aesthetic style of course I I was looking forward to this and it didn't disappoint I mean just you start with the talent on display in terms of you know the musicianship. A performer, but even you know as credit as director on here, the aesthetic that this production brings to you is lost. It's gorgeous. It's influenced by traditional African fashion and also this time intriguingly Afro Future. Ism so you get all that mingling around you get these vibrant colors sort of a celestial scope to this thing. That is it washes over you and it's it's a great experience now I will say. There are probably three powerful forces at work here. One you mentioned Disney's the lion king because beyond say did she was part of that remake and provided the songs for it and that's the songs you hear here which are fantastic. But then you also have this threat of African. Ancestral ISM going through black is king and then you of course you have herself who is. Her own forces own celestial force of nature and for me, all of those elements didn't quite convincingly coalesce. If you listen to her last album, the lion king, the gift I think that had a similar problem because there were snippets of dialogue from the movie between songs and it was a little bit Jerry and I think that's still does exist in this film when taken as a whole but independently the sequences, the individual sequences on. Their own are just stunning to and do work really well, and I think in terms of of beyond say being a performer something like mood forever that sequence you know it it's hard to imagine her ever topping something like that. So I do want to point to a few people who you know a lot of the references in the film probably made more sense for them and they've written about this and maybe The disconnect that I experienced they did not have, and if you WANNA watch this kind of trace, some of those references track down these articles. So one is by friend of the show she's been on a number of Times Angelica Jade Bastiaan for vulture she basically looked at nine images from beyond beyonce's career leading to black is king that Angelica says sort of define her. So that's fascinating then over at Polygon, Jilani? Turner Williams did a Deep dive into the imagery of black is king specifically. So again, connecting the dots there that I might have missed and then I the pleasure of editing a apiece over at thing Christian by Joy Linda Jamison because they're also all sorts of biblical, real illusions going on black his king. So jolanda traced some of those and talked about the biblical resonance especially as it applies to the lion king narrative that is at play here so. This is a lot It's hugely entertaining and also deeply meaningful. Depending on your background, you might have to do some digging to get at some of that meeting, but I would definitely recommend it. Almost. Gone. Like his king again can be seen on Disney plus in if you have seen that visual album or boy state I used to go here any of the films we talked about on this week's show we would always love to get your feedback. You can email US feedback at film spotting dot net. You can also find us on twitter at film spotting and Larsen on Film Josh that is our show that is our show and I should say I'll linked to those three articles as well in the show notes if you want to go ahead and find those also on the film spotting. Website, you can find archives over at films spotting dot net. That's where reviews interviews top vibes are they go back to two, thousand five, and on the website you can vote in the current films spotting poll we're asking which August twenty twenty release you're most interested in seeing if you order show t shirts or other merch visit film spotting dot net slash shop, and you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter at film spotting Dot net slash newsletter boy state one of the film's out on digital release this weekend as I mentioned over at Apple Plus and project power is a new film available on. Next week on the show, we're GONNA talk to Barbara Coppel legendary documentary filmmaker about her new film desert one and are overlooked. Oh, tours marathon begins we're gonNA talk about the short films of Maya Deren and Eater Lupinos film noir the Hitchhiker do recommend if you're curious about those films and curious about that marathon to go to film spotting dot net, slash marathons and check. Out The whole lineup films spotting is produced by Golden. Joe Dassault Sam van hoggard without salmon, Golden Joe, this show wouldn't go our production assistant is Cat Sullivan. Thanks also to Candice Griffith saying the listeners of the film Spotting Advisory Board and special thanks to everyone at WBZ. Chicago more information is available at wbz Dot Org for films spotted I'm Josh, Larsen and I'm Adam. Thanks. For listening this conversation concerns. No purpose anymore.

Josh Larsen Kill Jane Adam Sandler Chris Messina Amy director Amy Simon Craig Craig US Jane Addams apple Bergman writer State Farm Dot State Farm Dot Com Dana Stevens Youtube Staten Island Amy Saimaa
Feminists: Emily Greene Balch

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:06 min | 1 year ago

Feminists: Emily Greene Balch

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Britannica. Today's feminist was a political scientist. Sociologist economist pacifist and leader of the women's movement. Piece during the first half the twentieth century she received a Nobel Peace Prize in nineteen forty six for her work with the women's international league for peace and freedom. Let's talk about emily. Green Baulch Emily. Green Fall was born in eighteen sixty seven in Boston Massachusetts. Her father was a successful lawyer and a member of a prominent Boston family. In eighteen eighty nine emily graduated from Bryn Mawr College. As a member of the school's first graduating class at Bryn MAWR. Emily studied classics literature. Economics following graduation. Emily was awarded a European fellowship which gave her the opportunity to continue her study of Econ in Paris in eighteen ninety one family completed the fellowship and published her research under the tidal public assistance of the poor in France. The work assessed state institutions put in place to alleviate poverty in France after the fellowship. Emily worked on social reform in her hometown of Boston. The nineties marked beginning of the progressive era in the United States. It was a time when rapid societal changes associated with increased industrialization immigration urban ization led to the birth of major reform movements activists like emily sought to transform American society. Many women in particular attempted to alter aspects of politics and society contributed to inequality the women's rights and suffrage movements games steam as did the pacifist movement which was often linked to the pursuit of the quality. Emily was involved in most of the prominent movements at the time including suffrage. Women's rights worker's rights children's rights rights for minorities and pacifism during this period. Emily met Jane. Addams the founder of Hull House. We talked about earlier this week. In case you missed that episode Jane Founded One of the most well-known known settlement houses in the US. Jane became a close friend at Emily's and inspired emily to take up settlement work in eighteen ninety. Two Emily helped establish the dentists in house in Austin. Emily decided on a career and academia studying at Harvard. The University of Chicago and the University of Berlin before joining the Faculty of Wellesley College in Eighteen Ninety six by nineteen thirteen. She was a full professor of political economy and political and social science during her time at Wellesley. Emily was also active in promoting child welfare reforms she served onto municipal boards dedicated to children urban planning. She also served to state commissions focused on industrial education and immigration then came the outbreak of World War. One a lifelong pacifist and antiwar activist. Emily tirelessly against the United States entry into the war. She even prepared peace proposals and took part in a delegation to Scandinavia that tried to initiate mediation to end the conflict. Her activism came with consequences in nineteen eighteen when. Emily requested to extend her sabbatical. The wellesley faculty terminated her contract fifty two years old. She was left jobless. Emily decided to devote all of her efforts to antiwar activism in Nineteen Nineteen Emily Jane addams founded the women's International League for peace and freedom. Emily was hired as the organization's First International Secretary Treasurer to put her in charge of all of the organization's activities including coordination and cooperation with the newly formed League of Nations during the Inter war years. Emily worked with the League of Nations. In various roles on efforts related to disarmament drug control the internationalization of aviation and even the participation of the United States in the league. Interestingly the rise of Nazism and the human destruction caused by the Third Reich during World War Two forced emily to change her strong views on Pacifism. She came to believe that force was acceptable. And even defensible extreme scenarios when fundamental human rights are severely infringed upon in one thousand nine hundred forty. Six at the age of seventy emily's lifelong commitment to promoting peace was rewarded. She received the Nobel Peace Prize jointly with John. Mccain the head of the YMCA. Emily was awarded thirty four thousand dollars which he donated to the women's League for peace and freedom during her Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech. Emily said may know young man ever be faced with the choice between violating his conscience by cooperating and competitive mass slaughter or separating himself from those who endeavoring to serve liberty democracy. Humanity can find no better way than to conscripts young men to kill. Emily was the second American woman to receive Nobel Peace Prize. The first was her close friend. Jane addams. Emily died the day after her ninety fourth birthday. She's remembered for her incredible antiwar efforts and for the tireless work. She put in to change the lives of women children and workers for the better all month. Were talking about feminists so tune in tomorrow to hear another incredible story. This month of Encyclopaedia Annika is brought to you by five an online marketplace connecting businesses freelancers. Who OFFER HUNDREDS OF DIGITAL SERVICES INCLUDING GRAPHIC DESIGN? Copywriting web programming film editing and more fibers mission is to change how the world works together. The fiber platform gives everyone no matter their gender race religion or sexual orientation an equal chance to build their business brand or dreams on their own terms. That's something we can certainly get behind this women's history month and year round as we call for more industry leaders to join with fiber and make strides in creating opportunities for all fibers. Marketplace helps the world's get more done with less. Take Five and show your support for fivers. New Store at F. E. R. DOT CO SLASH. Women where they've over one hundred of the platforms top email talent that's f. e. r. Dot Co Slash Women Special. Thanks TO LOSE. Kaplan favorite sister and co-creator. Talk to you tomorrow.

Emily Jane addams United States Boston Jenny Kaplan Bryn Mawr College Nobel Prize Wonder Media Network International League for peace Bryn MAWR League of Nations scientist France Wellesley Massachusetts Hull House Scandinavia Harvard
44. Light Sleeper (1992)

Full Cast And Crew

1:04:09 hr | 1 year ago

44. Light Sleeper (1992)

"Pulls up your none of switching uh-huh. Oh i gave a little more background and traitor yeah okay. We're recording e think so okay so i'll do the podcast intro great hey welcome to full cast and crew which is a podcast that chooses a film goes down the rabbit hole of its i._m._d._b. Full cast and crew page mining for surprising appearances unlikely connections weird trivia strange quotes fractured takes and quirky off kilter digression <music> full stop full stop. You're going to add all this seamless absolutely lately or you or you could leave this part people like that apprise me that behind the scenes story breath well brechin or behind the scenes. It depends on your level of intellectual model. Wanna say pretension but i'm sophistication sophistication. That's right. That's more accurate no anyway. Go ahead <hes> <hes> this week. We're talking about <hes> this week. We're talking about a light sleeper. Paul schrader brilliant study of alienated urban denizens skirting the borderline of madness madness starring willem dafoe as john latour a rich upscale drug dealer for manhattan professionals when his boss and susan sarandon tells john on that she is planning to abandon the drug business for herbal cosmetics sort of a lateral move john's life is thrown into disarray coincidentally he runs into marianne dana delany an old girlfriend and former addict who has returned to new york to be with her dying mother when the murder of an upper west side woman involved in a drug transaction has the police scouring the town for suspects john thinks they are following him and the strain upon his life and his hopes for the future become harder and harder to bear schrader raider of course is the writer and director of such films as taxi driver blue-collar raging bull the last temptation of christ affliction bringing out the dead and the recent. I performed starring ethan. Hawke light sleeper has been rated eighty nine percent fresh on rotten tomatoes through that in just to encourage people to watch them which they have some. Should i just thought it was <hes> reacting to your note. You have underneath that maybe and there are those are my personal notes into those. It'll come although actually that note. I came to disagree disagree with my own note somewhat. We'll get there okay so anyway jason. Yes crafts you think well. I mean you're. This is the first if you've ever seen this movie. This is the first time between <hes> well. We should probably start with you because i've seen this movie many many times i remember when it came out because <hes> i think willem dafoe was still relatively young actor. I'd seen him in something else so when i saw like oh he's going to be leading this thing. I was like all the intriguing then just sort of missed. It never an i i loved it. I've seen a lot of posters working since then. He's such a strange. Filmmaker is and this is such a weird time. I'm in new york capturing and willem dafoe as a as a leading man is always so he's such a character ernie brings that to his lead roles. I totally agree about him. As a lead actor performer it's almost weird off-putting which i guess is the point schrader has said that this is his third man in a room movie with taxi driver travis bickel and <hes> american gigolo <hes> so the three of them are sort of of a piece for schrader in which i can see ya. These disaffected alienated men who hate their jobs interestingly. They all have that in common in their own way <hes> <hes> it's it's. It's such a strange movie like you said it captures this part of new york and also to me. It captures nothing. I'm an expert expert on the drug culture or drug dealing but it's so specific in capturing this character and defo's character for people who i haven't seen the movie is a drug dealer. One of the descriptions i saw online that i thought was so apt was <hes> defoe said he played a drug dealer who sold white drugs for white. People well jeff. I was so apt yet because it's all the bullshit of oh yeah. We're selling in using drugs but not really we're having fun. We're the fancy antsy. People were the beautiful people but really you're just drug addicts and users in drug dealers one of the things that i love about trader and also can be maddening maddening. I guess the specificity of of these these moments. There's so many moments where latour defo's character is is doing a drug deal in an supposedly supposedly fancy nightclub thinking the one where he goes and meets two girls in a nightclub and he's just making small talk after he does the transaction and he says so. Where's the so what's on for tonight kind kinda. He's so desperate for connection. He's kind of a little bit trying to invite himself along to this evening with these two girls and the way the actor doesn't show well she kind of just goes oh oh just party and it's like awkward silence and he takes his cue and he gets up and leaves like they don't want you around to deliver the product and go and there's so many times that's where that happens whether it's t's victor garber character kind of putting his arm and i just shoving them out the door and his whole the whole movie he's looking looking for this acceptance in connection which of course he never gets in trouble ironically the very you're absolutely right that it is such a strange specific kind of thing and here he is so disaffected but there is part. It also seems to be right for the job. Yeah in the center of you know the one of the first things you seem actual deal in the hand camaraderie so that they can find exempts to shake hands and and push the stuff that layer of it just makes it more interesting that he's probably unsure of how much how much of it is the put on that the job nerve versus his own real feelings and he seems to be so disconnected for yes his real taste like when the cop confronts him at the laundromat and sort it makes fun of his scarf and his silly glasses and his jacket downtown interested how a nineteen year old bonnard honor student fancy parents got a quarter uncut kolkata which is found murdered the temperature would find crews in alphabet city looking at school. You know what i'm saying. Somebody sold her. Somebody upscale. Somebody classy y'all classy so here. Maybe somebody knows something. We need to know understand boy. It's such a great scene because you're doing your laundry in a dingy rundown laundromat yet he's wearing the scarf and his bullshit tinted glasses and his leather jacket and the cop is just so dismissive of him in a way that show true to this approach to i i think nightlife in general and eighties early nineties nightlife like this is what ninety two so you say like when you say the seventies or the eighties of the nineties. It doesn't really mean in that. It's like the agents weren't really over yet by ninety two. It's still kind of looks and feels like the eighties yeah yeah. This is sort of the twilight. Twilight is the end of it. The party's over you're for everybody's over yeah. There's a lot of similarities between this and saturday night fever work and it was sort of interesting that the you know it's fifteen years difference but it does feel like ones the end end of one decade ones the end of a different decade end in in this. It's at a strange point. There's so many representations of new york during the battle as sort of taking a pelham one-two-three onto three taxi driver era of as hell scape and then you have this sort of sex and the city of new york as metropolis and cool and this seems to be somewhere in schick very finite window of time just between those two things at the drug dealer he has. He has a beeper. No cell phone cell phone. It uses still uses the payphones phones. Yep you know people are taking. Here's another weird thing about this drug dealer. He takes a towncar classy classy. Yeah here's another thing i liked about that speaking of the towncar a research into it but at the very end of the movie after he witnesses witnesses the suicide slash murder of his ex yeah life quote unquote because they weren't really married he gets into the back of the town car and the driver is referring to him really formally even though he's the only person we've ever seen driving john latour around and you get the impression early on the movie that this guy i i sort of thought until that that the limo driver was like an employee susan sarandon's character and he was the guy who always drove. This guy knew exactly what was going on but he he speaks so formally tiller tour. Where would you like me to go sir. Would you know like wait right here for mitt here. Sir you wanna wait here sir. They don't even know each other and it's just a little thing which i think given the specificity of schrader like all of these little collective things add up to this kind of overwhelming sense it's of disconnection that exists throughout the entire movie pertaining to this character who even though he's in and among people he's totally and utterly alone yes and it's he's unable unable to make connections with people that are trying to make connections with him so the susan's character and the other guy who's great. I can't remember his name name clemen or david clinton they. They have a togetherness like. I don't feel that they're alone in this world. Even though there's a loneliness kind of attached to both of them they have each other and they're going into the the cosmetics narcotics business going to the cosmetics business together and he's not a part of it. He hasn't been asked yet and then when she does ask. It's a little she doesn't really want him to come along into the cosmetics business though it's it's a question to me like how much of this is nobody wants him or how much of this he's putting out sort of a vibe that that pushes people away he is an odd and real specific character besides the specificity of this kind kind of drug dealing and and just to backtrack a little bit <hes> you know not only do they sell these sort of white drugs to white people. He's not rich you you know he. He's complaining. Money's nothing exactly so he has to put on these airs so he can blend into this world enough to do his business right but never enough to to actually make a change in his life and in the same way i think there's a similar dynamic between the way he deals with the two other people in drug dealing business we and and i i'm robert robert between annan robert though they are really nice to him and <hes> they do seem to be sincere and he he reacts oddly in places like all of that that struggle for connection. This isn't about gosh. The the world is so horrible able in disconnected. This guy is a specific character who has who has his own problems which are leading him to have trouble connecting with people but at the same time <hes> makes him able to move between those things so that's one thing that i really appreciate about this movie that it doesn't allow the character any sort of like every man kind of out to make him sympathetic boxes him in. I mean boxes himself. I was struck watching you this time how little he shares with annan robert about what's what's actually going on. I mean he's traumatic. Things are happening to him yeah. He his ex wife's mother died who who you feel there was a real closeness there at one point although ironically -ironically the closeness is represented as having existed both kind of only in latour's mind but then also kind of in reality like there is something something about when the sister says when jane addams who's amazing <hes> when jane addams says you know she always loved you john like you feel that it's real absolutely yeah but at the same time in the scenes with dana delany you also get the idea that this kind of was a destructive eruptive mutually destructive relationship which wasn't really grounded in anything real says her you know he's still feel it but i mean he's crazy. He pulled up up with a boombox re records her her name a hotel answer all service like you haven't. It's not presented the most balanced relationship. That's a little too seriously. She is hardly a <hes> a reliable narrator she interest amid suicide and or <hes> well absolutely and i think the drug problem that he had might also have times ad and or has he still still in recovery <hes>. He's got his problems but sort of so is she is all that i'm saying that i that. I don't think that he is delusional. She might be at times as well and might be more more. You know they have that great scene in the hospital whereas it wasn't all bad and she saying it was anything you married. You got kids a dog house plant which nothing details just open the door. Open the door to what i mean. It's not ethnic. Were strangers. After we married we were not serramonte. It wasn't even a minister he was he was he was also a minister of the church of universal harmony. Europae was not legally jeanne dixon. Mary was on the cusp. We're happy we are miserable. We were either scoring coming down mostly coming now. We had good times area. I don the street dancing with friends. We were magical for three months of that telling me and called once. That's how magical we where. I'm not saying that she is. I really don't mean to say that she star. I'm just saying that there well is flawed but he is not terrible either because again jane adams's character seemed like hi kim. Everybody seems to enjoy getting along with him to to a degree but at that scene in the hospital and i talk about that president because it's got that amazing framing yeah where in the scene is there. He's finally persuaded her with great reluctance on her part to come down and sit with them and have a conversation. They're having a conversation and trader frames at brilliantly brilliantly with a pillar literally between them and they're sitting in chairs with this barrier between the two of them. Schreyer's light touch is always appreciated and all it's it's also when they have the love scene and there's the the angel photo over the bed. I don't know what that painting is. It's probably some significance. Maybe you know that's more either. I think it's also paul schrader just his head's always in but that scene okay the dialogue is so good and i actually rewound this movie in a couple of places. I'm using the term rewind for you. Millennials is listening. That's what you used to do when you have moving on v._h._s. I actually i don't know what you call. It on. A stream is it. Rewinding is going back. What do they say ah go back. You don't say do back so i went back and this is one of the scenes because that scene latour is holding her hand. She's kind of melted a little bit. She's she's she's she's. She's a little bit with him. In this reminiscence and he goes we were in love and she goes yeah then. He says we were happy. She doesn't answer and i i actually on all the scenes with the two of them. I was on her side. I was like get away from this guy. You're you made the right choice. You however tenuously got to the other side. You have your life together. This guy is going nowhere and he's going to drag you back in and which is exactly what happens if you let him into your life again and she's right about that and and and so i'm just curious because it sounds like we have two different takes on this which is interesting. I think when i was always rooting for her to stay the hell away from this guy yeah. That sounds like you weren't. I wasn't i guess it's because we're seeing it from from his point of view and he seems to have it together like i. I never bought busy lives in an apartment with no furniture. So what does he have together. Tell me where you see him together -gether. That's what i'm curious about like together in this guy's life he keeps a journal. That's very okay right out the window but okay all thank you paul sater's light touch the very idea that they have a garbage strike going on the whole time so good good you see people like digging trash back to throw things away you just have to throw it out the window and it's in the isle of garbage with everything else when she fall yeah well how 'bout when she when she falls or is pushed. She's just another piece of garbage are behind the street. I mean he has the heaviest of touches but it's somehow works for me until the end of the movie but but it but it works the couple of other things if i just question of why i think i'm a little bit we mostly because you're seeing it from his point of view. No he obviously has his problems but he he but that's like saying you're seeing taxi driver from travis bickel's point of view on your sympathetic to his his experience mania when he when he it does bad things you shouldn't have done that. I was on your side now working. Yeah okay so you with here with john latour then you're all your team latour. I absolutely for him to succeed. I want him to ask anybody who so desperately goes to a psychic and like that also was i look at you and i give you my impressions. I feel your vibrations. I hate that word sounds so phony. Doesn't i can't think of anything better. You're anxious more than usual here. Livelihood is endangered. He worried about the future. You don't have much money saved. I see a woman who has betrayed you my mother well. She was paul schrader wife. I know yeah mary beth author and every about her. She was so good in to throw away scenes almost anybody else she really imbued them with something really really deep and cool i thought but he is so i see him desperate and struggling the whole time and i want somebody who's desperate and struggling to succeed over their own demon totally agree however for i want someone who's desperate and struggling to take active steps to succeed over there demons and he's not doing that. That's that he's not using but he's drinking and i guess bits. He's he's honest about well. I don't know if he's honest in a dishonest moment. She says he says to her clean. She goes. Let me see your eyes so he looks at is she goes something like is can be deceiving or something and she and then his beeper goes off and she's like oh okay. I'm dealing a little. I'm but i'm not using he's he's. He's actually lying until he's called hauled out ever tells the truth when he has to rain so hey who doesn't right full cast and crew is brought to you by the award winning comedy series philly court. It's like a fake judge judy but if way more of the cases involved percocet and illegal fireworks philly court season season two premiering now on facebook just like in follow chuckle or comedy on facebook for the latest episodes philly did not actually win any awards my dude but the guys in phoenix also except for brian right well. She's fucking bump heads anyways and i'm gonna beat his ass deeds all those things because we're seeing it from his point of view and we do see him they do i. I'm under no impression that he's an angel or anything anything. She'll get up in his bed the boombox playing her her saying her name over and over again. Are you moved by that or are you horrified by that. I sort of move. I feel bad for the guy hi 'cause we. We've spoken before. Here's somebody who's desperate for connection. Yes and i'm ashamed to say that i simply of known enough of these people huila when they're desperate for connection the more desperate you get the more difficult it becomes jamaica connection because every opportunity feels almost like it's your last one and so therefore in order to try to make it you make that connection in a way that sort of so harsh so strange that it's more off putting than anything else putting you further down where you were so that's the thing that i saw happening with him and with dana delaney's character on shoes phantom. I've china beach earning. I knew her name. I've only heard her in late lois lane and a lot of super mayor cartoons toons cartoons yeah she does so she's i can totally see that yes oh my god. Her distrust is not unwarranted. Yes but i still feel bad because again we're seeing it from his point of view so i'm rooting for him and wanting him and also understanding why he is doing things that have the opposite effect of what he wants to that. She has her own set of problems. Your sister even admits like she's been on drugs. She was lying to this. It's not like her mother is so therefore she yeah roker straps. I take cain adams in that scene a little bit enabling of john latour. She's a little bit kinda like obviously whatever happened in this these two sisters family. They had some poor choices that were made. I'm not sure in terms of their choice of of of men given what dana delany dan since nineteen ninety two different air however i'm reminded of my good friend chris campion had had a statement that john latour reminded me. Chris used to always say i always wanted to be judged on my intentions not my actions so our john look in. This movie is someone who always wants to be judged on his intentions. Which of course he never overtly states because he can't he can't communicate in a fundamental way. I mean when he shows up at the mother's funeral like like the funeral parlor like he shouldn't go there and i thought the scene with jane addams was so so well done. We're she's like john. You shouldn't have come and the way she is with him and that pause. There's a incredible pause in the scene. I'm trying to see if i made a note about it because i wanted to to really really kinda hammered here. It's like when when she is out on the street in front of the funeral home with him after dana delany has freaked out and like get out of my life you know when he says to her. I saw your mother and she surprised because remember remember. He came into housewarming. Jane addams was sleeping the chair so she has no idea that he came in. There is such a weird expression on her face. Which at first i thought was its structure is really creepy that he came into the room and saw their mother without waking her of course we know that's when dana delany saw him and sees him reaching for the toe of the the mother and the hospital bed and she's moved and she lets him back in and they go and they sleep together. She wakes up and she's like that was. I'm glad it happened but i don't call me. You don't see me. She cuts it off right. Jane addams faces kind of amazing in the scene where she's confronting him and saying you were and he's like yeah you were asleep. She looked freaked out and she gets in as quickly as possible and gets away from him and i wasn't sure she's putting together that that's why dana delany wasn't present at the moment. The mother passed away more whether she's just it's an additional layer of john latour creeping people out because of his intentions but he's completely. He's completely blundering into one bad thing after another that he has no business being a part of yeah yeah so. I didn't know what what jane addams was meant to a. B. i. cassandra representing struck you in that moment i thought it was interesting at the time <hes> it just seemed like more that she was sort of freaked out or sort of as with like you said if she enables her sister and enables john. I would think when you're enabling somebody like that. You have to edit your own memory in the same way that <hes> that <hes> dana delaney's character accuses john of anything. Jane probably did winks at certain. Things pretends she doesn't certain things and then when she is confronted with something that happened without her knowing it might have shown to her like oh. I've been kind of <hes> lying to myself about yeah. You are and maybe what about who says yeah. It hadn't struck me that moment yes that she missed it because they were having having sex maybe yeah and that she felt i felt it was it was it was the younger sister who probably always had a crush on her older sister's boyfriend slash husband and thinking he was cool and and then realizing in this moment he not only is he sort of not cool but because it comes on the heels of her seeing him being so startled and sort so like johnny shouldn't have come like the way she says the line to me he obviously shouldn't have just shown up at the funeral home like based on <unk> how it ended between him and dana delany. He knows he's he should know. He's not welcome there this. This is why i think dana's laney's mother his. I don't know schrader raiders history with this stuff. I don't know enough about him to know but the movie to me is really really smart about addiction and it's really really smart about drug culture and it's really really smart about the ways that people who are addicts and or recovered people manage and process their emotions. It's really smart in a way that i think he must either have some personal experience within or in his research for this which i read a little bit about how he would send. I think he sent defoe out on some drug drug deals with a a sit well with a drug dealer who who handled a similar clientele but he got all those details so right and the emotional journey is all right again up until until the end i just it's like the movie falls off a cliff in the last ten minutes a everything up till him and serandon knocking on hotel door after after that it it just gets so silly to me the shootout where like you know now we're all shooting each other and then the prison scene is well done like it's active really well between the two of them. It's just so weird like his. The final moment of connection he's been waiting for the whole movie is when he's incarcerated unlike a triple homicide that then he can connect to her then he's like he's burt he so loose free in a way we haven't seen him. He looks at he's at ease. He's he's comfortable in jail now. There's a part of that. That's really true. I think to addiction or recovery in a way and i think that the character is being really truthful to where the characters coming from in that like he's relieved. I think even says it was a relief actually <hes> because he's in a place now where where he's in prison that's where he wants to be. It's the same thing he was in prison in his apartment. He was just free to come and go from the prison now. He's in the prison and it's even more confined and the rules or even more clear-cut and he actually think he likes exit. One hundred percent this is not a unique kicking the frustrate now for emphasis yeah but this is not a unique ending like i was reading that particularly one of schroeder's favorite movies brisson pickpocket also ends it ends with the guy in prison guy in prison similar similar happy to be there. I'd have to know what the yeah pretty much. I don't remember well enough. The amount of detail whether there's the <hes> hope of a future that this kind of lays out certainly <hes> certainly he is there and he feels once he has had this this some identifying characteristic visiting he can no longer be a pickpocket once. He's this thing that had defined him but also hemmed him in was once it was taken away his he's going to be himself right to sort of grow grow again and i get the impression named that's that's the vibe we're getting here and i think that's also if you've ever seen american gigolo. That's that's very much the the same thing gigolo he's incarcerated and but free he's out of the life one of the things that i disliked though about the i mean it's well like yeah well written there or something. Maybe this is just twenty some odd years later looking at the gender dynamics the idea that he and susan sarandon would have some kind of romantic connection action connection seem really shoehorned in they made a connection. I just wish it was it's a- and well because she has a certain kind of growth and the fact that they talk about <hes> robert robert robert thought he could take the business over returns to the drug dealer returns to drug dealing the fact that they years another theme in the movie that i liked so much and that was also i think similar to saturday night fever in the sense of like getting old and move moulder and moving from one stage of life to another and hear them talk about like ten fifteen years ago when we were all doing drugs and having this sort of nostalgic element but then to find themselves. There's still in this life kind of wanted to get out and realizing they've stayed a little bit too long. I really i thought this i mean that's not like a totally new theme theme but to put put it in this context and the way that they dealt with it was and having it so just sort of more of their their life constant thing i i. I really liked it. I found it. I totally agree. I removing the scene where he's leafing through the photo album and it's kind of underscore again. This is where i think it's so brilliant about that thing that you're just talking about is he's looking through this photo album mournfully as if this is the representative photographic evidence of the closeness and the and the great time that was had had not only by by him dana delany but by all of them but the photos are just people at parties drunk and doing drugs. It's not a collection selection of heartwarming photos of togetherness. It's just party photos but he's leafing through it. As if it's the most photo of his newborn child while do you better specifically specifically the one he lands onto more and her into thing about her is a picture of just her on the beach but he's not he's not in it. It's a picture of her so yeah. That's what i'm saying to me. The relationship is not real. It's in his mind. It's played that way. It like both was and wasn't real which is is true to the to the to the subject matter. I think whatever disagreement we have about which of the two is more or less unreliable. It's just that i think they sort of both are and who knows maybe that's also where they they found their girlfriend here to find out really where your allegiance with theon latour sort of begins and ends. I mean if you get a little stalker. I i don't know i don't know reflection on his side when you're watching a paul schrader movie and you're thinking like i really i'm rooting for this guy. I hope the chris cassini. They'll turn it around. Come on jaws better than this snitch is out. You know his supposed- friends on the phone call today is not a very lake i his name also isn't john. Doe is john to her actual. The name is we don't know what is he has. A sister brought up like in the eleventh like the name is so good though like oh. Let's just again another layer of the bullshit to the supposed- class elegance of what they're doing. It's just it's so good and if he wasn't so desperate to try to create a real life that might just seem cynical this now it does seem tragic because here you have. This person who wants to feel trying to feel wants to connect needs to connect surrounded by so much bullshit and can't think of anything to do besides more. Both you know another another thing on the defoe part. I don't know if you watch this. I watched an interview that he did with charlie rose right before before the movie came out <hes> and it's worth looking at i we may have mentioned this before just in our interpersonal conversations but you know i always think that actors broadly can be classed into two groups. One group are capable and really good at discussing what they're doing as actors and the other group are almost almost unable to speak at all to their process or what they're doing like deniro for example isn't a guy who's going to go on and on what about you know what he was thinking or approaching in a given scene and kinda surprising to me because i mean of course we'll have watched willem dafoe for thirty years just do everything but he's surprisingly inarticulate about what he was thinking and what his process was kind of interesting to watch. He's so good. He's just one of those guys his look his his visage when you put that face on screen it's so i just think of all his movie movie roles. Now i think of him in all these other movies where his complexity it he's so compelling complex even if he's not doing anything <hes> and and he's so good at dialogue in this movie's dialogue is so good and tight and there's really not a wasted thing again until the end when it gets a little silly but really up until then man it's it's just it's so well done and he so interesting to watch and so perfectly cast. I can't imagine if anyone else was ever considered to be in this movie other than him but i can't imagine anyone else doing that and serandon was so good to she doesn't get a lot of credit for this role that i hear about man. I can't think of anything where she's really as as good as she is here again up until the end but she's so good and specific and the scene between the two of them in the restaurant so that's the plan the plan for the future my future at two conceptual. We have this conversation kind of session two years ago. We're going to have it again this time. It is for real well. I'm thinking about taking some music courses sound editing editing mixing. No that was acting that was modeling. Guess should try this bears. They're flown in from someplace. I mean everything's bonded from someplace. This is something you want to say and what's up. I guess i'm a little worried. Everybody thinks i'm so tough and you gotta be tough. I mean mean especially in this business. It's one thing to look tough. It's another thing that christie's instance the big producer nominee for kademi word best picture. I used to know every girl fact who how i mean. He couldn't take a shut me when we were like this so i told him to get straight concede cut him off old money. Remember the last thing you said to me. We'll keep in touch right now. Five years sokaia is so sad and fraught and yet taking place in this temple of were all rich and successful and everything thing is good but she gets snubbed by the former giant. Who doesn't you know she's just a drug dealer to him yeah and to herself to which because i think the the thing i feel like they're so desperate to pretend they're not what they are and their only choice has been to buy into that idea of themselves selves. I guess for so long that you know he's supposed to be thirty eight in the movie right. That's a long time to be in the low in life right. Yeah i moved to new york in nineteen. Ninety-five five i lived in the east village. My first apartment costs three hundred and eighty dollars a month when twelve street and avenue way and my first job paid two hundred and fifty dollars a week as a production russian assistant so you could live in the east village yeah as late as one thousand nine hundred five and get started in a career in the entertainment business and you could do that. Obviously you can't do that now. Now there is no such thing unless you are so far away in our bureau and living probably still with seven or ten rates in some kind of a situation where you can afford ford that right. It's another thing that i think lends the movie some retro active kind of ennui or angst. If you will in the sense that that you could still live that way when this movie was taking place <hes> like latour could try music career or an acting career or any of the careers that he talks about wanting wanting to try and discarding could try and do it and make a living because it wasn't quite so expensive at the time. The movie is set. It was possible to to live in so the east village the west village and house kitchen kitchens and rockwell were jealous jealous lives and and you could you you could eat out an existence yeah. That's part of what makes latorre even more desperate and sad really is. He's like i think of taking some production in music classes. She goes didn't you do that. He said no no she's like what was that acting painting modeling modeling. You know the sad lunch sad lunch yeah were. They didn't eat their fruit. It was that the only thing they were having or was that the resume and dessert okay. Maybe that's like famous dessert. Whatever that restaurant was <hes>. I think it was lakota bosc anyway we can jump into the forecast so directed by paul schrader of course i mean you. I've seen seen a lot of paul schrader movies. I don't think i've seen any in a while as you mentioned. People are talking a lot about. I reformed. I think the last one i saw would have been bringing out the dead which underrate yeah. I think i've seen more of his is that he has written then then. He's actually directed. I wonder if i watched bringing out. The dead. Again is nick cage sort of another man in a room character who hates his job in his on this same kind of paul schrader as journey i saw bringing out the dennis out in the theaters in ninety nine and it <hes> i found it incredibly moving because nicholas cage also is he and willem dafoe both have a i think partially it's because they're unconventional leading men yup and they have a character actor sensibility so there's so much going on but before you even get to this is the protagonist story doing a recognizable thing yep. They bring all that energy with them with bringing out the dead. It's <hes> <hes> because he's an ambulance driver and wanting to help people like that. Metaphor is sort of so much open. It's like a sweeter movie in that. It's not sweep but yeah but it's sweeter that's attend because the the desire that that he has yeah and he also has problems in the sort of ghosted this this thing that defines him that he hates and loves at the same time but it was great. I want to one of my favorite paul. Schrader movies blue-collar nineteen seventy-eight obscure. Have you seen it. I haven't seen it. It's richard pryor harvey keitel and you off that koto. It's it's a great movie and richard. Pryor is probably different in this than in any other richard pryor movie. You're going to see so. I recommend that movie because i can't think got any other non comedic roles that richard pryor on but it's right but it's joe dancer his own life his own life story. Yes so schrader obviously defoe serandon. We've spoken about dana delany david clinton. I mean david glenn is one of those guys like. I think. This is going to be recurring the thing for me because i'm as we do these. That's an actor to me. Yeah you look at his page. He's one of those guys who has credits going back to to like what feels like the sixties yup well nineteen sixty nine to today yeah. That's an actor man t._v. Ed movies everything and it's on gray ones in the thing and he was in the thing and being there so but not a leading man is that is that is it. Maybe it's better to be the david clinton then to be the tom cruise. I don't know i mean i mean tom. Cruise is out but one percent of the one percent but i mean i don't know there's so many guys like victor. Garber is great in this to you might also think of willem defoe also has <hes> has more of a character actor who has done some performances but you think most of his performances are character sort of supporting things but this clinton guy you're absolutely right like you have so so so it makes it feel so lived in an so earring the bell yeah lows like you feel like you're in good hands with him and that's something you can't really like. The script is whatever it is his lines or whatever the our wardrobe. I don't know but his avuncular presence he just has that. I thought victor garber was so good <unk>. I've never seen victor garber without white hair. I mean before he sees this to me is such a great character of god. It just reminds me of my misspent. Youth is the the effortlessly cruel wealthy person who who can indulge his own wims perversions addictions at no cost to himself. You meet the character tease. He's in a hospital hospital. Because some girl he picked up in a bar he doesn't even know had an overdose and he called his drug dealer to bring him a valium he. There's like a not a conflict but the two of them he's like hey showcase like who is that some valence and loot <hes>. Just let him attend what is it. You won't believe it a nightmare. I brought in this chick. She oh deed man. I didn't even know her. I didn't have to bring her and the cops are coming back to talk to me. I'm gonna come down. This would never happen in zurich. Take two thanks. She okay who the girl girl with was not the in fact she called me and she wants to go out again so funny. Jane addams amazing now one of my favorite full cast and crew thing paul jabara who plays the guy who is addicted to the drugs eddie okay. This also seems to be very conscious that even with the selling drugs to why people not just a party drug. The character of eddie is sort of a reminder of. I actually actually if you could tell you whatever lies. This guy is dying in front of you so that guy paul jabara is as a disco legend. I don't know if you knew this. No he wrote last dance why and he actually is more of a musician than he is really an actor although we had some sort of seminal acting roles here and there but yeah he he's a he's a guy record for casablanca records so he's got a lot of rape extended disco tunes and man. He's so good is eddie. I mean he's yes to your point. He's the person in the movie who strips away the veneer of the teas and the nightclubs all the shit and just shows you what you're really doing wing here. He apparently is the composer of it's raining men. I always he really. I didn't know that this was his last guy. He died. I think two years right. I forgot same rockwall was in this movie until he until he showed up because it's so jarring to me. I guess i guess what it is. Christmas and i'm old that nineteen ninety-two feels like a long time away a. and it feels like how could sam rockwell even be alive in one thousand nine hundred two and then winning an academy award in two thousand eighteen yeah come to find out he does. She had been in a bunch of movies before this exactly this. I'm sure you're looking at one thousand nine. Hundred i'm old tombs which has its positive experience numerate them some other somewhere podcast. He was great again. Maybe it's schreyer's i i or something like that but he's both with him as with clinton clement clinton linen that all of the actors that he cast in this hasn't again whether it's he has a good i for likes that style or something about his direction there there was nothing showy fussy say i'm not a sam rockwell fan. There's something there's something about him. As an actor that i can never get too. I find him really remote all the time in what he's doing wing and i don't find him accessible in a way that i i like. I like to feel like i can connect to the character in a certain way and there's just something about him and i don't know what it is. I just never he's never someone who's i can appreciate that he's that he's being good yeah like often watching him in movies and going wow he's. He's really good really good in this movie but i don't know you know it's funny taste just because i don't have a strong feeling about sam rockwell one way or the other and i guess it it also depends on what you're sort of looking for anything because this is more of a conflict i have not even a conflict but <hes> sometimes when with my own writing writing and and i have to admit that i am usually less interested in watching something or listening to something in relating directly to the person as being sort of interested in in in watching them and understanding them not from afar not that i wanted to be connected but there is something about like i appreciate so much some somebody that feels like there's sort of living in it that i don't i feel like i need to connect to them as much as like understand or feel like i've been given an honest portrayal that i share lean something from totally yeah well. I think it's interesting because i think you as an actor or have this quality that i'm talking about liking like when you're in something. You're there like there's a heart to it that i can connect to yeah. I think you're right. I think think with with him. I have this also with jessica chastain <hes> like i see her in movies that i'm supposed to like or that. I'm supposed to think she's she's amazing in this ad. Maybe she is but i just can't plug into. I can't there's some there's some there's i guess there's a remoteness and a coldness that may may well be indicative of you know like having appropriate boundaries or or being a well adjusted person. I don't know what i i like that. You're just like emotionally haywire and so when i see you in something i liked it. It's all there and i'm like yeah. Give me some truth. I don't no no but <hes> yeah. I don't know but he's good in this. He's really good in this jacket is amazing and the other one is the probably the greatest credit will ever have feel logical. Coquette is a pretty good acting credit to have what was that show. If there is no god then how can we conceive of you know i mean the idea of god presupposes the existence of god seattle logical argument that's anselm. It's twelve hundred fourteen hundred shekel. Check out this tourist. This is a good part so if the idea of god is implanted by god the census advertisers the sense of the divine you know then what is the role of human thought david speed ninety two. I don't know what years was david david spain on saturday night live. I was later. I think it was like ninety. Five been that much later because i see on his page tommy boy yeah. It was ninety five ninety five. We'll tell me boy was. I think at the height of his let me see david spade. I think he had to have been on s. and l. a. season s._n._l. Already when we saw this when when this movie came i think he was already only judging by. I'm sure they didn't give him. Tommy boy cast members for one thousand nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety-six so he'd been on for two years. That's crazy me because this also seems like such a again not knowing too much about david spade when somebody who's a comic star like that and who probably walk through and get as many joe dirt as he wants to these like this summer. I think i'd like to work with this. Oh tour yes. I have never done something like that again. Full cast and crew is brought to you by behemoth from monkey brain comics behemoth is the dirty dozen meets the fly with little spiderman thrown thrown in kids are turning into monsters and the government steps in to keep things quiet summer never heard from again but others are forced on suicide missions on behalf of a world that hates them as part of project behemoth find it on monkey brain comics dot com or comics allergy today the sense sometimes paul schrader movies and we can talk about the music as a jump off of this sometimes it feels like somebody he met at a party ends up having a really important thing to do with the movie <hes> <hes> when i first started watching the opening credits i'm like what is this music show overwrought and dated and crazy then of course. I remember remember that it's from the guy who was in the call. Ban walls came down. You know great band great song and this was like his solo effort and i think he's a much beloved guy in the music business. He died very young yup. I think he died when he was sixty. Yes so when i was reading about it i read that schrader originally wanted to use dylan's empire burlesque which is as a dylan allah gist is is probably the worst bob dylan album of all time and that sayings on embedding and actually so last night he went back and i said well let me just listen to the let me just give twenty seconds teacher these empire burlesque songs because my first thought was oh my god that would have been amazing. 'cause i'm thinking more of like the land wa aw dylan albums that would have been moving and kind of had that seem ethereal lost new york soul sense. No i mean once. I listened to the dylan songs i was thankful. Michael did the music for light sleeper tamed the shoes and as soon as the first shot came on and that music came in they fell. You know we were talking last week. You mentioned i'm alright kenny loggins at the end of caddyshack eddie shack. There was something about this i was like should i know this. I like this music is displayed so prominent confident that you're like. I must no one could non zone took jewish credit. I mean man. He's laying talk about talk about laying it all out there and being emotionally available. I kind of want to give this guy huggins. Eh michael. Let's go. Let's go down to six or seven here. You're in about thirty seven hundred on the emoting scale. I don't think paul schrader prostrate. It has got like like he recognizes zero three and then overreact ninety nine and above he doesn't have middle tones but the music does work it is evacuated of the time also his his scarf and his members only c._b._s. Wade jacket all of the things at the time probably didn't look and probably in ten years. They'll age you know there's sort of age again into awaited fuels yeah but right now it doesn't so to those very present vogels and the very fact that you have one writer of the of the songs doing multiple like rock songs in the soundtrack yeah. Usually there's like one or you have a few different artists but yeah in fact that that that the composer again not composing a score composing songs that yeah making that a sort of equal collaborator. It always seems to me risky risky yeah. I'm very because a lot of eggs in that basket. If it's a soundtrack it's like on a really like that that song but this other song but with this if you don't plug into michael biehn from the beginning well for me i always reference is turrets. A fire which is a great great movie which for me is ruined by the completely dated eighties soundtrack evangelist analysts that plays over it and there's some vangelis freaks out there. I know who are gonna have appropriate but that icon on conic theme right that you know <hes> <hes> but yeah the music it's funny. You're watching that i seen and it's just like a long shot over a huddled new york. Cobblestone street with garbage piled on either side and the song is so over the top and it's like the sound of a guy just ripping his heart out ironic because then we meet john mature who who his his heart is not really accessible to him. Yes until the very last shot of the movie. The movie does have that level of emotion going on but not demonstrably from any of the main characters which is i think kind of fascinating like the vibe of the movie is sad in heavy right and it's not sat in heavy in the way that saturday night fever is that movie is set in heavy in places because of things that are happening on the screen. This movie is freighted all over the place with this sad heavy. The party is over. We've stayed too long at the party. The garbage people are on strike strike like like everything about it. Has that tatty i'm in a nightclub and the lights came on and it's not glamorous anymore feel but not overtly which i think is great about and in that way the music which can seem kind of jarring to contemporary ears does fit and i i think actually the atmospheric music that he composed fits much better than those two epic themes where he's shouting emoting in lyrics yeah another shout out. I wanted to give in these full cast and credits. The cinematographer is kind of a fascinating guy and i would encourage people to look at ed lachman career on his i._m._d._b. Page this is a guy who has a cinematographer shot everything from the lords of flatbush to desperately seeking susan too. I mean still we're gonna documentaries. Carol lesson zero drunk minute gun which is a great great movie. If you've ever seen that my new gun i recommend arm and electra's aerobic striptease. That's what i saw a guy. I think he won an award for that up up to recently carol <hes> wiener dog wonder struck still working and i read it was interesting how this schrader raider has given some interviews recently talking about being kind of just like priced out of the the film market nowadays and the way that this ended up being produced bizarrely by i mario khazar and i think carolco right alco caracazo. I think it's caro- already asli where did a little bit of reading about the is the history of carolco which can pronounce huge musters and then within ten years was bankrupt. Yeah well is and low. That's the eighties chris. I mean yeah first blood rambo total recall eight or two and then l._a. Story jacob's health rhode island cutthroat island is like a movie that you think oh that would be fun to watch but really not really several hours of my life i'm not going to it's actually a real small list of that kind of like so bad. It's not even worth it karaka carolco like what do i find that hard to say. I don't know why do you think it's carolco. I've heard other people say. I think there was also a a documentary. No maybe no that was annan. No that was cannon film that had <hes> that's that's golan globus bright you right. You know what i don't. I don't know why orca roco accept because i know it sounds like a video game. What would you sounds like mario. Kosar's wife was named caroline so they named it carolco. Though that is not why they named how do you know because on wikipedia martin guitar said like yeah we sort of bought the name doesn't really mean it doesn't mean anything he was bought in a company. That was going out of business this the name still working apparently who mario marks are. Oh wait. No sorry not still working well. It doesn't say that he's dead. Let's see there's a section on wikipedia expedia caracazo carolco relaunch carolco carolco and that's cassara had returned as chairman of the board. Maybe he's just tired when i blood money any recall money or the terminator money or in <hes> november two thousand seventeen. The new carolco was renamed recall studios <hes> or i guess it could be any credits since two thousand nine. I'm sure it's just midnight living living the dream. I guess during the one thing undeniable chris let's live for the day when i am dp is actually paying us to do this podcast instead of us pirating off their intellectual property win win instead instead of only in kissing. There is a little bit more than you're doing. Well i think that is our attempted to produce the now shove bartholomew versus neff a john hughes film which would've started stallone and john candy wow. I'm interested to see like that's why. I want a time machine. Oh you had mentioned the young woman in the <hes> club. We're tour is with those. Yes that tatiana von first diane von furstenberg daughter now. Would you like to know a personal anecdote related to tatyana donovan furstenberg now. You should see the look chris i couldn't. I couldn't imagine looking happier writing blouse. Yes of all the things to make you happy well. In the say early. Nineties actually probably right around when this movie was filmed. I had a friend who went to brown university and and i believe that tatiana von furstenberg brother alex also both went to brown university at the time it was known as having for lack of a better term in no offense implied to the individuals in question it was known for having tier of students who are often referred to as eurotrash which was sort of extremely grimly wealthy people of european descent. I was surprised that didn't come up when talking about teas that term teases pieces like the embodiment of this type of person who lived extremely dreamily well at what was a pretty liberal and kind of touchy feely university brown university right talking like princeton yale harvard here but anyway i went to a party at brown tatyana and her brother alex were at this party and i remember my friend pointing them out and he was sort of poor firmly in this eurotrash scene and i sort of was like a tourist here both to the ivy league itself and to this eurotrash seeing that my friends seem kinda wanna be a part of which sort of reflexively and intuitively felt was kind of silly and ridiculous and they were like these stars these tanned beautiful default twins. I i don't know i keep thinking they're twins. I'm not sure this is one of those stories when you're deep into the story and too far <hes> to really get out you realize there really is no story or end to this story other than the thing i can edit. There was a party and i think that alex when i got into a fight and choke the guy a little bit and then we left the party and that was the last time i ever in casinos. Eurotrash is being violent well. That's great can't include that. I don't know that might be a slant. That might be slander. I mean if you're willing to testify well under oath. I just remember in my very impressionable. We'll teenage year being just one. There was only one and then i i grew up very quickly from there. I don't know if you have moments like this. Every member like with great specificity this random moment not because these people meant anything to me or because they were stars or celebrities which certainly they weren't i mean i can't imagine that i knew who diane remember. When i was then or even real i mean now i know who she is but i certainly didn't know who she was. Then i think these were just pointed out to me as like a those are two princelings slings of royalty and fame or something and of course just sort of staring and being like woo hoo and what are these these creatures and then remembering during that he got into this kind of brawl at the party and it was a very weird weekend at brown university. Let me just say that. So that's my great great story stories you will cut out of entirely of the are you on that on the left on the ground changing from full cast and crew to brown's only because you brought her up. Did i tell this because i thought i was like tell the anecdote about how i was at a party with her and then rise alantic me to tell that as a story i was at a party ones with allison and taty suddenly informal close friends caller taty anyway. I'm just saying i lived the eric chris. It was ninety-two. Probably i mean probably was around the time they were in this movie because i'm sure paul schrader is like a bit of a society -iety new york guy and i'm sure he encountered them and she's perfectly cast in her friend are perfectly cast as as the euro girls in the club that they we are in the scene in the movie that you're talking about. Yes so anyway just be- kind chris when to you to outsource talk to me mostly. I think i'm not saying not to include it but i'm just saying if you do included please include some of the self deprecating comments the rally it will not it will not live on. It's not letting me in the eyes. He told me that he has his fingers crossed. Okay well. I think that zunes episode of full asoka chris. I think this was our best episode after the mine now okay well. You know what we don't know what you're going to release these so it doesn't even do any good to discuss what we're going to. You may not put out the first one first or the second one second yeah who knows who knows people might not ever hear what we thought about saturday's pretty you sure no one will ever hear any of them. We're talking about right now. Thanks for listening into full cast and crew. <hes> just want to remind everyone to subscribe. If you haven't already see you'll get a new episode every thursday and we'd love to hear from you so so email us at full cast and crew pod at gmail.com or you can follow us on twitter and instagram at at full cast and crew or find us on facebook.

Paul schrader john latour dana delany willem dafoe jane addams susan sarandon new york new york victor garber raiders david clinton sam rockwell travis bickel murder latour eddie shack defoe writer Hawke
What about that other government report?

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

07:52 min | 2 years ago

What about that other government report?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by four x dot com. Committed to empower and helping traders seize opportunities in the foreign exchange markets. Learn more at four x dot com for dot com. It's your world trade it for trading involves significant risk of loss. The report we've all been waiting for is finally out. No, no, no, not that one in New York. I'm Sabri Benesch or in for David Brancaccio. Well, lots of people were eagerly digesting a certain report from the department of Justice. They were a select few poring over the details of another long way to document, the US international trade Commission's independent assessment of how an updated NAFTA. Now known as the US MCA will affect the US economy. President Trump has touted US MCA as a big improvement over its predecessor. Anyway, the big takeaway here is that if implemented the new NAFTA would have a small positive impact on the us economy. Marketplace's Tracey Samuelson has more when the International Trade Commission, tallied up all the different ways the US as new rules and provisions will ripple out through different industries. If found the US economy will be point three five percent larger with the US MCI in place, then it would be if we just stuck with the old NAFTA point three five percent. I'm surprised that so large even though it's still a very small number. Irwin is a trade economist at Dartmouth College. This is an incremental change on a a an agreement that's already pretty pre-trade. But some of the biggest differences impact the auto industry, like increasing the share of cars and car parts that have to come from the three NAFTA countries. The report found those changes will have a mixed impact. In new monarch is a visiting scholar at the Cato Institute cars are going to become a little bit more expensive in the United States. I not as many people are going to buy them, although will be more employment in that sector. The report is one step in the US MCA's long journey through congress, but manic says its findings aren't likely to change many politicians mines those four or against the deal will likely stay that way. I'm Tracey Samuelson for marketplace. Walmart and Amazon are now accepting snap benefits what we usually refer to food stamps for online grocery delivery in New York this part of a department of agriculture pilot program. Marketplace's ben. Bradford reports this could help connect low income communities to healthy food, the USDA calculates as many as fifty four million Americans live in food deserts low income communities where people may struggle to get to supermarkets Charles Plotkin at the hunter college food policy center says online grocery delivery, could help healthy food access is show important. Here's a solution that doesn't have infrastructure costs. Amazon is accepting snap payments for online orders in New York City while WalMart is covering upstate New York. One concern Plotkin says is that people still must pay delivery fees out of pocket. Three five six eight dollars. That's significant to a family. That's, you know, watching their budget another challenge low income households may also have less access to internet. Jane Addams at the nonprofit bread for the world says retailers have a financial incentive to encourage the program. Success big grocery store chains like WalMart and Amazon excetera Frank. Snap recipients make up a huge portion of their revenues USDA plans to roll in more retailers coming months and as many as eight other states. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Let's do the numbers. The Nikkei closed up a half a percent of Japan to Hang Seng in Hong Kong, close down half a percent. US markets are closed for Good Friday. Not everyone gets a chance to study the economy in school. Anyway, who doesn't need a brush up. Marketplace helps you continue your education in the way that we hope is smart sessile, and hopefully even a bit fun. Your donation is not only an investment in your learning. But also in helping us make more people smart about the economy. And that we think is good for everyone to learn how you can help. Visit marketplace dot ORG slash investors. Thank you. This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by with Sabi. Hot cloud storage, thinking about moving your data storage to the cloud was obvious enterprise. Class cloud storage at one fifth the price of Amazon S three and up to six times faster with no hidden fees for egress or API requests was obvious low cost high speed fully secure storage blows away the competition, including Google and Microsoft disruption starts here. Do the math for yourself and start a free trial. I was Sabi dot com. In the two weeks after getting out of prison. Former inmates are forty times more likely to die of an opioid overdose than anyone else in the general population. This is in a study recently published in the American journal of public health so jails and prisons have found themselves on the front lines of addressing addiction, some not many, but some are considering treating inmates for addiction using medication. The season of our podcast, the uncertain hours all about drug epidemics, and how they end and its newest episode is all about addiction treatment. So with all that in mind Kelly Moore joins us. She's a professor at eastern Tennessee State university. Welcome good morning. Why is it that inmates are so much more likely to die of an opioid overdose? Than almost anyone else. What happens is when people get arrested in incarcerated, you know, if they used opioids before they were arrested and got involved in the Justice system, they have to go through a period of withdrawal. And then they're tol. Lawrence to opioids decreases a when they get released and they go to use the same type or amount of opioids. They might have used prior to incarceration. They don't have the same tolerance in. That is largely what increases there. Overdose risk. How could jails intercept that outcome? Exactly. But biggest thing is by providing a medication assisted treatment during incarceration for people who come in with an opioid problem. So methadone buprenorphine and now trek zone or the three main medications that have been shown to be affective in reducing craving and withdrawal of is this type of treatment in an ideal world, if they were able to get that medication assisted treatment during incarceration and continue that post release might study has shown that can reduce their likelihood of engaging in a variety of offenses and getting rearrested for a variety of offenses. So we have preliminary evidence that that would be affective. So we have to look at whether. Got it during incarceration as well. As they if they continued at post released and looking at their recidivism risk a lot of studies just look at whether people got the medication while they were incarcerated in whether they then are likely to be rearrested. But we're missing that that key variable there of whether they continued at post released was this not commonplace. There just a lot of barriers to implementing treatments in jails in a lot of it has to do with the logistical barriers and the financial issues staffing issues that jails across America face. There's kind of a belief that these treatments are substituting one drug for the other or you're allowing people to kind of just continue to get high off of things like methadone, and that's just not true. But there's a lot of misconceptions about the medication assisted treatment right now. Especially in the Justice system Kelly. Moore is a licensed clinical psychologist and assistant professor at east Tennessee State university. Thanks very much for speaking with us. Thank you. You for having. Executive producer is Nicole Childers. Our digital producer is Miguel. Contreras engineer is Brian Alison, and I'm Sabrina Benesch. You're with the marketplace morning report. From A P PM American public media.

United States Amazon Walmart New York City Tracey Samuelson Sabrina Benesch New York Kelly Moore Ben Bradford department of Justice Charles Plotkin NAFTA Overdose trade Commission International Trade Commission David Brancaccio Jane Addams American journal of public hea Dartmouth College
080  From Depression to Advocacy for an Unbreakable Woman

Occupied

57:58 min | 8 months ago

080 From Depression to Advocacy for an Unbreakable Woman

"And Welcome to occupy four Nali Council old things occupation an occupational therapy this episode. I had an awesome chat with the wickedly Cool Cure Oregon from New Zealand. Cure is and Gemina. She's a strength athlete. She's a social media influence per se. Has An absolutely phenomenal back. Story has a lived experience with depression and anxiety, and has channeled all of that through her lived experience to turn it into something absolutely amazing. She now runs a strength Jim where she's able to have an influence over people who are in a similar situation and help them out. She is wise beyond her years. I cannot think are nothing coming on and having a chat with me. and I hope that you guys get as much out of it as I did. Take it away, hero! White lift up pal if the gym owner mom. Mental health advocate. Is there anything you can't do? is even thought to bite. Yeah, my interest in passions and job description as So I think so I I came across. You would've been this is on lawn. CH-. Whenever? It was that you were competing at OC shadows? Day. So? Yeah, yeah, have been about then because I had a couple of people that I was coaching that were competing in the same competent I'm like I never had senior online, and never come across your. Do this chick strong and then followed your I. Think it was mainly instagram pretty much then. Fuller account and over the years I've seen you post a lot of stuff that really sort of hooked me in Iran. Mental Health Advocacy. mental health is. Where I've spent my whole career pretty much working as an occupational therapists. I definitely spectrum me. What's your experience within mental health? We get to the advocacy stuff. Where where does your experience with mental health? Where does that stem from? Quite quite a long journey spurs. I was first diagnosed with depression at the time. and. The year off that a friend of mine committed suicide. which was followed by suicide a to my own. Spin a really long time after that. One not really knowing why also is a bit of a nineteen? Thing but looser grasping with have Brian. works the way the I needed into work saw I was very. Very lucky from a young age, that I was quite aware of what was going on, and that didn't necessarily gives me the toes from the get go so i. know that I would have these crashing laws on the enormous flipside I would have. Pretty intense highs and things like that so an. Early Age a little bit closer to that depressive. Side of the state, germ, So I spent. A quiet longtime on throughout my teenage years knowing knowing that I'd had. This. In with the diagnosed me to onus as it was. In our water, miss of of I. Guess My years. Initially, and That is chain in I started training in. This is where I guess the kind. Come hand in hand with me. What was the very reason that I? and. Got Into on the gym. And all that sort of thing say the benefits. Of Trainings on my own. And, that was very reason that I sticked into, and it was of funny because I. Ended this eight go. and. We only had to sit around on the fist I like. You know. Tell us why you WanNa be a personal. China in every single person when you went around the room. I played sports side. You know it just seemed the natural thing to do. And I, Love Pa Mike All of this. And it came to me and I like. I headed. And School and I. Played a split but I found that it was. On the passionate later in my life, not daily lighter I was only eighteen at the stage. Lights. and it was so inefficient How I could say the teacher made that. The other thing that I could say is that. A lot of China's obviously don't get into the game for that reason so They weren't China's. Going forth with that intention of this is how we can apply exercise at a really positive. IMPACT FACT Experience that I had quite nicely and the mainstream in particular. Is that the album Venice industry. Doesn't horrendous of people must not. So that was kind of. Kind of how I how I got my foot in there, and eventually obviously that that kind of like. Tuna Jovan of advocacy in sharing my store in vain, but yet they were as. Meaning, many years of not liking myself. Very much mini is of. Being very unclear all. yet it ain't times we have these really crashing lows and holiday talk therapy I really right talk therapy. I've done that. is now on off. That told me some really amazing things about figuring out where I'm warning signs. Figuring out while some of my triggers were that sort of thing. Developing those tools Even. Just being able to get used to signings out loud obviously can be really really. Beneficial when you can put on where to. Put Away a distraction Allen. That gives you. Allah! Arar. For sure. Just. Kind Batches A. You were first diagnosed when you're thirteen. When did you sort of realizing yourself like? Wait a minute. Something's not quite right. I really couldn't tell you I've actually lost huge chunks of my used. Comedy the large chunks of it and I think that is related powder that was. A little bit of drug abuse of thing. I. I. Since I'm we. WanNa Ugi, we moved to New Zealand obvious. In a soon as I got here. Tell that I had I, had gene very different life experience to a lot of the kids? I was going to school with and I ended up in the UK for awhile into skiing with With. Get quite a lot of refugees and emigrants send I was one of the only white kids in school, so it was really really culturally diverse, which was amazing. It was a really awesome about the school. was against a salad bar area, and we moved to New Zealand and I ended up in a school. That was completely the opposite. A much higher, this school and I could tell from dame that my life experience have been very different than that's not to say like I. Come from a middle class. Family so small decided my. Family life had been like that, but my life experiences have been so different, so I remember thinking that way. How different I was to people who is in school list and that just continues. Throughout my school by I was always hungry. You know size years at least more mature and wiser and when you feel like your. some different to your peers I think that that can be one of those reasons why you start to disconnect a little bit. And that can that can. Take all kinds of fast happened anxiety or depression? I think I think. From my experience, a connection is one of those things that. I don't even think it's got enough. Mental Health. Not Not even just depressionol mood disorders in general like old mental health. I feel like they either. have. All some of them do stem from a lack of connection or loss of connection, but also some of them have that as a side effect of like for example say someone was schizophrenia. One of the side effects is generally I ended up isolating, and they lose a lot of connections. I may have had beforehand so. I think. On. How much you know occupational therapy, but I know that one of the things that we look at a lot. Is that connection because we look at social environment as part of them as a whole? So that's something I'm very aware of, but I still feel like it's something that. Old Professions can look at. Moat Exclusively Holding A. Gun anyone's head overt but. It's something that even in my personal experience like I think I mentioned to you the other day like I've had bouts of depression as well. And I found that and I've never really been able to sort of pinpoint whether it's sort of chicken or the egg, but I found that during those periods when I am feeling really low. Is when I M disconnected and I. It's got disconnected. And then I started feeling low or I got disconnected because I started feeling. But it's it's definitely feel like A. A massive component. To a lot of people's mental health or mental wellbeing, depending on which she put on. So. You got diagnoses. Now. Here's a question. I'll have to ask people say when you got your diagnosis. Was it a relief? Was it scary? Or do you not remember? Thinking was just as what? was what it was. On. My I wasn't surprised I was. Worried about it I was agnostic. Mine Mom who's has depression and has They needed headed for a very long time so I suppose I understood that it's not be. So I wasn't surprised to find that I, wasn't. A. High by lied to understand how things work, so. Getting kind of down at the doctor's office of like it's a chemical imbalance in that's thing, and and that really resonated was made to a degree Bass I humbly a incentive to be. Too. Much science related at the time so I just saw it. As this is something that's funky. That's happening in my brain and I probably aren. That the teachers have as much power over that. As old as I ended up realizing as a nine, hundred, nine, hundred zero, I was just like this is who I am. What is taking? Leave me type. Thank you. Did you say you found that it? It will by the sounds of it kind of. Shapes your personality at the time. You kind of integrated into who you were as opposed to seeing it as. Separate from you like that's depression and this is me down. And I would say that even worse the following year. Nine I in the. Fringe boyfriend of mine committed suicide. Disney just became an olive. My it because I think that that's coming. Is Rare important to me now in in working with us, is that. Between, the ages of thirteen to seventeen been railing, looking to who we are and sometimes me to own, this can become net. Tragedy happens to US throughout time becomes. That's that's where we are in this person. That's been affected by this horrible thing, and that's this and we build our. Yeah. We built around that out. So, I think the following year at it was something that just magnified certain more and I Mind entire south my entire personality around. This tragedy, and also that I was this like not kid at school. Then I just. I just wanted that I was like. This is who I am a goal. The issues that's that I'm just in a was point by. Why will do any of this So I just get really into an indication that person, unfortunately foot, yeah. Chunk of plan. Everything That to? Do you. S. She will remember this spot. What would you? How would you describe what it actually feels like when you? Say in the depths of depression. Like, nothing. Nothing can ever be good. No like like. You can't say the positive in any. Everything. Everything that you've tried to do or As has become a failure Will attribute every bad thing does something us? Created I class south. distractive depressant so it. All becomes about how. Styled something or How I'm just not good enough where I'm going to be good enough at something and when I really depressed the person stage, I can't say anything hossack. It's the thing if you say so. It becomes theory panel. Towards like this is exactly what life is like I also am somebody who who's writing back in what king so I can only say, the the this is what we're at. I can't see that gray area between. You. Sound sexually slightly, maybe slightly different to my experience with it, so the one thing I kind of really. Learn I guess from. Initially experiences with it. Is I I. Go like A. What I don't feel anything. And that was the biggest thing that I picked up on it. Yeah, okay things went. I felt a negative probably wasn't as destructively negative as you describe but my biggest thing was. Nothing would make me laugh. Nothing could even said nothing I was just flat like just flatlined to the point where I picked this up. In hindsight I didn't actually realize this is what was happening at the time, but to the point where I was starting to. Like I would understand what emotion a should give from an interaction. But because. I would just contend. It'd be like us. Someone tells a joke. Oh! Yeah. The. I didn't realize it at the time like is this? Sort of worked all that stuff out in haunt looking sort of the first major episode I guess. What you described before. Is it something that your consciously aware of at the tone? Terrific agree the only has gone older. So I think I would say in first sort of five years, and to be honest, I identified myself enough Enough breathing space to really examine it as soon as I felt rubbish I was looking for advice. So I went through pretty much everything. Between the ages of Tatum in twenty I started off as a really heavy plus Marcus I couldn't school if I hadn't had a station. As an owner is alcohol stand? Through series of ways, a fantastic distraction, but Not so much when you when you try to. Examine how you're actually feeling. So I went through. Yeah, initially was just made a distraction so much as I go to jail myself from. How felt? As I've gone older edge I've learned how to sit with it though I know that I i. know one feeling of on now I. Can definitely relate to what you said about just not feeling anything. I would say in the last. Three years. That's kind of more the route. The my digression Seiken I it to do own kinds of really cold ends, and quite often I am not ever excited about them. And I and I know that I should be in. It's funny that you stayed I know. You can identify the emotion that you should be feeling. And people ask me or are you excited about this thing? That's going to be really cold and you just have to kind of. Thanks through it. Yet it's A. It's an awareness that developed bitter, bitter or at the time. But initially absolutely and you just start at as a teenager. You just don't have the emotional maturity to really ill we are. Any of the thanks very especially, not something. As fully encompassing as like as decoration. Yeah that makes sense I didn't really. I tried to sort of think back and think like how long has been around because. Have my first sort of major issue with it until. I was almost thirty. If the made me just just before thirty. And I remember. Thinking back like I. is this something I? Just haven't noticed. That's been happening Mahal off. Haven't been able to pinpoint anything. Earlier but I think. That pretty much exactly what you said like I was. Emotionally anyway fully develops by that stage. So I had once I realize what was going on. I had a full array of skills and also worked in mental health. How along by that stuff full arrive skills that I could then use to look at the situation and I guess analyze things in workout exactly where I was at and what was going on and what I could do about it. Well I can't even imagine. I I've never worked with. Underwrite hanes either. I can't imagine water life going through what I had experienced, but without the skillset and the emotional maturity that I had that another them particularly mature, but. A lot more mature than I was the anyway. Yeah, it's I suppose that's where the entrance survey is that I can find him A. Say, how important vices insomnia young lives and then how much hotter it's made by By needs to own us and I I just I so important that. Will try and. As far as That the systems vice place that specifically. cater for hits going through that developments. H. and they'll find. And the thing that's really unfortunate and it's it's. It's amazing. You know you talk about hindsight, and it's amazing how much you can. Say in hindsight but. It's taken nearly fifteen years to look back and go actually. There was paykel potentially in my who really filed a? and. For longtime like I, said I, just kind of embodied this personality. That was my that was all navy. This really bad student I. was this bad girl I you know I might brighten. Might. Implement was all of the vice that was may as opposed to actually going to resign really hot as a young person who didn't have the tools to manage it in, so don't. Manage manages are I have an amazing family. by school, and just had no idea what to do in. I done a little bit of weight now listen workshops on in sometimes we. into mixed makes someone kids that we get through with some of the kids have. Some really nasty things happening the lives. They had they do have Jonas. It's scary to say that the schools are still responding in a similar way as when I was at school you know these kids being punished a lot of the time because they are. The acting out in class because they're not engaged because they would have, and then you sit down and have a conversation with them. You find out. What tending olive oil, what's going on in the heat, so how'd You like how on Earth you. Descend in classical emerson to you. I don't even feel sites that aren't even feel happy with themselves. That are constantly on south good That's something that yet is very. That's very dear to my heart. Is something that I'm really passionate about? Solid Michael Bright Mother. And some people will look at me and they'll go. Ah, will you still think that out and you still ended up going dog? Something your success with your life, but that's on an exemption. You know I'm not a role. In that have that was locked in that like heading parents. Destructive things that identity have much damage in any money I cost them that they need a guy though at which lay not everybody has that so it's? It's terrifying to me. That so I think. Having had experience in heading head, come out the other side. I had this can really. Unique Palace. I suppose to to help to contribute workshops do exist, but has a lot of the time will created by. Like veering well-meaning. middle-class ladies who rarely care about able I really do. Much like the school system. In the Iran on Sunday. I stepped down. They try to you know the content going to His Eminence really? Inspirational. But. He's saying them down in like classroom type sitting being gonNA listen to US things the rose umbrella and he's kids let. so I think that I can can see that I've got as why unique perspective that I was the A. Greater this really top thing on ABC from the. Outside stages as well as heading. Had that lived experience so now it's. Now kind of has feel this calling. To Go and do something so what what role did supposed to say? Strength Sports in general play in your all. Your personal recovery. That's leg out taking on me. Describe it you're calling. I! Anything. That's difficult to overcome. Teaches, you how much how type Moya? Zara that and that can come insomnia for. Really neary of Off. Telling the story that tells nets is the only way you're gonNA. Find something is from exercise because I think sometimes we can put out. On one thing, which much talent in one thing I think new thing is. We become something that you don't think that you could do. You feel proud of yourself and tried as the opposite all shine, and all of those horrible destructive feelings that that kind of get a stop one by so. It could be anything and the first thing. I ever did actually give up drinking three months to get ready for boxing bite-sized like high chain and didn't even do boxing in about getting on drenching months when. Like Wedesday's Ruta Sunday night drunken. Basically lost lost the majority of my friends that I had at the time. I would have this like huge cockle. Yosemite of my problems actually related to Al.. Not. A Not specifically May. I felt like a superhero like having done something that I. have saved an Santiago in. Somebody will listen to this and be life. You'll unchain. You have after three months at the time that hottest thing. I. Felt like in Kuwait that US having. And, then I just realized. Okay! I up something that seems really hard, and I might I might my wife through other come at? That I it, just you building on that a myself. This is the biggest thing I think that anybody with any kind of the onus has is I just need to sleep in themselves? Alert more and I need to find reasons to be proud of themselves in so stressful. It's just as as one of those examples and the thing that I loved that strength sports is really cold crate obvious results. You can either Scott hundred cage as you hedges. It doesn't matter if he turned out. Feeling Bob, issue whenever. You want to. Obviously there attended degrade their introspects that name that you listen more or that. But it's really hard evidence. And that's something I. really enjoy those kind of interesting because I found strength or Asteroid gone show size of building. This is kind of. Very common for females. Stationing broken ones especially especially broken ones, which is terrifying another thing. That! I, that I, you know what? Is that particularly for size of about five years I, think Jeannie athletes and willing same time song popular in Saugus blasted everywhere and the panic of. You know it's a whole lot of different people into that, and if he was somebody who was looking for something to make. Those looking for an it. You don't really know who you are, and it's really easy to save the goodson grand off Bikini. these they. That looks like these girls of so confident and strong. Though, this was actually been a hiccup. Recuperated to some degree night. That's really engine. People to know is that it's not. It's neither Linnea so. Winter or really rubbish period as a teenager, but between the ages of Evenson of twenty two now is still been times where it had this huge news ops, and and you Tang. And had to go on. How do we know here is love his. Knowledge or whatever and you knew that you know you needed to get your appointment. Things Antastic, so yeah? I I bought into building. The first time anti. Dotted heading break. Image issued image issues. Heading really really poor relationship at -cerned I'm a girl who had. been naturally smooth. Anti had eating whatever I wanted and label. The subway was massive restrictions. Ahead of. A, couple of really bad coaches Blue smoke up my ass and movie nizing and you've got these fantastic genetics you go into national and all of this and I was online. At the time Ending I started having issues with. Cutting. Getting Lena to get ready for the showers? I bicycle. By one of. Hutches. He saved not doing enough. It was six weeks out from. He's taking the best. I'm trying. an answer to. That should have been made Marvin in time where I. Know, this is me. But, unfortunately I was in such a terrible place I'd. Create again. I've created my around the fact that I was going to this brilliant aggressively so I found another coach. Wasn't as nasty. By ozone was not prepared for the fact that I was somebody who who had a lot of our history of wellness. Wasn't prepared for the fact that. It was so much more and juster these things from a really fine. UH, so I've already stage. Afterwards I stand. Entirely can bid aiding everything that I could get my hands on a roll off by that team cage as the house go to work. Ahead this yet either the crash. Again still didn't quite attributed to the body. Who you so don't want the on else for another story. Orban's the. Time I'd meet Palestine, Butch. Aims. Just doing a little bit of collecting at point. Own side prepping for this other show and the building coach had gone. Look. We need you to stop training rigs because he will getting out of proportion at that point, I was nabbed. Ice of may-like. Biting my heat against the bull, joining this thing that rarely insert who I was. But I was saw defense. You Know I. I do created this personality in this persona around I. was gonNA. Be This Pearson and I was so stubborn and started to determine, and because I. Some degrade that seven Nessin dentist. Had come off. Coming this other life that I'd had so I was on man. I've become this really hot dang. Evans telling me how amazing I am now and I'm going to do this thing and you almost. You don't want. quit anything that point. You. Who are around the fact that you didn't give up on the east July Down Bala and I. Almost as damaging. As as being that, you know girl who didn't really even know who she was, and who was the incoming all over the place and stained I become somebody who's increasingly narrow minded to the point that it was really damaging. So that was a really a really big role and I think. Probably something. That's really really common. In anyone who has other comes trauma. Needs to hell. Did I become Saen. Determine that sometimes they don't know when to give up on things that are actually not breaking. So that was that was really up. Goal had a few different things out with my jobs onto type person who, when I do something. I do everything into it and I will refuse to give up the. Naga thing. You know learning to that. I've picked up the last three hoagies. Sometimes, it's not working in. Is Nothing wrong with going? Didn't work. Intending instead to this idol that cleanser or whatever? They yet don't Palestine. Palestine, shook me out of where I was the building. Didn't take long Paladins just become the replacement. Actually two thousand six day. I think I ended up containing times by was. I was quite badly injured the hotel on the head I was having issues with alive i. Have enough time in between jobs. Probably Great Habit, but I was just like must do. The next thing must do the next thing ever on. It's the same thing even now. Who is this new girl who's really strong in? She's GonNa. Be Great you're. To be so. And that's everything you want. Hear is somebody who. Doesn't value on their of themselves. AIRHEAD had a lot of time. Training all the time lives miserable. Islands really anxious a lot of the time I was doing a lot of. How Japan myself caught on social media to on the people, and then I realized yet the end of two thousand sixteen. That was like ooh. I enjoy the style training I. Love Training for performance and love things a love install and makes me laugh at us, but I have noticed that I had that type of personality. Hinges they too much on on being in prison that have to be really careful about what I. Myself into. Tyson mind training. Am I containing level casually. Is. Because I just got busy with Alexa. Orbiting Agenda Consistent training note. The thing was I just I? Just know that I wanted to make sure that I was having fun with it. So that's where I started crying around with Straw. Man With Olympic weightlifting. I get involved with some fun obstacles running things. Those kinds of light challenges and allowed to get back into a mash lot. I didn't up during the boxing. palling. So now now I. Of. Now I have a much better relationship with. Western, painting and with a affects and at and at the same time you know. I can I. Look at somebody who is a very dedicated athlete and I can. On, that and I can really stake that that I just know that it's not this in the sorts. Time suited today. It's interesting when you. Essentially describing your serve relationship with how you kind of latch on. Find dill used to find it difficult to sort of let go and. See the broader picture of the. Around. It is one of the things that I do the favorite a work with some of the guys that I used to work with around. Was this theory that a lot of? A lot of mental health care for the loss decade has been. I feel too strongly focused on building, retain and building habits, and I'm not saying it's a bad thing. Has as its that side. Exactly what you'd flight is that Yup? Okay people got really good at sticking to whatever routine that you built for Whigham or the whatever have came about, but then the slightest little deviation from that and the wheels fall. So Mark I guess alternate perspective was that we should be almost. Not Training people I make so many correlations between my work and and training strength training. But not necessarily training people to. Just do these things so I picture this. If you powerlifting. If you just trying to do squat, you just trying to do Benxi dress ended doodads. The moment you gotTa do something else you're gonNA. Test Muscles up. He go break. Whereas if we Almost train people to adapt. So train people to deal with Jane. Trade train people to. Change in any form. Or massive change has this inherent uncomfortableness that comes with? One thing there's a whole range of things but one of the things is this uncomfortableness and a Lotta people avoid it because it's uncomfortable. And they're just not exposed to it, but one of the things that I used to do with the guys that I worked with was. In the process of trying to I guess. Train, them to be more adaptable, was sitting with that uncomfortable sin, and realizing it's it's just uncomfortable. It's not gonNA harm you. It doesn't last forever. Chances are if you think about it, you know it's to stop. And you can just get used to. It's like almost exposure therapy you just get used to. Sitting with that uncomfortableness. Short period to start with, and then slightly longer slightly longer slightly longer, and through that you get people get. Accustomed to that feeling or that? Perot says all changed so that when? Unpredictable change happens like it does in all of our lives. You know you go to work in the Colin Stop. It's not the end of the world like. The stuff that needs to happen before you can get to work, but. You are now at least emotionally equipped. To deal with that challenge and not have it ruin your whole day. Likes like like I. Was Finding was happening with people that. Had the sole focus on routine routine routine. And I'm assuming judgy. Royal the nods that you can relate. Neither. Have, somebody. Bash. But it's incredibly true, and and that's the thing that you I've leant the rightist portion of right cross. Funding our business and Maurice may becoming a mom. Is. Yet you can't Klan everything. And will you one hundred percent when you ask somebody WHO's? Built bus only strict by Jane Addams, either all of these things on the perfectly function, Human Bang, and in some coaster bug after Monday, th you and all of a sudden you can't even get off and get dressed owns offense two hundred percent in that. So much of our so much. Of especially, touted on on social. Media John How much it frustrates. People who actually within the house any. Is Two sides. I think it's amazing that. Told me about it more on. We're try over the stigma and Blah Blah Blah but I think you also get all of this. Advice, you have samoans who. The need to give people advice. They probably shouldn't I need to learn me to sit down and be quiet. But is so many things that you say and people don't understand that is is. Another side to the coin almost Ozo- obviously likes huge ranges are named and severity off me to wellbeing some something. Joe, Justina Slobby, being rooted in. That's great I mean some of. So much more, and and and really should be reaching out and getting some big shout. Answering. Yeah, it's a really interesting to A. Hundred something that I've learned I. Don't myself office somebody who. was able to finalise tools. Baio always gonNA raging a point where those toes eighty to compensate, or you can't depend on them and you have another. To have more basically. A trial is the ultimate. The ultimate. Change in routine or just like complete chaos like. Aren't just complete lesson we take. From one week or one day of the Knicks. Completely different and it was pretty funny. Because for awhile I'd become nine. This free by the come on his suspension, his addiction to the WHO WANNA. Has like a slaughtered Ngoga calendar by half an hour slots. I even saw in light going guest. You like. Because of the nature of job is so many different random things, I have doubts again by six. I've the. I am the biggest trial that the business is saying cannot practice goes. My practice goes are. On grabbing housing my half of the moment. That person who? Slotted everything in telling my wife work and I had this one system and it was quite. A, though one. You have a daddy where you just can't do anything and I still have is occasionally right that when my reiss is. I don't want to do any of that. You have a baby. goes not. Tonight, he's going to be completely. Different died and we don't plan any of it. And so I think yeah. What you saying around teaching people to adapt to teaching people to adapt and a situations. Mike on the fly on a regular basis is solid credibly has put it and I. Think the one thing I think. It's really important that people need to get. The hetero ended set quite often. They feel like. That being free and adaptable. Is a passive thing like you just let go of control, and then you will all of a sudden adaptive when it's quite the opposite you. And this is why I think the strength training metaphor. Kinda works really well like. If you train squat bench and dead lift, you get really good at squat bench and left nothing else. If you train say four performance like you were saying before you get good at a range of things, and you could probably even do something you've never done before better than you would normally like. It's a very generalized. you. Attribute that gets spread across your whole lot same thing he but you need to train. It and I think that's the same thing with adaptability. Is You need to train it after just letting go of? Letting go of the Ryan, so if you just let go of your Google calendar. That doesn't mean that you'd automatically be. On free now I can do what I want and I'm. Not some work like that like actually, it's a conscious effort to. Rein that adaptability and your ability to or your resilience, your more emotional resilience, and your mental resilience to be able to manage that. For you especially at the moment, Konstanz change like you just constant state of flux. and. I Just want people to get into this. Like I feel like a lot of people would think that's more of just a passive letting go of control thing when it's just not something else. To be able to do that, you just. One of the best things that I learned. In opening the gym as That decision between if you're gonNA, straighten out something or if you're gonNA solve something Oregon the difference between reacting and responding. And I. think that's one of the things that I've learned I. I tend to accept the on a day-to-day basis. I'm going to be faced with. Take me when you're doing something crazy getting Jim. And I was managing the out in in the managing trades. Council building expected does all these different people who had the on completely different agendas timelines him on any known ended Isis that something's GonNa go ball bicycling. In Selah it was my. It was like the thrust entered this really horrible environment and had a terrible try very few months until I. Just Kansas I should. You every time will face with something like this. You you have options. You can't stress about it or you can look at solution. On. What you said budget has to try adaptability. That was my that was my. Quick Trust into Linnea and I have. The that more more more innocence. Genteel I did feel within the Vista at four to six weeks of having my son. All my God. How am I ever going to have Alaskan? How am I? Ever GonNa whip to the degree that I want to. Get to the point meal like you know what is just allergic. I have every opportunity to learn how to A. Each of these little panels day. As, I if I open my and willingness to and that's. The number one thing is that people are so. Resistant. and State of going. Okay half. An Hour Ryan different things that I am managing the moment owns. Face things and So much more likely to to push against needed to go like this or no. It's supposed to be like this instead of going. You know this misses the situation that managing most I can adapt. Wicked edge the grout wise to work working. Some of them might be offloading. realized they have technology much. It's not where he will actually enjoy what we joy That wellness to actually. Look at solutions as something that tour a lot more I think instead of. Being described things. Kinda, exist. I! Was GonNA say pet peeves, but probably more a soapbox that I regularly stand on is. Just bring me a problem. Bring me a solution, and then we'll work through that like whether or not. It is the final solution that ends up playing out. Who knows, but we need somebody to stop. I wonder. Wonder how much social media has turned, everyone antipathy fighters. As well like it's almost I actually had this conversation with this broke girls. At this workshop a lust. Yet, last week and it's become saw. agreeing that two years. Thing like you like I don't care about anything. To be excited that anything everything sucks. But it's almost something that gets thrown out so much longer because it's funny to say. The whining about things and we're so much more likely to post. MUNDANE! Winding of that stuff. I don't know in becomes just kind of like hot of who we are. That, we such complain and Whine, and that's something that we ought to heinous thing that I. That is actually going quite well, and that's what he's going to go. In. Order rubbish things that have been actually this. With someone the other day. The, Way I see it and I've read that other people have seen it as well as. The current generation. With a gain, the social capital is changed. My generation anyway on bit all day. It used to be like you know such and such achieve this great thing like he's also used to see you still see it in movies like the Jocks, they they win the sports things, and they're the heroes of the school kind of thing, whereas now social capital's change in a way that people are getting social more of their social capital for rather than achieving things than by tearing, told Police Indra by tearing other people's achievements. So it then becomes this thing where. WHO's. Height using this phrase, but who's the biggest victim gets the most attention, and that's the way. It Works Yeah Shit die you can. You can look on a lot of people's feeds. If you had a shit day and you post something. Vague and dock and mysterious about having day people start hall. Hey, going your okay Blah Blah Blah you get a lot more attention than like you said. A Great Day. Yeah and that's is another songs while that able. Become. I don't know what it is. Why whether it's like weird space, retain Hambo, or were discourse like not touting you know not glowing are trumpets. Basically, it's become like. Is something wrong? Like celebrating thing good at something. About, telling people about an achievement or you know like. Even even goes as far as You Hell how somebody will shine cer- cutting, not play. Photos themselves any things like that. You're like hey, we are wanting to the state germ. Papela speaking out about Megyn House South Chair has become right. This trendy Friggin Hashtag. And we'll. Look after one another H Out tool and then on the other the state, Jeremy. Find South to attractive like you don't be, too, shall we don't post too much A. Dungeon! We're. We're vice most fit in here like me. It's becoming sought to on. To know what the they socially accepted. As. Much steam off social media. It's crazy. I actually had a conversation. With a guy who works in the house. has featured in New Zealand and he thinks that Song Rachida need to health issues. Based on social media and even just smartphones. Because we now not going to sleep. Until stupid take out. Here's is up until stupid. Allah's scrolling on the F. is not getting enough sleep and saw much about me to do health issues just around you getting up sleep. It's. Massive. The change. That smartphones funds in particular have brought on. By this generation, but not just the younger generation this everyone at the moment. WHO's now like I guess the smartphone generation. We, now off instantly connected. We now have more APPs than we know what to do with. Why do we need more than say one social media like? What we do, we've got. Farm and The nature, generally, most people probably connected with the same people on. More options. Yeah time is growing exactly more times than staring at the screen and I'm. The worst for that I do talking about people staying up on not scrawling. That's me. I'm very aware of it and I to put measures in place to Brian. Minimize it, but again. I am the worst, but. At least I'm aware of it. But yeah. It's had a massive impact now. I'm wary of time I know you have to take off. I just want to say. Thank you for coming and having a chat. It's been amazing. It's been very insightful. Just one thing to finish off. If there's one thing you would like health professionals to know or take into account with regards to say working with someone with depression. What do you think would? Would you want them to die? I think. Every step should be about in paliament. that. We need to keep putting the power in people's heads. So instead of making things easier necessarily. I, think an even up. Potentially some people prepared to. Doing that, but I think it's all about empowering people mashing more independent, giving them options to things. It sort of giving them responsibility. Coming out the other end of that and Adam cells I think tried in one of dude to increase equal southward south. Not South. West Asia and SOUTH DELAYS! Whatever we can do to increase the yourself the race as the biggest bump. Love. Love it. If, people wanted to see you or the gym or if they're in new, Zealand come and see the gym in person like where can find on launch. That would've you want. To spray to find me as on Instagram, which is here is unbreakable, Indian. Jim Page is. Trading. Common. Either of those ages sweet and all throw some links in the show nights if people can find them easily. Awesome thanks so much. It's yeah, it's been A. THUMPER!

depression Mental Health New Zealand Jim Page instagram US China Iran Oregon Mike All Brian. Jane Addams Linnea Ryan depression Nali Council Tuna Jovan Cure
A Conversation with Jeffrey Yang on Mary Oppen

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

18:33 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation with Jeffrey Yang on Mary Oppen

"This is the poetry magazine podcast. I'm Don share editor of Poetry magazine. I'm Christina PUGH consulting editor and I'm Lindsay Carpet. Managing editor painter poet activist Mary. Hopkin was born in Nineteen. Oh eight in the kitchen of her parents frontier home in callous spell Montana her first book meaning in life. An autobiography was published. The year she turned seventy over. The last few decades book has at times been nearly impossible to find but that's soon to change meaning. Life will soon be back in print. Thanks to new directions with previously unpublished material from the author's archive. This week. We're speaking with new directions editor Jeffrey Yang about Mary options life and work. Jeffrey thanks for joining us. Thank you thanks for having me so. I have a an old yellowing copy of this book that I got probably in nineteen seventy eight or nine and it was always sort of Talisman for me and a bit of treasure to say are hard to come by those old copies but now new directions putting it back into print is very exciting. So what do you think happened? Why was this book? Kinda lost for a while. It's been With Black Sparrow since it was first published and I don't know I think sometimes good books As any buckle could just disappear how this one did. I can't really say I've been wanting to reissue this for a long time so I'm really happy that it's actually happening. You open the essay with a really beautiful idea. You talk about the concept of an auto biographical cannon. Could you explain what that idea is for our listeners? And why this Mary Open Book is part of your autobiographical cannon. I opened the peace with this idea of books that we love basically and growing up going to school. I think we've all been introduced. This idea of what is the Canon? What is the Western Canon? I think a lot of that has changed at least in my lifetime of what we read in how we read that Canon and what shapes it but then I just have this idea of a whole nother kind of Canon of books that is personal to each individual reader and those are basically the only rule. Those are the books that we love this kind of autobiography cannon. For whatever reason these books we could always go back to read again or to me. Mary poppins book fits perfectly in my autobiographical cannon lot of our listeners and readers will know the work of Georgia and they don't they should but a lot fewer of them are going to know about Mariappan. Can You tell folks how Mary up and found poetry and how she found? George Oh yeah I mean yes so much of this book is almost like a fairytale almost but it's not. I mean especially how she tells it is not in that in that way but just the circumstances of their life so Mariappan. She grew up in this small town. Callous Bell a frontier town in Montana and was an avid reader and then when she was eleven. I think it was around then. She moved to their family moved. Grants Pass Oregon. So she found books early on in. This again is all. She writes about this in her book. And then it was in college in a poetry class that she mets Georgia and there was I mean the way she described an interview Much later one of the only interview she gave on her own. Oftentimes they whenever they did give interviews or George. Offline would give an interview oftentimes both of together but she describes it as a miracle. I mean the and that's how they kind of thought of an Georgia writes about it too as this meeting meeting her and her meeting him as this miracle when they're eighteen. I don't know for most of US meeting somewhere dating someone and when we're eighteen I it's it's something totally different but for them. They knew early on exactly. I mean they didn't know what of course what's going to happen. But they knew they wanted to be together and so. Mary often got kicked out of college for breaking curfew and they just left and from then on. It was kind of this adventure that they had Together with their life that kind of answers like the poetry side. I mean she she's still. She started writing poetry early on just like George did as well. She was also painting and drawing and I think the painting and drawing kind of she she kept going with throughout her life and was only much later on through translation that she came back to writing again one of the sort of remarkable things about their life together including all the places they went so they also made a sort of huge decision to stop writing. Almost you know very early on and could you tell us a little bit about why. They made that decision in what they were doing instead. So at one point they went to France together early on in their twenty s and they met as re pound and pound introduced them or give them introductions to other writers and artists there and they decided to start this press call to publishers. And it brought out a book by pound and Williams. And I'm forgetting exactly. I think there's just a few titles there so early on they're very active or wanting to be part of that environment into Kofsky was part of it and then That didn't last. And they were in New York and they were part of this collective of object vists the thing that really affected them being back in New York to was what was going on through the Great Depression and people out of work? I mean the way to describe it just unemployed everywhere and it was really. What were they going to do about this situation? I mean it seemed that for them. They could just couldn't continue on with their own writing practice. Artistic practice at that point. They knew that they weren't going to give it up forever but they knew at that point that they wanted to do something else and so they joined the Communist Party and they started to work and Organiz for the unemployed the workers alliance they worked for a union in UTICA in New York and so they just became very active in the Party and at that point they pretty much cut off contact with all of the kind of artistic that they knew of leaving it. They kind of left it up to those people to to contact them if they wanted to. 'cause basically they knew they could get people in trouble by by their activism through their activism. And so so. They were just focused on that and didn't find kind of aesthetic outlet possible. I think at that point you know and so they they were just doing this other work. It's an interesting kind of silence that they worked together in and for a long time and Mariappan chooses to return to writing during the period of second wave. Feminism in the seventies and as you point out in the piece in the magazine. She benefited from quite a field of twentieth century. Women autobiographies like Jane Addams side to be wells. Emma Goldman Edith. Wharton Gertrude. Stein's or a Neil hurston. I mean just countless others and this kind of moment for the autobiographical act is really interesting. Especially with regard to the fact that I think as we mentioned before Mary options book kind of appears in the midst of this surging of interest which is continued to this day and yet her book kind of falls away. So what do you think has changed between the seventies and now that makes it the right time for this book to reappear. It's funny you know with the whole me too movement in what's going on with the ongoing women's movement now. I mean it is amazing to think that this book will be back in print during this time. It was a complete accident and coincidence that it is being published. Now I mean it was just a mentioned before. I've been wanting to reissue this book for a long time and it was just it was kind of like a rights issue for awhile and then kind of juggling. The list set new directions and trying to pinpoint the time and with everything. That's going on. I think Mariappan has think we can learn a lot from from her experiences. And what How she how she writes about them. Honestly and you can always sense that. She's never trying to embellish anything and at the same time it is very moving especially you know she and what she chooses to write about. You know she talks about stillbirths that she experienced in one section and even what she chose to write about. We'll have a A lot of people will find kind of interesting and I don't know I think I'm actually very curious to see if people find this book now because of course now to there's a lot more books being published and a lot of a whole range of different kinds of autobiography and kind of mixed genre things as well but I still think a lot of what. Mariappan is writing about and how she writes about. It is very pertinent to writers now and artists. Yeah Yeah I think another one of the interesting things that Mary Hopkins Life and the way she goes about her her art and her writing is sort of her relationship to fame which you write about a little bit in the piece. She published very late in life. As we've talked about and never had any sort of solo gallery show or anything like that which might lead us to think that her ambitions were thwarted. But you suggest that that would be a false interpretation. What do you think Mary poppins? Relationship was defame. And why should we think about it differently than maybe we do today? In the age of social media and all kinds of celebrity fame. I've talked to her daughter or their daughter. Linda a little bit about this as well. Who did mention to me that she she was a part of some kind of group show at the Smithsonian or or something like that so it's not as if she was doing all this completely excluded exclusively from outside of any kind of you know thought of showing it or sharing it but at the same time I think she was very serious artists in a very serious writer and I think she was also very encouraging to George often as well her husband. I think she I mean. Is Linda describe it? She was always the one who was holding things together for them because they moved around so much and then they had a daughter and then George was a soldier you know and so so she was doing a lot of different things but fame never really sat well with her. You know she writes about that specifically that it is very unsettling for her and that she she finds it as something that has kind of loss of self and not wanting to pursue that. You know whatever that means you know. It's so hard to kind of think about that that now as you mentioned so did she have regrets. I mean I don't know I I I would say to me like no. I would say that she would she? She lived her life exactly how they wanted to do it together. And yeah she says this interviews she she even you know. She writes about this that she the choice that she made. I mean I can't even read this. It's it's a romantic vision. And that is what my life is. It is not only the vision but it is what I've made. I would defend it. Do it again. And she's talking about her life and then she goes on to say the public fame for me would have been hell. It's it's funny because she could have ended there but she says one person's heaven may be another person's hell choose my own way again and it is heaven and so pretty explicitly says that how she felt about that and I think they were trying again they they were always seeking this clarity of thought and action and living and how that relates to words arts and live and being sincere with what they wanted to do with that. You know I love reading this. I reread this book. It's unusual book isn't it sorta dramatic and reticent at the same time by the time you read it. It's it's not an enormous book. It's got that sort of objective as concision. Yeah going for it but I think when you step away from the book. It's amazing that she lived this incredible span of years. I mean for nine thousand nine hundred eight in Montana. The seasons passing as you say with the day's milk delivered by horse and wagon show up to her death in nineteen ninety in California and I wonder you know sort of debt the end of her life I think is contemporary still for a quite a few of us but in the end. What kind of document do you think this book is? We sort of the life for an autobiography. But it's very different from that because it doesn't really reveal an awful lot of You know it's sort of not like on this day. I did this and it. Does it very spare which puts it at odds with the kinds of autobiographical or life writing? We're used to now and I think that maybe that's sort of one of the great characteristics of it as an artifact of its time I mean when you step back from this book where what do you think it's place is kind of a is it a classic or a Minor Classic. I mean. Where does it fit in with all these other kinds of poets and autobiographical writers and Women Writers? And you know the me too moment when we step back from the book. Now that it's available again. How should we look at this book? I wish I had a succinct answer for that dog. Because it's something that I've thought a lot about two especially because you know I was in the archive and I was looking for this other material to add to. I knew that she had written these other pieces. And so trying to contextualize lot about that. I mean I actually don't read a whole lot of autobiography. I love a good autobiography. I mean I even translated one poet bathhouse book but that's also not your usual autobiography. I mean for me I. I see it as a classic of American autobiography. What does that mean? I mean? I'm not sure what that means because there has been so many autobiographies written but the way her approach and how she uses poetic strategies and concision of very lyrical are writing again coming out of this objective. Vist Group of writers were connected taking very concise approach to language. Very you know extending the image and things and but also writing about what they were doing and what they chose to do but also what she was feeling and thinking at these times again without getting too without getting sentimental and getting too far into that. I think she she didn't want to do that. It seems like the story. I don't know it's just this incredible story of two people who found themselves each other found each other early on and knew that they wanted to be together. And so what? What does that look like for this time span of the twentieth century you we have. We have a book like CAIR WAX on the road. But this is a whole different kind of being on the road. You know And so it's also such an American kind of story as well so I don't know we'll see we'll see what happens but I mean I don't know the readers who I have met who found this book. It's it's always a book that has kind of made a impact. But maybe I should ask you that same question. We'll see like I say this biological copy of this book was something. I sorta carefully guarded and wanted to make sure I never lost track of it but now to sort of paraphrase pound badly since GONNA have a wide circulation to your work in new directions. So we'll we'll see what people think. But it's a wonderful book to read and Thank you Jeffrey for talking to us about about Mary up in and George and this wonderful Book Jeffrey. Yang is the author of the poetry books. Hey MARFA vanishing line and an aquarium off from Gray Wolf Press. You can read Mariappan. Meaning a life and introduction to nineteen seventy-eight autobiography as well as view a series of paintings from the nineteen thirty s to the nineteen eighties in the February. Twenty twenty issue of Poetry magazine or online at Poetry Magazine Dot. Org If you're not yet a subscriber to the magazine and you really should be one for a limited time. We're offering podcast listeners. A special rate of twenty dollars. That's twenty dollars for a full year of the freshest voices in contemporary poetry featured in eleven book length issues as well as free digital access on our mobile APP visit Poetry magazine Dot Org Slash podcast offer to subscribe. That's poke your magazine. Dot Org Slash podcast offer. We'll have another episode for you next week or you can get all February episodes all at once in the full length. Podcast on soundcloud. Let us know what you thought of this program. Please rate and review us on Apple podcasts. Or if you listen to another way email us at podcast at poetry foundation dot work. We'd love to hear your thoughts. Support Your magazine. Podcast is recorded by Ed Herman and produced by Rachel. James the theme music comes from the Claudia Quintet. I'm Lindsay Carpet. I'm Christina Pugh and I'm Don Chair. Thanks for listening.

Mary George Oh Mariappan Mariappan Poetry magazine Montana Jeffrey Yang Mary poppins Georgia Christina PUGH editor Lindsay Carpet Canon Mary Hopkins Life Managing editor Hopkin New York US Oregon Jane Addams
The Radical Existence Of Lucy Parsons, The Goddess Of Anarchy

Curious City

20:28 min | 2 months ago

The Radical Existence Of Lucy Parsons, The Goddess Of Anarchy

"Curious city is supported by goose island now offering accustomed three one two can inspired by and brewed four chicago restaurant workers and giving back to the community through the chicago restaurant worker relief fund available at select locations throughout chicago makes sense of the day with consider this. The new local meets national podcast from wbz and npr. You'll get up to speed in less than fifteen minutes with context and commentary on stories happening in chicago and around the world. Listen to consider this wherever you get your podcasts. I'm alexander solomon curiosity editor. And i'm here in chicago's belmont craig neighborhood and i've just come inside. Lucy parsons park. It's a small park with a playground with swings said in a slide. Not a lot of kids out today. It's pretty quiet. I asked several people who've walked by whether they'd ever heard of lucy. Parsons and nobody had any idea who she was. The park district describes her this way nationally important for her role in labor reform and the efforts for women's rights born of a mixed native american african american and possibly hispanic heritage. She married albert. Parsons a labor organizer who became one of the martyrs who was executed after the haymarket riots. She was a prolific writer on issues related to socialism and labor reform writing for publications such as the socialist they'll involved in anarchism often portrayed as quote a dangerous woman. She was defended important. Chicago leaders like jane addams. But as we'll learn this curious city episode this descriptions only partially true and lucy. Parsons wasn't entirely who she claimed to be. That's coming up after. Donald trump was elected president in twenty sixteen. Laura via nueva joined the women's march here in chicago. Yeah right after trump. I think maybe marched with women and not her image like like some banner and then like who is that the banner said lucy gonzales parsons and identified her as an organizer and labor leader from the turn of the twentieth century amazed by her. You know i've heard about like jane. Addams who i think live around the same time and i've never heard about her. She lived full life. And that led lord ask. Who is lucy parsons. She wanted to know more. So we turn to reporter iran nettles. Who did a lot of reading about lucy. Parsons and spoke with a couple of experts including one researcher. Who were to biography about her life hairy on high alex. So you know. I have to admit i don't know a whole lot about lucy. Parsons i heard her name when we did a story at curious city a couple of years ago about why there aren't very many statues of women and we asked people to nominate people who they think should be featured in statue and someone suggested. Lucy parsons and at the time. I'd never even heard of her we learn. She was labour leader and activist. There's a park named after her and belmont creggan but you know. We didn't really dig into her deep biography and i gather there's a lot to know about her. I mean you definitely have the basics down. That was lucy parsons. She was an anarchist. Anna fierce defender of workers rights. She fought for the eight hour workday for example and when they named that park after her. They said she was dedicated to improving the lives of women in minorities but as i dug into her life i learned that that was only partially true. And there's something else. There were questions about her racial identity which she actively avoided for all of her life questions. What what kind of questions. We'll we'll get to that. But first you have to know how she became. Prominent she was originally from the south moved to chicago with her husband and they found chicago was in some ways a horrific place. It was dirty. It was crowded in factory. Workers were expected to work these long hours in those terrible conditions and they also saw really wealthy people living in luxury seemingly unconcerned about the workers poverty so lucy along with her husband. Albert parsons both join. The movement for workers rights and in eighteen eighty six albert got caught up in the haymarket affair. We have a haymarket affair. That was the series of strikes by factory workers. Curiousity did a story on it. That's right so if you remember. Workers were striking for an eight hour workday and albert. Parsons was one of the organizers. There were several days of strikes and protests and lots of clashes between strikers and police on may fourth. There's a big protests and a bomb goes off killing police and other people who were there and they blame albert. Parsons along with some other people. Even though he wasn't there when the bomb went off and so he was prosecuted in after a three-month trial execute. It lucy had been working in the background until then actually earning money for both of them as a seamstress but she started advocating publicly on his behalf during the trial and that's when she started getting attention. I see so up until this point. She'd begun to stretch her wings doing speaking. She's making money for the family but It was once she took on the defense of her husband. Albert's case that she really became this public facing figure. Absolutely so she's touring and trying to gather support and even after he is executed. She still continues. You going around and talking about the events that happened a at haymarket and she becomes one of the most recognised voices in the labor movement. Several years later she helped start the industrial workers of the world. Right and that's the big labor union people might have heard the term wobbly. And that's how they're known exactly. And so you know dr jacqueline jones. She rolled the biography of parsons named goddess of anarchy the life in times of lucy parsons american radical. And she talks about how it's really this fiery rhetoric that so many people right here was this kind of demure fashionable lady engaging in some really raw rhetoric about the worker. Struggle against capela was You know she would say she would love to run the guillotine machine that cut off the heads of kappa. Was robert guillotine cutting off heads. That's strong language. Yeah another time. She referred policeman as quotes a blue coat. It murderer she saw the government and the capitalist factory owners as part of the same ruling class that oppress workers. She saw the police is basically doing their bidding rather than protecting people. She wasn't really an organizer. She didn't like to go to. Let's say different places where people worked and tried to get them to sign up for a union. That wasn't her thing what she was famous for. Was this rhetoric that we're talking about right now. Really being able to get people riled up. Unfortunately there are no recordings of her speaking. But we do have this recording of chicago oral historian studs terkel remembering the speeches at book. House square square is an area devoted to free speech iraq. How square was this park on the north side of chicago near north and often people in the more radical side of the political spectrum with speak their communists anarchists wildly w w someone solving some sex hygiene. Charcoal remembers going the air in the twenties and thirties when he was young but the one i remember so graphically was this little lady. Lucy parsons the widow of albert posits. Lebron long on time and lucy price would speak about events of the moment. Friday the depression in favor of a social security wherever it was knows as unemployment compensation i remember she was further. I remember she wore a flowered hat. Enough he get that part of our. But you know what alex there is. I'm not gonna lie. There's one thing that really did. Catch me off guard when i was researching this so if you read. The reports of her at the time as jacqueline jones says reporters don't really know what to make where reporters saw her. They were really intrigued by her because they couldn't figure out what her origins were. She looks very exotic to white people. What does that mean. She looked exotic so she looked like she was likely a person of color she was married to albert but she was racially. Ambiguous by people weren't sure what she was so she started to use the name gonzalez as her maiden name and she claims to be of mexican indigenous origin. Okay and it was that true. No that was not true at all and actually it was jacqueline jones. Who really figured out her true origins. Although many people already suspected that she wasn't who she kept climbing to be more on that after the break. Hello i'm peter segal and in the year nineteen ninety nine. I was pretty much doing what i am now. Which doesn't speak much for my ambition. But i was also watching a lot of great movies. What would you do if you had a million dollars and net. Recaps with peterson is back and we are recapping like his nineteen ninety nine. Perhaps really one of greatest years for movies ever. You can find nerd at recaps with peter. Segal wherever you get your podcasts. Okay when we left off. We just learned that lucy. Parsons wasn't exactly who she claimed to be. So help us make sense of this. So she was born as lucia in virginia in eighteen. Fifty one to an enslaved woman and so it's likely biologically. Her father was her in slavery so she was a black woman and in chicago because she was light skinned. She decided to pass for something else. I see so she was not mexican. She was not indigenous right in for her childhood and early adulthood. She lived a really har- live. Her family was forcibly moved to texas and after slavery ended she got married as a teenager in waco texas to a much older man. A you know she goes from difficult situations difficult situation and the marriage of albert parsons in that moved to chicago was a chance to leave everything in her early life behind to reinvent herself. And after lucy became more prominent and people wanted to know who she was. She started telling reporters that she was mexican and indigenous. She even worked it into one of her speeches. She told everybody. When columbus. I came in sight of the western continent. My father's ancestors were there to give them a native greeting when the conquering host of cortes moved into mexico. My mother's ancestors were there to repeal the invader so she actually used it a little bit to her advantage. And i'm not gonna lie as a black woman. This made me upset. When i first read that. Yeah i mean. I know you i can imagine that this making you feel upset. I mean she's denying her blackness. Especially because i was so excited to reserves. Lucy parsons Is really as i thought. Wow this is this amazing woman who do all these amazing things so then it was kind of disappointed to learn that she didn't want to identify as black. And you know ahead to really kind of check myself though and really say okay. Who am i to judge this woman who was born into slavery and lived all of these things all these experiences that i could never even truly imagine and so that really kind of made me instead. Say okay let's think about why she would have needed to claim to be somebody else because ask more interesting. Salt reached out to historians era answer. She's a professor at princeton university and really an expert on black women of this period. She clearly wanted to escape. What it meant to be a black woman. You know at that time the strictures that were imposed on black women the limitations of what they could aspire to be normally when we talk about stories of black folks passing. They're usually passing for white. But because lucy was to pass in that way she needed a story that made sense and there weren't very many mexicans in chicago at the time and most of the native americans in the area have been displaced by this point. So because they're likely wouldn't have been many to her claim. Luther used this as an explanation for her appearance. She chose other. She chose to to strategically identify herself as not black. Not why some form of being spanish or mexican or aztec to emphasize that. She was sort of indigenous to american society to sort of push back against claims that she didn't belong. And if you think about it to do her activism lucy parsons needed to be accepted by white radicals people. She was working with speaking to tara. Hunter also points out lucy. Parsons expressed more interest in class struggle than race struggle. And as she's coming into sort of seen herself as a socialist whatever oppression that african americans space. She understood it in class terms. That class was really at the base of exploitation in american society. I'll much more than racism. She did speak out against lynching in the south but in chicago there were opportunities to fight for labor issues. That would have helped black workers who were forced to take the worst jobs employers offered. But he didn't do this okay. So if this denial of her black identity was strategic. How effective of strategy did that ended up being for her. I mean as far as what people thought that part was not very effective because people steal assumed she was black so even though she tried to deflect from the question that reporters have for her. The reporters who were usually white man often described her as a good looking well dressed milano. Which we know is a word you can use for. Makes rice black people. And they commented on the mahogany hue of her skin and the texture of her hair so this evasiveness and the made up story. They really created this mystery behind her. That got people more intrigued and made them more of obsessed. Well that's like like to me one of the most interesting thing that obsession with her racial identity. It keeps the spotlight on her. It does and i think that at one point she realized. Hey keeping the spotlight on me is really evans pages to me. And to my 'cause it's important to point out not everybody would agree with what she did but historian tara hunter thinks that parsons achievements need to be recognized along with other intrepid black women from their time and the person that comes to mind immediately who she resembles is ida b wells the journalists and preeminent anti lynching activists both were courageous sunset outrageous Outspoken women they came from similar modest backgrounds and they both created these new pathways. that seemed unimaginable for women of their times. Rem curious what our question asker. Laura thinks about all of this so that is interesting Laura is mexican american. And i thought she might be dismayed. That lucy parsons was not mexican and chose to claim identity. That wasn't hers but laura is sympathetic to lucy. Parsons reasons for claiming both mexican and indigenous heritage. Maybe she was in texas and she's like oh they're treating mexican women better than me. I'm going to stay on mexican From texas this is gonna be r muli. So i mean i can understand what she would want to suck set like. She couldn't live in a world where she could identify as a black woman. And what about you know that anger. That i felt when you learned. She denied her blackness and years journey to kind of understand what that was about. Where where are you at now. So alex i think that even her existence is a revolutionary at. That is something that i as a black woman in the year. Twenty twenty have a lot to be grateful for so because she defied every box because she made the decision she fell were necessary for her and she didn't let anybody else make those decisions for her. Even her decision not to be black. She set a tone for being a box. Breaker a lawmaker. A a rule breaker in. I think that what was especially important. Is that enslaved black women before that did not have the opportunity to define who they wanted to be where they wanted to live what they wanted to do and jess that defiance of being who you wanna be in breaking out of those boxes is something that led the way for me to be able to who i wanna be what i wanna do grow up in a world where i can say i literally can be anything i want to be and i am grateful for her as an ancestor. I think her well. Thanks for sharing her story with us. Thank you thanks for having me curiousity supported by the conan family foundation. Jesse dukes produced this episode music by jasar big lazy and blue dots sessions. Thanks to steve. Bynum an ara. Sally gomez donna. I'm alexandra solomon. Curiousity is supported by the goose island. Beer company brewing beers in chicago since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight three inspired by the city of chicago like their three one two urban wheat ale and supporting live local music with their three one tunes music series goose island beer company chicago illinois.

lucy parsons Parsons chicago lucy albert eight hour Albert parsons jacqueline jones wbz alexander solomon Lucy parsons park lucy gonzales Anna fierce parsons movement for workers rights dr jacqueline jones goose island robert guillotine House square square jane addams
GSMC Movie Podcast Episode 241: The Spooky Month Begins!

GSMC Movie Podcast

1:07:20 hr | 5 months ago

GSMC Movie Podcast Episode 241: The Spooky Month Begins!

"Can't decide in torn between a romantic comedy action or an Indie film to watch for the weekend. Well, well, golden state media concepts movie podcast is your ultimate guide to the latest movies. Join us as we dissect the latest on the busters it's the Golden State media concept's movie podcast. Hello and welcome to Jesus and see movie podcast brought to you by the GMC podcast network. I'm your host Davey peppers and I am so excited to be here with you all because it is spooky season it is October and that means horror movies and Pumpkins and fall and I am so excited that you're just GonNa have to forgive the very terrible. Transylvanian impression because I am just. Full to burst with joy. That we are finally in the season. So to celebrate the fact that we are now in the time of the spooks today, we are going to do three reviews of three horror movies from this year that you can watch right now. So first off, we're going to do a review of the Brandon Cronenberg movie possessor, and then we're going to switch over to a review of the shutter original. Films scare me and then we're going to do a review of she'd is tomorrow which is available on Vod, and came out a few months ago. Then at the very end of the show, we are GonNA continue on with the karate kid retrospective that started last week with the karate kid part three. So you're gonNA stick around at the very end to see my thoughts on that. All right. Should we just jump into possessor alright. Let's jump into possessor so. Possess her. Possessor started to be notable in January when it. When it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and it was notable mostly because people were. Walking out. And violating and just generally not having a very good time in the theater for this movie and me being a little bit of horror not saw this and went, ooh, I want that movie to be. Put directly into my brain whole and it was it was put directly my brain Ho very recently actually, and it can be put into your brain hold to. Because on October second it is coming out on Vod the possessor uncut title. which doesn't make a whole Tennessee because the there's no cut version there is no are rated version of this movie. The only version that is available is the not rated version, which is not ready because it would probably get an NC seventeen. This is A. Very graphic movie in every sense of the word it is bloody it is shocking and gory. It is very, very sexual. There is a lot of nudity in this film. So obviously, like don't watch it with your parents or your kids. But If you have the appetite for this kind of extremist logical metaphysical horror. then. There is. Maybe no other film in Twenty twenty that you need to check out. I'm just going to cut to the chase here. This movie is incredible. Now Brandon. Cronenberg obviously is the son of famous video, dead ringers, history of violence horror filmmaker David Cronenberg and Brandon I came out on the scene around eight years ago when a little movie that he made called Antiviral starring Caleb Landry Jones came out. And I adored that movie I thought it was incredible and nobody ever talked about it. So when I heard that he was coming back with another movie finally after almost a decade starring Andrea Riseborough Christopher, Abbott, Sean Bean Jennifer Jason. Leigh who are a much bigger cast then Caleb Landry Jones was in two thousand eleven two, thousand, twelve and Malcolm McDowell who will show up and just about anything. I had really high hopes that this movie was going to get a much more notable released. An definitely has people are talking about it. It's being distributed by Neon who know what they're doing in terms of making their films seen and talked about within the online space especially. So. If you've seen some of the images or some of the promotional materials for possessor, it is weird and complicated and the movie is really no different I'm GonNa do a very quick plot synopsis because I really don't want to spoil. This. Movies many surprises which are numerous and quick. So the basic rundown, is that this woman tasio played by Andrea Riseborough is? She works for a company that allows you to implant yourself into other people's bodies to possess them and carry out assassinations. She's really good at this like too good at this. She's basically their top agent and she is tasked with inhabiting the body of Christopher adds character who his name is Colin. Who is kind of the deadbeat boyfriend of the daughter of a very powerful corporation and so? Andrew Horizon Boroughs Job in Christopher Abbott Spotty is to kill Sean Bean because this is a movie and if nothing else is ever secure in the beautiful world that we live in, it's death is horrible taxes suck and Sean. Bean will always die in a movie that is just the way that things have to go. or at least they're going to try to. So, this movie takes a lot of maybe not necessarily inspiration, but it has a lot of similarities to films like the skin or even the allies you would remake of maniac very much an art horror film, and if you've seen any of those movies as well as something like the Laguardia Nino remake of spirit from years back is that these films are harsh and unforgiving and not necessarily designed for a traditional horror audience. You are not going to see people in the theater who in Hollerin or at least I. Hope. I mean I not in theater but if you this is not the kind of horror movie that you like get your buds around, you get bruised and you have a good time because if you do that with your friends either stop talking to you or you have very strange friends, stranger friends than I have in that is saying something. But as for an individualistic experience as for a movie that. Work. So hard to upset and confuse and confound the viewer both in terms of its story, it's character. Work is performances and the. Mind Boggling visuals that happen more and more frequently as the movie goes along. It becomes very clear that this is not a traditional film with a traditional structure or a traditional story. which for some people is going to be an immediate right off you know this type of movie and if this is not for you, that is totally okay it is not for everyone it often isn't for me there I usually get about one or two movies a year that do this sort of thing that are very style over substance that have very cold characters, but the themes, the ideas and kind of the spectacle of it all. Just really overtake me films like the Neon Demon. Our Only God forgives or anything else that Nicolas Winding refn is touched in the past ten years or so. But is that sort of storytelling device? It's that sort of way of putting together a movie that is more of an entrancing dreamscapes than a proper narrative. And we're going to see a similar talking point come up later on she dies tomorrow but. On possessor. The violence and the shock value of it is very real like I want that to be extremely clear. It's not just that this movie is weird. It said this movie is. Graphic and upsetting in very, very many different ways. I watch a lot of horror movies. I really love the genre, but there were one or two moments where even I like. Crunched into little Paul Because I. didn't like what was happening onscreen. I will say after the reports came out about the film at Sundance I was expecting to be a little more grossed out in a little more upset than that might just be because, I, have pretty strong Horlick's at this point but. I mean Sundance audience is you gotta get yourself together like just we'll just watch anything Japanese like that'll that only leapfrog over this and that's not even a dig at possessor. It's not trying to be this like Uber shock value grotesque thing is not trying to be something like Cannibal Holocaust, it is still telling a story and it uses the shock appropriately. But I know many people who are not as. Experienced with like gone zo horror are going to be really really upset and disturbed by this movie and not necessarily in the way that I can recommend. So I just I want to reiterate that you need to be careful and you need to know what you're looking for, and you need to know what you're getting into with this movie. If you are. Super comfortable with artsy. Really graphic horror films that do not have a very concrete. Structure and plot and do not follow a lot of the traditional rules of filmmaking. then. You have to see this like right now like don't pause the podcast 'cause like that would hurt my feelings but like in. Fifty minutes or so when this thing is over, then you can stop the podcast and then you can go see this movie like I mean come on like I'm recommending you really. We gotta we can you help me out to help you out I recommend some good movies and you listen to me, and then you watch the really good movies that I recommend. That's that's how this works. Right I'm not entirely sure. But talking about it on a more traditional level Brandon Cronenberg is a exceptional director. This is only his second movie and he is already starting to craft this weird like late era millennial body horror out of kind of the shadow of his father, which is such a horrible horrible thing for a young filmmaker to have to do to come from someone who is such a great and is so revered as David Cronenberg is and then to be existing in the exact same genre as him I can't imagine. The stress that would put you under. But. While there is the connective tissue while it is very that both Cronenberg's. While they're films are related both metaphorically and literally related. There is. A way of seeing the world in a possessor, an antiviral. That speaks to me personally much more as a younger person than films like video drummer scanners do that were not tapping into the anxieties that I personally have they were tapping into the anxieties that I understand and I have learned about in studied but it's nothing that affects me on that Personal Gut Punch level like the anxiety shown in possessor the anxiety shown in antiviral. And I think when Brandon, Kronenbourg makes his masterpiece which could very possibly happen within ten years if he doesn't take eight years to Reagan on movie please Brandon but I think when he makes that film not if but when I think it is going to be a game changer and the type of movie that I do not shut up about four years and years on end and I know he has that in him because this movie is close. It's real close. It is a little too long It doesn't clarify things super. Well, it needed someone to kind of look over it and say, well, here's how, yes, it's making it a little Duller. But here's how to make all kinds of make sense. There are some rules that get broken almost for the sake of breaking rules which on one hand I do appreciate breaking screenwriting rules and filmmaking making rules for the sake of it. You have to know exactly what you're doing and I think because Brandon Colonel Berg is so good at knowing like eighty percent of the roles he's breaking exactly why that that twenty percent concert to get a little bit loss which is completely understandable and again That is an incredibly high ratio of good to bad as not even bad. It's just less great. and. That's what is such. A joy of talking about a movie like possessor is even if this isn't your cup of tea, even if this kind of thing should never grace your screen. I find such a joy in talking about a film that sets out to do something. Does it so incredibly well that the worst pieces of the movie are not things that are bad in my opinion they are just things that are less over the moon. Good which just warms my heart in every possible way. I've I've talked over the past couple of ourselves about some films. Over the past couple of episodes that I've done about some films that are either very bad or just kind of okay and don't really have a ton to either connect with specifically or two or I think to offer to the cinematic landscape of this insane year. But. Now we get to hear me talk about something that I love and I do love this movie. This is currently my second favorite film of the year behind bill and face the music. So it beat out Charlie Kaufman it beat out I'm thinking of ending for me, which is a really big deal But there is just something special something weird and something kinda haunted about possessor it. It's just it's so it's so good. It's so good and it is. It's the kind of movie that makes you feel alive because. It makes you grip to that life. It is trying to pull it feels like trying to pull you away in the same way that under the skin did. Where trying to pull you out of your body out of the little flesh sack that you're in and say, no ascend and you as the viewer have to say, no, I'm sticking right here and that is such a weird wild and really really cool feeling that you do not get a lot in the horse base even in the art horseface even in the guns. Oh, art horror space. So when a movie like this comes along and nails it really close really close to the bullseye that needs to be commended and celebrated and disgust and recommended. On Mass, this might not be for you, but if you know. Everyone has the weird friend, right? Recommend this movie to your weird friend as a resident weird friend. I love this movie and I think all the other weird friends out there will love it to. Possessor gets eight and a half out of ten stars. Now if you'll stick around, we are going to do reviews of scare me. She dies tomorrow and then we're going to take a look back at our karate kid retrospective. So stick around for those. All right. Want to know latest and hottest music hit the airwaves George be left out. Listen to the golden state media concepts. Music podcast keeps you on the loop with everything you need to know from pop rock hiphop top forty, and we'll throwing news of your favorite artists concert and tour dates and so much more listen no further because this is the gold standard in music podcast. Welcome back for more. Oh So, after that possessor of you, we are going to go onto a review of the shudder original film that launches this weekend that scare me. In this film is written directed and produced by Josh Reuben as as well starring Ruben, and if you are familiar with the Internet comedy scene of about ten years ago, you should probably know the name Josh Reuben. He was one of the original cast members and writers of the Website Youtube Channel College. Humor. And he was one of the big forces there when that site was really really exploding in the late two thousands early twenty tens. He made. Just some incredible things and he was extremely talented as a writer and as a performer, just putting together some of the weirdest and. Almost most grotesque things that came out of that website is clear even from those things ten years ago that he has such a love and respect for the horror genre and for the tropes. So. When I found out that he was breaking into writing and directing a movie more not just a movie but a horror film horror is going to be in quotes. You'll see why soon. I was super intrigued and I, really wanted. To see what he was going to do with this genre with a budget with a cast and also to you support someone that has given me so much content and so many laughs. Over the past ten or so years of my personal adolescent journey. So the premise of scare me is that Josh Ruben Plays Fred a WanNa be horror writer healy really really wants it like more than anything in the world, and so he rents a cabin like an airbnb cabin in order to sit down and writers retreat the sucker out let go full Jackie, Torrens and just immerse himself in his work. While he's there he runs into fanny played by I. A-. Cash who most people will probably know from her role as storm front on season two of the boys where she is killing it. But Fanny is a very, very popular horror writer. She just published her first book. It was getting huge a rave reviews and she is kind of the talk of the literary were world and especially the horror world like everyone loves her. So they run into each other, they introduce themselves and. That night, the power goes out around this whole area and so fanny shows up at Fred's door and says, Hey. You're writer I'm a writer. Let's tell each other scary stories until the sun comes up or until power comes back on and so the bulk of this movie is these two characters in this nice airbnb cabin or airbnb like they never specify. But. It's these two strangers in this cabin getting to know each other kind of having their tensions belt and. Dissipated over the course of A. One hundred minutes, and slowly starting to come to terms with both of their individual insecurities and wants and fears about their work specifically. The interesting thing was scare me is that you would see this and go oh, cool. Like we're GONNA have little scenes of these stories kind of playing out we're going to get to see what's in their head. No the entire movie is just these people in this. Basically. This big room. Telling stories to each other. There are some small effects like shadows or like a hand creeping, and there's a ton of sound work to kind of immerse you in what is being told. But aside from that, it is all just performances just dialogue. It's almost a stage show and there have definitely been some people who said that this should have been estate show and while I don't totally disagree I think the way that Ruben uses the space is really really cool. I definitely. Understand or probably suspected that this might have begun as. A. Theatrical performance as opposed to a cinematographic one if you will. So the thing with scare me and the interesting thing about it being on shudder the horror centric streaming service is that it's not totally a horror film not totally a commie not totally a drama. It's not totally like a psychological thriller. It's kind of those things. It's kind of old this things in a weird blender so to speak. Like it doesn't even have all of them enough to say that Oh, well, this is a comedy horror film because. It's not scary enough to be a horror film. It's not funny enough to be a comedy. It's not serious or like necessarily compelling in the traditional sense to be drama and it's not spooky up to be a thriller. But it works for the most part there are there are some issues with the film especially with how it kind of ends. If. You've ever seen a movie. You'll know they're like three or four ways of this movie can end and none of them are super satisfying and It does and it isn't but the league ninety percent before the final moments of the film. Are just kind of. Despite yourself engrossing to watch a lot of that comes down to cash and rubens performances because they are acting the crap out of these words and especially when Chris read from Saturday, night live shows up as a pizza delivery driver and joins in for one of the stories and. The whole thing just sparkles to life. There is about twenty minutes. The story that Chris Reds character tells with the two of them kind of everyone working in tandem is. Some of the most enjoyable. Stuff I've seen this whole year. It's so fun and so weird and just it's so sharp. And I. think that's the biggest thing about a movie like scare me is that it is really sharp and it knows that it's really sharp. So if you aren't a fan of movies that know that they are clever, then you should probably stay away from this one because I think that is both it's big strength and weakness is while side from the ending. Is that it knows that this is a weird idea and it knows that this is a cool idea and it will. Milk it and stretch it as it needs to and thankfully. The movie is corrected is a good idea. It is a cool idea. In the sort of way where it's kind of a terrible idea like if someone pitch this to me, I'll go. That's not a movie. Why would you do that but it works because of that and it's got this awesome push and pull with the audience is trying to be like. Are we here for a reason or is this just? Improv night on October thirty first like what is this movie shaping up to be? and. while. Yes. The eventual resolution isn't the most satisfying thing in the world I don't know how to do it better. There is no answer that I could give that was ailing. You should just done this like this would affect it, and so I don't know if I can properly criticize that I mean you can always criticize it in the sense of like well, if you didn't have a good ending. Money make the story but if I was if I was tasked with writing this film. Probably would've ended the exact same way because it's kind of painting yourself into a corner. So incredibly like the paint is like five layers deep like you can start like step in it and like sink a little bit. That's how badly movies painted into a corner, but the pain is so pretty. The paint is so beautiful and the floor looks incredible that you don't really care that in order to finish it out, you have to walk over the paint and gets blueprints onto onto it. which is weird analogy but I think I really think it works for this movie. There are some I mean, there are those blemishes there are those footprints but outside of that is just a really solid put together little experiment. I don't even know if it's proper to call it a horror movie, but it's horror adjacent. It's comedy adjacent, and all of those things make for the type of thing that I really want from my October viewing sometimes, which is. Clever movies about the things that I love which are spooky stories, I. Really I like I like scary stories I like to be scared and this is less than owed to. Fear and more and owed to the concept of scaring and being scared by someone and that is. A very weird thing to make a movie about an I really dug it. I'm definitely giving this movie. A little bit more of a leeway than I probably would. If, it wasn't a first time director for some feature director if it be. Wasn't a really small production with a very small cast of most. Up and coming TV performers and see if I wasn't already familiar with rubens work as a young man. Young boy I was like nine when I started watching college I don't think that counts as a young man. But With all of that said with all of those caveats there. I cannot. Deny. That the movie is fun. And it's weird and the actors are killing it and Reuben is flexing his muscles as well as he can given the premise and the limited setting as both a writer and director. and. The Foley artists are just knocking it out of the park like. Best sound editing best sound mixing go to this movie like and obviously, it won't because it's a shudder film it's a very small movie that not a lot of people are going to see but the sound were curious really really good like it is. It feels almost like a Foley creation homework assignment where you just have to transport peephole into something using only soundscape and that is hard to do. That is a really tough job I have tried to do that and not done a very good job at it. So I can. I can appreciate the work in the effort that went in to making. This as cinematic as humanly possible and trying to break out of the criticism of just two people talking in a room like what's what's so interesting about that? Was My dinner with Andre. This is as good as my dinner with Andre but there is a lot of that stuff going on. It's tight. It's. It's fun. It's just a fun movie to watch. That's the genre. The Genre is fun but you have to be. The kind of person that I am, which is someone that really likes. Really likes dialogue really likes horror movies. Super Meta very almost obnoxiously clever film about movies about dialogue and about being Meta. But if you do enjoy those things. Then I think this is something really worth checking out. It is worth getting the shudder trial in order to see it in order to your own opinion about it because it's a film that I think will have a lot of very weird. And different reactions to it. There are some people online who hate this movie. And I totally get it. It's not like with possessor where someone says, they hate this movie ago no that that makes sense is the very specific and weird movie. With scare me. I disagree with it more with possessor. I feel like a lot of the negativity and there's not a lot of negativity about it. But some of the negativity I feel like stems from how much it is and I am I empathize that I understand that. But here. I I don't really get why people don't. Connect with movie although it makes sense to me like I can't put myself in that shoes in those shoes because this movie is so well designed for type of thing that I am hungry for as of your right now. But I can't deny that there are people that are going to really hate this and you might really hate it but he also might really find something that you connect with and that excites you in. That makes you kind of froth at the mouth for the future of what these sorts of stories can be. And I think that is very much worth the shutter trial and one hundred minutes of your time. Even. If it's not going to be a movie that blows you away, it's going to be a movie that sticks in your mind. and. Scare me has been sticking in my mind for a for a couple of days. Now, actually a about a week at this point it's. It's staying in there. It's buzzing around in my head I. Didn't I didn't need my notes. Outside of for the main character's names. And even in a movie that I like more like possessor I needed my notes to be up to properly talk about it. And if there's anything. Better to offer to scare me than I do not know it. So scare me. I am going to give eight out of ten stars. It is on shudder this weekend I highly recommend you give it a shot. All right. Thank you so much for second around for those two reviews. Now, if you're going to stick around a little bit more, we have a third review for you where we are going to discuss she dies tomorrow a comedy drama horror thriller. It's another kind of genre cocktail kind of thing much like scare me. where? Well we'll. We'll get into that when we get into it, but we're going to do a review of that, and then at the end of the show, we're going to continue on with the karate kid retrospective and discuss the much-maligned karate kid part three and you can see where I fall on that. All right. You'll just stick around a little bit more and we'll get to those reviews. Thank you for sticking around. Tired of searching the vast jungle of podcasts now, listen close and here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching. The, golden state media concepts podcast narrower is here nothing less than podcast bliss with endless hours of podcast covered from news sports, music fashion, looking entertaining a fantasy football and so much more. So stop lurking around and go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guaranteed to fill that podcast is. Whatever it may be visit www dot Jesus MC. PODCAST DOT com follow us on facebook and twitter and download us on I tunes soundcloud and Google play. And we return. All right. So now that we've gotten possessor and scare me out of the way, we are GonNa go onto a review for a movie that's a couple months older. It came out at the end of July on Vod, and in some drive in theaters it is called she dies tomorrow. And it is a according to wikipedia. It's a comedy horror thriller film although I would. PROBABLY MORE DESCRIBE IT AS A. Dramatic thriller or just honestly just inexperience film and it is written directed and produced by Amy. Siamese, who is mostly known as an actress for her roles in films like pet cemetery and her work on the stars. Girlfriend experience, television show. The Film Stars Kate Lyn. She'll as a young woman, Amy who? Is Under this notion That she is going to. Die. Tomorrow. She doesn't know why she doesn't know how and she doesn't know exactly when. But. She knows that she's going to die. Tomorrow. And? Over the course of the film. The her. Penchant. For her imminent death starts to spread. It is. Viral. Almost. Where someone will hear the words That they are going to die tomorrow. And it just consumes them. and. It is a very its definitely potent right in how But Knowing that Siamese made the film in according to her after trying to explain to people how innings diety attack felt. There is something really palpable about the type of movie that this is. Because the cast is huge, it's really not amy story story is much more about this concept. So the cast also includes a lot of notable in weirder names such as Jane addams Chris Messina Katie Aselton Michelle Rodriguez Josh Lucas out of wing hard like this is a very big cast of this of a lot of like this mumble core aesthetic and filmmaking principles kind of coming together for this project. And it is hard. It's hard to talk about movie like she dies tomorrow without getting real. So I'm just GONNA, lean into it I have really bad anxiety attacks L- I have had them. For. Probably a decade at this point like crippling. Really hard attacks and for a long time. 'cause you feel like you're dying when they happen. And they don't happen anywhere near as often as they did when I was an adolescent but. They they come around every now and again, there are a lot more sparse. There are a lot shorter and there are a lot less powerful Thanks to things like years therapy and medication and general healthier living. Principles But I still hold that. Those moments really strongly in my head because it's unlike anything I've ever felt. Outside. Of that. So knowing that her own. Disorder was the. Was the impetus for amy statements to make this film. Is it helps give it a lot of light because without that knowledge. And I guess this could be interpreted that as a as a criticism of the film itself. Without that knowledge. The movie loses a lot of its power. And it loses a lot of. Its strengthened residents at least to me as an audience member. Personally. Because while. There are some things about this movie that are too experimental for me. That don't totally work and the moments of. ABSURD ESTA levity. Distract from the absurdist horror of the film. There is something so powerful about this little nugget of an idea of. A contagious. Existential crisis basically, IT IS A. These people in this film are slowly watching themselves get consumed with the self-fulfilling prophecy of nihilism and it is. It's horrifying. Yes and I guess that's why he's being considered a horror film but it's not scary it is. It fills you with dread. More. So than actually properly scaring the audience or making them feel uneasy 'cause it's not even it's not even traditional unease like possessor has that unease even scare me has a little bit of that unease near the end, but this is a. Metaphysical and metaphorical, and it makes you reflect more on your own life. Then the lives of these characters because the characters themselves really do not matter they are place holders. This is much more of. Almost like a happiness or magnolia style, dodgy film but without. But without the characters in those films that make them really prominent and maybe the connection to happiness because Jane addams is in this film it wasn't that film and she was great in that film and people should watch it unless you're sensitive to literally anything which is totally fair but it's a very. Very. Intense movie but we're not talking about todd salons happiness talking about she dies tomorrow. There is. There is a spec somewhere deep within this movie of just like pure concentrated pain and anguish. And Siamese has recently been in the news because of. Restraining orders that she has filed against. Her ex partner really notable director Shane Caruth. So it is an I. Don't WanNa speculate on that I. Don't want to speculate on people's private lives in something that is clearly very traumatic. And difficult for her But you see a lot of this raw tapped nerve motion throughout this film to the point where the movie seems to know that the characters don't matter that the plot is just free form because it's all about communicating a singular idea to the audience and like with a lot of very experimental films, it is not shocking. This movie gets classified as a horror film. Because it is upsetting and it is brash in a way that a traditionally structured narrative film just cannot ever be. It's not perfect. Of course, not it's messy and. Very, short and it doesn't land almost any of its like big tonal hits the way that I think it wanted to. But underneath all of that underneath the character underneath the shock underneath the the neon colors and the attempts at creating a wacky world there is. something. So honest and something so. Insanely rare and that's the reason why I love three's why I love horror movies. It's the reason why love independent films so much is because you find these little nuggets of Oh this person just. Cut a vein blood on celluloid like that's what we're watching. We're watching someone in touch with their pain to an uncomfortable degree. It's like when you watch a movie and the final shot. Is the character and they're glaring down the barrel of the Lens. And they make eye contact not just with the camera but with you in the audience and you go, they see me I don't like being seen. And there is something similar to that. Within she dies tomorrow. It feels like you're peeking into something that you shouldn't be like you are a voyeur and the movie has the audacity to Glare back at you and say, right you WANNA look. I'll give you something to look at and. It is such a disturbing feeling for someone who knows what who has the same root experience as Siamese does. I don't have her exact experiences, but they are classified the same. and. I get how that experience can turn into a film like this. It is ultimately very personal experience talking about this movie an if I'm being perfectly honest I didn't realize how personal my thoughts on this movie were before I started before I started this recording before I started just discussing it. But when I when the images from this film flash in my head and I, look at the poster I read these names and I look at all of the things about it that I'm supposed to talk about about the plot which doesn't exist about the characters which doesn't exist about the acting, which is completely serviceable. There's nothing great about it. The something terrible everybody does their job fairly well, they're all extremely competent performers. But. It it's not. It's almost not interesting to review, which is why this is barely review. I mean, there's GonNa be a star rating at the end, but there's really not anything to. Discuss that can tell you whether or not. You should watch this movie. It's very short. It's a very, it's eighty five minutes. If you are into things that are weird and things that tap into that like karnal nerve then yeah. Give it a shot. If you're having a bad day, probably don't watch it because if it taps that nerve in the wrong way and I'm very lucky that it did not tap the nerve in the wrong way. But it could. Really, messy obey could incapacitate you for a couple of days. I've had movies that have done that to me, and there are people who would really connect with this film. Who I will not recommend it to because I know. that it will hit them in that way. And that's never fun and I don't like that feeling and I, don't want to put that on anybody else. Your health is always more important than a movie. But. With the gift of complete happenstance that I have been given in that. This. Movie hit the nerve but it did. So in a way that was that did not lead me into a self destructive episode. Or. Into just a generalized anxiety attack. I would like to use that gift in order to say that. This movie is very good I. Think it's very good. It's very powerful and it means a great deal to me. Despite the issues that it has despite the flaws despite the things that I can look at and say you know this is all. Know. This is all kind of wrong. But it's experimental film. It can kind of get away with some of that stuff. That's another issue with reviewing experimental films and this episode has been three films that are at least to some degree experimental in nature. So it's hard to it's hard to talk about and I do apologize that this whole episode has been. A lot more ethereal a lot more punting on. These films in their place in horror and in our lives than usual if the movies were little more traditional but I, think that is the best way to appreciate what these films bring to the viewers is by returning the favor returning the cerebral with the cerebral if you will returning. Returning the fear. And returning the raw nerve with the fear and the raw nerve and kind. and. She dies tomorrow and Missile Siamese. Sent us the audience. Into each of US individually sent us. This piece of her heart. That is messy and bloody and bruised. And that is. One of the biggest compliments that can give film a compliment. So big that it drowns it almost fully drowns out the fact that all these characters are bad people and the premise is nonsense and the structure is not there. But I don't really care about all that because I just when I see this movie in my head in my memory, it is Just these images and this feeling in my stomach. The feeling that I presume you would get if you ate a chunk of a human heart. She served this to us on a platter and the least I could have done. As a viewer and as someone who is lucky enough to have a platform to discuss these films twice a week. I ate it. It sat with me. It's sunk in my stomach. And I don't know if it's supposed to be there. But it is. And I understand to a degree And maybe it will hurt. But I am to a degree thankful. That I have that piece. Melting away inside of the stomach acid. That was really pretentious. It is a pretentious movie so I, think that is. Fair I suppose that is the best way again, keeping with the philosophy of you gotta give back to the film what it gives to you in this film gives you a lot of pretentious ideas and images that do work and I think it is the best way to respond. I think that's the best way to respond to. It is with pretentious ideas and images that I do believe work if I can be so bold and so self aggrandizing for a moment. This movie will be in my head for a very long time. I don't know if I will ever watch it again and I don't really know if I would properly recommend it but. If nothing I have said has made you say this guy sucks well, he shut up and talk about the karate. Kid. then. If if you didn't have that reaction. Then, this movie might be for you if you did have that reaction. Whereabouts talk about the karate kid part three. So don't worry about that but just give you like two sentences. She dies tomorrow is not the best film of the year. It's not even the most powerful film of the year. It's not even the film that resonated with me the most. But it is a film that I am. Exceptionally glad that I had the privilege to witness and have it affect me as much as it did. Seven out of ten stars? Who now that's over. Who I almost started disintegrate just by the sheer nature of. How self series I got there. So if you're GONNA stick around which I, really hope that you do you've already gone through three reviews with me why not stick around for something a little little wackier at the end in a little bit we are going to be discussing the karate kid part three as the third segment of this little crooked retrospective that I've been doing. So stick around with us then. and. Then I'll sign you out. Watching, TV has changed over time streaming has become the new norm. That's why golden state media concepts television podcast dives headfirst to the world of cord cutting wants to be on the loop of what's hot and Netflix or if it's not a preference what about original shows in Hulu we've got you covered join us as we fill the blank and talk about movies to stream and what show you should be binging. This is a golden state media concepts television podcast. mean. owned. And we are back for the final segment of today's show. Thank you so much for sticking around for the end of today's show. Will we're GONNA do is we're going to do the third part of this little karate kid five movie retrospective thing that I've been doing if you WANNA check out the last episode that I did to get the pieces on the karate kid and the karate kid part two there waiting for you but if you're caught up or if you just don't care. because. We're talking about movies that are older than I am today we are going to be discussing the karate kid part three which came out in nineteen, eighty nine and much like the first two films is directed by John G appleton written by Robert. Mark Cameron and starring Ralph Macho, and Pat. Morita. The most notable thing. About the karate kid part three is Ralph Macho. IS A. Twenty eight year old man he's an adult I guess he's probably twenty seven around the time of filming. But when the movie was released, he still playing A. Like. Seventeen eighteen year old is ten years older than that, and you can really start to tell at this point he doesn't. He really cannot pull off. Being, a kid anymore at this point and that. Already robs a lot of the power from this movie that the first and even the second film had in this very wholesome. Relationship between his character. Of Danny loose are a between his character of Daniel Larusso and the character of Mr Biaggi play by Pat Morita, Pat Morita who is always good in these. He's fine I suppose he doesn't really have a whole lot to do this movie is much much more about much yeowah than it is about the two of them together like with the first two films. So the plot here is. Directly, after the events of the karate kid part two. Larusso and Biaggi come back from Okinawa and they are confronted with John crease the. Teacher of the Cobra Kai DOJ from the first movie who is back and he is his life is just in the toilet and he wants vengeance on these two people that apparently stole all of his honor and his pride. Laruso kicking the crap out of Johnny Lawrence and the end of the first movie and Mr Biagi defeating and humiliating him in the opening of the second film. So. crease. enlists a old Vietnam War buddy of his named Terry Silver who? His job is to. Go to Larusso and say, Hey. My friend John Chris he's dead and I WANNA rebuild Cobra Kai and make it right. So I'm going to help train you so that you can defend so that you can defend your title in the next year's competition. which does not want Larussa do and so the wrestling well, I gotTA. Go train with with their silver I can't do a I can't do a New Jersey and. I shouldn't have to and I apologize for attempting it I. Hope that you can forgive me. So we have this. Kind of retread of the first two films. There is someone who is coming after the two and he is saying, let's let's hold off for a bit and Larussa very headstrong and then the the violence and the torment escalate, and eventually they do karate 'cause he is in fact the karate kid. You know like in in the title, the movie. and. It's just it's so much the exact same as what's come before but just with less of a purpose where the second film at least to me really felt like a proper continuation of the ideas and the themes of the first film while there was some retreading going on there, it still had its own identity I found. Where here? There's just none of that to be found. There's a romance subplot that is basically just lifted directly from the first film and plopped in here but just worse. Again. Macho. Doesn't really fit this role anymore by this point and his performance suffers a great deal because of it, the villains are all. The. James Bond Cartoon Villains John Chris is even more ridiculous and in the first two films. Terry silver brings some charm in some like Sali's fun to the events of the plot, but for the most part, it's just. Very Dull And these films are generally around two hours long, and this one is to it's one hundred and eleven minutes and. You feel every single second of them if I'm being perfectly honest, it is A. There there's a big plot about Banzai trees because Larousse owned Muruga open up a Banzai shop and it just. None of it feels like it coalesce into the ending in the same way that the first and second movie and especially the first movie did so well because it all. Felt somewhat meaningless, and then all coalesced into this beautiful explosion Oh that's why they did it because it all makes sense like they knew what they were doing and none of that energy seems to translate into the third film. Things just seemed to happen. Characters get introduced and written often talked about and say, well, they're that and that's why we're here and they're not here and none of it. Ever feels I would I don't even want to say naturalistic because the first two films are not necessarily naturalistic but there is no, there's no through line here there is. It's hard to talk about the plot of this movie because things just happen there's another. Karate protege WHO's GonNa Fight Larusso is just Johnny Lawrence. But like sent through the Michael Keaton Multiplicity Copier machine a couple times and these. DUMBER and bigger and Maranh meaner, and it's ultimately it's ultimately very. It's just very shallow. It's a very shallow film which is such a disappointment. Coming from a franchise that seems to really pride itself on having. Some really. Deep and interesting themes whilst not delving in them extremely hard because they are still movies designed for audiences. They, dealt with stop they stuff mattered in these movies and here almost none of it matters as the culmination of this trilogy and the last film that features. Danny Larusso and Mr Miozzi together I mean Pat Morita. Passed away a while back and there can never be a conclusion with these two characters. That can. Out Do this that can replace. What this film has left as the final piece, and of course, there is the next karate kid and the remaking, and there is Cobra Kai which macchia stars in as Larusso but much older. But the special thing. Really special thing about that first movie is this relationship and to see it. Just be just an on such a whimper of a no on such a wet blanket of film is really really disheartening and I I, definitely not helped by the fact that I have watched these three movies within like two and a half days of each other. Like I been like marathoning these things I've been tearing through them and It really highlights. Just how steep drop it is from the second film to this one. I can't imagine the disappointment of going from that. I. Moved to the second one which again I still quite like I still think it's a pretty good movie but going from that to. A film like this that just has the air pulled out of its tire. So quickly and is so slow and meandering for almost no reason. I could not imagine the disappointment if I was a fan of the series and a fan of this world which I guess I him at this point, but I didn't have to wait. I didn't have to wait three years. From. Part to part three, I just had to wait like a day to watch the next one and even then I felt the crushing disappointments having to wait three years for this I. I. Literally can't imagine it. I mean it's it's at the point where even Appleton in Twenty fifteen called the film and I quote a poor imitation of the first one and a horrible movie. Which? I mean good on him for speaking up about a thing that he thinks he failed at but. I think that really shows. Where this film stands is that It like no one really cared. It seems no one wanted to do this they just. Made another one because the second one may money because the first one made money and got nominated for an Oscar and that. While it is very common with big successful films, especially in the Eighties where any huge movie would immediately get a sequel if possible. It just breaks your heart. Honestly. Like it really it really bugs me on. I mean this movie didn't even do terribly well, it made thirty eight point nine, million dollars on a twelve and a half million dollar budget. Both of the predecessor films made one hundred million and this didn't even make half of that. It's still technically a financial success but just barely. And it's almost poetic in an almost feels natural that a movie like this is really just there to get cash just to milk the brand a little bit more and a little bit drier would be such a disappointment but. Again, they made a number one they made the next karate kid five years later which. Were GonNA talk about it? The next episode. And I am. Not thrilled about that but. It's what's going to happen. I can't imagine a movie with. US. With less of a reason to exist or I mean I can but it's hard to imagine a movie with less of a reason to exist than the karate kid part three and I am mortified as to the movie that only reviewed half as well as this movie did as I mentioned in the previous episode that I did. All four of these movies, kind of half the previous, the the predecessor films, rotten tomatoes score. Like high eighties for the first movie like fifty, forty, five for the second film fifteen for three, and then seven for the next karate kid so. If the next I truly is a movie only half as good as this one than I am. I'm scared for what I am about to. Put myself through because this movie. is a real disappointment and. If like me, you want to watch Cobra Kai and you've never seen any of these films and you went to experience them for the first time. You should absolutely watched the first movie. I think I still think you should absolutely watch the second movie. I still maintain that the second movie is good and you should stay far far away from the third one and we will discuss soon about whether you should stay far far away from the fourth one and or the remake. I. AM, getting into the weeds and I'm starting to question it is worth it if Cobra. Will be interesting enough for me to have gone through. What I'm going through with these films because if Because if what I'm about to watch is worse than this than I am a little unsure as to how. This franchise could be potentially redeemed and I think that's definitely going to be a testament to Cobra Kai which I'm not GonNa Review here because that's TV that's not really what we do on this on this episode on the show. But I will. Probably, just in the at one point let y'all know if it's worth it. But Man, this movie is just a it's just a real disappointment and it's a hard to talk about disappointment to I. Think this episode has been as a lot of movies that are hard to talk about for various reasons possessor because it is. Because a lot of the really interesting media, stuff is spoilers and is hard to discuss without going into a lot of graphic detail that I don't want to go into scare me is to talk about because it's so bare bones and a lot of the surprises in the film come very naturally, and I don't WanNa ruin that she is tomorrow is almost impossible to talk about because it's so freakin weird and the karate kid part three is hard to talk about because nothing happens I don't think. I'm talking more about it. Now then people talked in the conversation to green light, the film that. We. We need some more miles. Let's just make another kid kerr made one to. Make three that's never gone poorly in the past before and will never go poorly again. Yeah I don't. I know I'm ragging on this movie and it deserves that it's it's not a good film. But it definitely is. More than a bad film. It is a really poor send-off to these characters into this relationship that really captured a lot of hearts and captured a lot of mines in kind of in its own little pocket like I mentioned in the last episode changed the course of American youth for Awhile it get revitalized. Karate interesting to people that is. So. Cool and to see it have it sendoff in such a way just. Really bothers me. The tagline for this movie says, I it was teacher to student than it was father to son. Now it's man to man and. Woman Karate kid part three meaty you. You shouldn't have been made. He shouldn't have been made and. It is a horrific disservice. That you went out the way that you did. to the point where Pat Morita was nominated for a raspberry award the worst movies of the year last. Four for worst supporting actor he didn't win but he was nominated for worst supporting actor. To films after the role that gave him a nomination for best supporting actor at the Oscars and think of anything can tell you about the decline that this franchise has had up to this point. It's that fact right there. So on that note. Thank you so much for tuning into GMC movie podcast brought to you by the GMC podcast network I have I have been your host Davey peppers and if you would be so kind as to lever of you for us that really helps out we really appreciated, and if you can also follow us on facebook twitter and instagram that also really helps the show and helps the whole network. So thank you. So much for that support. Thank you for listening I. Hope You have a fantastic rest of your day I'll see you around. Bye you've been sent to the Golden State media concepts, movie podcast hard of the Golden state media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at www dot Jesus, MC podcast dot com download our podcast on itunes stitcher sound clock, and Google play just typing. Mc to find all the shows from the golden state media concepts, podcast network from movies to music through Sports Entertainment, and even we are us. You can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope you have enjoyed today's program.

writer David Cronenberg director Brandon Cronenberg Sean Bean Brandon karate Josh Reuben rubens Cobra Kai US Johnny Lawrence Jane addams Pat Morita Andrea Riseborough Caleb Landry Jones John Chris Larusso
Lovelogical  DNA Not Required  Episode 48

PodcastDetroit.com

50:12 min | 1 year ago

Lovelogical DNA Not Required Episode 48

"You're listening to the PODCAST DETROIT visit. WWW dot com past detroit dot com before information walk into love love logical DNA not required. This is Michelle Anderson coming to you. Live from podcast. Detroit Royal Oak Studios. We are looking forward. Won't to intriguing and entertaining every Tuesday at seven. Let me start. Today's show by saying thank you for joining our family which she's biological by nature of logical by choice DNA. Well Hello. Hello hello everyone. Happy New Year are this is the first podcast of twenty twenty. We have been here for a little over a year now and I WANNA start off by saying thank. Thank you to those of you. Who helped make my first year Successful I was at an event on Saturday and and I had people come up to me and tell me that they watch my podcast and that they've listened to it and how much they enjoy it and I wanna tell you that that is. That's very heart warming and very appreciative. So my goal is to make twenty twenty rock and I am starting off the year with the happy positive sister who has a true love logical heart. No one would ever believe that we just met spent three weeks now. Yes yeah it's been about three weeks now. We met We met while I was actually being interviewed. Four four three one three believe believe yes in Detroit and Shaniqua sucks. It came down to pronounce it. Russia Qana Qana. I'll know why Qantas hugs came down to actually watch. How a podcast goals and I just happened to be the guest that evening and we started talking looking and I told her about love logical? She understood right away. One love logical was she ended up purchasing zing a sweatshirt that I actually brought down to show on the show and it ended up being the size that she needed. She ended up purchasing T shirt for a Christmas gift for someone else. I love logical mind and we have been and we've been thickest thieves over sense and I know that she's going to be a very important part of twenty twenty because we were brought together for purpose. We have a lot of the same goals. We have a lot of the same dreams James and there are things that we're both working on that I know that will be able to help each other with so we have strengthened strengths and weaknesses. That actually actually complement each other. So that's a good thing and that's not something that you find on a regular basis so walk them to my show. Mr Quantity suggs hugs of potluck Kitchen Cafe Detroit and one thing that I love to say Dope Cali great now chak want. I'm just I'M WE'LL CALL YOU I. She's nervous tonight. You guys so we have to pull her up out of this. So come manav closer to the MIC relaxing. That chair so we can have the conversation. Because you can't Redo a potluck kitchen cafe telling stories and stuff and be nervous nervous. Just because you're gonNA podcasts. We calling you out tonight. It'd be like this town. I know you know what sometimes it depends on who my guest are. I find myself being a little nervous but once I usually get going the nerves go away you know and it's just we're just having in a conversation and you have just titles of Your Business. That is a conversation within itself with the potluck Kitchen Cafe Detroit and Dope Collard Greens. But I'm gonNA leave them wanting a little bit more. Tell us about sure Qana and why you embrace love logical as fast as you did. I embraced it because the essence of love logical no. DNA require has been it really gives and title to my life gave the title to the journey. That I've been on And it just really is some bit up You know I told you that when I got home and I had a chance to really process everything I said. Well while my whole life has been about the kindness of strangers and what strangers have been in my life or people they they are not related to me in who they became in my life and Some of those people are just pick. Go to the person I am today and it just makes sense. It clicked the whole essence of love logical. It just clicked you you know love logical DNA not required. It clicked now when you think when that first person came to mind you had someone who came came to mind Who Was it my I call him my God mom but she's really a really great friend? Okay she he is My mom passed away in May of two thousand fifteen and that same that same week that same week I'm better And we've been thickest the sense and the and she is just like my mom she has Even when she calls my name she says the same way she has weighs like my mom and they actually have the same journey in life. Okay and she's helped me understand a lot of things that I didn't understand Before her mom passed away how does she say your name. This unique you give it to us now you storytelling now so I want to hear you say your name we win. Cvs One time across the store. Kwame Wanna I had like my mom. So yeah she's there so much alike and I'm just blessed to have her in my life. Yeah see it's almost like It feels good when you have someone who you can really look up to MHM after after you've lost your biological mom yes you know. That's that's there and I was blessed to have a biological goal. Mom who was the most amazing woman in the world. I talk about her a lot. Because if it wasn't fulfilling I would not have the love logical heart that I have you know because my mother embraced embraced. Everyone we had to Kuwait House. You know growing up. Yeah so I truly get what you mean and then I was also very blessed to have a love logical at the same time. You know My first boy friend his mother Miss Jane addams she was there for me and many ways and then after I lost my mom she was still there. Yeah so you just this. You never know who's going to be sent for what reason if a what season absolutely yes. Yes so tell me tell me a little bit about Some of your other love logical because you have a village. Yeah Well yeah okay. Well I will have to kind of take you back a little come. Take me back My mom she has many struggles in life. That kind of tour family apart. Okay and I kinda had had to step up as a child and teen and adult life In places where probably you know for things that I probably shouldn't have shouldn't have to but When I lost her when she passed away it was unexpected and it was at a time wear we were actually healing? We were on a path a journey that I hadn't experienced before okay and I was looking forward to what was going to happen in our relationship and she passed away suddenly and so I was at a place where I was confused and I didn't really know what the purpose was in bringing us together only to take her away so fast and but at that same time you know I've been reaching for my goals and dreams for very long longtime which is potluck kitchen okay and I was in the process of You know working on working on that And so I started by retracing my roots in in the city. Okay one of those roles. Let me to a soup kitchen kitchen that will familiar to me in my childhood so I would go and visit the soup kitchen volunteer and I met some people and I was involved in their agriculture program. And everything so. When my mom passed away I went back to tell some friends that my mom had passed in this particular day? It was a few days after she passed and So I want to talk to our friend and My friend introduced nice to meet someone else and when I was talking to this person she stopped me mid sentences said wait a minute is your mom name. BJ They call it And I'm like yeah and we both just bust out crying. She's like I loved her. That was my friend. You know this that. And the third and She invited me to a women's meeting that was going on inside the kitchen. And so I agree and I went to the kitchen. I want to women's meeting and it's been five years that you've been going to the women's dead. I've been going women's that I saw. Yes now share the name of the women's meeting or is IT A. Is it a more of a private meeting. Now it's actually open the the public okay And well a few years in I was given the opportunity of A leadership role. Okay and I it took me a while. It probably took me a whole year to accept that role And I accepted accepted the row. And I just Kinda brought with me the idea of hilling okay And part of my healing journey has always been supporting the women so we kind of went with Sisters and support sisters support. This so hear me say Susan which I say support Yes to me means sisters and okay. Yeah so oh those are my sisters and support and like it we just love on each other and they have become my love logical family okay. Spin Spin in. May this may come in. It'll be five years. I like it. I like it. And they're part of the soup kitchen as well. Well well some are most Jose. Elias of the women are women in recovery But not all know sound come for whatever reason they choose. Choose to come I've invited other people. You know that may come. You know Every now and then but you know women are there for all kinds of reasons. But most they're women in recovery which makes it even more special to me because That was part of my mom's Her journey was her struggle with recovery. Okay so to see these strong women you know sticking it out and some like like my love logical mom she has over twenty five years clean a right and I I learned so much from her But I learned a lot from all the women in the group and we just pretty much. We support each other Some you know we have some that. are homeless We have some that still struggle with addiction. Some struggle with other things and some are there just to support other women man and I think that that's kind of makes it special because we're all when we when we're in that room where all equals we're all the same and there's no judgment and it's really a beautiful thing and I'm just grateful to be a part of it. I love it. I do you you know one of the things that's very important to me. Is Women reaching out and helping each other because at at one point in time when women were considered especially within the African American community we considered as crabs in a barrel and we did not really really help each other the way that we should helping each other with our businesses helping each other with struggles. finances teaching each other. You you know Supporting each other's businesses and any other endeavors that we have. And now you know I belong to a community of women where we are lifting and we're giving each other a hand up instead of a handout and that is it's strong and it's powerful and it's not you know it feels good to see professional women coming together and supporting and and I also have another group that I go to on Mondays and it is women from all different walks of life life. Some of them are in recovery. As you stated some of them are home homeless as you stated some of them have never had any type of addictions that way but they may have you know financial struggles or they may have PTSD THEY May. Have you know something. That's going on to hold them down inside but when everyone gets together like I say you lift in each other up and that's where we are supposed to do. I think that you know one of the things when I when I sit back and I look at headed and you know they say with our chromosomes you know. A woman has two x chromosomes. A man has an X. Y.. Well you link those XS together together and you're GONNA end up holding onto each other to make those XS Lebron up her eat you hold on to make those excess salsa if you have an opportunity that you can help help one of your sisters with with. Then you're supposed to help you know you see someone with a business like with you right away. You said how much those sweatshirts shirts and I told you what I was selling it for for Christmas and you said I want one. You didn't say can you give me more more off. You didn't say what can you hook me up or anything like that. You were like okay and then you called me and said I need another one you know. And that's what we're supposed to do when you do something I'm coming. You know I want to be there if I see someone who's running a business like okay. One of my one of my my friends you know Jenny. She has her Potpie Company. You know Christmas time gave me a pot Pie And I plan on getting a whole lot more. She's at the Royal Oak Farmers Market on the weekend. Ruth WHO HAS GOURMET SALTS I've purchased from Ruth Breath. I didn't go up to ruth and say hey. Can you give me some sought so I know I purchased in right. You know. That's what we're supposed to do. We are supposed to help each other absolutely and I'm glad that you have this. You know because we need each other and especially you know sisters who are out here. And they're they're homeless and you're struggling. They really need to know that they're cared for absolutely and do you help them. Find shelter or most of them are ready in within shelter. We'll cappuccino actually does catching. Yeah Yes yes it is. An amazing place is an amazing place. That's what made me go back to Give okay because give my time and talents because I remember it being a place of comfort when when I was a kid So again when I went came back to trace my roots and just kind of revisit I ended up there. I'll get us. I remember it being a place of comfort comfort for us. Capuchin kitchen does a lot for the community. 'cause they even they do the the like the meals on wheels to. Yeah yes I've delivered therefore they do a lie yes they do us a lot for those people Not just women. Yeah anyone it they do a lot. They do a lot of good in the neighborhood. I love it now when when everyone's looking at the flyer for you today they're going to see the potluck luck kitchen. Cafe Detroit is actually potluck kitchen. DETROIT CUTLASS KITCHEN DETROIT. Okay where do I get the cafe. FRY email okay. Okay and it's been a journey men fest and you brand new rebranding so you get it right because the thing is as long long as you don't stop because you gonNA fall you get back up you fall you get back up and then you say hey village John need help and then the village is GonNa come around you. We go surrounding. We go and help you where you are right now. We're both surrounding ourselves with our villagers. Here's that's helping us get to where we want to be. Twenty twenty is a year of the woman we link our XS. And we're going to do this. Yes yes yes falling girly scabs on these unease. But you know what if you didn't have the SCABS on your knees. Then that means that you never got up And you got up a scab over you go hurt them again until you get it right. It's called perseverance. So you have to keep persevering until you get it right. I learned a lesson. I've fallen so much I have hit my head falling on probably broke every bone on in my body falling and no matter what happens I put a mental cast on. I'd get my butt up and I try it again. I try it again and and every time I fall I learned a lesson but that lesson propels me forward. I don't let the lesson pull me back. I see it as that's okay. Those lessons are stairs. They're steers towards your goal. Every lesson learned is a step and as long as you don't repeat the same thing over and over again you good and sometimes you may cause sometimes you know we may fall on our knees but until we fall on our on our big heads. It's so we we but we keep going love logical has been. It's been a journey within itself but there's growth yes and as long as there's growth then their success and my level of success US each level of success is a little bit higher than the other same thing with you agree you know. And I don't know I just I see so much and I know that we were placed together because your journey similar to mine and sometimes times. You have to see somebody else's journey to realize where you are run yours. Yes yes absolutely so Lincoln all link it all so so another thing is can act and you know I gotta say it you know I love Santana some reason Oh dope Collard Greens and when I think of that I do think of the Collard Greens on the table just about every Sunday every holiday we always have our Greens. My mother was a mustard turnover collar green anti warming. You know sometimes we have mustard and turnips sometimes we had the Collard Greens but Collard Greens to me is the staple home in a African American household. Yes you know and when you think of when you think of the grains you think of the big Mama's back in the day Mhm you think of those Sunday dinners you think soul food. So tell us about your dope colleague. Craig well well don't Collard. Greens are is one of our staple menu items But the name before they were just Collard Greens with smoked Turkey Before they were just like bomb Collard Greens yummy tasty collard. Greens the oil school. These but now My colleague Greens has a different meaning. It kinda represents my story And I always say my story you know is our our story Because everything about me is hospitality so it kind of became a platform. Okay so again let me go back into my story. On that okay. When I got reunited with my mind okay We were reunited for nine months nine months in the beginning at nine months and in but During that nine months of healing and we started Recording our journey our life. Okay because we would always say to people wouldn't believe some of the things that we've been through when you know l.. Some of our stories. She was like really really funny. And I actually have footage of because you know riding around reminiscent visiting Oh neighborhoods and her telling Alan some of her stories and it's amazing because I had no idea that she wouldn't be here that's beautiful but so in that nine months a I was a cook. And she found out that she loved my collard. Greens and I mean when she she would eat them she would literally In kind of Davos. That's that's my good food. Damn so everybody around. Let me get my when the food is good. Yes yes that's really funny but So when she he passed away Like that next Sunday or Sunday off you know however long that I made Collard Greens after that. I was talking with my husband. And you you know we were eating. And I'm like you know what my mom loved my college green she. She loved a lot of my food but she's really picky but she really loved Collard Green and our say a while I create a somethin- then that she loved you know because her addiction took our wife from an essay but I created something that she loved and I said Oh flip the script in hill community. You know we dope is is a good thing is a good thing absolutely so okay. So it's not a negative thing the dope that sucker away is now to note that brought her back in gave me something good so that's Kinda like were to hold dot Collard Greens. I love him. I love it now. That's deep that's deep the but that also I'm sure that she's smiling down. Just thought of what you just said that we had nine months in the beginning and nine months in the end. They gave me goosebumps because that Man I'm not at a loss of words often often but when soon as you said that I was like. That's that's D.. Yeah that's really deep and the fact that you took those nine months rather she she you know through her addiction and all you spent that time with her riding around just looking Can you share some of the neighborhoods or was that something. We'll have to wait for the book no Well my family is actually from black. Bottom Detroit okay My great grandmother had a restaurant. Oh Oh and That bottom hold down from black bottom and a her stopping ground per se that area and actually have you heard of Heidelberg. Yeah the head of our yes okay. So there's the Polka that house. Yes which is their headquarters their yeah office with all the mirror yeah. That was her best friend's house. Oh Wow okay. That was her best friend's home so oh she hadn't been over there in quite a while so I took her to see the gentrification of Heidelberg where all my stuff happens happens so much drama But yeah so we went over in Heidelberg. She went through the House. And you know I have a recording of walking through the AW Buddha House and So we went there. We rolled through Lafayette That area like Shane Lafayette. Yeah Yeah Yeah Just inside Ratchet McDougal area which is the the but area Just everywhere truthfully truthfully but we also went on set roll down seven Mile West seven mile area. That is where that was like my grandma's neighborhood because my grandmother other helped raise me so I had to lives. I had boozy life when my granny and then I had the hardcore alive life with my mom and it helped balance me. I believe So we roll from the east side to the west side okay. Just just reminisce reminisce and laughing and talking. She was something else. She was hilarious. Do Do you know the name of your grandmother's restaurant and black bottle. I'm believe it or not my family When I found out about there was like a static? Like are you kidding me so I started questioning everybody. Nobody really knows me remembers much but from what I've been able to gather. It was the peer for House. The pure for yes okay. I've never heard of the Mom and pop Peer to peer for mass. Not all I was able to get and was do you know what type of food she she was. It was a soul food. ooh Okay well the owner of births birds. Okay he remember okay Forgive me. I wasn't prepared for this. I'm sorry that's why I told you. Just a regular conver- Yes yes yes I don't remember. Just don't remember. At that moment I was able to remember a little bit more down onto the address and he remembered and he said what he remembers. Are these huge sausages. That they used to cut down the middle burst open and they put all Garnishes and everything on it. So that's one thing. I was one one piece of information I was able to get up and onions. Yeah okay all right so But other than that unfortunately no I don't remem- yeah yeah. I know my dad and everyone is gone now because I would have been something. I would have asked because anything dealing with sausages especially if they were hot sausages then then he probably would have known about it and he used to talk about you. Know the black bottom area hastings street and things like that and before you know I stopped eating meat and all of that and when I was younger I remember going different places getting the sausages really and stuff like that because that even but usually that's black bottom I would have been real little but yeah sausage and those are big deal in African American community it. It really was one photo of hers in behind the Counter Which I cherish do you look like I don't know I can't really tell from the photo because it's really old black and white but I do just like my grandma and it was her mom so yeah okay so in with BJ with your mom. How much do you look like her? Alexandra like her. Just it's like I told you the lady was like it's your mom. BJ That's cool three generations or is that for uh-huh is that is that what got you into storytelling. Because you like to. You know you like to do storyteller. So is is part of researching your history is is what really got you into wanting to do storytelling or was it. Something else. There's a few things okay One would be watching the women in Mr Family. Tell stories okay everybody was really animated And you know you coming up you used to get the speech If I hear anything repeated come out of my mouth. Oh yeah yeah our sent back but I will watch. I knew not to say anything but I will watch and out Out as they would tell these stories I will be able to pitcher what they were talking about. And I don't know I was just really really intrigued by in those are just great memories Marie for me back in the day children were saying not her. Yes we we listened but we knew not to pipe in conversation where kids now. How are very much so included in adult conversations? Which is hard for me very hard for me because I know with me I would argue? Needed was the look at new. So I I remember hearing different things you know growing up and but but for you to hear those stories. That's what made you want to tell stories. so that's one of alcohol and other is hip hop all right. I Slick Rick. Oh Yeah Yeah. That's who was in the concert with Cameo and parliament. No me some genetic to that concert and she was in awe she was totally in all. Yes I remember looking at. His album flew with record. Check it on and I would just sit in in front of my record player and just listen. You could just see the story so yeah rappers likes liquor it inspire me. I knew I couldn't rap everybody I couldn't wrap. Hey Ron ah not really a poet I but I can't right okay and I could tell a story and actually. I didn't realize that there was a such thing as a storyteller teller. Yes Until there was an article in the newspaper and I saw a story about a an artist's name Satori Sukur Okay and she She's the founder of the Secret Society twisted storytellers. And I see. Oh my God. This is a real thing like this is now this. This is what I can do that. So that's that's what I think the dream was born like you know what I am a storyteller. Yeah and you know even with even with spoken word spoken walk in word oftentimes is storytelling. It is through poetry and through short stories will monologues to. Yes you know. So we've we've been telling stories for years if you even sit back and excuse me I'm about to tell my age and older than me but remember back. In the day our parents bought albums that had storytelling that had poetry and everything else and comedy. The comedy albums had story on absolutely. Yeah so all of that plays a role and then our history. Many of our history was told through story absent around quilting circles and everything else and they were passed down through the years snap. So that's how a lot of families remember their history absolutely through the telling of stories. Yes absolutely and to this day. Anyone who has seen me around a very elderly person. I am like a child. I would sit at their feet and I will listen to the stories that they have to tell them about their lives. Because often times you have of people elderly people. They have so much to share. But they don't have anyone that really cares to listen to them anymore and people are so blessed less than fortunate to have elderly relatives and listened to you know and I just I love elderly people ask I love it I do well. My family is my mother's my aunts my uncles. They're all gone as far as you know. My immediate family eighty. I would love to be able to sit down and listen to stories about our family that I don't get to hear anymore. Yeah so to be able to hear. Those stories stories is healing is for you to have their stories is. He'll it is for you to have your mom recorded telling stories about her life that that as as your colleague Greens. That's don't yes. Yes man it is and I think we need to tell more stories Our children They need to hear our stories they do. We need to hear each other's stories so we'll know we're not the only one So we can begin to heal and get rid of some of these stigmas behind some of the things things that plague our communities the good and the bad absolutely the good and ab-absolutely yes. Do you think that we're getting there now. That we are on a sister self doc. self-care journey now self care has become a new. Buzz is a new term. It's a new way of life So I think that a lot a lot of the sisters and I WANNA shout out to John to scarborough with the sister circle. Thank you for the retreats last year looking forward to this year and you know going to retreats and then I have my mother's Day weekend retreat for women who have lost their MOMS. Yes looking for and this is going to be our second annual at the red. Poppy everything will be out by next Monday. And I just. We sat there and we laughed and we shared stories of our moms positive stories. And you know and it was just is healing kneeling. It's good. It feels socred absolutely does yes it does and I like to laugh so love to laugh love to let yes so some of the stories that even in my mind I think of stories of my mom and all my goodness I can think of stuff in just in just crackup Echo just crack up. No I look crazy. Don't care because it's just a thought here so I love it. I love the whole concept. Do you mind if I ask the women For the retreat to come prepare to share a good positive story about their moms or the act would would you be okay with me current county all right so we're GONNA have Can we don't colleague Greene Story. This get it all right. We add up collar green stories to agenda. I love it because I'm I'm GONNA get emotional. I just I I love the concept and the fact that you had been such a blessing that nine winds wants near nine months at the beginning of the end that is low in it is. It's a miracle and everything in between was a miracle how I founder everything you just gotTa so good And and and that's pretty much the essence of dealt Collard Greens. Is this mind. Beauty for ashes story. 'cause out of so much pain you know. Those nine months really helped put me on a trajectory of healing. You said of duty for ashes. Beauty for ashes beauty for ashes. Yes that's what I said. Yeah beauty ashes. Yes yes. That's my beauty for ashes. Story you coming up with some with some stuff. I'm looking looking forward to being in a setting where you're doing your dinners and sharing stories. I'm really looking forward to that. You know do you know when you're GONNA start them back up again Well we took a break for twenty nineteen So I'm planning to get back into it. in twenty twenty. Okay not planning and we will absolutely will As a matter of fact we are lining some things up right now. I don't want to spend on it around. We'll have to bring you back. I already know we'll have to bring you back when you're ready for your launch. Yes so that like the one thing that I told her. We wanted to get all her intellectual property and trademarks and and all that stuff together. We want to make sure that you get your copyrights together because because you have some really unique things. That's about to calm and I could actually see you have a franchises of what you're doing so oh I received that. Let's I I want to see it happen. And I'm looking forward to being a part of it because it's not too often that you have women coming together or have something to offer to each other and this has become A wonderful love logical community to be a part of a logical sisterhood. And we bought. We've got to do some stuff in Detroit. Detroit is only the beginning you know that. Don't you get it. Destroyed is beginning man and you all think Detroit as are are tough and everything else but you got to see Detroit. Women come together and truly make a difference because we're already doing that not right now. I know that We are probably about fifty strong right now of US coming together and it's going to only get stronger longer. It's GonNa get stronger excited you know. And when it comes down to it the best the best village which to be in is a village filled with diversity diversity of personalities diversity of ethnicity diversity of religion diversity diversity of everything so when you add that diversity and to into our into our current. You're looking at you looking at hundreds of women in my goal is to make it thousands of women to we'll we'll be able to come together in one place and just say thank you to each other. That sounds amazing. It's common twenty twenty is is there is actually it's growing and it's it's there and I'm so excited about it because because I have wanted to see us come together for so long for so long and to see it happening and to to be a part of it it makes a difference. Logical is biological logical by nature logical by choice. DNA not required. And we we're doing this and quantum since crazy smokes is one of those women you have such a strong beautiful heart. You do that and and you you are you. You're soft-spoken but you have such You have this spirit about you this just just just I miss. And it's a positive thing you know and so I just know that it's important. It's important for us to do. What's best for the village that we're building around us so I'm GONNA start singing? We are family upping go here we go. Yeah so tell us tell us something. That is a goal for you as we're wrapping up here for twenty twenty without divulging your secrets. What is your goal for? Twenty twenty my goal. A one of them. Yeah well the main Bangel is to step out on faith be bold and courageous. Yes like just put off fear behind amy and just do it that that that is my goal. That is what I'm GonNa do if I may get a little biblical here go uh exodus. Four four reach out Yohannan grabbed by the tail. And then attorney your hand and that's what I'm expecting. I'm reaching out and I'm greg by the tail and I'm expecting to turn into a ride in my hand so them all right. I know that I learned something something last year from a gentleman Dr Kevin and last year he had set a goal for himself. And and I this this year I was like you know what one of the things that he said last year. I'm going to I'm going to receive that and use it this year. This this year is going to be the year of the profit for love. Logical and the Prophet is P. R. O. F.. It prophets. Yeah yes. Yeah but there's also going to be a lot of prophecy within that year so yes watch US and double for your trouble watches. Yes so watches this year and I just want to tell everybody this has been. This has been an awesome some first year first of the year. PODCAST I am happy to have you here today. I want to share that that this is going to be a year for love logical. We are partnering with Brilliant Detroit. We are going to be coming to you with with some different motivational And motivational and meditation experiences All of their houses this year. So there'd be one month we are looking forward to coming to you. It's going to be myself and Sonya car wall. We had a meditation experience last month that I shared with you and it was a success. And thank you yes you you you said you got a lot Out of it. So yes so and then brilliant Detroit has decided that yes. They're going to work with us. You're going to see a lot of us this year and and we are helping people grow I've helped you know when it comes to a lot. I have someone right now who I'm getting ready to mentor a Place with a mentor to help them through the fostering process and then the adoption process. You know I have people who I'm helping with the mentoring process and these are not reaching out. These are people that are just coming to me. So I know that it's meant to be because they're finding me through various means and and I am just so happy to be able to be who I am to the people that I'm that I'm that I'm being metoo and I also want to ask for prayer for my family. You guys have not seen me but I do have a family member who is in ICU. At Ua them right now and and it's been a very I don't even know how to put it. It's been a hard few weeks and it's been a prayerful few weeks and I'm going to ask lasted you do lift my family member up in prayer. Be there for my family and know that you know my family. We're all all LUV logical blended family. That came together. We were raised by a mother who has won the biggest love logical hearts and and we come together in unity and we come together with love logical love for those who are around us so I want I want to thank everybody that has embraced love logical and know that we are going to do things this year because my goal is love logical Detroit it D- Not required so thank you so much thank you Michelle. Thank you for coming tonight. It's such an honor to be your first guests of twenty twenty twenty twenty. Yes is such an honor and I appreciate it so very much. I appreciate you for being here so can I share with what we didn't nicknamed you know the we will share. The QUANTA is going to have a podcast this year. So I'm sure that I will be there and we won't be He's lending support to your podcast as best we can and Good luck to everything that you do. And Twenty twenty and good luck to everything that you all do in twenty twenty and good night good night.

Detroit twenty twenty Collard Greens Qana Qana US Michelle Anderson Detroit Royal Oak Studios Collard Greens Greens Russia John James Jane addams Mr Quantity suggs SCABS founder Collard Greens
She Dies Tomorrow (Featuring Michael Frank)

Piecing It Together Podcast

56:51 min | 6 months ago

She Dies Tomorrow (Featuring Michael Frank)

"All right. Welcome to another episode of piecing it together the podcast where we take a look at a new movie and try to figure out what movies inspired it, and today on the show we are going to be talking about a creepy weird little indie college. She dies tomorrow from writer director, Amy, sites and joining me is Michael Frank first time on the show and we had a great conversation about this movie and about all things impending doom and dread it. Believe it or not. It's really fun though so we are going to get into that conversation here in a second. But before we get onto all of that I, do want to remind you to make sure you're subscribed piecing it together on your podcast App of choice, and of course, enjoying the show you can always rate and review us on Apple podcasts or Pod chaser and You know follow social media at Piecing pod join the facebook group popcorn and puzzle pieces where. We continue the conversation about all these movies and so much more, and maybe a little bit of existential dread creeps into those conversations as well. We'll see what happens but for now though let's start talking about she dies tomorrow. WHO Are. Joining me today we've got writer and film critic Michael Frank Michael. How's it going? Fantastic thanks so much for having me. So, we're GONNA be talking about this movie she dies tomorrow and I will we'll get into that in a minute I. The first thing I wanted to ask you, and then also I'm GonNa WanNa you know get tell my listeners a little about yourself and all that but first things first though I know you seem to really dig this movie I remember seeing you post about it a few times I had replied saying how, yeah I'm thinking about watching this. What made you well I. Guess Before we get into what made you connect with the we'll get to that later I, just WanNa know are you still thinking about it constantly because I know you said you're thinking about it quite a lot after you decide I'm thinking about it constantly I would say that part of that was how I watched it. I watched she dies tomorrow I started at about eleven pm on Wednesday night just by myself in my room, turn off all the lights. Ice Cream like the forty X. of existential ISM yeah. To be honest I actually had to posit halfway through. Adding specific. Seen because I was feeling like really really uncomfortable. Just because I think that especially where I live when it kissed her certain time I out here in I live in Brooklyn just like really quiet on my specific street and there's not too many lights or anything, and so I just like very dark and quiet. and kind of like the dread was starting to fill me up I. Don't think about it as much as I did last week, it's slowly starting to. Dissipate from my body. But definitely I hit me and I still have flashes of thinking about it. I've actually I've told a lot of people to watch. Which I'm not sure if that's good or bad thing. But Anytime, you're recommending movies good thing exactly and so anytime they watch and bring it back up. It kind of fills. Me Fills me back up with that at same dread. Nice. Well, we introduce you our listeners here. What do you tell people a little about yourself and what you do? Yeah Definitely I. Do a bit of writing. And critiquing out would say of a film and Television I actually only started writing and doing this whole Shebang about a year ago I studied journalism actually in college in California and minored in film, and so had a little bit of background that way but now I freelance right for a bunch of different sites and mostly love doing interviews out say that is. Become kind of what I do the most of. Done. Done a few of them recently for Roger Ebert and Awards Watch and film inquiry and and those types of places. That's awesome. Yeah. See Your name in a bunch of different places, and so I'm glad to finally meet you and get to have you on the show. So this movie, we were kind of digging into it a little bit in that first question but this movie is absolutely filled with like I. I kind of dread that is a little bit unrelenting and you know we'll get into it more as we get into this conversation. But that is kind of my thing when it comes to a movie, you dig when a movie. Just kind of. Just takes a hold of you in like it really doesn't let up and even though there's a lot of like kind of dark humor in this I mean it's still it's just a lot of like heavy stuff going on here. Well, yeah, and the reason why I love it so much as it's it's pretty snappy i. think it's like eighty, four, eighty, five minutes short and so. Number. One it doesn't take a long time for you to understand what kind of movie you're watching. Within the first ten fifteen minutes you say, okay I've I've been hit by this like like we've said sense of dread or isolation and Then, it just gets right into it. You know and it Kinda starts spreading per se pretty quickly and I liked it a jumps kind of from character to character, and it's not just solely focused on on one person when idea and and because of that I think it is so unrelenting like you said, you know I think if it were just focused on, you know the the main lead just kind of Milwaukee around kind of her past experiences with her ex or her just you know being in the backyard and you're looking. At boxes then I don't think it becomes you know as as special or as haunting of film because though it runs with every single person that she interacts with and who they interact with and and that's kind of how it's set up It feels I think I don't know I just think it's much more effective. Sure. Yeah. I think it becomes a much more individual personal story if it was just about her whereas in this case, it just becomes a total exploration of you know what it means to be scared of death. But you know with with that all said I mean we we kind of got to the basic idea of the movie here. We've got that out there. Why don't we start jumping in puzzle piece? We'll talk more about the movie along the way. What do you have for your first one? First One I have one that came out in twenty. Fourteen, the film it follows By David Robert Mitchell it's it's a film that I've seen be mentioned along that she s tomorrow quite a lot and actually really watched it just because I was I was curious how they kind of match up and you know that film is about younger people one it's about a like sexually transmitted monster. Or horror of sorts but I think the big similarity is Both of these spreaders you know or like infections or whatever they are Can Be parables for something larger can mean much more than just thinking die tomorrow thinking that because you had sex with someone that now someone is following you. And then the second huge pieces in both films it's really the only person that sees that or feels that way you know. So it follows no one else can see the monster except for the person that it's following and then she dies tomorrow it's really singular. You know sure it's something that okay I feel this way and it affects just me specifically and then everyone else kind of confused by that right? Right? Yeah I. think that's absolutely a great piece to starts out with I. Surprisingly did not have it on my list even though it totally makes sense but I think just on the the main level of this, you know unsatiable thing that you know. You know follows from one person to the other. But another another comparison I think that makes a lot of sense is a really strong use of music in both of these movies I mean if one of the best scores of the last, you know ten years and This this movie she dies tomorrow Great Score and then also interesting use of music. Lacrimosa plan over and over again, all that which really like set you up for like Oh this is going to be pretty weird like. I think also both of those are kind of trying to reframe elements of horror and thriller. And nontraditional ways. Sure. Yeah. No that makes sense a lot All right. I'm going to go to my first piece and I'm going to get this out of the way I because it's it's the one movie on my list a not really a good one. But I reminded me of in a way and that's m night Shyamalan the happening. Late. Again, you know you've got this kind of unforseeable force that I. Some reason is traveling from person to person in that case, causing them to kill themselves. I believe I kind of forget that movie. That kind of thing though and. You know there. There's a certainly question of like you know what exactly is it? That's unfolding here like. It's kind of hard to put your finger on for the beginning of the of the movie, but it starts to like kind of slowly get on packed for you and it's quite possible to even not fully understand it by the end I. It's definitely something that isn't as interested in fully explaining itself as it is. You know letting you try to piece all that together. Yeah I think that makes tons of sense. That's funny that that's a movie. I. I truly have not seen. Yeah and pro I mean at least eight to ten years. Yeah. I saw in the theater and that was the last time. I do remember it had a couple of really effective moments like I'll give it that I'm Anne Shamlan he's. For All of his bad films, he's made a lot of great ones too and know I'll I'll give them credit where credit's due that movie had a few good scenes just Kind of not super well thought out dough the rest. The NSO I am just another kind of interesting similarity. I think that that movie has just like a ton of people in it. All I remember is is from the movie is just seeing like a lot of familiar faces which She dies tomorrow if I think you watch. A lot of especially say like Swan Berg movies or kind of a lot of the smaller indie movies. A lot of these people will pop up. From. You know she dies tomorrow and. It was kind of the thing where even you know Michelle Rodriguez pops up for. You know twenty five seconds at the end. Adam Adam lingered of all people. Yeah. Just like okay. I. I guess lots of good actors are just going to be in this movie for not necessarily you know the entire time yeah. Yeah. No, it's definitely an interesting cast and A lot of these people who certainly wouldn't expect to see but hey, there they are and. They're filled with as much tread as the no name people. One hundred percent. What do you got your next piece? So my next piece is a film that I personally love might not be the most critically acclaimed. But I think it actually like set. You know someone important precedent for horror and I think you know death filled films and that is final destination so. I had to put it on I. think that the feeling that you know you're going to die. That's basically that entire movie. And just trying to one grapple with that fact I think they actually fight that of course in final destination. When she dies tomorrow, it's much more. You know resignation Shumur acceptance but there certainly characters in the final destination first film in two thousand as well as the rest of the films Accept that fact and then either commit suicide or laid out in front of a train or whatever it may be it just because they know that at this coming. Yeah. And, of course, that's at a much different kind of movie though it still is. A at least Genre Jason sure. Yeah. I think it would be very fair if you're trying to you know explain what this movie is to someone and just say like it's an Indie. final. Notes Eight, twenty, four, neon. Asian you know. It would I think some of it would be okay. I I get what I'm getting into. Well, yeah and and it's a lot of like we're gonNA build you know like I think like a bunch of really small builds I. Think you know throughout it and she dies tomorrow like every single time. It's kind of like it's kind of conversation and then builds those bright lights. Yeah. and and We've said the the score and the music swells and you're like, okay, I feel like the something is happening inside of me. And one I'm dreading for the people that I'm watching as you do in final nation even though they might be. Not dumber movies you know but I think they're not grappling with the same types of things. At least in the same weighty way. As, she dies tomorrow. That's still. Effective in making you feel nervous and anxious. Absolutely. No. I think that this conversation could not have happened without talking about this leash. Yasser exactly. Give good piece and I'll go onto my next piece, which is a a a movie that people just really did not talk about but I loved last year it was called to dust and it's written directed by Sean Snyder starred. Matthew Broderick in a role just kind of out of nowhere come back and and. Geeze Aurora and yeah, it's a really great indie like very pitch black dark comedy that kind of deals with grief and it's about a a acidic Jew who how a community college professor to try to help them deal with. The loss of his wife and what happens after death and what death means, and because is religion isn't quite giving him the closure and the understanding that he needs and so in this movie I it's you know it's it's very different thing more of a horror thing but. It certainly though is these characters who are having to come to terms with death means and what death is and acceptance of that and. Everybody kind of has their own way in which they like they all have that I'm going to die tomorrow moment but then they also have their own little bits and pieces of the way that they're they're dealing with the idea. Yeah. I to be completely honest with you. I've never heard of this movie. Oh, I mean that slow synopsis and your. Your your speech on that I mean it's it's sold me immediately I. Think I'm probably get a queue it up. Immediately after this and I would love to see Matthew Broderick in. ANYTHING THE TO BE HONEST I. I feel bad for saying sometimes I just forget that he is out there because he he affleck, he's just rarely. That people see he just like kind of like disappeared forever but yeah. No definitely I can't recommend that film enough. So please do check it out and I've done my job if you do watch it. So yeah, definitely what's your expertise? So I am also going to talk about something that deals. Heavily with grief and death, and that is a the HBO series, the leftovers. From Damon Lindelof. It's a show that I didn't watch while it was going on that I actually watched I'm not in the last year and. it's stars just a ton of fantastic people from Justin theroux and. Carrie coon to Regina King and. Margaret Qualley, and just kind of all these people pop in and out And it's a show. Have you seen it? Is I have and that that was on my list of when the whole quarantine situation started. I was like I'm filing to watch the leftovers and it just hasn't happened. I'm not going to try to give away too much but you know. Two percent of the world's population just disappears Ram, which is like just an a weird amount of people you know like an ends up being You Know One person in your family you know or a few people in your town or whatever may be in. So it's about all these people that are dealing with. The loss of family friends and normal see and you know it's on a really specific date and so every single year this comes around this specific date of. kind of like the disappearances and the vanishing. Everyone thinks are not everyone but at least you know some characters and you know certain people in the town or community feel as though then again, they're going to die on that day. So people are preparing constantly for. Death throughout the show because no one really has any clue win death is coming. You know or this something that is a going to happen again or if it's just a coincidence or if it's you know random event and that idea of of death and. Grief to seep in constantly into your life shorts I. always they're like, yeah, and it overwhelms you know characters throughout the show and and I think it's an absolutely fantastic haunting Really Weird show that is a very confusing and very dark. You know it's it's not an easy show to watch three episodes of in a row. Or else you'll start feeling I think really poorly about the state of the world and about About your death in your own life and death around you. But I couldn't help but think about it. When watching, she dies tomorrow Po possibly because I watch recently but also because. It's one of the best pieces of television or film that I've seen that deals with Grief and death and how. We're really freaked out by you. Know we we. We just don't know how to act like we don't know how to act, and so we either we jump into something that is. EITHER NOT HEALTHY NOT SAFE Or will lead us down a very poor path. Sure and that's like baked into just like being person and so it's like it's great like a movie like this could come along and you know we we, of course, love our big action movies and comedies and all that. But for something like this to come along is awesome to to be able to like explore these kinds of themes in a very unique and different way one, thousand percent I mean I know you did a an episode recently on the tax collector. I it's just it's funny to look at, for example, like she'd as tomorrow versus the tax collector her. Like okay. These movies came out within a couple of weeks of each other. And they are really for a for different themes a different different appearance, different effects. A tax collectors got some heavy stuff once you get into the. Pouring chicken blood on yourself and. Exactly yeah. Well I go on to my next fees I'm going to. Stay squarely in the whole existential -ness of that last one there and talk about Iheart Huckabee's from David Russell. A, which is I mean to me like kind of the ultimate when it comes to like dealing with that whole existential like. What all mean kind of question within a comedy, a dark comedy you know and they're certainly like I said, moments of humor in this movie really dark humor. But also like the thing that kind of like connected the most aside from just that that. Those kinds of questions is. The way that I remember the IHEART Huckabee's. How am I not myself? How am I not myself? You know just kind of becomes meaningless that question and it's like I'm going to die tomorrow going to die tomorrow and it's like it's just kind of it's like this repeated thing that becomes like you know do even like know what you're saying at this point like, is it just kind of coming out? What is what is the purpose of? What does it do? These characters understand what they're saying or is it just kind of coming out on autopilot in a way you know and it's just it's a fun use of language I think in a way where it's like. It just kind of shows how wants something gets repeated over and over again, it just starts to almost lose meaning and a very strange way and it's it's an interesting phenomenon I guess. Can I ask you something you know about that film? Why do you think I? It's gotten kind of lost in the shuffle of the last. Fifteen years why why do you think it's it's like it's sort of anonymously forgotten, but it's just like not nearly as necessary I feel like beloved as other I know David, a Russell films. Yeah I have to assume it has to do with all the Oscar attention that came like right after that with like three in a row ray wasn't it sort of a linings playbook American Hustle and the fighter the fighter yet? Oh, and also the other one would Jennifer Lawrence where with the mop was at joy is that what Joe a? Yeah that was him to write it was it was yeah. I particularly loved. Yeah. That was definitely the weakest of those more but But yeah, no, I have to assume it's all that Oscar buzz between all four of those movies and so it's just kind of like Oh that's what he did before that kind of and. I love that movie actually. Just a weird little tangent for a second. But my best friend Q. and I we we went as Jason Schwartzman and mark. Wahlberg. Characters for Halloween that year that. Was that was that a pretty popular costume literally not a single person knew we were. Which of course, made it all all the better exactly. I I I love to hear that those are always the best costumes, right? Yeah. Absolutely. Ridiculous. To think about. What you get for your next piece. So I don't know if this is allowed but I'm going to of give a a few movies that are all kind of I think in the same vein sure that I think Phil kind of the same hole and so this is the nineteen ninety seven Japanese film perfect blue. Black Swan. and then Polanski's repulsion and so all three of these movies though not the exact same, they're all I think about like. central. Ama- like female lead characters. Who are going through some sort of like mental. By taxing mental experience I would say 'cause I. Don't necessarily think that like. they're yours completely like. A spiraling or anything like that but. There about people that really don't know what is real and kind of what's fake. and. That feel that someone or something is coming for them. you know. So all three of those films are thy there think a person they think a group of people they think Death whatever it may be is like coming to get them and they're really. Those films are mostly just like that the central characters and it's it's kind of your living inside of their mind to a certain degree and I think there's no sense of you know. Spreading, of IINO, know illnesses death of anxiety. Sure. In terms of anxiety captured onscreen, I think those are like incredible films that show the anxiety when you start thinking about something so much to read it can becomes all consuming and then you struggle to live. You know you struggle to move past that so that you think okay, maybe death is coming tomorrow you know more someone is coming to kill me or. know this man that is walks by to go to work is. Coming tomorrow to and my life to break into my apartment. And it also includes you know some sort of like visions and and kind of these these types of things. But I had mention those those movies especially especially perfect blue which is just an absolutely. Incredibly twisted A. Weird movie It looks a lot more fame I think but definitely is an interesting look at anxiety and and. nerves just think in general when you're living and when you're being influenced by all these other people and you start to. Really, lose control a little bit. Sure I actually have never seen perfect blue, and now I'm feeling like I probably have to but specifically to Black Swan though I think a lot of Aronovski could fit that bill as well. I mean requiem pie even mother Yeah. Definitely. A lot of that that same kind of feelings works to a lot of his work. Yeah it end those films definitely have just built in dread. You know so that you feel as though something really bad is going to happen by the end of this film railway when you're watching and that's how I felt when I was watching sheet is tomorrow I didn't know if people were going to die or are kind of what was GonNa Happen but I definitely felt as though something bad is going to happen to these characters that I'm rushing onscreen and that's how I felt with perfect blue with black swan with I guess like you're saying a lot of Aronovski but. Had did just give a little shout out to to perfect. Nice. Yeah. It sounds sounds sounds like an interesting movie for sure. I'm going to do something here with my next piece that I don't think I've ever actually done before maybe did wild wild back on the podcast but I'm GonNa go with something that's not a movie is a piece of a song lyric. But I just re it really Kinda. I thought of it while I was watching this movie and I was like this kind of fits really well. So I'm going to do it. It's my show I could do it. It is from the cures plain song on their disintegration album the album opener it's the line. It's so cold like the cold if you're dead and you smiled for a second, which I thought is like a perfect it perfectly encapsulates kind of this feeling of these people who are terrified of dying. But at the same time are are coming to this acceptance of dying and of what they're. Of that the fact that that is all part of what this whole existence is and that it's you know it's just a natural extension to to life and and it's okay and some of the characters are more okay with it than others some of them are not kind of giving into that that realization at all but some of them are totally on board with this. Kind of Goth idea. Of this cure song can you? Can you reread that lyrical more time? Sure. It's It's so cold like the cold when you're dead and you smiled for a second. It's interesting though it really works. That's why I. Think. You know it's it's weird when. You're listening to a song and you might hear that and you'll be like, oh, it's just whatever it's part of the song. Then when you put it in context of something like she dies tomorrow or. On death at grief and You're like, oh my gosh, that is the most profound thing. anyone has ever written. Well. That is Robert. Smith. So yeah, he's fantastic. I'm so glad it could be a part of history. There you go. Right To do that again sometime because it was fun. So, what do you got for your next piece? Okay. So is this my last I? I don't know how many we go right five five basic around five. If you if you have any like extras, you really want to throw in after we can squeeze him in but Yeah. Okay. So I'm GonNa go with something that is it's definitely more Sifi. Focus but I think it's still really holds true to the idea of those around you are changing. And they're changing in a sort of. Reluctant. Acceptance which makes no sense when I say next one is invasion of the body snatchers. Right on and I'm going with the nineteen seventy eight. Film direct by Philip Coffin with Donald Sutherland, and it just incredible Jeff Goldblum performance in there and that film is you know about. Aliens coming and taking over bodies but the biggest thing that made me. Link it to she dies tomorrow is When these aliens take over the bodies, what happens to your loved ones and the people around you is become basically emotionless you know. So they basically just become not necessarily robots but they become just resigned to a quiet. Nandan very action based nonviolent, really based existence Yes of course, it's much more about the end of the world in a different way and additional sense. But a really made me think of it especially with I think some of the acting she dies tomorrow win characters become infected. when they start to feel as though. death is coming for them. Then their demeanor changes in their acting changes a bit you know it becomes very not deadpan but very Amercian less and kind of just hear the lines here is what I'm feeling sure and it even reminded me which isn't necessarily like a link to peace but reminded me of the acting and and such killing up sacred deer. And and that kind of just like plain faced I have accepted what I'm saying and what I'm feeling and it's reminded me of I don't know why body snatchers it reminded me of that. But that's just a much more Sifi based film. But sadly, still about the end of the world and it's about those around you changing in a way where they lose the essence of of themselves which I think is happening to certain characters and she dies tomorrow you know you. Would you think that you're going to be dying tomorrow? And you look back at who you are and what you've done Sometimes. As seen in the movie, you are like upset with those things. And you wish that those truths were different and so you lose a bit of yourself and you lose all those decisions you made you know to become the person. That is going to be dying in inshore day. which was a long winded way of saying that I think that those two movies. Are Related Right Right. Well, totally, and and I think this is kind of a a good a good moment to kind of go on a quick little tangent here and that I've seen a lot of articles that kind of point to this being like a perfect co vid moment movie you know and I mean, what do you? What do you think that like? Do you think that that that makes sense to To look at this movie and just that. I. Guess it's like a combination of of the you know the lack of connection and the the realization that that. You know things go bad at any moment. You know who knew that things could get this crazy like what do you think about that comparison? I think it's interesting and I know this has been talked about by by others but you know the film wasn't made you know during Cova time or for this specific time and so. Usually in my opinion when that happens, it ends up being much more relevant. At this film went will end up being. More relevant to Cova Times to to to living through pandemic than the COVID movies that come out in two to. Oh Yeah I think. It's tough to say because I personally am someone who gets. Not Necessarily freaked out about death with someone who definitely thinks about it like I think I think about sickness and death in those things you know on Tuesdays at one thirty am. which is just You know not a positive or negative thing is just. Something that I've grown to do over over the last. Six years as time has gone by and as I've continued to grow older. I, think it's a fine comparison to say that it's it's great for Cova Times I think. The biggest piece of sheet is tomorrow that relates in my mind is that idea that you can get sick at any time and not realize it right? I think that as we see all these people around us, you know some of us have lost family members. Some of us have lost friends an and. I was a most people at least know someone that's been in factors that's had been quarantined, and we all kind of feel the sense of loneliness, an isolation which is not really a part of the film that we've talked about tons but. It's definitely something that Amy Simon says I think trying to say about Loneliness and how these things lead you to really get inside of your head and being unsure of what's going to happen accident I think bat. A mixture of isolation and fear of the unknown. Is part of what's driving all of the. You know in all of our heads right now and it it multiplies it ally like when you were the combination of being isolated and anxiety you know they they multiply together when and it's like in the it's like in terms of sheet is tomorrow Jane Addams character I? Think her name is Jane I'm pretty sure You know she seemingly lives I'm somewhat alone she spends a lot of time. A basement looking at looking under a microscope. You know and and when you're doing that, let's say all day and you have the idea of dying tomorrow or the idea of those around you getting very, very sick. It's hard not to let that infect your mind when there's no one to talk. About it with you just kind of like by yourself, you're allowing these thoughts to infect your mind and you. Can't move one way or another, and so I think it's pretty incredible that this film comes out right now. And it's also terrifying to watch right now. Like nobody I mean like the horror I think were much better because. We are at a heightened state of. Anxiety around let's say sickness and death Well. Speaking anxiety in sickness and death I'm going to go with my last piece. Which is Charlie Coffman's two, thousand, eight film synthetic New York, which is I think masterpiece of those feelings and those ideas but but. I just think that the idea of just like. This movie isn't really like a hypochondriac kind of thing, but I mean it basically just this idea of like I'm sick and I'm going to die and I can't explain it but there's something wrong and that whole thing that the Philip Seymour Hoffman character has going on with him in synthetic. I think there's a definite parallel there Somebody given a certain set of circumstances could turn from a character in this movie into that character in that movie possibly I it's it's a it's a weird thing to explore for sure and an interesting link I. Think. That is absolutely I think an incredible pick. I- Nice. I saw that movie for the first time a couple months ago I had never seen it kind of missed it and it hit me like an absolute train I think especially a movie that works very very well, right now Yeah. I think that's such an interesting parallel I. It wasn't on my list for some reason I. I didn't really think about it but it's interesting to think about one person whose can feel that they're getting sick like he knows that he just doesn't really know what's wrong, right? Sure there's something there must be right. There must be something wrong. Yeah it's it's so interesting and he I like it also because I think the last fifteen minutes of. Have a huge parallel with this movie where you get to a certain point that you don't want the rest of everything you just kind of want to like sit. By Yourself in a room and you just want to know what's going to happen to you and what to do. Right. You know you know when when when it gets to that point in that film the characters and she dies tomorrow get's to get to a point where they just want to happen. You know they're just they already wait. Yeah. They don't WanNa. Wait around. There's like a definitely a a level of. Readiness to. And things are. End At least the waiting. Sure. Yeah. Absolutely. One of the thing I hadn't even thought of before I had it on my list but I I just thinking about it right? That's another kind of parallel is a thing with with she dies tomorrow that I found interesting is there's like little bits and pieces of those like abstract are things that we get as kind of like transition pieces in in the movie they're actually in the scene sometimes like as paintings in the rooms and stuff. Like that and so it kind of almost in a way is like a parallel to listen it's New York with the whole idea of him you know creating his whole existence within this play that he's making, and so there's like pieces of of Israel world blending in vice versa and not being able to tell where one thing stops and the other starts. Yeah I completely agree and I love that about Kaufman I think in general you know playing between those lines of reality and Imagination or just is this in someone's head or is this actually happening in real life and have you read an kind yet? I actually just started reading it a couple of weeks ago and I'm I'm about a hundred pages eight, hundred pages in? Totally off the deep ends the next hundred patients it feels like it's already headed there. So I I can't imagine. I've heard very interesting reviews. Were you a fan. I loved it because I I'm I'm on board for Anything Charlie Kaufman does but I can totally see how someone who is either not a fan or maybe like you know I, like some of his stuff would just they wouldn't even be able to make it through those first hundred to begin with and it only gets crazier from there. Yet feels like a pretty serious undertaking Especially when you buy the book originally, you just like by it and you're like, okay, I've seen some of coffins movies I know he's a pretty weird dude you know he's he's making things definitely Are One confusing to make you think very deeply about your own place in the world And so all right. Let's start this. You know six, seven, hundred page. Book, and just got to see what happens to her twenty pages in. You're like, okay. This is like I noticed that Charlie Kaufman like. Eating. Yeah, it's definitely a break heavy book. Oh Man. I'm so excited for his new movie. I can't even begin to tell you but. Before we give for too much further down that tangent Do you have any other that you wanted to squeeze in real quick before we finish this thing up? Yeah I got squeeze in one. one movie and TV show the film I want to squeeze in one I just saw take. It's it's I. think much less about death and much more just about like I think general anxiety about the state of the world and about the people around you and that's twenty seven film by Jeff Nichols with Michael Shannon and Jessica, chastain and I was just blown away by that movie. And I think that the way it deals with like hyper anxiety that builds up inside of you. so much that you are convinced that something is going to happen. Sure. Yeah. I love that comparison I hadn't even thought about that even though I I saw your tweets about movie and it still didn't kind of hit me. But yeah, you're absolutely right I, love that. Yeah, it's a weird relation. 'cause I think the movies are fundamentally quite different. Sure. No. But the lead character till what's happening inside of the lead characters actually might have some similarity absolutely handle. What's the TV show you wanted to bring up the TV show is the OA. I love. I love that show I. Think it's Just. Such an interesting feet of storytelling but the main reason why I thought of it is that. You know. Brit Marling WHO's the lead and Co creator of that show she convinces people of something I think very, very outlandish and something that really makes no sense to sure the naked eye which I feel is happening and she dies tomorrow you know I think it's it's about a character like this thing is going to happen you know or like this thing exists. Without much of any backing or without much of any proof. Or clues at this is going to happen and then people just being influenced enough to say, okay, I, believe you and now I am involved and I also feel those exact same things And so I just wanted to shouted out really quickly. Yeah. I like that it's like it's such a big leap for any of the other characters to take, but they jump right on in. Yeah. All right. Well, I will do the finish puzzle here and list off all the things we just talked about, and that includes it follows the happening final destination to dust the leftovers iheart Huckabee's perfect blue black swan squeeze in a few other Aronovski in there. repulsion. The Cure is plain song invasion of the body snatchers synthetic. New. York take shelter and the A. So I think we've got a lot of a lot of heavy movies on their. You know a lot a lot of interesting stuff obviously. That dread and then exiled he is something that is going to just obviously filter through any conversation about this movie any writing about this movie I mean that is that's that's what it is when it comes down to a and I I think it's a it's a very unique film and I I certainly enjoyed it quite a bit. Do you have any other like like kind of closing thoughts on anything we kinda didn't mention about the movie. I. Don't think. So I mean I. Think you pointed out there's been. A brutal. Conversation about grief and and and death, which I have quite enjoyed, which is an odd dichotomy there I do I do WANNA mention that. the use of colors which really isn't something that we touched on in terms of You know puzzle pieces are are linked movies but she dies tomorrow is I think a pretty. striking film to watch and I think it has Incredible use of color throughout it that's you've seen on the poster you've seen you know in in quick clips but to watch it with the music and and once you've lived with those characters for you know, even twenty thirty minutes Really puts you into an odd state of mind and so I had shot that and then I there is like a one pool shots, his a pool shots towards the end of she dies tomorrow that. Really has stayed with me with. Jane addams character. Jane. That I just thought was absolutely fantastic and like just that three to four seconds is something that has. Unfortunately been swimming in my mind, not not to use a a horrible pun. I like that. No I totally know what you're talking about there with that shy in. Yeah I mean definitely amazing USA Color and here I in that color that use of color along with what I talked about earlier, the use of music I think just really makes for a really cool visual experience with this movie Only. One other thing I wanted to mention Ed just really briefly is that the the main character when she died, she wants to be turned into a leather jacket, but we'll just have to save that for our next conversation. This movie. I. Can't believe it wasn't brought up. Shocked by that. Sorry guys you're GonNa have to wait for of this conversation for that. But this has been great Michael another movie you saw recently like to recommend to our listeners. Oh. That's tough. I have to recommend this. It just got back on net flicks safety not guaranteed. Seeing that always wanted to mark do plas Jay Johnson Aubrey Plaza. It's one of been one of my favorite movies for the last. Whatever. Since it came out decade or so and I just think it's so fantastic. It's a wonderful lovable film that includes a little bit of time travel and a little bit of weirdness and it's it's great. I you know I, think it's finally time I've always wanted to see that it just it looked great at the time I just never got around to it. But awesome. What do you tell people where they could find your work? Yeah. Definitely. You can find me on twitter at Peach fuzz critic. Hence why I currently have the mustache. For an audio experience. And I'll have a couple of reviews coming out on the film stage coming up and then I'm doing some math fantasia fast coverage as well for a few different outlets. So I should be coming out with quite a few articles over the next couple of weeks. Beautiful. Well, Hey, thank you so much for doing this and I I would love to have you back sometime if you're ever interested in doing the whole puzzle piece again. Yeah definitely I'd love to come back for a happier. More enjoyable film. Could plan one that one that's not completely ruining our sleepless nights for for the weeks leading up at. Thank you so much for having me. Appreciate it. Hey, guys I'm Sarah and I'm Stephanie and we're the hosts of dead time stories. Dead time stories with Z. is a weekly podcast where we tell you stories of ghosts, haunting mysteries, conspiracies, the supernatural paranormal, the generally eerie spooky and all around. Weird if you like scary stories. Witty. Banter and Classy broads where your goals. GALS. Some of our stories include eastern state penitentiary. talked. The Gettysburg Dine Museum they relate shows starts at five Mr President, you make you by. Seventy he was like, thank you I. For this land. So the Americans burn down there for their like. This. To philly. And more. New episodes are posted Thursdays at midnight on Itunes soundcloud, Google play, and stitcher listen and subscribe rate and review. Today. All right. So I. Hope you enjoyed the conversation about she dies tomorrow. Thank you to Michael Frank for joining me on the show great conversation and If you enjoyed this episode of piecing together, make sure you are subscribed on your podcast app choice where of course, on Apple podcasts spotify stitcher tune in radio podcast, all the big podcast APPS, and if you listen to podcasts somewhere and we're not there let me know I'll make sure to get there and you can, of course, also rate and review us on Apple podcasts or Pod chaser you could follow us on social media at Piecing pod showing our facebook group popcorn and puzzle pieces and check out our Patriot on our Patriot on. Under my name produced by David. Rosen because it includes content from my music career as David Rosen, and then also from all the podcasts I work on including, piecing it together all rice beans awesome movie here, and we don't have any bird road content on their put maybe we should one of these days but anyway, check the Patriot lots of great stuff on there and coming up this month in. September. We're GONNA have a lot of music related stuff because I've got a new album coming out in. October. So I am very much looking forward to sharing some new stuff with you guys. But for now, let's dig back into the. Dreaded of this, she dies tomorrow movie with one of my darkest tracks a piece that I put out as a single for Halloween last year it is called stocker and I'm sure I probably played it right around the time I, put it out but that would have been the last time. So it's good to dig back to this track and play you something that's nice and dark with a lot of impending doom within the feeling of the tracks. So again, this is called stocker. It's available as a single on itunes on spotify on all those places enjoy it, and we'll be back with more piecing it together coming up real soon. Why All points West production produced by David. Rosen in LAS. Vegas.

Jane Addams Aronovski Apple Iheart Huckabee David Black Swan. Matthew Broderick WanNa facebook Michael Frank Michael David Robert Mitchell Amy Simon Michael Frank Charlie Kaufman David Rosen Cure Cova Times California
Social Justice Lessons from Roger Williams by Dr. Lisa VanHoose

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

1:11:22 hr | 3 months ago

Social Justice Lessons from Roger Williams by Dr. Lisa VanHoose

"Retail pt drink. Beer recorded craft beer for years. This is the p. t. Podcast let us jomon good morning and welcome to my living room. Hi i'm dreaming. Mckay hosted pine cast a very special broadcast. This morning usually not much. Pt podcasting before noon. Today would make an exception here on november seventh helping out with the new england. Regional virtual conference excited four states coming together almost like voltron to make this great online learning experience. we've got connecticut. We've got new hampshire governor's island massachusetts coming together and no stranger to that. Arrangement is mighty not little not not small but mighty rhode island chapter president. Michelle college joining some show. Michelle there you are. Good morning jimmy. And it's great to see you. This morning brian early and we hung out last night. We did a live episode last night when we got to talk about some of the things that you'll be talking about today and for maybe people who are watching on the social media channels. We will say right now broadcasting by the facebook pages of via facebook pages of abt rhode island new hampshire massachusetts connecticut. So hello to everybody out there. If you're watching. I always like to make sure like. Is this thing on like dropping the comments below whether you're watching on facebook on youtube on twitter where you are geographically. This goes along the lines of what we're talking about last night. Michelle survey your audience. Right now. i can see that we have eighty five people live with that. I don't know who they are so like. Just let us know you physical therapist physical therapist assistant you student academic research tell us about you in the comments below and just let us know you watching this live. You're watching the replay. Same question But an exciting experience You know when. I found out about this This conference i was like that makes complete sense with a bunch of states coming together pooling resources and just making a better online experience kudos for you and the other three chapters for doing that. Well thank you. Jimmy and i do hope listeners. Out there Lit themselves non. Jimmy see it coming along. But i said come on rhode island's show them how i see. You know your from show. That rhode island isn't a tiny little state here and that were bigger and better than the others just for a little fun competition. You gotta you gotta. Sp from rhode island already jumping on aaron from rhode island. Mike guineans in connecticut. But how great is this. I mean we just saw. Abc's national student conclave. Not really break records. I mean rewriting the record book in terms of attendance for the national student. Conclave online shattering attendance when take geography out of the way. When we're not together blaming. I blame a guy who likes to go to conferences michelle. I like to be in the same room with people. We can't do that right now. But we're saying well what can we do. I think that's such a physical therapy profession thing which is focused on what we can do. And what we can do is get together in this way and learn and utilize technology in leverage it. And we're we're seeing that in physical embodiment of this of this event. It's great and it allows us to get out of our silos. I mean i traditionally am a very much appeared private practice. pt and because of this environment. I've become a much more holistic learner and hearing about reading and cardiovascular pulmonary side of things listening tara is see therapists and then getting into things such as population health and listening to lisa. Today i think overall it will ultimately how proficient be much bidder providers at healthier. Because we won't be silent. This is just my people in the kind of p t i know about so. It's like it's making lemonade. Out of limits belting time and i think sometimes we feel a little bit guilty when we look into great opportunities as can't gimmick as created but. We need to have the courage to do that. Otherwise you're just going to go downhill. I mean taking out of the equation. Obviously but also time. So we're gonna drop in the comments below if you're watching this on facebook and you're saying what are they talking about with this new england virtual conference. I'm not from new england. It's okay because if you're watching this right now you can access the content And what you're saying is being able to get out of the silos. The conference is gonna be live today all day long today and again we're gonna drop the the link in the comments below so you can access that but if you can't watch all the presentations today. Because he got something. It's going to be available for long time right. It's available through the end of january. And i woke up this morning and it seemed to be seventy degrees today. Which seems a little absurd since there was a couple of inches of snow on the ground last week. But that's new england So yeah please stay. As long as you can today engage but also go back and listen to the other presentation is going to be back and gleaming so ahmet commute home when you're stuck on a saturday night because his curfew flinton listen to jane baldwin. My friend day from massachusetts. He's going to be speaking about. Tallahassee listened to my eyes and half us talking about population and these things will help you be more from sewing career and provide your patience. I think i just gave her a new nickname right in mighty rhode island. I that jayme wants to know when the keynote speaker lisa vanhoose is going to begin the do right. I just wanted to make sure people can get rich. Give a second kind of set the stage. I will say this. We do want to let people know questions or comments usually in the middle of a presentation. You'd never raise your hand and ask a question of drop a comment working encourage that right now. Knowing that lease it will be able to get to the core of the questions or comments after she's done we're not gonna interrupt her ideas or thought process but please in the middle of that throws below i'll be monitoring those in the background along with our producer juliette And if we have some time least we'll be able to dig into those. I always like to hear comments and questions from the audience so no that that is possible. No matter what platform you're watching so Without further. I'm gonna get out of your way so we can get lisa on out here so Michelle feel for The status shorts. Thank you so much jamais and good morning to everyone About three years ago. I was at a conference cram stations and i three or four years ago and this woman got up to speak. Who's a little shorter than may and But she hit because voice and was able to communicate some really profound ing facts and things that i hadn't thought about such as the impact of zip code on your house and i mean you can even google it and say depending on my zip code if i live where i live. I'm gonna let him stevens. Where if i lived in new york. I'm on the term eighty in. Us found founded information. Profound and i found the way. That lisa vanhoose how she communicated this extraordinary amazing and i was like who is this woman i wanna know who she is and so i do go her and i kinda stole turn a little bit and this year has been like a punch in the face for all of us we've had to deal with the pandemic and the house disparities that go with that. We're constantly reminded when we go to conferences that the majority of people look like nate. You'd have patience. Look all different kinds of colors ages backgrounds all of that. And then we've had to deal with. George floyd and we've had to deal with an election is being an extremely stressful here. But i think it's been a year that we've been basically punched in the face to. Hey look we have to deal with the challenges that lie with diversity equity and inclusion and as we thought to bring together this conference we thought who could speak about this and the first person that came to my mind was lisa. Vanhoose son really excited today to hip. Lisa vanhoose seek to us. She is associate professor and the director of the physical therapy department. Down in university of louisiana monroe. Which is awesome because at name she has a very different exit to not just may to all of you here in new england and she's a board certified and oncological physical therapy and she's a whole host of credentials which you can go and read because that really profound and she's done an amazing amount of work and advocacy in the areas of racism. The areas in health disparities and being very influential in those areas. So i couldn't be more excited to introduce and welcome to my rhode island as well as wonderful massachusetts beautiful new hampshire and cutting each connecticut. The one and only lisa vandross low every morning morning in. I am so excited to year. I'm talking with you. And i am thankful for the opportunity to your space in time with you. So today's presentation is we're gonna be talking about social justice lessons that we can learn from roger williams and so although it is the virtual northeast conference. I'm we are going to recognize some other regions that might be participating in so just like jimmy said you know in the chat if you're from the south there if you are up early early this morning from california put that in the chat and let us know where you're from so we know what regions are represented. But i will admit today. We're going to give a lot of privilege to the northwest. Because we're gonna talk a lot about their history. And so i wanna start off with just saying thank you to the components to connecticut. Massive -chusetts new hampshire rhode island for inviting me to participate right. Y'all because there are eight billion people in on the planet. so that means that they're eight billion voices in so. I am excited. That you allow us to be amplified but i will be the first to admit that my voice comms with the knowledge that is from my family. My mentors in my friends right. So i want you to also remember that every time you step into a room you step into that room as if not more in so today i am stepping up to speak with you based on model experience also. I'm the wisdom that i've gathered from others in so i wanted to start talk off with a quote from teddy roosevelt. So i'm a huge history teddy like us history fan. And i love teddy roosevelt and so teddy talks about the more you know about your pass the better prepared you are for the future right and so for this for this northeast consortium. Your pass is so rich but with that history. There is also a challenge to you. There is a responsibility for each of you right and although it is massachusetts in rhode island and connecticut new hampshire everyone. That's from this northeast region. Your path almost says the chew. I have a responsibility that at times may be greater than some of us from the other regions because you were birth from those original thirteen colonies. Right you are walking those cobblestone streets that our founding fathers and mothers in other person's walked right so because i'm not just gonna leave it up to the men. We are a hundred percent sure that women had a role to play in. This just might not have been documented but we know we were there but you come from this richness in so because of that we are going through this talk and talking about social justice in talking about one of our forgotten forefathers. I want you to think about the fact that you are there. In the birthplace of america in how much responsibility you have to your communities and also to the nation not just as physios but as he minutes as americans and we are in an amazing place. Right now to really say okay. How are we going to create the next future for ourselves and also for our children. And so anytime i get ready to talk. Y'all the anybody i go in. I do the same thing. Michelle sits michelle. Says she kinda stopped me. I stocked her to write and i stopped jar a little bit because always wanna know who. I'm talking to because even though it's a presentation it's still an intercultural exchange Because i want to know what you you know. Kinda what history is what your values are on because i want to make sure that when we had this conversation that there's something you get out of it because i can't give you your talent back this morning instill in going around the internet in finding out more about your four states. Some of the things that i found out was that connecticut your motto is he who has transplanted still sustains and i was like there is a heartedness in a consistency in resilience to that. And so those of you. That are from connecticut. If you feel like yeah that's us. Put something in the czech represent your state because you had this powerful motto. This is nowhere. It does not matter where i met. I will sustain an infant massachusetts. This would be massachusetts model right so by the sword. We're going to seek peace but peace only under liberty but just true massachusetts way. It's body sword. Were common to fight. Were ready to defend. And then for new hampshire new hampshire just kept it simple. They said there's two things we either on live free. Are we going die. Those are the two choices we either on live in live fully and freely or just which we just found that end in the last one is rhode island so mighty rhode island in so mighty rhode island's motto is just one word just hope instill i loved getting into your history and finding out more out. Why have you had these different models in. Who were your founding fathers and mothers and persons and so then. I am a sucker for good word cloud gel so i put all these words in a word clad in what kept popping up. Was this piece right. So the intensity of the term peace. And so then i was like i wonder you know when we start thinking about peace and justice had those things intertwined and i think as michelle talked about. We are in on. Precedents is so we're dealing with covid. Nineteen were dealing with an election that is never ending. We're dealing with racial reckoning. Were dealing with poverty on employment if he could all on us at one time it is here and so i was like you know for especially if massachusetts that has piece built into its model. Unlike what does peace look like. Now you know. What would those founding fathers of massachusetts say peace was and so i found this great quote from jane addams it so jane addams. Although she's not from your region she is an amazing leader are was So she was a social worker that fought for the rights of women and children and what you see her saying he or she says that true peace is not merely the absence of war. So here had people from massachusetts put down for a minute truffes not merely the accents of war it is the presence of justice and so i started reflecting on this saying how are we. Pt profession a group of pt's pta students. How are we helping ourselves in our up in others to have this presence of peace which only occurs through justice and i started thinking about my own activities. I started thinking about us as a society. And i'm like what is the role we are playing as a profession to make sure that there is justice for all in so i wanna make sure that we are working from the same definition because this is important because some are thinking. I'd do justice all day right. I don't get anybody else's way and let them do what they wanna do. I'm not taking anything from no one. I'm not stealing anything from anybody. That's not what justice. So if you look at this definition justice says that there has to be a constant in a firm wheel so that constant is it. Just when you're in the clinic from eight to five in you provide services or when you do your pro bono. Care on monday and wednesday afternoons. It says it is constant. So that means that you when you drive past that neighborhood that you didn't want to live in and you ignore it been you've lost your consistency. Justice says that it is constant and firm in there is a wheel or an intention it is not pass it in the next part of this says that it is to give human persons there do and with that giving people there do that is the equity that we talk about because giving someone there do means that i see you. I'm not colorblind. i'm not gender balon. I'm not national blind. I've seen who you are. And i i embrace you when i get to know you when i learn what you need so that i can give you do because without me embracing you building relationships with you really listening to you. I might give you equality. Which often what. That is. What i think you need but justice says i will give you your do then. It also talks about how they didn't empowers all people right in empowers all human persons to respect the rights that are inherent in every human person. So if you're from the northeast region should be languishes. Speaks to your heart right. 'cause that's sounds like founding documents that it is inherent in every human person in stipulated by society in so we know that it is supposed to be Stipulated by our american society what i challenge us is pt communities to really think about are we stipulating by our by the rules and behaviors within our pt side. Are we just giving it. Lives service or are we truly saying. We are going to hold each other accountable to this definition of justice because justices also gonna require you to remove the axles to peace in his. Not is your piece it is also the piece of others and then it goes on the about how it rewards those who respect human dignity in punishes those who sabotaged peace and i will say that is where we have forgotton who we are in a may even be a question for you. There in the northeast region. Because you would birth from this place that said this is these are the principles right. We hold these truths to be evident in what we're seeing right now is that we have flip this right so we are punishing those that respect human dignity dignity were not being. Connie each other. Were making fun of each other. Were harding each other right now but we are lifting up those that are sabotaging peace and saying that looks great. That is the definition of winning. And i don't care which side of this political thing you are on right now. We are not being good. Missed each other and so as you think about this. P. t. standpoint ask yourself how are you embracing in empowering yourself in other ways to contribute towards justice in the united states or within your community and then when you put that adjective of social justice on it it takes it to the next level because justice talks about these in haired rights that we have social justice says that we also are going to acknowledge the fact that there needs to be equal access to wealth opportunities and privileges and i will say that again. Equal access that's social justice in some people will automatically see these terms in we'll go socialism does not with say it didn't say i was communist. Take your stuff in distributed amongst everyone what it said was. I'm not going to get in your way of getting access to being able to generate wealth opportunities for your family in your community and also to have privileges and so when you think about social justice i started looking around your websites right so i told you did the same thing that michelle did now. Stock in y'all in each component had some language in there bell we are going to defend the profession. We will promote the profession. And i was like that is good right. 'cause all y'all need to eat so you need a paycheck so that was a good thing but then i also started to think. Okay so yes we need to defend. Our rights in that is very much a newark east region culture. But i also wanted to know what else are we doing. And so then. I started looking deeper into your missions and your visions and your values and i want to remind you a reminding of the promise that you gave the public in in these promises that you gave. The public were so rooted in justice in social justice so for some of the websites that talked about. We are going to inspire engage in empower you to reach your potential. That's an access issue. You're saying we are here to help you get the access that you need based on what you feel like is due to you. It said you were going to advocate for the needs. Right of those we serve you. Were going to restore health wellness and wellbeing to the public. You were going to optimize. The health of all populations not just the populations look like you but all populations not just the ones you have an affinity with magical warns you bike with not just the ones you go to whole foods with. Not just the ones you worshiped with but all populations and then you once again talked about that advocating for access to care and so when you think about those promises that you may with the communities that you serve and when you think about the footsteps that you are following. I want you to ask yourself this so this is one of my favorite. Statements is is if you could see your ancestors all standing in a row. Would you be proud of them or not or don't you really know but here's another question which requires a different view. If you could need your ancestors would they be proud of you. And so we're going to take a minute in reflect on neck when you think about the The roots from which you come would those ancestors look at what you are doing in your life how you are contributing to your community to the profession in would they say yes you are you. Are you know following in our footsteps. You are continuing his legacy of greatness this legacy of peace in liberty and freedom for all najib's just yourself or for some of us. Would they say that. We have drifted from our mission and took that freedom just freedom for isolated few and so in my reflection on the started really diving into roger williams. And i'm in love with him. And i'm gonna tell you this after like. I got gypped history because i had no clue of the rich history near within rhode island and so roger williams was born roughly around sixteen o. Three and Is considered were. There is no considering. He is the father of rhode island. It's so there were five basic principles. By which roger williams lived his life in these are five principles of social of social justice. And we're gonna talk about them briefly as we talk about them. I'm gonna give you a little history lesson about roger in for those of you. Who know roger. You've got extra fats. Drop them in the chat. Because i am a novice in regards to roger williams but he like in my top ten his. He was pretty amazing. So the things we're gonna talk about our access equity diversity -ticipant action in human rights and as we talk about these things in talk about how roger embodied them were also talk about some opportunities within each of your state on for you to think about his pt's and pta's in students and so under this first one of access. I'm going tell. Roger story on backwards so because of some life events that occur wider ends up fanning. What's known as providence plantation. Which then goes on to become rhode island and so what was awesome about providence plantation. Was it was known as a place for the liberty of cautious. It so in his mind what he wanted was he wanted a place where you could be authentically you in. That was the whole for the founding of it was because he felt like the church was in such a way that it was encroaching on the freedoms of others and so he created a place where you could have religious freedom. Because if i had to describe roger i would say he was like a little bit republican or democrat and a whole lot of independent and it was just some goodness in. It's just a great model of how that there's a beauty when we can see the perspectives of both. Because he was a huge bannon proponent and advocate of religious freedom but then he also spoke about the social injustices at the time instill in providence plantation. There was he abolished the witchcraft droughts Rid of debt imprisonment right. In also in rhode island mighty rhode island. That was the first state to have a law that abolished slavery. Although it was temporary it was two hundred years before the emancipation proclamation. That was how ahead of time rhode island is so if your rhode island shout-out to y'all shoutout to rhode island in so roger williams showed as early on that you could create a place where everyone could be sales and it's still be productive both economically and socially and would allow for there still to be capitalism that the two things don't have to be exclusive have to violate each other when we talk about access. I wanna present some numbers to you So that we can bring this to the current times. And so what you see on this. Slide is some data on this is from massachusetts so europe first mighty massachusetts so what we're looking at his. We're looking at the cities with the lowest median household income and they were looking at the cities with the highest income median household income. Were looking at your covid. Nineteen cases her ten thousand people in. You can see the disparities right even before. We started talking about racial and ethnic demographics that there is a correlation between covid nineteen cases in income levels. Now the next piece of data that you see in this slide has three columns. The first column is the population for that city. The second column is the number of physical therapy clinics or physio. Clinton's and i will be so. Let me tell you the assumptions in that number. So i took your city. I put it in google maps. I looked at the boundaries in than i did a search for physio or physical therapy clinics and i can't at them and then the third column that you see is extrapolated a number that look at the number of clinics Two thousand persons. And the reason why i picked it. Two thousand is because if we're going to take the lessons from our past and start thinking about how that's gonna affect our future the future for. pt is. we're trying to move the primary care right. We're trying to make that argument and also show our value. As primary care providers. And so when you look at the national and county health ranking data those counties and states that tend to be considered good health primary care provider somewhere between one that one no one thousand nine thousand persons and so i took that two thousand To come up with the data today and so what you see here. Is that in most of these cities. Where on the person's have a lower income. They are decreased access to physical therapy clinics but then a pop up the data in regards to those higher income households and so in the chat. Tell me what you see are made the same. So you see how that in that lower. Those lower median household incomes. We're at point. Three three clinics per two thousand persons but in some of these higher income on cities. We're almost at a clinic in half for twelve thousand people were up here. We've got cds. That have two hundred twelve people in their point one clinics for every two thousand people. You cannot tell me that. That's that's not an access issue in. You cannot tell me that the northeast region cannot better. You are the birthplace of a nation. You can start another clinic somewhere overnight if y'all wanted to now the neck social principle that we're gonna talk about his equity in this is where failing love would roger because water was courageous enough to have an argument a flat out. We gonna take our earrings off with some vassil. Lean on our face argument with the king and also his peers about the fact that they could not come in and just take land from the native americans. He was like i will not stand forward. It is not just not fair in. That was actually what led to him. later on. having to found Rhode island was because of these ongoing arguments about colonization imperialism and so even when roger went on to purchase providence plantation. He gave he negotiated with the native americans for a fair and reasonable price in the remember. I told you the first. I was around abolishing slavery. Here's the other i. It was the first legal deed ray. I'm like a barrage of williams was ahead of his time. And so when you think about equity in this concept of land rights then you have to take this conversation of social justice. Red lining in so ran lining was a process was a practice that was started in the forties in what it was was that Bankers appraisers would lower undervalue african american Sometimes irish communities where they would say that the property value was a third to a half of maybe that same property in what would be considered a white neighborhood and so what you see here is they would give them a rating of c or d and because of that redlining practice you might not be able to get a mortgage so then you would maybe have to continue renting or if you owned a house you might not be able to get a mortgage to do renovations to improve your property and you were able to have that access to wealth generation writing social justices about access because instead of your house going up you know teen twenty percent might only go up one percent and so the reason why ran lining is still hot conversation. A day is what you see. Here is a red lining map from providence rhode island in the next slide talks about rhode island economic inclusion form in this form which was just held a year ago still talking about the consequences of brand line from nineteen forty because in many of those neighborhoods that were given a c. d. that were inhabited by persons of color or persons from lower income those neighborhoods then became places where there were increased environmental exposures to toxins. A lot of those houses have significant lead exposure. Which is dan impacting. The children and so the state of rhode island has developed in initiative where they are trying to address these homes and create. What's called a healthy home in. So if you are from rhode island as a p. t. a. p. t. a. student. This is an opportunity for you to get into this conversation to get out of your clinic in actually be part of a community solution to improve the health and wellness and some of you are like their time your mouth home renovation. And you're talking about healthy houses have does that fit in p. T. if you look the definition that they're using the definition of healthy home. It is one that is marked. Not only by the access of health and safety the ritz in a built environment but it is also one that nourishes physical is ical mental social in environmental wellbeing. And so if there is a conversation going on about the physical space in about movement you as pt's pta's a student's needs to be in that conversation in those of you that are in rhode island. This is going on now. In his been there have been funds earmarked to it. A near is a very robust strategic plan about it. But i'm like i was going through. Their documents had couldn't find one. Pt that was involved in so this may be opportunity for the rhode island Component to step up and step into the space and partner with this community and so then the the next social justice principle is diversity in loved roger williams term of soul liberty. This concept of. I don't care who you are. I just want your soul to be able to be free and we are going to create a space where your personality right so that external person that you show up as can be in alignment with your soul because so often what we do is we create spaces that say you can only come if you act or if you look a certain way in roger was like no the soul has to be free in the personality should be a manifestation of that seoul and even when he did the of rhode island. One of the things that they did was in their governance was issue. Were a on the hunt that homeowner or the the head of household you had voting rights in. It was even true for women right early on in our history. Roger williams said no. If you meet this qualification. I do not care with your sexual orientation is i do not care what your gender expression is. You have this right. He was just a wonderful model of how to do. Both you know fiscal responsibility along with freedom and so this is one of my on quotes. That i really adore in in doing my research about him was he said that. forced uniformity confound civil and religious liberties and denies the principle of christianity and civility. And he says no man. We don't add woman or person she'll be required to worship or maintain a worship against his will so he spoke this message of. We don't have to be the same and so when you think about that. The fact that he embraced in value diversity. I started been looking at some of the diversity. Data related to education. Because i'm not gonna go down the five hundred different ways. We can talk about the lack of diversity in pt. I'll touch on a little bit but not a lot but ultimately starts early on it starts upstream. It starts in pre k. It starts in first and second grade. Will we start to see these black. And white education gaps. We can even say black white brown education gaps in so connecticut europe. Now we talked to massachusetts. We've talked about rhode island but in connecticut there is conversation about the inequities in education and so some of the data that's being talked about as factor that suspension rates in connecticut are four times higher for black students than white students. Absentee rates are higher the access to advance those ap classes those Classes are significantly different an having access to a teacher that is same race issue or racially concordant Data's not an opportunity. That black students have as much in connecticut in so you might be like what lisa i'm a. Pt talk about k. Through twelve education because the pt profession number one will not diversify until we address the academic gap. The number two is because you have privilege right because you are. Pt you make a higher income. Your children are probably in a different educational setting user privilege to ask. Why ask your principal. Is there something we could do to have. More teachers have feller. Look at the data in regards to how your school is handling suspensions absentee rates access to gifted and talented in. If you notice that it's all white kids than ask the question. Why if you notice that it's all kids from one neighbor. Who asked the questions why sometimes justice starts with nothing more than asking why that may be all of the social justic all led the civic work that you have to do is just by asking that question and so then the next principle of social justices participation so Williams was known for his peaceful relationships with native americans in what was fascinating about. This was it wasn't just that he was cordial right because for some of us were like i'm nice to everyone. He took it to the next level because yes he was cordial and he is respectful but remember he was an advocate. He wanted an ally he was downright accomplice. Where he's fighting for their land rights he also took it upon himself to learn their language so that there would be a language barrier so that he could actually leaning in and speak with them in their native language and bill community with them. So it's not just about being nice remembered. It's about the constant in that firm wheel in intention in roger embodied that he embodied that in his relationships with others. Now i will admit though this peaceful relationship that he has with native americans actually becomes part of the demise because asked tensions increased in the region. He had to make a decision between this relationship with the native americans and with on persons from from the colonies. And so what happened. Was he decided to go with the colonies in so that law that they had polishing slavery that log went away The native americans were enslaved. Many of them died from disease and other illnesses in end in rhode island actually started participating heavily in the african slave trade and so there are times where our spirit in our wheel is really good and then we get to this work in the road. Where the peer pressure becomes so much that we violate those very relationships that we sent we honor in that was in. It's it's sad me. Because i knew that that was probably one of the things that roger Most likely regretted in his story. Because he had lived this life of equity inequality but then he. He made this really difficult choice. That ended up somma data suggests it might have resulted in embellishing almost eighty to ninety percent of the indigenous population. There in so as we think about these peaceful relationships in if we're going that put a modern day spin on that. We're gonna put in new hampshire on the hot seat now and so what you see in this. Big boxes that New hampshire has some implicit bias. That activists say is kind of percolating in brewing under the surface in. Although new hampshire is ninety to ninety five percent caucasian the numbers are starting to trend in regards to increases in minority on percentages. And and the route that we see really expanding is the hispanic population right. Activists are concerned that if there is not an effort to talk about on this kind of underlying cultural tension that that may actually be a barrier to those numbers increasing. In some of you are like well. You know it is what it is. It's the survival of the fittest. But in new hampshire. Businesses are starting to talk about the lack of diversity in new hampshire in how that there are certain businesses. That are not a making the decision to not come to new hampshire because of the lack of diversity Because there's just this condoms monoculture of whiteness there in new hampshire and so much harsh us. Pt's and pta's think about okay. What is your contribution to that in new hampshire so there's about twelve hundred and fifty p. Pt's on their new hampshire in that pool. The data in regards to professional demographics of the schools. So we've got franklin pierce university. that's however about ninety two percent caucasian and then plymouth is about ninety percent caucasian in so based on these numbers. Were not going to change the demographics of new hampshire so the pt profession really is not helping the community address this issue of their whiteness and possibly the negative impacts on economic development and then river valley. I wanna make sure. I give a shoutout to you. I couldn't find your ta program demographics but it says at your school is about eighty four percent in regards to student population in this is typically what we see in the p. t. a. p. t. world is that there's more diversity within our pta ranks but unfortunately we have yet to figure out as a profession how to get more pathways available for pta's that so choose to be dpt's. I'm so that as a challenge that maybe the schools there in new hampshire could start thinking about. Who would we create some more alternative pathways for pta's to become dpt's who'd you start looking at some holistic emission. Maybe some other innovative strategies to get these numbers trending downward in the reason being is because this is what. The current demographics of new hampshire is about ninety three percent caucasian. But as i said. You're minority numbers are starting to trend upward in if you are going to talk about all the goodness of liberty and freedom in you also gotta stop and think about the fact that if you do not address. The lack of diversification of the workforce you are taking a freedom away from patients in clients who might want a therapist who looks like them in. India just seems counterintuitive to the very nature of who you are in so i. I challenge you to figure out ways. In which to address the workforce issue there in so then with the last principal of social justice. We're gonna get to the very beginning of roger story where he was being in sixteen thirty six. And that's what led to the founding of rhode island and he was being used for what people thought were these new in dangerous opinions and so i hope that each of us will be able to lean in to social justice. Be able to be okay with saying we're going to be a little dangerous right. You're going to embody a little john. Lewis lowell necessary trouble because when you think about our founding fathers roger williams these were people that were okay with being courageous in a little dangerous in realize that there might be a consequence to it in that. We don't all have to conform because when we conform we are not being our best selves in. This is a quote from roger himself. That says the greatest crime is not developing your potential. When you do what you do best. You're not only helping yourself but also the world in so i come back to that. Promise that each of your components may right to advocate to restore to optima is to inspire into engage. But i will say that. I love those promises but when i look at your sites when i boo goo and tried to figure out okay. What are they doing that. Aligns with these very beautiful missions associated with justice in social justice it was hard to find the action items in so it is possible that you are doing a lot of really good work. I saw some things about peachy day of service. But i asked that you be a little more intentional about it right that you have that constant infirm wheel in that. You're able to articulate that in your activities that you are accountable to that because we have all s. Pt's taken this oath that we are going to live with his vision of transforming society but to transform society. I've got to be able to know what was the baseline. where did you start in. Then where you at in that as the gap. That is the gap that i see right now in the way in which we all right in so in closing i just want to remind you of the five principles access equity diversity participation in human rights and i want to remind you that you are walking in legacy of amazing humans in what you see on. The right side is unanswered prayer. So sorry yaw in it says i look within my soul for those who created me. I am not just the boy. The woman the child the sister the person i am a soul just working everything out the wisdom. I was born with his been lost in my upbringing at asked my ancestors to guide me protect me and support me as i ve all to allies or soul. So we're going to acknowledge the work that we are doing because we realize we are all in earth school in trying. Ask yourself. have you lost something in your vision. As a component as a pt as a pta as a student as a human and then can you lean back upon your ancestors in their wisdom for that evolution. You take you to the next level because history cannot give us a problem for a program for the future but it can give us a fuller understanding of ourselves in our common humanity so that we can better face the future and so as pt's. I think we need to stop. Especially those in rhode island and connecticut massachusetts in new hampshire. And remember where you came from. Remember the calling that is within your roots. And then really ask yourself. How are you going to answer that and be responsible for that for the profession. Yes promote ourselves but also for the larger on population. How can we build a better future for all our right jimmy. I'm don ramblin party. Louder louder cheering. We'd like to show your appreciation for lisa and her time and information and your words in the comments and just seeing at least there's a little bit of a delay twenty thirty seconds if you don't seem think for a couple of seconds that's what it is or people are probably just clapping at their keyboards. Right there Lisa some of the Some of the comments monitoring those a lot of the a lot of them were re iterating the that you had had share terrace and Thanks so much and julia modique is well. Make how we doing So feel to drop the comments whether you're watching this presentation or listening to this presentation live or recorded One question that did come in was Was was steph. Y rocks was asking about redlining and this might be a little bit deeper. Some more in research for she was asking really redlining. Being a product of the roosevelt administration. Do you know the the policy conversations that went on our went on during this. He was known for his positive social policies. How this fall through the cracks might not be in your scope but you might have come across it since you were doing a deep dive in this. Yes so how it fell through. The kratz was because it was so woven into the banking industry. It was one of those that it was too weak to break apart in they could not come to agreement on how to dismantle this system in. That's why it's still actually Hard of our our banking system today if you actually go into a bank and look at their data you will see that Black and brown communities communities of lower socioeconomic levels are still being undervalued based on these ran lining principles. It's deal with is quite active in our our current system. I didn't learn about the school at any. I didn't learn about this school. And you know there are people within our society who are actively trying to prevent different viewpoints and to our education. I like tactics because it's one thing to be inspired i can't keep up with all the comments Which shows a lot of the. The audience was inspired and saint. Thanks so much but one of the tactics. I liked that you share. Which is i won't say easy to do. I'll say completely within our more realm of possibility our scope of practice our duty as humans is Sometimes justice starts with nothing more than asking why and repeatedly asking why and then. I would say and thoughtfully waiting for an answer. And if you can't hear a good one that says a lot. I think jimmy i learned from you where the different places i mean you mentioned within schools and and i think for good reason right if you wanna look upstream. You gotta look downstream at the students and where they're coming from Where some other places that we should be asking. Why lee said i. Schools is very important because children. Our future not to quote a song lyrics there but l. Let them lead the web. Where where some other different places that we can we the audience listening right now. The profession physical therapy people who want to see change or different places. We could be asking. Why so i would say wolf framing around around a movement. So it's if you've got a client that you're like i want you to get on walk plan so think about you. Know what is their walkability in their community. Each of you can go in. Gula what's called the walks four and you put in your clients address in. It'll tell you you know how walkable is their community if there's complete sidewalk systems right so You wanna look at physical activities faces. You wanna look at greenspaces. Wanna look at nutrition you know where the food desert it within your communities and could you partner with the community to help address those. Where are the rehab desserts. So we have to take some ownership over the fact that we have created some injustices or regards to access which was the data was talking about Also because of who we are we are animals so we liked to be with our drives but push back on that a little bit right because we live in these very insulated bubbles and so you tend to worship in live in educate with the same people. Get out of your bubble students to do it. That's uncomfortable though. It is but we need the uncomfortable right otherwise there will be no change. We know that about exercise human physiology. Why would we think otherwise. These things mimic each other michelle. Kelly and i were talking last night about communication and and physical therapy paralleling each other. I think if you look deep enough most things will parallel each other. They really will. If you look close enough right everything just repeats it. Life is all about matters. But i i agree with you. Though everything comes back to wolff's law you need a little tension for growth good tension right juma much. We breakdown right. There's the parallel again. Not enough and you get nothing but not enough in too much. Bad and julia brings up a tactic. Why aren't our association website producing languages of all of our communities. Why why aren't the websites. If i can't access information why would. I ever consider physical therapy an option. I don't understand this. Therefore i reject it i will look elsewhere now. I totally agree in. That is just one decision away right so a lot of these. Things are just want choice away but a lot of times. It's just the The traditions and we've always done things a certain way in because we lack diversity in our leadership we don't we sometimes forget to look with the beginners. I in say who might be saluting that you say that it's always been this way. Great radio segue kayla just. I've found barriers in schools. Clinics center can be as simple as. Oh but that's how it's always been it makes the well why well why so powerful A lot of times this this could show a parallel between innovation a lot of times innovation stifled and it could be something as most as as julia chiming and say. Hey why aren't association websites producing languages. Sometimes it's a lot of people looking around like. Is this my problem to solve. Like i don't want and sometimes it can be imposter syndrome. Will i can't enough to solve this could i. And that's why i'm not or is this. I don't want to step out. Am i stepping on toes here and doing that. Yeah which goes back to your asking. Why is it like this. And then when enough people look around and go. We don't have a good answer as to why this is like this but it could be like this. And that's what. I think the group think can say okay. Well we should change this kind of like when they do that undercover. Tv show where they put people in uncomfortable situations to watch how they Nunez anthony nunez and watch how they react a lot of times i think innovation can sometimes be stifled simply because our human psychology. And that's we with feel more bolt. Any innovation requires energy right so it takes more energy to pivot in change so people will do that cost benefits that roi conversation. The other thing of it is is that if you are seeing these inequities differences in your group goes. We can't figure it out and asked for that. We're all here together. And i think co on thomas Because there's a reason why we had to shut down was because how connected are are all on this. One planets farland in the middle of nowhere. We're kind of connected. Mega brings up something reiterating. You talk about which build authentic relationships across differences. You talked about roger. Was he nice. I mean he was co. I wrote this down. He was cordial. That's good. that's the minimum nice to everybody. Does that mean. I'm making change. No he advocated. He was an accomplice he was an ally. He learned their language. He was fair but he could've taken advantage like so. Many other people did which leads me to something else that you had brought to is. If you lined up your ancestors would you be proud. Thought about that i. I don't know so when you guys are figuring out jamie do it. Now help me in. That's that's really the challenge for all of us is to slow down and just take a moment and reflect in really think about who we are because we get caught in this business or we get caught in these definitions that other people tell us when we are just sit with yourself have purchased self. I i want to ask you this. This is something i've wanted to know about you visit in the last six months. This is not when you began talking about these issues. You've been talking about these for a long time. Are you as an individual. Are you re tired. Because you i feel like every time i look your everywhere talking about this. So i'm asking as a human to human. Because i've i've not had. This is not been jimmy mackay problem. This is not affected me. I'm now paying attention to it more in the last six months and saying oh my gosh me not doing anything is not enough but you have been i mean are you hired. Are you re energized. By how much you see people learning. How do you feel right now. We're great question jim. And so are actually move as started in his face in nineteen ninety five. When i was in school might i. Research project looked at recruitment and retention of minority students in the southern states in. I am tired but i will say. I'm more tired because of the cycle and the cycling just like any other disease illness condition that is bringing you in and out a piece. That is what wears you out this these ups and downs. And i'm like could we as a society. We just admit to this right. Just be constant because it is the cycle. That just makes you exhausted ended. It makes you like right now. I am struggling with trusted. jimmy Because i truly thought that we were going to do something different as americans in now. I'm in this place where i'm trying to really reflect on what is going on with the vote because i do feel like there was a lot of good work going on. I mean i think people bought at every anti-racism premacy book in the planet right but then when it came time to vote we did the thing that roger did was pick somebody else over the people that we said we created this authentic relationship with and so i am reading that right now in trying to work through that and trying to be generous in thought because there are different perspectives in everyone gets a right to their freedom. And that's one of the things that i also learned from. Roger is a have to make sure that don't restrict other people's droughts so but i am exhausted. I'm tired but i'm here for the fight. As long as people just show up as their authentic sales stone loud to me well. That was the thing that i wanted to the every time. I see you doing a webinar. Doing a podcast or writing an article which is Lisa isn't trying to be the anything lisa would like to be. Hey come with me walk in front of me like do this because many hands make light work and that's the only way it isn't a cycle and it becomes this thing that sticks around because that's that's gonna get us excited and disappointed and eventually people will do this with the news cycle. They just flame out. Yeah that's worse than liking it or disliking. It which indifference is the worst part. Oh you just utilise local that and like the u the body also keep score so would we are doing this cycle. You are harming me you are harming yourself because the body's not built for that it physiologically can't keep this up. We see that with glucose we see that with insulin. We see that with you. Know other hormones ev- we are built for peace. It is when we get in the way of others that we You want to see a parallel between This situation these topics were talking about the human body fighter flight wrestling. We'd like to be in the middle right. We want to be in homeo- stasis we'd like our society to be in homeo- stasis with too much sympathetic in too much like eventually you start to tie you tired. You burn a lotta calories bring bring them up and down and eventually you want to stay away from that situation and that's not what we want to fix the situation. We want to stay away from the situation situation in like in the other part of that is you know you wanna be able to say we are friends but when we site will then. I constantly have to do that sympathetic activity of going. Are you friend or foe in. We start our relationships back over again and it just slows down our progress as we're trying to create a new future. It just gets away. Yeah i love that Questions and comments still pouring if you're watching the replay as well commenting on this broadcast wherever you see on the facebook pages of rowan new hampshire massachusetts connect. What that does is that. Starts the conversation again. This will pop up on your news feed if six months from now someone sees this which is why. Pt to pt person to person sharing. something like this however. You're watching it sending to a colleague if you're a professor giving it to your class to take a watch. This is your assignment for today. Tell me tell me who thinks you're gonna do now that you've seen what lisa has talked about. That's a great way to keep the conversation going as rene chimes in their on youtube as well. Yes and i love the fact that you talked about bringing lots of voices to this conversation. Because truthfully y'all when when i as a as a black woman next how identifying himself when i'm having to constantly having this conversation then it also limits me media just one dimension of my diversity right in this intersection of all kinda goodness What i often feel very suffolk related because we keep having to have these urgent conversations about race and ethnicity other vices. So this doesn't allow me to explain because you're keeping me in a box. Is nagara right. So that's a that's a big we again. Lisa's not trying to be the she's trying to be a come. Follow me take a listen. Let's be a week Traditional show is the parting shot. It's kind of like last mic. Drop moment kind of like most of your presentation was mic. Drop moment but if there's one thing after hearing these questions seeing some of the comments what do you want to leave with the audience. Would you wanna leave the audience with today. Acting the amelita with the ultimate mic. drop her. Why angelou if you know better do better very difficult to fall. That will not Lisa thanks so much for really kicking off. This great idea of northeast Virtual conference again. If you're watching this for free on the socials and say i'd like some more great virtual conversations Jump in the link is in the notes in the comments below and the content while live today on november seventh as we record will be available for you through the end of the year. So you some dashboard. Time or some walking around the neighborhood time gets steps in while you listen to this great content Thanks so much for share with us into etc. Hear what you're doing next. Thank you so much and thank you all for being courageous stepping into these conversations. Ever go weekend in have great conference. Love the pt pine cast. Yes yes the show telling a friend or by leaving a review. 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rhode island massachusetts new hampshire connecticut michelle roger williams new england lisa vanhoose roger lisa facebook Mike guineans cardiovascular pulmonary teddy roosevelt seventy degrees flinton jane baldwin jane addams mighty rhode island George floyd
Activists: Carrie Chapman Catt

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:55 min | 6 months ago

Activists: Carrie Chapman Catt

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia Manica. Today we're talking about an inspiring. Suffrage, just she was a skilled political strategist and peace advocate. Let's talk about Carrie Chapman capped. Caroline Lane was born on January ninth 1859 in Wisconsin the second of her parents three children. When she was six years old Carey's family moved to a farm near Charles. City Iowa at the close of the civil war. Growing. Up Kerry was of baristas reader often memorizing and reciting entire columns in the paper. Carey said she became a suffrage EST and a very young age when she learned that her mother lacked the same voting rights father. Kerry later said. It was feet dot a career that took me in charge. I could never forget that rank injustice to my mother. I. Verily believe I was born suffrage Est.. Carry enrolled at Iowa State University in eighteen seventy seven where she was the only woman in her. Class. She worked her way through school by washing dishes and serving his librarians assistant. Kerry also enjoyed extracurricular activities choose the first female student to give an oration before a debating society and helped start military drills for girls. After graduation Carey began working as a teacher and principal. At, twenty four years old, she became Mason City, school superintendent she was one of the first women to be appointed to such a position. Two years later she married newspaper publisher Leo Chapman. Leo died of typhoid fever the following year. After. A period of grieving Carey began working at a newspaper in San Francisco. In eighteen eighty seven carey returned to Iowa and joined the Iowa woman suffrage association she worked as a lecturer and writer. Four years after her first husband's death she married engineer George W cat who should I met in college? Around that time, carry also became active in the national. American. Woman suffrage. Association. She became head of field organizing eighteen, ninety five and five years later she succeeded Susan B. Anthony as president because of her stellar speaking and writing skills she became known as a leading suffragette West in nineteen. Oh, four Carey resigned as president of the National American woman suffrage association to care for her sick husband he died in October nineteen o five starting a succession of deaths in carries life including Susan B Anthony in nineteen o six and her younger brother William and her mother in one thousand, nine, hundred, seven friends encouraged grief-stricken Kerry to spend time abroad. So. She spent the next nine years advocating for equal suffrage globally as president of the international woman suffrage. Alliance. In Nineteen fifteen at the request of many suffragettes, Carey returned to the US and resumed leadership of the National American woman suffrage association, which at the time was divided over suffrage strategies. At that point, just a few states had granted women. The right to vote Kerrey famously said in nineteen sixteen the time for women's has the woman's has struck. Under her leadership several critical states approved women's suffrage including New York in nineteen seventeen the next year President Woodrow Wilson, his stance on suffrage and supported a national constitutional amendment. The amendment was passed by Congress in Nineteen nineteen and was ratified by the states officially added to the Constitution one hundred years ago last month in August nineteen twenty. Many attest this triumph to carries imaginative and resourceful leadership. Soon after carry reorganized the suffrage association into the League of Women Voters to work for strengthening progressive legislation throughout the country. In the nineteen twenties Carey was an active international peace advocate. At the start of World War One, she joined with Jane Addams to organize the Women's Peace Party. During the Inter war period, she worked for refugee relief efforts and child labor. Protection laws. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three in response to Hitler's rise to power. Kerry organized a signed letter of over nine thousand non-jewish American women condemning repressive laws against German Jews. She pressured the US government to ease immigration restrictions, for Jews, fleeing Germany. For her work, Carey became the first woman to receive the American Hebrew metal. After world. War Two carry actively used her influence to have qualified women placed on. Certain. UN Commissions. On March ninth nineteen forty seven Carey died of heart failure in New York. She donated her entire state to Iowa state her Alma Mater. Kerry gained praise for her work both during and after her lifetime. She was featured on the cover of Time magazine in Nineteen Twenty Six and received the Pictorial Review Award for her work in international disarmament in nineteen, thirty. In nineteen forty, one, Eleanor Roosevelt gave carry the Chi. Omega. Word at the White House. In Nineteen ninety-two carry was honored as one of the ten most important women of the century by the Iowa Centennial Memorial Foundation. Today carries childhood home in Iowa has been converted into a museum honoring her legacy and the history of the Women's suffrage movement. All month we're talking about activists for more on why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter weekly. Follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia Britannica and follow me directly on twitter at Jenny M. Caplin. Special. Thanks to Liz Caplan my favorite sister and co-creator. Tune in tomorrow for a special bonus episode brought to you by the woman suffrage Centennial Commission. The woman suffrage, Centennial Commission, and the US Senate designated August as National Women's suffrage month a month long celebration honoring the history of women's fight for the vote. They have a non-partisan mission to ensure that Americans across the country have the opportunity to participate in this antennae oil and to learn about this important but often overlooked history. To, learn more about the women's suffrage Centennial Commission and its initiatives tune into bonus episodes releasing every weekend this month on Romantika and had to www dot women's vote one, hundred dot org. Talk to you tomorrow.

Carey Kerry Iowa League of Women Voters Iowa State University Centennial Commission US Jenny Kaplan New York Carrie Chapman Iowa Centennial Memorial Found Wonder Media Network Susan B. Anthony president Caroline Lane Wisconsin Leo Chapman President Woodrow Wilson Time magazine
NAACP founded - Feb. 12, 1909

This Day in History Class

08:28 min | 2 years ago

NAACP founded - Feb. 12, 1909

"Here's my Blake to tell you about another podcast. You may enjoy it is the end of the world with Josh Clark. It is a ten episode series. All ten episodes are out there in the world now for you to binge. Josh Clark is co host of Steph, you should know and for the end of the world, he dives into X stencil risks. There's ways that we humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out with the same technology. We're developing to try to make a brighter future the end of the world with Josh Clark is waiting all ten episodes. Find it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, I'm eve. Welcome to this day in history class a show that reveals a little bit more about history. Day-by-day today is February twelve twenty nineteen. The day was February twelfth nineteen o nine. In New York City, a group of black and white people met to talk about the status of black people in the United States. There were sixty people at the meeting, including suffrage is philanthropist, journalists, clergymen educators and people from other traditions and attendance and some of them have been part of the abolitionist movement. Many of the people there had also been part of the Niagara movement, which was a civil rights group. Founded in nineteen zero five by sociologists and activists W E D boys, and editor and activist. William Monroe Trotter the date of this meeting was notable because it was the hundredth anniversary of former US president Abraham Lincoln's birth which many found meaningful because Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation, but anti-black violence was still endemic in the United States and the people who met in New York on this day we're committed to. Fighting racism and discrimination in the US bus starting what was sometimes called a new abolition movement. At the time. Jim crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south though. Discrimination on the basis of race was a constant throughout the United States. Thousands of black people were being lynched by white mobs at public events that were made into spectacles and deadly race riots were taking place across the country. In the period after the reconstruction era interpersonal and institutionalized racism were plaguing American society. But activists reformers and revolutionaries were organizing and fighting to combat rampant racism and violence in the country. In August, nineteen o eight. There was a violent race riot in Springfield, Illinois, where mobs of white people destroyed the homes and businesses of black people in the community and killed in lynched, others, author and activist NS John ski and her husband, William English, walling. A socialist journalist went to Springfield to investigate the riot. And in September, a magazine called the independent published in article a walling titled the race war in the north in the article, he wrote that people must revive the spirit of abolitionist entreat black people as social and political equals or else. The race war would continue to spread across the country. And walling went on to write the following the day these methods become general in the north every hope a political democracy will be dead other weaker races in classes will be persecuted. In the north as in the south public education will undergo an eclipse and American civilization will await either a rapid degeneration or another profounder in more revolutionary civil war, which sell literate, not only the remains of slavery. But all other obstacles to a free democratic volition. That have grown up in its wake who realizes the seriousness of the situation. And what large powerful body of citizens is ready to come to their aid. Marie white Ovington a social worker and writer heated Wallin's call and sent him a letter in support. So in January nineteen nine she met with walling and social worker Henry Moskovitz at walling New York apartment to discuss proposing an organization that would fight for the civil and political rights of black people so Oswald, garrison Villar grandson of the abolitionist, William Lloyd, garrison wrote, the call which was a summons for civil rights activists to form an organization that would advocate for ending racial injustice in America and fight for African Americans rights. The call was endorsed by sixty people including W E, B, D Boyce, turn lists and activists item be wells philosopher and reformer, John, Dewey, an activist Jane Addams and February. Toldt nineteen oh nine a group, including Mary Turks, Terrel, Charles Edward, Russell and Florence Kelley among others met for a national conference. But they didn't hold their first large meeting until may when they organized as the national negro committee. There was some conflict at that. First session as leaders tried to get the more conservative Booker T Washington to join in on the meetings also tensions rose between white and black members. And the press beer, the radical nature of the conference, but by nineteen ten members of the committee had formed the national association for the advancement of colored people or the in AA c p. The N double ACP mission was quote to promote equality of rights and to a radical cast a race prejudice. Among the citizens of the United States to advance the interests of colored citizens to secure for them, impartial suffrage and to increase their opportunities for securing Justice in the court education for the children employment. According to their ability and complete equality before law. The organization established is national office in New York City in named a board of directors and president Moorefield story at this time w d Boyce was the only black executive in the organization, but that same year two boys. Started the crisis a journal that offered discussion on race relations, politics and black life and present it black intellectual in artistic work in AA. P members went on to challenge. Segregation laws stage boycotts. Start anti lynching campaign in lobby and advocate for new legislation. The end up Alesi Ps methods aren't loved by people who use more direct action tactics. But the organization did make gains in the movement for black civil rights and is still going today. I'm Jeff coat, and hopefully, you know, a little more about history today than you did yesterday. We'll see you tomorrow. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts.

United States Josh Clark New York City apple walling New York D Boyce Springfield president Blake William Monroe Trotter national negro committee Abraham Lincoln Steph Marie white Ovington Booker T Washington Illinois
Feminists: Mary Church Terrell

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:06 min | 11 months ago

Feminists: Mary Church Terrell

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Will Manica. Today's feminist was an African American civil rights activist and suffragettes just who worked in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to improve the lots of race and gender as a writer educator and organizer. Her accomplishments were far reaching. She was also one of the first black women to go to college in the US. Let's talk about Mary. Church Tarot Mary Allies Church was born on September. Twenty third eighteen. Sixty three in Memphis Tennessee. Mary's parents were both freed. Slaves who owned small thriving businesses and provided a comfortable life for Mary and her brother. Mary's father Robert Reed. Church was one of the southern United States first black millionaires her mother. Louisa Eire's Church was one of the first black woman to open and run a hair salon. Their success was remarkable Tennessee in eighteen. Sixty three during the middle of the civil war was quite discriminatory place to say. The least her parents success allowed MARY ACCESS TO AN EDUCATION. She may otherwise have been barred from receiving. When Mary attended Oberlin college she became one of the first African American woman to earn a college degree. Oberlin was the first college in the US to open. Its doors to women and African Americans. Mary majored in classics and earned her. Bachelor's degree alongside Anna Julia Cooper and Ida Gibbs Hunt to other prominent black intellectuals and activists. Mary then got her masters in education. After graduation Mary taught at the historically black college wilberforce college now called Wilberforce University. She then moved to Washington. Dc and taught at the M street colored high school there. She met a man named Robert Heatherton. Tarot Robert had his own successful career. As an attorney and educator he would later become the first black municipal court judge in DC. The two got married and had four children. Though only one daughter survived infancy. The couple would later adopt second daughter. After spending a few years in Europe studying languages Mary returned to the US and dove into activism in eighteen. Ninety two Thomas Moss a friend of Mary's was lynched by white business owners. This had a major impact on Mary and let her to join anti lynching campaigns. She famously wrote a piece. Condemning the widespread trend of lynchings in the south in the piece entitled Lynching Negroes Point Of View. Mary wrote the South has so industriously. So persistently and eloquently preached the inferiority of the Negro that the North has apparently been converted. The spew in eighteen ninety two. Mary formed the Colored Women's League along with her college friends and other well known feminists abolitionists and scholars. Their intention was to provide support and empowerment. The African American community and especially to black women. Dude are successful career at her achievements and activism. Mary was also appointed to the DC school board in Eighteen Ninety five. She was the first black woman to hold that position a year later. The Colored Women's League merged with other mission aligned organizations to expand its reach an impact the coalition formed the National Association of Colored Women. Mary was the first president of the Association and her words lifting as we climb became the organization's motto those words conveyed the essence of the associations. Intention that through solidarity comes progress for all as president. Mary was extremely active. She spoke and wrote for the cause. She fought for women's suffrage and specifically for black women. Suffrage she would later even pick at the White House with the National Woman's Party which we talked about earlier this week in our episode about Alice. Paul 1898 Mary gave an address called progress of colored women at the National American woman. Suffrage Association conference in DC through the movement. She became good friends with Susan. B Anthony and other luminaries of the age like Jane addams Frederick Douglass and WABC boys in nineteen. Oh Four. Mary travelled to Berlin to speak at the International Congress of women. She was the only black woman at the conference. Mary delivered her address in three languages. German French and English and received a standing ovation five years later in one thousand nine. Mary was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored. People then double. Acp The next year she also co founded. The College Alumna Club later called the National Association of University women the Nineteenth Amendment was added to the US Constitution in one thousand nine hundred twenty giving women the right to vote but that right didn't extend in practice to people of Color. Mary urged activists including Alice. Paul to turn their attention to extending rights. More broadly Alice. Paul wasn't interested but Mary didn't give up. She published an autobiography called a colored woman in a white world to share her personal experiences with prejudice in Nineteen Fifty. Mary helped in the fight to desegregate restaurants in DC by actively protesting against segregated establishments segregated restaurants were deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. Three years later well into her eighties. Mary continued protesting picket lines and taking part in advocacy work. She passed away in nineteen fifty four at the age of ninety all month. We're talking about feminists. We've covered feminists everything so far but differentiates this month is that we'll be looking at women. Were particularly important to the women's rights movement the suffrage movement and or modern feminism and feminist theory on Saturdays. We're talking about modern feminists brought to you by this month sponsor fiber on Sundays we're highlighting favourite feminists from past months chosen by other podcast hosts. We love for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our new encyclopedia were mannequin. Newsletter you can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia Will Manica and you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny. Kaplan this month of Encyclopedia Britannica is brought to you by fiver an online digital services marketplace connecting businesses with women who are creating designing copywriting programming. Editing and more fiber is here to support the world's Free Lance community during these challenging and uncertain times when businesses need to adapt in the face of the CORONA PANDEMIC. Women are an integral part of fivers platform. Many having worked with some of the most influential brands in the world. Five is here to support all freelancers entrepreneurs and businesses at this time five operates and over one hundred sixty countries offers digital services across three hundred categories so there are clearly lots of opportunities to change how the world works together with fiber in these unprecedented times had two F. I. V. E. R. Dot Com to see how five or might be able to support you or your business that's F. I V. E. R. DOT COM special. Thanks TO LOSE. Kaplan my favorite sister co-creator Talk to you tomorrow.

Mary US Church Tarot Mary Allies Churc National Association of Colore Dc Jenny Kaplan Colored Women's League Tennessee Memphis Paul Wonder Media Network Alice wilberforce college International Congress of wome Anna Julia Cooper Washington Robert Heatherton Europe
Best of Season 1: Mary Church Terrell

Encyclopedia Womannica

09:55 min | 8 months ago

Best of Season 1: Mary Church Terrell

"Hey, everybody, I'm grace, lynch producer at wonder, Media Network and one of the many people who gets to work on Encyclopedias Lamonica my favorite feeling whenever I'm working on an episode of Manteca is when I find the perfect piece of music that will underscore a series of events or transport the listener or communicate the emotional weight of the situation. It can be really hard to find these tracks, and all of us spend hours poring through music libraries to find them. The song that you're listening to right now is one of my all time. Favorites which I found one day toiling deep down. Music Rabbit Hole I sat on it for months, waiting to finally find the right episode, and it was actually Jenny who had heard me use it inappropriately too many times before who finally picked the right spot and ended up working perfectly for Mary, the Jewess one of our. Our many beautiful minds. We featured in December. If you enjoy what we do and WANNA keep hearing more incredible stories of women throughout history who deserves to be remembered I? Hope you would consider joining membership program by going to blow dot com slash woman Ika you can help support the team behind the show and make sure that these stories keeping told that's glow dot FM slash will Manica. Thanks again. Hello I'm lexie intern from the National Women's History Museum today! I'm excited to introduce when of my favorite episodes featured on Encyclopedias America Mary, Church terrel. Mary story reminds us the Nineteenth Amendment did not extend the right to vote to women of color. After the addition of the nineteenth amendment to the US Constitution. Like Mary continued to work to pursue a future where all not just some women would be able to vote. Mary inspires me to be an advocate for social change I hope she inspires you to. This episode initially aired in March Twenty twenty now. Here's host Jenny Kaplan to tell you about Mary Church terrel. Hello from wonder media. Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. A Manica today's feminist was an African American civil rights activist and suffer just who worked in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to improve the lots of her race and gender. As a writer, educator and organizer, her accomplishments were far reaching. She was also one of the first black women to go to college in the US. Let's talk about Mary Church Tarot. Mary Allies Church was born on September, twenty, third, eighteen, sixty three in Memphis Tennessee. Mary's parents were both freed slaves who owned small thriving businesses and provided a comfortable life for Mary and her brother. Mary's father Robert Reed. Church was one of the southern United States first black millionaires. Her Mother Louisa Eire's Church was one of the first black women to open and run a hair salon. Their success was remarkable Tennessee in eighteen, sixty, three during the middle of the civil war was quite discriminatory place to say the least. Her parents success allowed Mary access to an education. She may otherwise have been barred from receiving. Merry attended. College she became one of the first African American woman to earn a college degree. Oberlin was the first college in the US to open its doors to women and African Americans. Mary majored in classics and earned her bachelor's degree alongside Anna Julia Cooper an IDA gibbs, hunt. To other prominent black intellectuals and activists. Mary then got her masters in education. After graduation Mary taught at the historically black college wilberforce college now called Wilberforce University. She then moved to. Washington DC and taught at the M street colored high school there. She met a man named. Robert Heatherton Tarot Robert had his own successful career as an attorney and educator. He would later become the first black municipal court judge in DC. The two got married and had four children, though only one daughter survived infancy. The couple would later adopt a second daughter. After spending a few years in Europe studying languages Mary turn to the US and dove into activism. In Eighteen Ninety two Thomas Moss a friend of Mary's was lynched by white business owners. This had a major impact on Mary and let her to join anti lynching campaigns. She famously wrote a piece condemning the widespread trend of lynchings in the south in the piece entitled Lynching Negroes Point Of View. Mary wrote. The South has so industriously so persistently, and eloquently preached the inferiority of the Negro that the north has apparently been converted to this view. In Eighteen, ninety, two Mary formed the Colored Women's League along with her college friends and other well known feminists, abolitionists and scholars. Their intention was to provide support and empowerment. American community and especially to black women. Dude are successful career and her achievements and activism Mary was also appointed to the DC school board in Eighteen, ninety five. She was the first black woman to hold that position. A year later, the Colored Women's League merged with other mission aligned organizations to expand its reach an impact. The coalition formed the national. Association of Colored Women. Mary was the first president of the Association and her words lifting as we climb became the organization's motto. Those words conveyed the essence of the associations intention that through solidarity comes progress for all. As. President Mary was extremely active. She spoke and wrote for the 'cause she fought for women's suffrage and specifically for black women suffrage. She would later even pick it the White House with the National Woman's Party. In Eighteen, Ninety, eight Mary gave an address called the progress of colored women at the National American woman. Suffrage Association conference in DC. Through the movement, she became good friends with Susan B Anthony and other luminaries of the age like Jane, Addams Frederick Douglass and WABC Boyce. In nineteen, four Mary travel to Berlin to speak at the International Congress of women. She was the only black woman at the conference. Mary delivered her address in three languages German French and English and received a standing ovation. Five years later in nineteen o nine Mary was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of colored people that NWEA CPI the next year. She also co founded. The College Alumna Club later called the National Association of University Women. The nineteenth amendment was added to the US Constitution in nineteen twenty, giving women the right to vote. But, that right didn't extend in practice to people of Color. Mary urged activists including Alice Paul to turn their attention to extending rights more broadly. Alice Paul wasn't interested, but Mary didn't give up. She published an autobiography, called a colored woman in a white world to share her personal experiences with prejudice. In Nineteen Fifty Mary help in the fight to desegregate restaurants in DC by actively protesting against segregated establishments. Segregated restaurants were deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court three years later. Well into her eighties Mary continued protesting and picket lines and taking part in advocacy work. She passed away in nineteen fifty four at the age of ninety. Thank you for listening to this best of month. It was so fun for us to revisit. Some of the many women covered over the last year, and the good news is. We're nowhere near finished tune in tomorrow for the first episode of Season Two. For more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter manacle weekly. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at Encyclopedia. Were Manica and you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny Kaplan? Special thanks to lose Kaplan. A sister and co-creator. Talk to you tomorrow! Racial injustice has been an unacceptable part of our nation's being for far too long. As we grapple with authentic ways to dismantle the inequitable power structure of our country. The census takes on a whole new level of relevance. It allows us to recreate our histories and bring to life human beings who's been disregarded and discard it. Learn more about the census and how it could be the most undervalued tool we have to preserve democracy in a four podcast series called twenty twenty counts I. Our friends, bridge or media. Hosts Alison Badger Sharia and Leila Jerusalem speak with activists, academics, historians, and community organizers to understand its history and importance. A complete count can completely change representation in our country. Listen to understand why some experts believe being counted is more important than voting. Subscribed twenty twenty counts wherever you get your podcasts.

Mary US Jenny Kaplan Mary Church Tarot Mary Church terrel Mary Allies Church DC Association of Colored Women Colored Women's League National Women March Twenty twenty Tennessee History Museum producer intern International Congress of wome Media Network Europe Manteca wilberforce college
NAACP founded / Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn arrested - February 12

This Day in History Class

15:33 min | Last week

NAACP founded / Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn arrested - February 12

"To show you how easy it is to file a claim with geico. We hired a soap opera star. Gracious me my car has storm damage. And i've had to file a claim go to possibly get worse when my claims team leave me for someone else. Someone less intense. No actually when you file a claim with geico you get your own dedicated claims team. Who promises to stay with you throughout the process. I've never known such loyalty. I can't wait for the second season. Geigo great service without all the drama. I've got one word for you. Tom cruise on this new weekly podcast meeting tom cruise. We're gonna talk about tom cruise. Everyone who's met him is an amazing story to tell. Hey everybody i'm jeff mitchum. Tv's blackish. I'm joel johnston from the marvelous. Mrs maisel sponsored by tom cruise. But we've never actually met down proofs but after we talked to some people who have maybe we finally will. It's not impossible. Listen to meeting tom. Cruise on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. Hey history enthusiast you get not one but two events in history today with that said on with the show hi. i'm eve. Welcome to this day in history class. A show that reveals a little bit more about history day-by-day the day was february twelfth. Nineteen o nine in new york city. A group of black and white people met to talk about the status of black people in the united states. There were sixty people at the meeting including suffrage is philanthropist journalist clergymen educators and people from other traditions in attendance and some of them have been part of the abolitionist movement. Many of the people there had also been part of the niagara movement which was a civil rights group founded in nineteen o five sociologist activists w. e. d. boys and editor an activist william morris. Trotter the date of this meeting was notable because it was the hundredth anniversary of former us. President abraham lincoln's birth which many found meaningful because. Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation. But anti black violence was still endemic in the united states. And the people who met in new york on this day. We're committed to fighting racism and discrimination in the us. starting what was sometimes called a new abolition movement. At the time. Jim crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south. Though discrimination on the basis of race was constant throughout the united states thousands of black people were being lynched by white mobs at public events that were made into spectacles and deadly race. Riots were taking place across the country. In the period after the reconstruction era interpersonal and institutionalized racism were plaguing american society but activists reformers in revolutionaries were using and fighting to combat rampant racism and violence in the country in august nineteen. Oh eight there was a violent race riots. In springfield illinois where mobs of white people destroyed the homes and businesses of black people in the community and killed in lynched others author and activist. Ns stransky and her husband. William english walling. A socialist journalist went to springfield to investigate the right and in september. A magazine called the independent published an article by walling titled the race war in the north in the article. He wrote that. People must revive the spirit of abolitionist. Entreat black people social and political equals or else the race war would continue to spread across the country and walling went on to write the following the day. These methods become general in the north. Every hope of political democracy will be dead other weaker. Racist in classes will be persecuted in the north. As in the south public education will undergo an eclipse and american civilization. We'll await either a rapid degeneration or another profounder and more revolutionary civil war which sell obliterate not only the remains of slavery but all other obstacles to a free democratic evolution that have grown up in. Its wake who realizes the seriousness of the situation. And what large and powerful body of citizens is ready to come to their aid. Marie white ovington a social worker and writer heated wallin's call and sent him a letter in support so in january nineteen o nine. She met with walling in social worker. Henry moskovitz at wallin's new york apartment to discuss proposing an organization that would fight for the civil and political rights of black people. So oswald garrison villar grandson of abolitionist. William lloyd garrison wrote the call which was a summons for civil rights activists to form an organization that would advocate for ending racial injustice in america and fight for african americans rights the call was endorsed by sixty people including w. e. b. voice journalist and activist ida b wells philosopher and reformer john. Dewey an activist jane addams and on february toldt nineteen o nine a group including mary turks. Tarot charles edward russell in florence kelly among others breath met for a national conference but they didn't hold their first large meeting until may when they organized as the national negro committee. There was some conflict at that first session as leaders tried to get the more conservative but washington to join in on the meetings also tensions rose between white and black members and the press beer the radical nature of the conference but by nineteen ten members of the committee had formed the national association for the advancement of colored people or in double. Acp the n. Double acp mission was quote to promote equality of rights and to eradicate cast a race prejudice among the citizens of the united states to advance the interests of color citizens to secure for them impartial suffrage and to increase their opportunities for securing justice in the courts education for the children employment according to their ability and complete equality before law the organization established is national office in new york city in named a board of directors and president moorefield story at this time w e b d boys was the only black executive in the organization but that same year two boys started the crisis a journal offered discussion on race relations politics and black life and present it black intellectual and artistic work in double. Acp members went on to challenge segregation laws. Stage boycotts start anti lynching campaign in lobby and advocate for new legislation the end ps methods aren't loved by people who use more direct action tactics but the organization did make gains in the movement for black civil rights and is still going today. I'm eve jeffcoat in. Hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. We'll see you tomorrow. It's black history month in kohl's is a company that strives to celebrate black achievements. Not just for a month but every single day they know that strength lies in diversity. Which is the driving force. Behind their kohl's diversity designed council a group that includes black designers who curate collections that reflect black culture. It's a mixture of products with designs and messages that celebrate tradition and history unity in ally ship kindness and hope these designers pay tribute to the major moments of black history while serving as modern day. Examples of black excellence but kohl's is doing more than just elevating 'black voices. they're also raising awareness of the health crisis happening within black communities. Kohl's donated one hundred thousand dollars alliance for a healthier generation. This is a group that works with schools youth serving organizations businesses and communities to help children develop lifelong healthy habits and supports new health programs. That address specific health issues facing black families. Kohl's is making a difference. Learn more at kohls dot com. Today's episode is brought to you by ford. The ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years and counting the all new twenty twenty one f. One fifty is completely redesigned to be the toughest most productive f one fifty ever. The interior has gotten a huge upgrade with more luxury more comfort to help make work more productive available pro power onboard. Gives you the ability to use your truck like a mobile generator. You can power and electric grill or tools and available tailgate work. Surface helps simplify and support. Your work includes guides for measuring and even a built in slot for a smartphone or tablet. Computer that could really come in handy and work takes you into the wee hours of the night. The distinctive lighting system of the all new f. One fifty includes available zone lighting for better productivity embed lighting for working in dim light toughest. Smart can only be called. F one fifty check out the all new twenty twenty one ford f one fifty at four dot com built fort. Proud built ford tough. Hi everyone. I'm eve's welcome to this day in history class. A podcast for folks who can never have enough history knowledge. The day was february. Twelfth nineteen seventy-four russian author alexander solzhenitsyn was arrested charged with treason and stripped of his citizenship. The year prior solzhenitsyn had published the gulag archipelago book on the communist soviet forced labor camp system. Soza neat san was born in nineteen eighteen in russia. The year after the russian revolution took place and the russian civil war began. He was raised by his mother as his father was killed in an accident. He studied at the university of rostov majoring in physics and mathematics in the nineteen forties when he began to get negative attention from soviet authorities during world war. Two solzhenitsyn was drafted into the soviet. Union's red army in nineteen forty five. He was arrested for writing letters to a friend that criticized soviet dictator joseph stalin. He spent the next eight years. In prison labor camps for political prisoners his sentence ended in nineteen fifty-three and his first day without armed guard was march fifth. The same day that stalin died but after he served his sentence he was sent into exile for life and in stand there. He taught math and physics in wrote poems. Plays sketches and a novel in the following years solution. Ethan underwent treatment for cancer and survived. He began writing down the experiences he had as a prisoner nikita khrushchev. The new soviet premier denounced stalin social. Needs senate was then freed from exile and he moved back to russia where he continued teaching in writing his novel. One day in the life of ivenisevic about life. In one of stalin's labor camps was published in the soviet literary journal novy mir in november of nineteen sixty two. The novel was popular with soviet readers for the way it depicted the everyday struggles of life in a forced labor camp. The book inspired others to to pick their own hardships in soviet labor camps and gained a global audience. It was however controversial as soldiers. A neat santa was accused of being anti-soviet. The book aggravated the rift. Between anti stalinist and conformance khrushchev fell from power in nineteen sixty four solzhenitsyn was increasingly targeted by authorities as he continued to write short stories and denounce government policies after nineteen sixty seven. His work wasn't published again. In the soviet union until nineteen ninety for years the the soviet union's security agency collected information about him and seized his writing as he was deemed. An enemy of the state in nineteen sixty nine. solzhenitsyn was expelled from the union of soviet writers. The next year solzhenitsyn won the nobel prize for literature for quote the ethical force with which he has pursued the indispensable traditions of russian literature but soviet authorities did not let him go to the awards ceremony. They continue to harass him with the kgb even attempting to assassinate him with rice in one thousand nine hundred ninety one but he continued to publish his work and nineteen seventy-three he published the gulag archipelago abroad after the kgb seized a copy of the manuscript in the soviet union. The word gulag refers to the network of labor camps in the soviet union. The book provides a record of the arrest interrogation conviction and imprisonment of people in the system. Along with soc johnson's personal accounts. The soviet press denounced him as a traitor and on february twelfth. Nineteen seventy four. He was arrested and charged with treason. The next day he was exiled from the soviet union he proceeded to travel throughout europe and by nineteen seventy six. He had settled in the us. He lived in the us until nineteen ninety-four when he returned to russia after the soviet union dissolved back in russia. He praised the leadership of president vladimir putin he died in moscow in two thousand eight remembered for writing works that criticized the soviet union and communism and revealed the conditions people faced in the forced labor camp system. I'm eve steph coke and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you've seen any good history means lately you can send them to us on social media. T h z. Podcast or. if you want to get a little more fancy you can send us an email at this day. At iheartmedia media dot com. Thanks for tuning in. And we'll see you again. Tamara for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

tom cruise us geico Geigo jeff mitchum joel johnston Mrs maisel wallin stransky William english Marie white ovington Henry moskovitz oswald garrison villar springfield ida b wells mary turks solzhenitsyn charles edward russell florence kelly national negro committee