38 Burst results for "Jamison"

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

01:44 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"Team anywhere. He was an incredibly important part of the lakers championship. Back in two thousand twenty. Maybe the most important right alongside lebron james how he played in that bubble. Dwight howard has a playoff resume of his own. The two thousand nine magic. We're not a good playoff team. They were one of the worst finals. Teams that we've seen in a long time. Dwight howard carried that team in the final. So i don't know how you as a voter. How dare you leave. Dwight howard off your about the seventy fifth anniversary team. Love your passion for dwight howard screaming. I have not even like a tweet howard fans. It's just like the guy. I remember the guy being really frigging great for like a decade. Not quite a decade but really really good for the orlando magic At a time when the east was it was okay. It was a great. Lebron was stuck on really substandard cavs teams and dwight the year that he took the magic to the finals. He did get through lebron. But it was lebron t with you. Know whatever breaking down the drain assault gaseous mo. Williams and i don't know was that the antoine jamison year like i don't even know like we rabbit. They run through. Do we need to run through dwight. Have that magic. No but listen. Let me to this about that. About that orlando took to the finals. And i'm not going to diminish what he did at all and it's not that that was some like superstar lineup with turkoglu rashard lewis jamir nelson. But what team did withstand van. Gundy has coach. Dwight is the centerpiece was established. One of the first true like a spread. Pick and roll three point. Shooting spread out that he fence have won. This was a defensive phenomenon. Of course dwight in the middle but it was perfectly calibrated around him. They had the right roster around him and no. It wasn't a great team. They lost in the finals. And the problem. I have with dwight's career is what has it amounted to and we we get in these chicken and egg discussions or these difficult discussions all the time. You know. carmelo anthony is now ninth all time score. Never been to the finals. One conference finals. How far did he lead his teams but ninth graders scored. Nba history is really hard to argue with that. Yes carmelo was on my ballot for the top seventy five. Let me just say this. Real quick about the seventy five list. The nba did not ask us. The voters compile the list of the seventy five greatest players in nba history. There's greatest was not in the description as per usual with the nba. There was no real description or standards. Or any specificity whatsoever. it's creating seventieth anniversary team here you go. Here's a bunch of drop down menus go to it. And if you wanted to compile the list of the seventy five greatest players either in the totality of their careers or some people say their best peaks whatever we can start just tossing guys overboard left and right from the original fiftieth anniversary team. Because a bunch of those guys would get obliterated by modern players obliterated you if you if you like plant kyrie irving in the one thousand nine.

Dwight Howard Dwight Antoine Jamison Lebron Turkoglu Rashard Lewis Jamir N Orlando Lebron James Lakers Cavs NBA Gundy Howard Williams Carmelo Anthony Carmelo Kyrie Irving
Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on Black, No Sugar

Black, No Sugar

00:49 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on Black, No Sugar

"To me about the things that you are going to find out in life experience in life because honestly for me. I think my experimentation with alcohol and cigarettes and substances how i talked to. It was because experimented with somebody who i was in a relationship with at the time and then eventually relationship even as the relationship progressed until the time that we broke up this puzzle activity now had noticed that i had become addicted to it and then all started faulting me over that so like we just need to have safe spaces for like hardcore truths on the truth about alcohol use and substance use because the greatest addictions that we're struggling with this shopping addictions our what can say pornography is also a very huge one although that one is it pornography needs professional counseling. Because that that now goes beyond. Its both psychological. It's emotionally psychologically emotionally. It covers many dimensions in need professional help for that but we need to have safe spaces and speak that truth about alcohol. Not just walking around. I see people having. You'll see somebody having a one year old birthday party and places just littered with other kids. Kids are growing up seeing bhutto's by the tennis channel which is eighteen. Why wouldn't they say like you grew up around jamison and they grew up around. See like this is cool like this. Let's do the lips. Why not i think ended. We all have addicts. Don't make themselves and they don't happen like the cliche goes in a vacuum there mid by society into satu norms. So i think it's really important to be responsible to da sales but also towards the environments we create. So thank you ladies. This has been such an insightful. Discussion shape thank you so much for those insights So this is the end of episode. We are at a lift book cafe. Come here for coffee and tea and books. Do you have something to say about addiction about the topic. We've been talking about us. A comment subscribe on share on your platforms until..

Bhutto Jamison Tennis
Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on PPRO Podcast

PPRO Podcast

01:34 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on PPRO Podcast

"Soy in of the vertical focus in terms of the In solve the countries of the performance of the countries and all these areas so essentially. Like if you ask me like Basically the one of the main reasons why ecommerce or we have seen the ecommerce growing substantially would last year or so Between nineteen twenty twenty was because of the pandemic you. The kind of the consumers are actually forced to stayed at home because of the The regulatory restrictions imposed lockdowns and stuff and therefore they were required to shift to the in the ecommerce space. Or you know like to shift to the digital purchase methods who satisfied their a daily requirements. And that's one of which has offered in the recent positive twenty printing vis-a-vis twenty twenty nineteen. And of course in a lake call as hunting games was acting. Opponent jamison kelvin. You can feel free to you. Know a pitching. I think it'd be a visible shift in town. So for the wages or the contribution from various verticals right of prior to the pandemic. I think you know traveling. Tourism particularly airlines and sales of used to of you is to is to command a kind of a very significant of version of the market but Because of the log down their share. I think has come down. And a great extent love of countries whereas the the share off the essentials defense iraq's are even even the Held for up to the Beauty products even even of the owner and funderburk access to a great extent maybe driven by the walk from whom thing which has kicked in these articles have seen an increase in the market. Share the expense off for airlines and hotels. So that's one thing which has happened of. I don't jim. So calvin do think of you. Have you also observed the same kind of shift in the market. something like that yeah Seen dairy seminal received out of seminar the exact same shift to the markets to the clients..

Jamison Kelvin Iraq Calvin JIM
No. 5 Alabama rebounds from loss to rout Mississippi St 49-9

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

No. 5 Alabama rebounds from loss to rout Mississippi St 49-9

"Alabama bounced back from its loss to Texas a and M. last week I routing Mississippi state forty nine to nine the fifth ranked from Sentai jumped out to a fourteen three lead in the first quarter and were never seriously threatened by the Bulldogs who beat a and M. in their last game two weeks ago Heisman Trophy candidate Bryce young led the way for Bama by passing for three hundred forty eight yards and four touchdowns young's most significant TD pass with the Jamison Williams for seventy five yards on the first play of the second half to seal it with a twenty eight six lead I'm John Merriam

Sentai Bryce Young Alabama Mississippi Texas Bulldogs Bama Jamison Williams John Merriam
Weekend Prop Bets: Sam Darnold

Behind the Bets

01:22 min | Last month

Weekend Prop Bets: Sam Darnold

"Let's jump right into is one of my favorite roberts heading into this weekend. And that is sam. Darnold over is passing yards. Nothing has been posted yet. I'm sure we can close to kick off. It will be posted but man. You know a lot of people i think. Sleep on sam darnold because just the raw deal that he got here in new york. But i just i love. I love his offensive coordinator. I love that rule. The head coach. He's playing behind better offensive line he ever had here in new york with jets. You've got a plethora of talent to work with in on top of that this week. He's gone up against a gaggle rookie corners to sophomore quarters. And here's another thing a not a number all then were have not been drafted. We're not drafted higher than the fifth round. I mean i think sam darnold it could be a sneaky. Good play not just in the That world but in dfs as well. So i love. Sam darnold i also love. I think he's going to connect with robbie anderson don't forget robbie anderson or her jet as well two of them gonna wanna take it to the jets. Got ravi anderson scored a touchdown plus one ninety and also men the jets. They're just a complete mess. Jamison crowder's out. I think. Zack wilson is going to struggle. So i like under in passing yards for zach wilson in this

Sam Darnold Darnold Robbie Anderson Roberts Jets New York SAM DFS Ravi Anderson Jamison Crowder Zack Wilson Zach Wilson
Guerrero Jr, Semien Power Surging Jays Past Yanks 8-0

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Guerrero Jr, Semien Power Surging Jays Past Yanks 8-0

"The blue jays have continued their hot stretch within eight nothing rather the Yankees in the Bronx Vladimir Guerrero junior slammed his fortieth home run in Toronto's fifth straight win any foot nine games he and his hall of fame father joins us when prince fielder is the only father son duos to hit forty homers in a season Marcus Semien added a pair of home runs including the J. six grand slam of the season when my mechanics and timing or sound I think I see the ball better I'm more confident I'm seeing that with everybody in the cage and they were just you know this time of year you really get a good feel for what you're doing he engine real limited the Yankees to three singles over six innings to move to thirteen and eight Jamison Diane took the loss allowing three runs and three hits over seven frames on the ferry

Marcus Semien Vladimir Guerrero Blue Jays Yankees Prince Fielder Toronto Jamison Diane
Alabama Dominates the SEC

CBS Sports Radio

01:26 min | Last month

Alabama Dominates the SEC

"I thought today, the SEC. Really showed. The dominance and superiority that it has Over the rest of college football. If you had to say today. What Two teams are the biggest winners of the day. Who did you come out most impressed by who put together the best effort who got the biggest wins who really jumped off the screen who sizzled the most. I think both of those teams would be in the SEC. Alabama. Was special today. You can't really dominate a good opponent. Better than what we saw Alabama do earlier today. 1 44 to 13. They just continue to have a quarterback factory. Bryce Young. For 344 Yards, four touchdowns. For Alabama, So you know they ran the ball effectively. They had a big time wide receiver effort today. From Jamison Williams. I mean, this was It is Alabama. They went out there. And they were clearly the best

SEC Alabama Bryce Young Football Jamison Williams
Young Throws 4 TDs, No. 1 Alabama Routs No. 14 Miami 44-13

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Young Throws 4 TDs, No. 1 Alabama Routs No. 14 Miami 44-13

"Don't break down the Bama beat number fourteen Miami forty four thirteen in Atlanta Crimson Tide quarterback Bryce young found receivers Jamison Williams and John met she wants each and Cameron Latu twice for touchdowns Trey Sanders rushed for a fifth score young completed twenty seven of thirty eight passes for three hundred forty four yards for me it was just trying to try to do my best help the team and that's was always mean that's was going to be for as long as I'm you know for for all season hurricanes had a better second half quarterback Derek king connected on twenty three of thirty one total but only racked up a hundred seventy eight yards he did find exit your restaurant in the end zone but by then my me was too far behind to mount a comeback I'm more in Ruston

Bryce Young Jamison Williams Cameron Latu Trey Sanders Miami Atlanta Derek King John Ruston
New York Jets Wide Receiver Jamison Crowder Positive for COVID-19

Pushing the Odds with Matt Perrault

00:30 sec | Last month

New York Jets Wide Receiver Jamison Crowder Positive for COVID-19

"There is some breaking news in the nfl. And if you are a jets fan you're not gonna like this jamison. Crowder has tested positive for kobe. Nineteen we are ten days out from the opener. And it's believed according to tom pella sarah of the nfl network. That it's an isolated case but crowder is going on the kobe list. In now he is very much up in the air for game one against the panthers. I was leaning towards the jets in that game. But i mean you need jamison crowder on the

Tom Pella Sarah NFL Crowder Jamison Jets Panthers Jamison Crowder
Voit's Double Lifts Surging Yanks to 7-5 Win Over Twins

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Voit's Double Lifts Surging Yanks to 7-5 Win Over Twins

"Look for at least a two run double what the Yankees scored four times in the third inning of their season high seventh straight win seven to five over the twins Kyle he does yoga homered and started a four run rally with an RBI double or we we just want to contribute to the winds so I know for putting pressure on the pitchers and we're gonna try to line up over and you know the judge Rizzo void all those guys are going to come up with runners on base and and have a chance to do some real damage both hit scored Brock's date of entry Velasquez who had two hits and also stole a base Giancarlo Stanton also homered for the Yankees who lead the first ale wild card by one game over the athletics Jamison tire and took a shutout into the fifth inning and earned his seventh straight win I'm Dave Ferrie

Yankees Kyle Rizzo Giancarlo Stanton Velasquez Brock Athletics Dave Ferrie
Judge, Sánchez Drive Yanks to Blowout Win Over Royals

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Judge, Sánchez Drive Yanks to Blowout Win Over Royals

"Homers by Aaron judge Gary Sanchez Luke voit powered the Yankees to their seventh win in nine games eight won over the Royals judge opened the scoring with a first inning blast and finished with three hits Sanchez went deep for the second straight game a three run shot in the sixth inning to break the game open Jamison Tyana Nestor Cortes junior combined on a six hitter with tie and allowing a run and five hits over six in the third he ended an eight start winless skid losing pitcher Brad Keller was reached for four runs over five innings I'm Dave Ferrie

Gary Sanchez Luke Voit Jamison Tyana Nestor Cortes Aaron Royals Yankees Sanchez Brad Keller Dave Ferrie
Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 04

Daily Dose Football

07:19 min | 5 months ago

Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 04

"Is thereby do like the fact that kyle amaury stole from the ball but now we are going to hop into a guy that went fifteen picks earlier in nfl draft. A guy that. I absolutely love allied larger more. He felt a second pick of the second round. And i am adjust fan. So i hope i'm not too biased here by do absolutely love elijah more because you look at the offense there. The new york has in place and the did geico davis and they do have them. Zal dumbbell mims there too and jamison crowder and you may think while there's a lot of receivers here but fact of the matter is the jets spent high draft capital. Two goping get larger more. If they're picking him with the thirty fourth pick of the nfl draft when they have all these other holes on the roster. We're talking edge quarterback you can make the case that they probably should have picked a player that was an edge or cornerback but they went ahead and they pick the larger more probably because they had a first round great on him and viewed him as one of the top receivers in this class. And if they didn't think that he could he could become a number one number two receiver. The offense and zack wilson. They probably wouldn't have bothered. They're in picking eligible more. So i think that you have all these. Ribisi were twos vibrancy. Threes in newark. Don't have a true alpha by receiver one in york and you saw gems on men's last year yes. He had injuries throughout the season. So we didn't really see enough from him but clearly the jets haven't don't believe him enough to be born receiver because they drafted elijah more. And when you're looking at college football last season devante. Smith had a great season but a lot of people are not talking about elijah more enough and i believe elijah moore had the second most receiving yards in college football last season in a shortened season. So this is a guy you can make the case for is a very very good receiver and it was. It was definitely disappointing for him. To see 'em fall out of the first round. But i absolutely love this landing spot with zach wilson in leiden. More both being rookies. I think the chemistry is going to develop an plus alleged. moore's blazing fast receiver. He can like a four three forty and this is the guy. That's an impressive rat runner to me to really has a little bit of it all. He may not be the biggest receiver the biggest taller receiver. But i think that he s potential to be a slot receiver a coup number for the jets in years to come so i am all about allied more this year and going forward i think there may even be better than rashad. Bateman and may be the third or fourth fest receiver in this class. Well i just wanna stay for the viewers. You know anybody. That's been listening to us. Knows that you're not just being a homer on him because you were higher than just about everybody in. The industry like the entire draft process before the draft. So i know it's not just because he landed at the jets because i would call you crazy. It was just for that reason. But you know i think you make interesting cases you know it you also knowing you. You're not a very high. You weren't high on the corey davis signing. I don't think that you're surely how on mims of abbas really really Into mems last year Going the draft process. I did not end up with him on any teams because his a draft dot com just started skyrocketing and he the point where i was taking pittman over them. Still then you. I wasn't getting him. On the turnaround you know because i also claypool and gibson ranked ahead of them but Like mims and i thought he was actually a really really interesting prospect. So at night we're willing to give on him after He's got that alphabet. I'm not willing to give up on him after a year. That a complete dumpster fire in new york last year. You know they have a completely new offense. I corey davis kinda showed that he could be the number one wide receiver. Antonio brown was hurt. Leisure you know most of those. Those guys actually kind of started splitting targets down the stretch about pretty pretty evenly. So i do. Think that Corey davis they paid him. I think they're going to at least attempt to get him. The number one spot and i do think mims profiles really well and the outside as well Us why they went out and got him with that pick. What corey davis and mims strengths are like down the field jump ball situations whereas i think Allies more profiles more is like underneath guy that can can really thrive if he gets volume. I just wonder how much volume is going to be there. If they're not running a dominant amount of sets of three watersheds. Because i do think that the other two receivers with their bodies and big catch races will Out snap him on the outside while it's interesting that you're high on Corey davis. And i know i've said before the not hot high in corey davis so i think that's another reason as to why i'm higher on a lighter more. I'm just not buying the fact. That corey davis succeeds in new york. Two years ago not last year but if we look back two years ago and a lot of people probably have wiped out from their mind. But i have not wiped that season from my mind because i was big. Encore dave's heading attest season and he completely let me down lake completely. Let me down. I'm not even sure. I'm thinking was probably healthy the entire season and i'm not even sure if he finished as top fifty receiver in the league and so fast forward a year and had a very successful year with the titans. I'm not knocking him. But here's a guy who was picked with the seventh or east kick in his draft and he was supposed to be the number one receiver for titans and we never really saw that work out for the titans. And i think they declined his fifth year option. So there's a reason why the titans aren't holding onto corey davis and i think unfortunately core gape is a receiver who can be great here and there like a devante parker. But he's not consistent enough. He's not a true number one receiver. You gotta in a way force in targets from the be successful. And i think the jets are just gonna realize the gecko that our number one receivers probably larger more in a number two receivers probably summons so. I'm not scared about corey. Davis getting targets. People were saying the same thing last season about shod paramount and how he was going to have a huge role in that new york offense and what happened in bre shot parent. Who by the way. I was extremely on extremely law. Shot payment last year. What happened to be shot. He did nothing for that offense. So i think just because the jets went after core gave us that doesn't mean that he's going to automatically demand targets. It's zach. wilson's offense now. I think zack. Wilson is going to gravitate Skies like elijah. More over corey davis and a jamison crowder dems. I think the alleged moore will end up being his normal receiver. And i think that the ceiling for more is very high to it. Might it might not happen with a larger more by think by the end of the season we're going to really realize how good of a player that allies are more is. Yeah so

Zach Wilson Elijah Moore Fifteen Picks Smith Kyle Amaury Second Round Ribisi Moore Thirty Fourth Pick Zack Wilson Second Pick York Jamison Crowder First Round Last Year Geico Davis ONE New York Elijah Zal Dumbbell Corey Davis Jets Zal Dumbbell Mims Mims NFL Like Mims Football Leiden Titans Newark Rashad
Jameson Whiskey and Cannibalism

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:28 min | 6 months ago

Jameson Whiskey and Cannibalism

"Whiskey today. Suck is soaked in whiskey. mostly jameson. Some irish whiskey a great drain for some fun times kicking back and enjoy the taste of one of the best exports. The emerald isle has to offer also popular drink in my experience for people to torture with by buying you shot after shot after shot until you're spending and puking in the parking lot talking about jameson will lead us obviously into talking about cannibalism. Yup john jameson. The founder jameson was originally a lawyer from a loa in scotland before he founded his distillery in dublin in seventeen eighty and eighteen o five. He rejoined joined by his son. John jamieson junior who took over the family business for the next forty one years junior built up the business before handing it over to his son. John jameson the third and eighteen fifty. One they were killing it by the turn of the nineteenth century. Jameson distilleries were the second largest producer in ireland of whiskey in one of the largest in the world producing a million gallons annually. Dublin at the time was the center of world whisky production. It was the second most popular spirit in the world after rum. An internationally jamison had h five became the world's number one whiskey and then almost a century later at the end of the nineteenth century. The jameson name would get tarnished a wee bit when reports came back from the congo. The john's great grandson. James s jameson. Jimmy james paid to watch a young girl be killed and eaten. Cannibalism not a great pr moment. Hard to build a successful ad campaign around some cannibalism. What the hell happened in the congo

Jameson John Jameson John Jamieson Jameson Distilleries Center Of World Whisky Dublin Scotland Jamison Ireland James S Jameson Jimmy James Congo John
"jamison" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

05:59 min | 8 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"The website has every linke related to the show and without further ado. I'd like to Have our guests The reef jamison introduced himself. If you could just tell the people. Dr jameson where to find you and and what you're about hey family. You won't dr jameson. And i'd teach said university of alabama birmingham. And i teach snap american studies program and so my losing my master's vote in psychology. My masters was in communities with a focus or emphasis on inside ozzy at florida. Indiana university and i was ashes by the only school that actually both zone psychology from that type of african senate perspective as that wins at simple in. That's why i combined my interest in african american studies with black psychology. So that's the type of work do the intellectual history of blast psychology the psychology race in racism. And i think one of the things about me like why got into this area is at first. I wanted to go and sixteen indication. It's kind of like what you did right i to do that but i didn't see how that how i get to that based on the schools and the things i was looking at one day i was in the library and i looked at found during this introduction to black studies and when i found that black scientology section. That's why i was like. Oh this idea of how we think. In what influences out thanking and how that impacts behavior in that whole section of black psychologists blew my mind. And that's when i was like. Yeah that's what i'm going to focus on. So yeah. Yeah that's that's what i do. And teach black psychology psychology hit Snap american studies. African diaspora traditions. So yeah that that that does make you know. I didn't know but on that jameson. I didn't know about that psychology of hip hop topic. Would you by giving a quick summary of the kind of scope of that class and what you guys Covering my interest i started. We'll hard part of the reason why you might not have known that. I haven't published anything on that sense. what was that all sit. Actually my first. Publication was my thesis. But in that i looked at the relationship between rap music culture identity and masculinity so i was looking hours using our wilson ceases about reactionary masculinity in the looking at different ideas of african self consciousness in tried entity in high that tied into the type of music that people listen to so that was what the publication was about in the class. What we do is at. I do psychology hip hop. But really this. I tell students we. We use hip hop is a lens for analyzing the experiences of black people so we psychology but isn't abroad since so we looked at..

jameson Indiana university both florida one African sixteen indication african american one day african alabama Dr first birmingham ozzy jamison snap american
"jamison" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

01:31 min | 8 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"jamison" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

04:41 min | 8 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"People with no noses so we don't even have the language to describe even what ourselves because we inherited a language of people in a whole different way of looking at the world so i feel like a lot of times even black people have even though we can we buy into this idea that were magical or you know. Cutting right. Made a spiritual because we are cells. Never got a chance to develop the language to describe our own culture or if we did we lost. It drew You know the middle passage and white supremacy language. Teeth thing is important. So i think that's this. Unique of one of the beauties exactly is at inch against this other language coming out of african mythology right and the thing with mythology is that it doesn't matter if it's true or false is history in history biology psycho history. It is a matter of his true. All is what impression it leaves on our minds right so i think this whole notion of this language in her grounding that language in in in that dogon mythology the gives a whole nother world you of In hit that certain things that just don't exist in particular cultures so so they look at it. through another cultures. Language is still look at it through their cultural perspective with their cultural biases. In all of those things is always. I love that. You say you're in finance by. I like bananas says to assume a language is to assume a culture. And so when i speak Goals which are like you think you're doing something you still just assuming culture in that position so too so. The language is to assume a culture in the we see what happens when people use different languages. How even judge people who might not speak a particular language yen is in value statements. That come along come along with that. Yeah yes so by all means feel. free friedrich. Continue where we left off. I'm really enjoying hardaway. Oh man onto. Yes we we had. We had the side cookies. And then there is in nineteen sixty eight. We have the birth of the origin of the association of black psychologists answer with association of black psychologists nineteen sixty so there's american psychological association. And what happens you know. They have the conference apa. Everyone goes to the conference so here..

one apa black psychologists african nineteen sixty american friedrich eight
"jamison" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

01:38 min | 8 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Browns' playoff chances take hit with 23-16 loss to Jets

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 10 months ago

Browns' playoff chances take hit with 23-16 loss to Jets

"The jets pulled off their second stunner in his many weeks by holding off the Browns twenty three twenty the Browns raced most of a twenty to three deficit before Baker Mayfield fumbled twice in the fourth quarter once on a sack in the second coming on fourth and one with one eighteen remaining Jamison Crowder caught a touchdown pass and threw one to Braxton Berrios son a razzle dazzle play Sam Darnold threw a TD pass to Chris Herndon and newer clinched the number two overall pick Mayfield threw for two hundred eighty five yards but the tenor five Browns manage just forty five on eighteen carries I'm the ferry

Browns Baker Mayfield Jamison Crowder Braxton Berrios Jets Sam Darnold Chris Herndon Mayfield
The Best Ads of 2020

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

06:24 min | 11 months ago

The Best Ads of 2020

"You're listening to yeah. That's probably and the ad we podcast. We've talked about marketing media technology in pop culture because in the end everything is an ad especially this week. Because it's our ads of the year episode. Look forward to this all year. We get to nerd out about which adds stunts activation chains weird random social media responses from brands. We really liked this year and joining me this year to talk about it. We've got enes alaya who covers Performance marketing experiential marketing for edwige. Ian it is always great to have you here. Hello thanks for having me. We've also got katie lindstrom katie as a reporter who covers up breaking news and quite often big creative campaigns that are coming out katie. It is always a pleasure to have you joining us from your in austin austin texas. Got to be here and We've also got jamison fleming senior editor for membership here at ad week. jamieson has He's involved in just about everything H- here dad wake. And so i can't think of someone better to have kind of a big picture over overview and opinions on a lot of the biggest work that came out of the year. Jameson thanks so much for making time for us. Yeah accent. it'd be here excited to really digest very weird here battle tossing. It really was and i have to say of all the years of doing this every year. The ads a determining the as years difficult just I'll go and give the the can alert in the sense that Add wigs twenty five ads of the year Including our number one pick are all on dot com as of monday So if you're listening to this Probably monday or later. You should be able to find that on advocate dot com this year. We also did a reader's choice Bracket for the first time where we let. We identified thirty two of the biggest campaigns of the year and again ads and weird social responses. And even some political fundraisers and people really went nuts with it Jamison unload by you. And i both been watching edwige stuff for a long time. The level of this readers choice voting online was bananas. Yeah i mean the the semi finals between oreos and stake of guts. Seventy two thousand votes just on twitter. And i don't think i've ever seen any twitter poll by any twitter user. Get seventy two thousand votes so kind of crazy. When two brands with loyal followings can do twitter to say at least yeah that one was a crazy match of oreo created a doomsday vault when among many other doomsday scenarios happening this year There was an asteroid supposedly headed toward earth and so oreo created an underground bunker to save its recipes and Other things so That was up against stay. Combs campaign on social media against misinformation which was a very different kind of form of marketing. But they're following turned out in force. Seventy two thousand votes later. Oreo was the winner. Only i will say by promising to follow back. People who voted thing and then and then had a real struggle to follow through on their campaign from us. So as we record this we are in the final round which is orioles doomsday vault versus The princess bride reunion which was a fundraiser for wisconsin. Democrats really brilliant idea. They brought together just almost every Living actor and a person behind the princess bride Fred savage couldn't make it because it was his brother's birthday and he was spent with him but Everyone else pretty much. He's alive was there and As a really fantastic idea. So we won't know the winner when we record this because those are being battled out over the weekend but we will be able to talk about our favorites. So with that katy. We're we're just gonna go round robin here we're gonna talk about. Each of us has individual favorites. We i am happy to talk about ad. Weeks official favorites. But let's start out just on individual katie tells about one or two that you really love this year. I was thinking about this and just kind of thinking back to the ones that i shared with my own friends and family this year. That are you know. There's some overlap in some that are just kind of silly oreos already shouted out orioles doomsday camp. But they're proud parent Short film they released a couple of months ago. One that i just thought was really powerful. And i ended up sharing with it with a bunch of different people just because i thought it was a beautiful little short film and the story behind it was at the two actors who play a gay couple are actually partners in real life and it really came through when i thought was just like a lovely example of storytelling and then to shut up the mid west. The canadian beer brand labatt made some ads in that came out in the summer but it was like they had to completely reshoot their campaign so many brands had to this year. After creating a summer campaign that was not pandemic friendly and then having to totally start from scratch and there's was one of the one of the first stories like this that i covered in more like in-depth way they literally got back from there shoot for their summer campaign on the same day. That trump announced a national emergency. And then they that these two creatives just like created these really funny ads from with it within their own homes using like a power washer to simulate tubing and using a spray bottle and a little treadmill dissimulate like wake boarding. So it's kind of a funny way to pretend like these midwesterners we're at the out at the lake having a good time when that wasn't actually possible this summer over the summer so those were a couple of them now. Did you see that one griner. No no i didn't catch that one. It's it was by the burns group in and it's a pretty small like regional brand. But i just thought it was such an interesting pivot to use the word of the year.

Enes Alaya Edwige Katie Lindstrom Katie Jamison Fleming Twitter Austin Jamieson Jameson Jamison IAN Fred Savage Oreo Combs Texas Katy Wisconsin Robin Labatt
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
NFL Injury Report: Week 2

Waddle & Silvy

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

NFL Injury Report: Week 2

"Receiver Chris Godwin isn't concussion protocol. George Kittle has been rolled out. George Kendall. Hi. Did you see his need bent in a really strange when he came back and finished that game in that loss against the Cardinals? He was just ruled out, so I don't think it's on your hot list. Okay. What else do we see Anything else of note? I saw it last night, The Bangles tied and CJ Zuma. Zuma has a torch Achilles. He's out for the season cold. Starting, Jack Doyle is out against the Vikings. Jamison Crowder for the Jets is out against the 40 Niners. As you mentioned Adam, the Lions have ruled out Kenny Golladay. Cornerback Desmond Trufant and guard Joe Doll. Free money Packers No tackle Kenny Clark is out for lions. I got to tell you, I think that the injury reports are lighter than I thought they'd be after one week, especially with no training camp, but

Cj Zuma George Kendall Lions Chris Godwin Kenny Golladay Kenny Clark Cardinals George Kittle Jamison Crowder Desmond Trufant Jack Doyle Joe Doll Vikings Jets Adam
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

02:51 min | 1 year ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the denture of the gallon I just see a big black guy I don't I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison's feedback is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call to lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested and that was their first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape however seem long course man in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

Detroit
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 1 year ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Now a man who says he was falsely arrested after a computer algorithm mis identified his face is speaking out as NPR's Bobby Allen reports critics of the technology said case shows how unreliable the tool is police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the picture of the guy out I just see a big black I don't at all I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison Spivak is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested that was our first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape how they perceive law enforcement in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Jamison thank we good afternoon food lovers wherever you are in the world I'm Cheryl alters Jamison and were heating it up and eating it up too thanks to my engineer Dino Thompson here in the studio who's doing his very best as always to keep me on track today he's also getting to have some of those as other duties are required part of his job today as those of you work in northern New Mexico at the moment no it's been a very snowy weekend hours few days at all and he's the one who gets to go up on the roof and knock snow off of the satellite dishes so that we can actually broadcasted we can receive signals from some of our other shows and things so anyway yeah right now is getting to sit inside which probably makes it a lot happier even though we don't have any food in here right now we'll see if we can fix that later on well you know he's the one who does all the work anyway I just get to sit here and talk about some of my favorite things in the world which are food and beverages too and we're gonna do some good beverage conversation here in just a minute well are you as excited about food as I am you know if you've ever check my website that I have all kinds of fun things going on in the world of food and there lots of my Instagram images and other things that you can find at the the website excited about food dot com you know the best way to get a hold of me if you have ideas on our show here and whether you want to comment on something you've heard or you have an idea for something that we ought to be investigating and talk about you can reach me at Cheryl C. H. E. R. Y. L. at Santa Fe dot com all right.

Jamison Dino Thompson New Mexico Cheryl C. H. E. R. Y. L. engineer Instagram
Social Distancing is No Joke

Guy Benson

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Social Distancing is No Joke

"But I saw on Saturday night a lot of people that I know and like on my social media feeds posting videos or photographs of themselves in a bunch of friends out at crowded bars and restaurants celebrating St Patrick's day and drinking and laughing it up and they had all these sort of snarky ironic hashtags and commentaries about social distancing in quarantine and ha ha it just isn't funny at all and it's actually extremely stupid and selfish to be doing that I tweeted blown away by the number of people I follow posting Instagram stories of themselves out of crowded bars and restaurants with ironic tags about social distancing the quarantines here's the message that I want to get across number one we know based on other countries experience because there are other countries or ahead of us in the time line on corona virus we know that there are a lot of young people who have a corona virus who don't have serious or any symptoms even if you are a symptomatic and totally fine despite having her on a virus you are contagious and is extremely contagious and even if you think that you don't interact with many people in the danger zone quote unquote older people let's say sixty five plus people with underlying medical conditions you don't know people don't walk around with their underlying medical conditions plastered on their forehead you have no idea you have no idea if the person that you brushed past and briefed on at the bar while you're getting your Shamrock shots of whatever Jamison and something you don't know if that person is then going to go home where there's a multi generational family including grandparents or if you're gonna go fill up your car the next day and put your hand on you know a gasoline pump that the next person who drives up to seventy and uses the same pump it is highly contagious that's why this is such a bad idea social distancing isn't some sort of buzz word that's fine it's an actual new lifestyle that we have to embrace for the time being we are seeing examples out of Italy of what can go wrong when people don't take this stuff

Jamison Italy
Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

07:39 min | 1 year ago

Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

"All right local pastries will be kicking off at Tuesday with amazing friends he's a Polish tradition they're also breaking other sugary sweet Chicago Chicago police police police officers officers officers and and and their their their families families families bakeries bakeries bakeries located located located at at at fifty fifty fifty nine nine nine twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven west west Lawrence Lawrence Avenue Avenue they're they're selling selling area area shaped shaped like like hearts hearts and and Chicago Chicago flag flag all all falling falling off off in in blue blue line team at the proceeds from all the cookie sales will go to Chicago police memorial foundation which aids families of officers who were killed or wounded in the line of duty the owner of the billions ski is the owner and the chef of delightful pastries in Chicago and she joins us tonight welcome in Dover good evening how are you I am great I am great first let's talk about the bakery generators separate celebrating twenty years which is very cool thank you and what I love about what you are committed to you is you are putting V. best ingredients into everything that you do you know what that that's a real commitment on my end because I really believe I should have quality ingredients in my products I don't think you should have a PhD in chemistry to read my labels I believe in butter flour sugar eggs yeah I think if we have good ingredients that go into the product we have a great product and then we feel good afterwards I think a lot of the times of people take short cuts because they want to have a fast monetary gain but people don't support those kind of places so I think it's very important that people that come to delightful pastries say we have Nielsen Massey vanilla which is the best vanilla in all of United States made right here in Waukegan by this wonderful family for three generations now so it's and you know we use all butter from Wisconsin thank you Wisconsin you know my flowers from Ohio and from Minnesota you know just a lot of local ingredients a lot of great ingredients I just think you know butter should be the foundation of an fresh eggs should be the foundation for a honey cakes we use real honey you know so it's just it's just you wanted to have deliciousness you know people's people said your did your punch you made me we put you know thank you thank you you know it's funny you say that is there was a bakery that was around I won't say what it is for fifty sixty years and I got taken over by for the first time by another family they changed all the recipes they kind of cheap in the the goodness of what they were doing and they were gone in six months so knowing that you know this is gonna create nice legacy for for you and your family you know what I th I am I'm hoping one of my daughters will take up the mantle after after I'm you know after I'm ready to retire I don't know when that will be you know my mom my mom started this business so it was we started that in naming in nineteen ninety eight and my mom just retired last year and finally she gave me the recipe for punch you so as to get issues given that herself he was getting into like once I retire you'll have it but not nothing until then and you know what's what people are like what makes punch you punch you wait what what's what's so different about it so a real punch I could that's one pump check many punch keys so I'm teaching you guys Polish has been like that and so you know you will you put rom in the dough we put orange oil and that that would put lemon oil in the W's milk we use barter and you know when you eat upon check in with you know like a Krispy Kreme donut it flattens into pancake yeah well up upon check the dough springs back and holds itself yet yeah and you really did it for the dough mostly you don't really you did for the filling like American donuts have this much filling in and it's just like you can really taste the dough and that's kind of sad because the the the beauty of it is the doe how delicious how delicate you know it's fluffy it's crunch on the outside deliciously moist and goodness on the inside and I love coming up with wonderful tart fillings like Weezer long potter we use nice I make passion fruit jam is a thing that's a Polish thing hello Mister he's thing I grew up with yeah Tom is a Polish thing we love our heart to heart fillings pulls people do not like sweet pastries we you know when we post people come and I'm there like I wanna see desert that's not sweet enough that's the first thing that comes out of the mouth and yet we believe in having something rich pottery full of group Belgian chocolate and walnuts and nuts and lots of beers in a post poll should point towards you know like there's one walnut poppy toward that I make that I literally one liter of vodka goes into the entire thing while because it's that busy but then it has to sit for four days before you can eat it so all that lot of that stuff veterans but the flavor is still there so lot of Polish pastries like our have tons and tons of alcohol and actually European pastries have tons and tons sure think of tiramisu think about fruit fruit cake think of a Kinshasa toward a black forest torte absolutely all have you know somebody said oh you're just you're just you know to contributing to the delinquency of minors I first of all if you don't want rid of them in one day that's pretty when you're cooking the stuff it yeah the potency is is gone by that time now there's you've got the traditional but you've also got some really cool gourmet flavors as well let's talk about some of the traditional ones that you have so the traditional ones are plum butter which we've mentioned before Polish people are crazy about plan which I'm not a guy that brings food and booze into the studio because listeners can't see they can't taste what what I'm doing in here but I will describe this the best they can and you were so kind to bring daughters your big highlight that's that's that's my favorite then rose petal jelly that's very very traditional very Polish and we use real raspberry preserves a local company here that makes the boss raspberry preserves there's just sugar packed in lemon juice and raspberries and if nothing else that plan has a beautiful flavor you know it's a great little tart but I'm I'm chasing sweet because of what you put into the dough surrounding it so I'm getting a little bit of both it is coming in and out that's really cool thank you thank we we try really hard and then some of the other it's nice and tight is good yeah yeah it's it's you know it's it's that's the whole point about plans you kind of want to make the jam kind of to reflect the fruit when you eat fresh plums they're not sugary sweet they have that little bit of sweet and tartness and that's exactly how the jam as the crazy flavors as I call them we have German chocolate we have Jameson whiskey chocolate okay yes you got these drunken get a which I love so Jamison's here Davis is in chocolate custard I'd add that can't wait to taste that when I'm a busy guy but given the low beam yeah but you got this moonshine and lemon and that's what we've got here tell me about the moonshine so the story is I have a my packaging guy bought a house in Kentucky and I said listen Simon when you go over there can you just bring me some moonshine and he when he was getting his house built he asked everybody for moonshine and and everybody would get so upset him there's no moon shining in talking the plumbers electricians that window guys the dark eyes everybody yeah and finally he built his house is sitting on his porch and some guy pulls up right to his to his front stop and he's it's are you the guy looking for moonshiners like yeah he brings out this carton of more of these Mason jars full of money it is like a hundred Bucks the drop that often like drives right off like it was it was like a transaction and have a little remote brings it back you say's Dover I found your moon shine so I said what flavor it would be really good for punchy with moonshine enacted lemon card will make this delicious lemon curd from scratch yeah with lemon juice and butter and eggs and sugar together then we think I spy to it like a little sharpness even yes yeah

Chicago
"jamison" Discussed on Creepify

Creepify

09:25 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on Creepify

"May finally get the P.. She has been waiting for her son. John has been missing for four years now but this weekend a possible break sky five flew over the sands boys mountains were hunters found the skeletal. Two were Maine's of two adults and a child. This is the same area where bobby and Cherilyn Jamison disappeared with. Their young daughter gives his capacity spoke to Bobby's mother about her long. Wait for answer. The Jamison family lived here near Lake. EUFAULA but bobby's mom says they were looking linked to move to the mountains in early October of two thousand nine. They made the hour long. Drive to Latimer county to look for property. But we're never seen again for the last four years. starlet Jamison has worried and wondered. Bobby was one of these people that was always helping people her son. Bobby Jameson has been missing. Sing along with his wife Sherline and their six year old daughter Madison. She was always be no get into something then she looked at you with a big brown around is eight days after they were reported missing. The family's truck was found in the mountains. Maisy then just a puppy was inside barely alive. The remains discovered by hunters. This weekend were less than three miles away around the same time. The remains were found. Bobby Jameson mom says no official official confirmation the remains are the Jamison family through partial skeletal remains in some some clothing shoes things like that. This mom believes God. His answered her prayer revealing the remains of their bodies but she believes their souls left long ago. And I know that there with God now and they're in a better place the FBI says it will take dental records and DNA tests. You prove the remains are those of the Jamison family but say there have have been no other reports of missing people in that area and you follow can pass off Theo. Five Years Bobby and Cherilyn Jamison Manson and their six year old daughter. Madison went missing in the Rhodope Mountain area of southeast home in October. Two Thousand and nine Over one hundred people were enlisted to search for the Jamison family but no sign them was found until November two thousand thirteen. The skeleton remains of two adults and a child were found in the woods face down and side by side roughly three miles from where their vehicle has been abandoned. It wasn't until July two thousand fourteen at these remains were positively identified as Jason Family. The cause of death was never determined rather than provide closure to the Jameson friends and family. It just raise questions as to what really really happen. The jetsons live in follow Oklahoma about thirty miles away from where they were found in the isolated mountain range where doke okay is home to just over five. Hundred people in the Jameson. were interested in purchasing a forty acre plot of land although Sherlund and son from a previous relationship Colton so was mother just weeks before she went missing and never mentioned plans to move when their truck was found in two thousand nine there was no sign of distress or a struggle in the vehicle had not crashed inside the car. Were Bobby and share ORLANDS wallets. ID's mobile phones GPS maps and thirty two thousand dollars in cash but disturbingly. The family dog mazy was also in the coal malnutrition from not having eaten in a week. The dog survived ride and went to live. With Bobby's mother theory surrounding what happened to the Jamison family have swirled since disappearance. One theory suggests that it was a murder suicide. Both adults had suffered from depression sherline. Most recently after the death of her sister bite full Levin page page letter was written bobby from Sharon. She was found dead in the Bannon. Truck sherline pistol was missing. Another theory points needs to bobby with his father Bob. Jamieson Bob had a contemptuous relationship with his father stemming Ming from the Prophet of a gas station that was supposed to be split between father and son when it was so bobby ended up suing his father his mother starlet. starlet clams your ex-husband. Threaten the family police decided it was not a credible theory. Despite rumors of Bob Seniors Ehlers ties to the Mexican Mafia. He died two months after his son went missing. Drugs were also thought to be part of the equation. Red Oak is known for Producing Crystal Meth and share. Lemon bobby both look random in the weeks before their disappearance security video of the two outside their house today they left in the mountains showed them. Moving in a trance-like state and the huge amount of cash in a a truck made this a credible theory even share liens best friend. Nikki should know Jameson. Were possibly involved in a one off meth deal because Zor experiencing some money troubles it's time but both Sheridan's mother Connie and Bobby's mother starlet. Do not believe their kids were involved in drugs and police found no no evidence of Elizabeth Substances in the Jameson. Home or truck was interesting theory behind the death. The Jamison family has to do with costs witchcraft and evil spirits during the initial investigation. Before the bodies were found. The Families Pastor Gary Brandon Topa. Oh police the Jason's had been involved in spiritual warfare both Bobby Ann. Sheridan claim to have seen spirits in their house belonging to the family who died long ago daughter Madison claim to speak to the spirit of the child who died in the house. Bobby asked his pasture for special bullets. We'll have to shoot the spirits with and claimed he consulted a Satanic Bible to exercise. The Property Nikki missed both she and Sheridan were interested in witches and both had bought which was as a joke which the police found when searching the Jameson property. Despite joking about witches Nikki felt the Johnson House was haunted once I was in the living room and this sort of gray mist descended down the stairs. It really scared me. Nikki told the Daily Mail will she also said this airline told her gentle husband. Bobby would come toward her. With is completely dead and black like he was possessed. Nikki doesn't believe in witchcraft was behind her friend's death but Cheryl may have been a bigger believer the Nikki she would leave notes around the house that would say things. He's like get out saying and was researching whether the house was a native American. Burial ground. Nikki Connie you. You know. Sheridan's mother believes her family fell victim to witchcraft of a religious call. Connie claims that the portion of Oklahoma's known for harboring costs and stuff like that and it was told that she was on a hit list around the time of her disappearance. Connie doesn't offer the name of the call or or any other details trail in the Jameson cases. Now called Israel the sheriff at the time of the disappearance with the force in two thousand eleven and moved overseas according to Nikki. He couldn't stand the guilt of not being able to find. Madison's kill Pastor Gary Brandon also left the area shortly after the James Disappearance has spoken to anyone about the case. Even though the Jameson remains were found and put the rest not knowing what happened has caused tormented surviving friends and family. That that will probably never end. I hope you enjoyed this week. On Crete before. I hope I struck a nerve or gave you that. Feeling as if you're gladys gladys daylight or you're freaked out because of nightfall if you have a creepy story you want me to tell us a segment in creepy Fi and send me A. DM On twitter. The story you've heard of or experienced yourself and I'll read it aloud episodes. Now you can subscribe on Itunes Google. Google play pod bean or wherever else you listen to your podcast offer free now. If you feel need support my show you can do so my patreon If you're waiting for my next episode drop feel free to check out my podcast I host. It's called Lewt News L. E. W. T. news for an upbeat hind his scary social podcast. But until next episode just remember to stay safe and watch yeah darkness.

bobby Bobby Jameson Jamison family Nikki Connie Madison Sheridan Cherilyn Jamison Jason Family Jamison Bobby Ann Cherilyn Jamison Manson Jameson Oklahoma Latimer county Sherline EUFAULA Maine John FBI
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"In Vegas and being sober And that would be a bit of a head scrambling experience I think for most people given what you see on that Strip and you've written extensively about Sobriety and about addiction in recovering covering an and beyond. There's this idea that there's some sort of connection between dependency and creativity. Is that a myth to you. Or there's there's something to that so when I was coming of age as a writer I very very much grew up on these ideas. And these kind of mythologies of the drunk genius and the kind of rogue artist WHO's self destructive tendencies were intimately bound up with his ability to create beautiful art and my book recovering was sort sort of long reckoning with what happened to those set of ideas in my mind when I got sober and my own attempts to find a supplementary on alternative turn it off manse turn it set of stories. I guess about the kinds of creativity that writers had discovered when they got sober or win recovering in those. I'd heard the stories of drunk right. I hadn't heard the stories of the SOPA writer author. In fact there are quite a few of them and so I think is it. Is it a myth that there's a relationship between dependency and creativity not entirely because certainly a relationship between pain and creativity. I mean people make beautiful for art out of painful experiences and addiction. Alcoholism often that pain becomes kind of driving engine. That writers are working. I'm from I think the myth at least the myth for me that I had to really contend with was that addiction had some kind of monopoly on the creative process says or on being creative engine. You know that that people can make creative work from other spaces as well. One of those spaces look like you'll often hear from musicians. Who who have heard those same stories and they perhaps have come through Addiction find themselves on the other side and they'll talk about something that they have gained reigned as a musician or that. They've gained as performer. What do you think that that you've gained as a writer and sobriety so for Lisa Brady was a lot about waking up which is not to say that I was asleep for the first part of my life but that alcohol really gave me this way? Eight to check out of experience to check out of feeling to sort of shut something off in my head in a way that I found a lot of relief in and so when I was sober I was you know in the beginning. Very painfully awake. I was aware of everything I was feeling and I was aware of. You know I almost felt even more physically aware of the world. I was aware of like light and cold and it just felt like the world was very very palpably present and and I think that was a struggle to just show up for everything to show up for every feeling to show up for the world to show up for other people but there's also a lot of richness snus and being awake and being aware and so for me it actually was quite a natural thing that sobriety would ultimately create a deeper kind kind of creative energy because it was it felt like a tune and felt like being present in the world rather than always trying to flee it and from that presence. There was just a lot to notice a lot today. Tell me about writing and maybe this comes out of that moment but in writing at length we live in a time. Now where where. People are consumed with not just brevity but he all the things that they should be reading that they haven't read because they're stocked up on their phones. You look at things things In seconds not in minutes or hours what do you love about about writing long and writing. Essays Yeah so first of all I guess I should say I'm glad we can have lots of kinds of writing in the world in the same way that maybe I was saying earlier. I'm glad that we can have lots of different kinds of journalism. Because I think we need first responders. You know there's a lot happening right now. That is really difficult to make sense of. And I'm really grateful that there are people out there who are going to turn around an OP. Ed In twenty four hours because I wanna read it and I want to know I want I want to sort of have those virgils who are guiding us through hell like a more immediate clip But I myself feel like the most useful things I have have to offer anyone rise out of letting myself think about something often for years before I put out some piece of writing about it and I I do think it's important to also preserve space for that sort of long term thinking and researching and you know even with a very personal essay. I'll probably Lee spend two or three years on it which is not not doing anything else for this two to three years that I'm giving it time to percolate giving it time giving myself time to revive the stories. I've told myself about myself which I think is really important Giving time a chance to just complicate my perspective I think we all have those Azizi what I call like cocktail party versions of our lives and what's happened to us and sometimes sitting with a piece of writing for a longtime is the way to get underneath that cocktail party anecdote version and let the truth. Be More complicated. So ultimately I think whether whether I'm writing into my life or away from my life part of the virtue of time just comes back to letting something be as complicated as it needs to be and sometimes it takes six years for those other layers of complexity to emerge. Is it hard to let those pieces go after two to three years of thinking about them off it. It's actually write about times. They also can reach saturation point with a piece. I mean I'm never going to let the whale go like I'm happy to talk about fifty two blue and told pulled ahead of time and I still sometimes listen to. That song was obsessed with when I was writing about him. So you know I still sometimes speak to subjects from pieces is that I finished writing so in a way I never let go suicide from the whale. What are you obsessed with now? I have spent a lot of the fall. Obsessed with the photography of Gary Winner Grand. There was this beautiful exhibit of Gary Winnick Color Photographs up at the Brooklyn Museum that I was going to with my Daughter who's a A toddler Gary winner grand. You know in the fifties and sixties took photographs of Coney island the streets of Manhattan rest-stops across American highways like often public spaces where ordinary people were just living their lives and I think his photography is is yet another another way of engaged in ongoing obsession with ordinary people. Ordinary lives ordinary moments banal places banal experiences says and how much All of that ordinariness. How much profundity and meaning it can hold? This is a wonderful collection and It's a a real pleasure to talk to you about obsession and other matters leslie. Thank you thank you so much for having me a pleasure to talk to you as well take care bye bye leslie. Jamison is an SAS and the the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Her latest book is called. Make it scream. Make It burn for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

writer Vegas Gary Winnick New York Times Jamison Lisa Brady Brooklyn Museum Coney island Lee leslie Manhattan
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"And being sober And that would be a bit of a head scrambling experience I think for most people given what you see on that Strip and you've written extensively about Sobriety and about addiction in recovering covering an and beyond. There's this idea that there's some sort of connection between dependency and creativity. Is that a myth to you. Or there's there's something to that so when I was coming of age as a writer I very very much grew up on these ideas. And these kind of mythologies of the drunk genius and the kind of rogue artist WHO's self destructive tendencies were intimately bound up with his ability to create beautiful art and my book recovering was sort sort of long reckoning with what happened to those set of ideas in my mind when I got sober and my own attempts to find a supplementary on alternative turn it off manse turn it set of stories. I guess about the kinds of creativity that writers had discovered when they got sober or win recovering in those. I'd heard the stories of drunk right. I hadn't heard the stories of the SOPA writer author. In fact there are quite a few of them and so I think is it. Is it a myth that there's a relationship between dependency and creativity not entirely because certainly a relationship between pain and creativity. I mean people make beautiful for art out of painful experiences and addiction. Alcoholism often that pain becomes kind of driving engine. That writers are working. I'm from I think the myth at least the myth for me that I had to really contend with was that addiction had some kind of monopoly on the creative process says or on being creative engine. You know that that people can make creative work from other spaces as well. One of those spaces look like you'll often hear from musicians. Who who have heard those same stories and they perhaps have come through Addiction find themselves on the other side and they'll talk about something that they have gained reigned as a musician or that. They've gained as performer. What do you think that that you've gained as a writer and sobriety so for Lisa Brady was a lot about waking up which is not to say that I was asleep for the first part of my life but that alcohol really gave me this way? Eight to check out of experience to check out of feeling to sort of shut something off in my head in a way that I found a lot of relief in and so when I was sober I was you know in the beginning. Very painfully awake. I was aware of everything I was feeling and I was aware of. You know I almost felt even more physically aware of the world. I was aware of like light and cold and it just felt like the world was very very palpably present and and I think that was a struggle to just show up for everything to show up for every feeling to show up for the world to show up for other people but there's also a lot of richness snus and being awake and being aware and so for me it actually was quite a natural thing that sobriety would ultimately create a deeper kind kind of creative energy because it was it felt like a tune and felt like being present in the world rather than always trying to flee it and from that presence. There was just a lot to notice a lot today. Tell me about writing and maybe this comes out of that moment but in writing at length we live in a time. Now where where. People are consumed with not just brevity but he all the things that they should be reading that they haven't read because they're stocked up on their phones. You look at things things In seconds not in minutes or hours what do you love about about writing long and writing. Essays Yeah so first of all I guess I should say I'm glad we can have lots of kinds of writing in the world in the same way that maybe I was saying earlier. I'm glad that we can have lots of different kinds of journalism. Because I think we need first responders. You know there's a lot happening right now. That is really difficult to make sense of. And I'm really grateful that there are people out there who are going to turn around an OP. Ed In twenty four hours because I wanna read it and I want to know I want I want to sort of have those virgils who are guiding us through hell like a more immediate clip But I myself feel like the most useful things I have have to offer anyone rise out of letting myself think about something often for years before I put out some piece of writing about it and I I do think it's important to also preserve space for that sort of long term thinking and researching and you know even with a very personal essay. I'll probably Lee spend two or three years on it which is not not doing anything else for this two to three years that I'm giving it time to percolate giving it time giving myself time to revive the stories. I've told myself about myself which I think is really important Giving time a chance to just complicate my perspective I think we all have those Azizi what I call like cocktail party versions of our lives and what's happened to us and sometimes sitting with a piece of writing for a longtime is the way to get underneath that cocktail party anecdote version and let the truth. Be More complicated. So ultimately I think whether whether I'm writing into my life or away from my life part of the virtue of time just comes back to letting something be as complicated as it needs to be and sometimes it takes six years for those other layers of complexity to emerge. Is it hard to let those pieces go after two to three years of thinking about them off it. It's actually write about times. They also can reach saturation point with a piece. I mean I'm never going to let the whale go like I'm happy to talk about fifty two blue and told pulled ahead of time and I still sometimes listen to. That song was obsessed with when I was writing about him. So you know I still sometimes speak to subjects from pieces is that I finished writing so in a way I never let go suicide from the whale. What are you obsessed with now? I have spent a lot of the fall. Obsessed with the photography of Gary Winner Grand. There was this beautiful exhibit of Gary Winnick Color Photographs up at the Brooklyn Museum that I was going to with my Daughter who's a A toddler Gary winner grand. You know in the fifties and sixties took photographs of Coney island the streets of Manhattan rest-stops across American highways like often public spaces where ordinary people were just living their lives and I think his photography is is yet another another way of engaged in ongoing obsession with ordinary people. Ordinary lives ordinary moments banal places banal experiences says and how much All of that ordinariness. How much profundity and meaning it can hold? This is a wonderful collection and It's a a real pleasure to talk to you about obsession and other matters leslie. Thank you thank you so much for having me a pleasure to talk to you as well take care bye bye leslie. Jamison is an SAS and the the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Her latest book is called. Make it scream. Make It burn for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

writer Gary Winnick New York Times Jamison Manhattan Lisa Brady Brooklyn Museum Coney island Lee leslie
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"Not just any whale song though. The sound pattern is similar to the call of a blue whale but at a much higher frequency the mystery behind did that sound has gripped the imagination of people right around the world. Leslie Jamison tells that story of obsession and others like it in her latest collection of essays. Make it scream make it burn. Leslie is the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Leslie Good Morning Can Morning Matt. Let me start to be here. It's great to have you let me start with that sound. It's the sound of fifty two blue. What is the story of this whale? The story of fifty blue which is still ongoing actually is the story of the whale who ultimately became known as the loneliest whale in the world as you said his his his song was first discovered by these naval audio engineers. Once a set of Navy hydrophones had been kind of decommissioned from tracking Soviet subs at the after the end of the Cold War and they heard the song that was unlike. Any whale song. They'd ever heard and wants. Their results became public. People became obsessed with this this elusive Wale and his song for a couple of reasons that his song was different from any other whales and that he was always tracked traveling alone. I was interested in telling not only the story of the whale himself. And how he had been discovered but really the stories of people who had become obsessed with him and why they had become obsessed with him and and what sorts of meanings they projected onto him. Told me more about that. Because to your point people people became obsessed with this. Well Yeah I think and and I'm very interested in in getting at the insides of people in the mysterious insides of people through these things that they get consume buying. Can't let go of so you know I tell the story. Three of a Polish tabloid photographer who got down by his girlfriend and became very attached to the whale as a sort of mascot of heartbreak and ended up getting a massive massive tattoo of the whale. That I can show you many many photographs of if you're interested across his back I tell the story of a an Irish union organizer Sir. who sort of restarted his life and Middle Age and for him the whale was a mascot of endurance? I really got quite close to one woman men who was recovering from a coma up in Harlem and for her the whale was simultaneously symbol of loneliness and a symbol of what it might mean into be resolutely adamantly independent. Why did people project so much onto the whale? There's a line that somebody says that the whale is everything. What was it about this whale? That allowed them not just to get the Tattoo and to write songs about it and to create art inspired by the whale but to project all of that onto this thing I think there were a few elements at play. I think for starters. The whale was simultaneously vivid and distance. So it's it's an immediate media image of this whale all alone in the vast ocean you can picture you can kinda get attached to that image but the will was far enough away that we didn't really know do that much about him and that not knowing made it easier to project sort of everything onto him. I also think there's something about Wales Moby. Dick is obviously the original white canvas. Bewail who comes to stand for lots of different things to lots of different people in the Melville novel but I I think whales are simultaneously genially so huge and powerful and that with this particular whale there was a sense of vulnerability living alongside that huge massive power because has he was always alone because he was a little bit different and I think those veins of vulnerability made him a a a more appealing source of obsession. What were are you more interested in the whale or that sense of Obsession I? My ultimate interest was within the obsession of which became a participant in as well as the documents are of. I there anybody who knows me during the eighteen months span probably two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen. When I was working on that long piece nose and was subjected to listening to like a particular song that had been inspired by the whale? Everybody in my life was hearing a lot about the whale. I myself was coming out of a long term relationship and so I think that idea of solitude and what could be done with solitude became Quite moving to me as well and so when I was writing about these people who are obsessed. I wasn't writing about them. As kind of clinical anthropologist. I was writing about them as as kindred spirits in a way. How'd you land on this? I mean you have written a lot about obsession and things that people become obsessed with whether it's running incredibly long distances whether it's it's the whale whether it's a mysterious skin condition or the idea of reincarnation how'd you end up landing on what you become obsessed with so there are lots of pads to my subjects. Sometimes their personal so in the case of the ultra marathon the brutal race through the Tennessee Z.. Wilderness that you mentioned i. It first came onto my radar screen because my brother was running it and he is now run it run it and not finished it many times which is kind of in some ways points race did not finish other pieces come to me. Through editors and editors approach me with a lot of ideas that I don't take so I think it it always always comes down to the question of whether I feel both a deeper level of connection to the story and usually that deeper level of connection comes from feeling like I can tell both the surface story of the whale of families who believe their kids were reincarnated spirits from the past. There's there's that story that I can report out on the tangible level but for me to really take the story on there has to be some set of deeper questions that I feel like that surface. This material is granting the access to and that's ultimately my entry point into the story. How do you define that? I mean the the idea of obsession because it's not just a fascination. It's not a preoccupation. It's something that's deeper and it's not just about time either. It's it's something that goes beyond that. What's what's the definition that you apply to that I think for me part of part of what I come back to you in thinking about? What makes something an obsession? Is that it. It feels as much a part of of a person as the external realities of their lives so their family life their job life their daily commute their their home where they live. You know that that this obsession if you were to ask that person like who are you. What makes you who you are? What makes you tick that? This obsession would be just as much a part of that answer. Maybe even a bigger part of that answer then. Those External realities of their daily pragmatic life. Life it's almost like if if every person is sort of the is the version of like the surface of the earth or kind of geologic crust than the obsession is this Fisher that opens in the earth in. It feels like that Fisher can deliver me to something deeper and more multi and stranger inside of them. You could dismiss some of the things that people people are obsessed with. There's a piece in the collection about couple who believes that their son was Second World War pilot and his past life and it could be easy to say. Well that's odd and kind of put it off to one side. You don't do that. The why the reincarnation piece was a good example of the fact act that there was a reality happening there no matter what. So maybe there was the reincarnation of a World War Two fighter pilot in in which case that was a reality that was happening but even even if you were to somehow which would be impossible I think totally disprove the possibility that he was reincarnated fighter. Pilot there's still a reality of what's happening there. which is that a family has constructed an entire sense of identity around around the soul of their son being the sole of this pilot? And that's become a big part of their sense of who he is as a person it's become a big sense of who for him who he is says the person and it's become a big part of their family narrative so for me it's impossible to dismiss because whatever the truth of the reincarnation piece there is a truth truth happening there of the store. Is that this family has been telling themselves and kind of constructing their their lives around as a journalist. Or you comfortable with that. I mean you talk about with this in in The pieces as well the line that you may or may not be crossing. It's not as though you believe their story. But you don't completely dismiss it as well and you almost believe you you you find yourself almost aligning with with what they're saying right. Yeah so I think my I think. My understanding of my role was the journalist in relation to their story was that I had to pursue that angle. Of how does the story of reincarnation align with the facts that we can see your. The scientific frameworks we do have but at the same time it also felt like to me and even more compelling part of my role as a journalist was to really investigate what the story had come. I'm too mean for the family and to be as honest as I could on the page about my own. Subjective investments in the story. Why I felt defensive? Incisive of this belief in reincarnation why I wanted to sort of make a case for a belief in reincarnation as suggesting something beautiful about a human understanding of the soul even if we couldn't back it up with physics for example. When I'm writing about reincarnation I'm also early on and twelve step recovery and actually a a lot of the ideas that were appealing to me about twelve step recovery? Were also appealing to me in the vision of Self Hood that reincarnation suggested and so I put that I put put that kind of bias on the table. Because I think I'm telling a story of my encounter with a phenomenon and that's a part of that story. It's also but encounters with with people told me a little bit of votes the photographer that you meet in one of these pieces any appeal. Yeah another another instance of obsession. In this case I think both identity and and time the passage of time have have a lot to do with with her obsession but Anne is a photographer who has been photographing the same family in in Mexico for almost thirty years at taking many many trips to spend many many weeks in their company a lot of her method involves does getting close at both emotionally and literally so that she can show up enough times to be present for the shots that are ultimately going and it be the ones that kind of crystallized some truth for her but I was really interested in her photography as an art practice but I was also really interested in her emotional investment in that work the way that she kind of wasn't able to let go of it. What did you learn from her obsession? A couple of things one that the same things that make a creative process beautiful and profound can also make it wrenching and difficult so I think for her part of what I loved about the photographs. She had created of this family was the fact that they existed over thirty years the fact that they seemed saturated with the intimacy of these bonds. But I also saw the way is that you know. First of all there was a a kind of pain embedded in her relationship with them because she was exposed to the injustice of their poverty the extent of their suffering not that their lives were entirely composed of suffering but they held a lot of difficulty. And that you know for her there was a a real ongoing pain in becoming so close to them so I think that double edged sword quality of like the same same thing that makes something strong can also make it..

Leslie Jamison New York Times Wale coma Tennessee Harlem Dick Bewail Wales Fisher Anne Melville Mexico
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"Not just any whale song though. The sound pattern is similar to the call of a blue whale but at a much higher frequency the mystery behind did that sound has gripped the imagination of people right around the world. Leslie Jamison tells that story of obsession and others like it in her latest collection of essays. Make it scream make it burn. Leslie is the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Leslie Good Morning Can Morning Matt. Let me start to be here. It's great to have you let me start with that sound. It's the sound of fifty two blue. What is the story of this whale? The story of fifty blue which is still ongoing actually is the story of the whale who ultimately became known as the loneliest whale in the world as you said his his his song was first discovered by these naval audio engineers. Once a set of Navy hydrophones had been kind of decommissioned from tracking Soviet subs at the after the end of the Cold War and they heard the song that was unlike. Any whale song. They'd ever heard and wants. Their results became public. People became obsessed with this this elusive Wale and his song for a couple of reasons that his song was different from any other whales and that he was always tracked traveling alone. I was interested in telling not only the story of the whale himself. And how he had been discovered but really the stories of people who had become obsessed with him and why they had become obsessed with him and and what sorts of meanings they projected onto him. Told me more about that. Because to your point people people became obsessed with this. Well Yeah I think and and I'm very interested in in getting at the insides of people in the mysterious insides of people through these things that they get consume buying. Can't let go of so you know I tell the story. Three of a Polish tabloid photographer who got down by his girlfriend and became very attached to the whale as a sort of mascot of heartbreak and ended up getting a massive massive tattoo of the whale. That I can show you many many photographs of if you're interested across his back I tell the story of a an Irish union organizer Sir. who sort of restarted his life and Middle Age and for him the whale was a mascot of endurance? I really got quite close to one woman men who was recovering from a coma up in Harlem and for her the whale was simultaneously symbol of loneliness and a symbol of what it might mean into be resolutely adamantly independent. Why did people project so much onto the whale? There's a line that somebody says that the whale is everything. What was it about this whale? That allowed them not just to get the Tattoo and to write songs about it and to create art inspired by the whale but to project all of that onto this thing I think there were a few elements at play. I think for starters. The whale was simultaneously vivid and distance. So it's it's an immediate media image of this whale all alone in the vast ocean you can picture you can kinda get attached to that image but the will was far enough away that we didn't really know do that much about him and that not knowing made it easier to project sort of everything onto him. I also think there's something about Wales Moby. Dick is obviously the original white canvas. Bewail who comes to stand for lots of different things to lots of different people in the Melville novel but I I think whales are simultaneously genially so huge and powerful and that with this particular whale there was a sense of vulnerability living alongside that huge massive power because has he was always alone because he was a little bit different and I think those veins of vulnerability made him a a a more appealing source of obsession. What were are you more interested in the whale or that sense of Obsession I? My ultimate interest was within the obsession of which became a participant in as well as the documents are of. I there anybody who knows me during the eighteen months span probably two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen. When I was working on that long piece nose and was subjected to listening to like a particular song that had been inspired by the whale? Everybody in my life was hearing a lot about the whale. I myself was coming out of a long term relationship and so I think that idea of solitude and what could be done with solitude became Quite moving to me as well and so when I was writing about these people who are obsessed. I wasn't writing about them. As kind of clinical anthropologist. I was writing about them as as kindred spirits in a way. How'd you land on this? I mean you have written a lot about obsession and things that people become obsessed with whether it's running incredibly long distances whether it's it's the whale whether it's a mysterious skin condition or the idea of reincarnation how'd you end up landing on what you become obsessed with so there are lots of pads to my subjects. Sometimes their personal so in the case of the ultra marathon the brutal race through the Tennessee Z.. Wilderness that you mentioned i. It first came onto my radar screen because my brother was running it and he is now run it run it and not finished it many times which is kind of in some ways points race did not finish other pieces come to me. Through editors and editors approach me with a lot of ideas that I don't take so I think it it always always comes down to the question of whether I feel both a deeper level of connection to the story and usually that deeper level of connection comes from feeling like I can tell both the surface story of the whale of families who believe their kids were reincarnated spirits from the past. There's there's that story that I can report out on the tangible level but for me to really take the story on there has to be some set of deeper questions that I feel like that surface. This material is granting the access to and that's ultimately my entry point into the story. How do you define that? I mean the the idea of obsession because it's not just a fascination. It's not a preoccupation. It's something that's deeper and it's not just about time either. It's it's something that goes beyond that. What's what's the definition that you apply to that I think for me part of part of what I come back to you in thinking about? What makes something an obsession? Is that it. It feels as much a part of of a person as the external realities of their lives so their family life their job life their daily commute their their home where they live. You know that that this obsession if you were to ask that person like who are you. What makes you who you are? What makes you tick that? This obsession would be just as much a part of that answer. Maybe even a bigger part of that answer then. Those External realities of their daily pragmatic life. Life it's almost like if if every person is sort of the is the version of like the surface of the earth or kind of geologic crust than the obsession is this Fisher that opens in the earth in. It feels like that Fisher can deliver me to something deeper and more multi and stranger inside of them. You could dismiss some of the things that people people are obsessed with. There's a piece in the collection about couple who believes that their son was Second World War pilot and his past life and it could be easy to say. Well that's odd and kind of put it off to one side. You don't do that. The why the reincarnation piece was a good example of the fact act that there was a reality happening there no matter what. So maybe there was the reincarnation of a World War Two fighter pilot in in which case that was a reality that was happening but even even if you were to somehow which would be impossible I think totally disprove the possibility that he was reincarnated fighter. Pilot there's still a reality of what's happening there. which is that a family has constructed an entire sense of identity around around the soul of their son being the sole of this pilot? And that's become a big part of their sense of who he is as a person it's become a big sense of who for him who he is says the person and it's become a big part of their family narrative so for me it's impossible to dismiss because whatever the truth of the reincarnation piece there is a truth truth happening there of the store. Is that this family has been telling themselves and kind of constructing their their lives around as a journalist. Or you comfortable with that. I mean you talk about with this in in The pieces as well the line that you may or may not be crossing. It's not as though you believe their story. But you don't completely dismiss it as well and you almost believe you you you find yourself almost aligning with with what they're saying right. Yeah so I think my I think. My understanding of my role was the journalist in relation to their story was that I had to pursue that angle. Of how does the story of reincarnation align with the facts that we can see your. The scientific frameworks we do have but at the same time it also felt like to me and even more compelling part of my role as a journalist was to really investigate what the story had come. I'm too mean for the family and to be as honest as I could on the page about my own. Subjective investments in the story. Why I felt defensive? Incisive of this belief in reincarnation why I wanted to sort of make a case for a belief in reincarnation as suggesting something beautiful about a human understanding of the soul even if we couldn't back it up with physics for example. When I'm writing about reincarnation I'm also early on and twelve step recovery and actually a a lot of the ideas that were appealing to me about twelve step recovery? Were also appealing to me in the vision of Self Hood that reincarnation suggested and so I put that I put put that kind of bias on the table. Because I think I'm telling a story of my encounter with a phenomenon and that's a part of that story. It's also but encounters with with people told me a little bit of votes the photographer that you meet in one of these pieces any appeal. Yeah another another instance of obsession. In this case I think both identity and and time the passage of time have have a lot to do with with her obsession but Anne is a photographer who has been photographing the same family in in Mexico for almost thirty years at taking many many trips to spend many many weeks in their company a lot of her method involves does getting close at both emotionally and literally so that she can show up enough times to be present for the shots that are ultimately going and it be the ones that kind of crystallized some truth for her but I was really interested in her photography as an art practice but I was also really interested in her emotional investment in that work the way that she kind of wasn't able to let go of it. What did you learn from her obsession? A couple of things one that the same things that make a creative process beautiful and profound can also make it wrenching and difficult so I think for her part of what I loved about the photographs. She had created of this family was the fact that they existed over thirty years the fact that they seemed saturated with the intimacy of these bonds. But I also saw the way is that you know. First of all there was a a kind of pain embedded in her relationship with them because she was exposed to the injustice of their poverty the extent of their suffering not that their lives were entirely composed of suffering but they held a lot of difficulty. And that you know for her there was a a real ongoing pain in becoming so close to them so I think that double edged sword quality of like the same same thing that makes something strong can also make it..

Leslie Jamison New York Times Wale coma Tennessee Harlem Dick Bewail Wales Fisher Anne Melville Mexico
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"I'm not saying I have any answers without problem but it's definitely a problem at I is very Jimmy Hart and I would love to somehow get involved with any kind of organization that is doing something to improve health education and general health lower income children and families and then for. What gets me excited right now. It really is a podcast. The podcast is still in its beginning stages so it's been so new and I've been able to meet so many incredible people and it's quite interesting because my whole motivation frustration. The podcast was to help others and educate others but learning myself so much in the process. Some guests are interviewed. Have had just a wealth of knowledge that I've been able to take in and it definitely gets me excited. There's days that I get up super early. Because I'm on the West Coast and some of the people. I interview are three hours ahead. And maybe they're not available to and I have a Monday to Friday job so I'm available usually from five pm until nine pm but there are times. That is like eight. Pm until eleven and it's too late for them so there are days. I will get up at four thirty in the morning so that I can interview somebody that I really want to interview him because that's nine. Am for them or this morning. I had another episode launch. I was really excited about so. I started work at seven. Am I got up an hour early so I could do all of my instagram posts? Promoting the episode. And just telling everyone about it so I guess it really is. What gets me going right now and just hope that somehow. I'm able to even just reach one person and either help them decide to start making some positive changes in their health or wherever they are on their health journey. If they can just get another push in the right direction I love that. I absolutely love love that. It's it's no excuses you know you're doing a fulltime job with a family and you're finding ways to get things done and I just absolutely love that Kathy. I am so glad that you came on to share your story with us and were open and vulnerable and I know that there are people out there. They're going to be going me too so I so appreciate you thank you. Well thank you so much for having me and listening to my story absolutely. That's all for this episode of the Toxin Terminator and we hope we've helped you remove the hidden toxins in your life or renew health. If you're looking to continue your journey towards full rejuvenation reach out to amy directly by visiting Amy Carlson Dot Com or your own one on one chat session as well as your free toxic risk assessment. That's a I m e pulp and DOT COM and remember. You are just one small. Change away from renewed help..

Kathy Amy Carlson Dot Com Jimmy Hart DOT COM amy West Coast instagram
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"The vegetable oils and canola oils. I had tried to limit them as much as possible. But I wasn't super strict about it if I thought if I have a little bit once in a while. It's not that big a deal. But when I got really strict about those oils it also affected my Zima. Other things about okay. We're onto something here. We're heading on the right pass right now to be completely on this. I'm I'm still dealing with the Candida. Okay with that being fed what I was a child and a teenager I was on antibiotics probably almost yearly for different conditions. I had bronchitis often I had. Ut is often and like I said doctors headed out antibiotics like candy. There was a long while where I was using Like I said I was going through a bottle of Maalox a week. And acids from from my heartburn which again affects your gut health. So the way I look at it is. It's not going to be a quick fix. It's not going to be an instant checks. And so I'm incorporating things all the time and making changes all the time Different supplements I take very good probiotic every day and in fact one of your podcast episodes told me about the best kind of probiotics to to take That was really helpful and I also just diving in further into my journey so I try not to expose yourself to as many hawks ins in your food in your environment. But it's also about removing toxins in N. detoxing so I take supplements that are Antifungal to rid of the candidate. But then I also take other supplements like activated charcoal which help detox and remove those toxins from your body. And I'm still making daily changes like I said it wasn't something I did overnight so I've started switching over occasion. I instead of storing food in plastic containers were getting a glass containers to store food and because plastic is terrible and could have a lot of endocrine disruptors or on the go into our body. And there's something they haven't done yet. I'm still going to do. I are frying. Pans are nonstick Teflon. Which I know is horrible. And so that's next on the list to get Some some better pans that be iron-cast hands or things like that and just really looking at the environment in our home. I started looking at laundry. Detergent man cleaners and going back to basics. I I went to just using a bottle of I replaced with index and started using a bottle of vinegar and water and spraying that all purpose cleaner in cleaning windows with that. And if something really to deep clean sprinkling baking soda on first and then the vinegar I found easy recipes online to make laundry detergent as my family. Kind of looks at me like I'm crazy and I'm going a little bit too far up but if you were me and they're along for the ride so well and I just love that you're taking a look at all the different areas your you know your you've looked at the the food toxins in in removing those and continuing to work with that and continuing to figure out what needs to come out and then you know looking at the environmental toxins because it know. I'm six years into my journey. And it's always continuing you know I can't even remember what I learned just here a week ago. About you know the mattresses that were sleeping on and think about that. We spend a third of our life sleeping. And I know I have good sheets and good matches pads and and good comforters. And that type chamber the mattress itself. You know there's always something you know to look at but you look. I'm no people will see you if they come to my youtube page and if they come to the you know the facebook community because your face is just vibrant and I know it's because of the changes that you've made you know I don't know Kathy of you see people a look in their face and you look in their eyes and you can see the vibrancy the stars coming out when we start removing those toxins out of our lives and I love CNN. You will thank you. And it's it's so true what he said about always continuing to learn because I think that's what the real differences for me between a diet to lose weight and health journey because health journey just doesn't end it's not like oh. I hit my goal weight and now I'm done when it's overall health and overall wellness. There's always something else for us to learn and that's become my real passion now is. I just want to continue learning and I don't ever WanNa stop so rather than feeling overwhelmed like oh my goodness there's so many toxins how are going to get rid of all of them. It's more of a okay. I've done this one now now. Let's try and move onto the next thing the next step. And what else can I learn? What else can do to improve my health. And it's it's not even about being sick and wanting to get better. It's just we can always be better. There's always a better out there that I love that. Absolutely so tell us so. We want our listeners to obviously check out your podcast which is called the live best life. Podcast IT'S BEAUTIFUL. Is Pink background with all? These stone stacked up on top of each other. How else can our listeners? Get a hold of you Kathy. Yes though I'm really active on instagram. Okay and my instagram handle. Is Kathy underscore? Live your best life and I also have a facebook page for the podcast and that is a live. Your best life podcasts. Okay and is there anything that you want to promote out to the listeners Do you do anything in terms of helping people coaching people or just really come on and listened to the podcast so right now? My main focus is the podcast and That's how I'm trying to reach out to people and help people but with that being said I feel. There's always going to be more. What I see on horizons very soon is a facebook support group. I do get friends and people messaging me sometimes with questions so right. Now I'm talking to people went on one through those private messages. If they have questions for me but I think a group environment where we can all be encouraging each other and helping each other would be really exciting. So that is something. I'm thinking of the New Year. Perhaps is a facebook health support group. I love that I love that so I really. I love to end our podcast with a question and I'll ask it to fold and you can answer it kind of the same question but you're gonNA answer in any way that you want that it's it's either. What brings you to tears. You can answer that or are you could do both are what is it that you just it this is what makes you get up in the morning. It's what keeps you awake at night because you're so excited about something that you're doing something that you're learning about something that you you know are out there doing you know. I think everybody has that. And if they don't have that in their life I really felt that for them in their life okay. I think that's a great question. So what really brings me tears? I is children coup. For whatever reason do not have access to good quality healthy food it could be because of income circumstance education. I think is a huge one. What I would just love is for people who are lower income to have access to better quality food. I know that food is provided by a food. Bank is usually packaged food. Because it has to have a shelf life.

facebook Kathy bronchitis Ut Maalox CNN
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

07:03 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"So yeah as I got a little bit older. I think we we all got a little bit more lax. My mom thought that perhaps my these sensitivities were something that I could grow out of and so we started not be as strict and then. Yeah when I when I got into my team years. There wasn't really much control. My mom could could have we. Would we would go out to eat and do whatever but as far as family members go. Yeah you know So my mom's side of the family and my Dad's side of the family were pretty much polar opposites as far as food and food relationship. My My my dad was was morbidly obese and unfortunately he did pass away at the age of fifty four and I saw him struggle. I saw him struggle with all the health complications. And I think it's hard my motivation for wanting to help people get healthy today but on my dad's side of the Family. They showed love with food for sure. And so it was really disappointing for my grandma. If she wanted to give me a treats and my mom would have to be. The bad guy knows sorry. She can't have that she's honored. We used to say I was allergic to it or its food sensitivity and my grandma would be like well. What do you what do you mean? I don't see her acting weird. Do Anything Weird. Yeah because she's following that we put her on your. It costs them. Some grief and some conflict for sure. I and even a child in school I can remember. You know not being able to participate in the traits that were happening or if there was snacks or Sunday night. The kids even be like well. What do you mean you? Can't you can't eat that what what's wrong with that. And so but still so grateful that I was put on the Diet and I. There was a solution. I think I think that's the most important thing but as I got older. I really wanted to believe that I could just eat whatever I wanted. I wanted to just not worry and not care and eat the macaroni and cheese out of the box and eat the processed foods and so I really did start to put it by the wayside and into my twenties into adulthood. I I would try to eat healthy ish because I always wanted to watch my weight but it was really only a concern about my weight. I didn't thinks was acting in any other way. I thought that my Moody nist and my really bad. Pms every month was just normal for me. I thought that The occasional bouts of asthma that I would get just normal for me and then fast forward into I've turned forty and at this point. I'm really overweight. I am the same weight as I was nine months pregnant with my daughter. And it's not even so much about the size but I had all these health problems that when I've just couldn't ignore anymore and I don't mean to interrupt but you said something that I want to really kind of hone in on and I want people to hear this. Is You said you know? I HAVE MY MOODY. Nece MY PMS. Mike cramping my occasional asthma. This that it was just normal in. I think especially as women. Sometimes we go through feeling crappy and you know for me like I had menopause for what fifteen years and it's not normal but but we accept things as being normal and that just blows me away that we all you know well. It's just normal just normal absolutely absolutely in fact. That's my mantra now. Is that what you think is normal is does not have to be your normal rusher and I think we are all especially about anything to do with women cycles. I think we are taught that that that time of your month is supposed to be a horrible time and that you're going to be a raving lunatic and there's nothing that can be done about it wrong so wrong so it's funny because here you are at a time alive and you've got your body speaking so loudly to you right. You're you're talking about you. Know you. Also talk about having heartburn and acid reflux. And so you've got where your your body saying. Hey pay attention to me know Kathy. I'm talking to you here but sometimes we ignored that And it takes getting cancer getting an autoimmune disease. Getting you know something before. We're absolutely willing to listen but you you said wait a minute. Wait a minute right. Thankfully I didn't get to the point where it was as bad as as cancer or one of those things but my body was definitely yelling at me that I needed to make some changes so so yeah all the things that were going on. So I had really bad heartburn acid reflux. I would go through a bottle of Maalox a week and that is not solving anything. In fact what I've learned is taking and acids affects your gut microbiome and your gut health so severely. So I'm taking a bad situation and making it even worse. So there was the heartburn. There was the acid reflux I had symptoms of of I B s where all said. My stomach would just be in nuts. I'd be at work and have to leave a couple of hours early and just go home and lay down flat on the couch. And just wait for it to pass Some of the milder things that I didn't think problems were by. I'd Eczema on my face and.

heartburn Mike Kathy food sensitivity cancer Maalox autoimmune disease
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"That is the one thing that I am just so grateful for. We can all look back at our childhoods and thank you know. Oh Bitch things. My parents should have done differently. I mean I grew up in the eighties. I'm was surrounded by secondhand smoke by extended relatives at. There's less than antibiotics. Doctors were handing out antibiotics. Like Candy of course commenced even conventional doctors. They know better now. They're much more cautious with the antibiotics. So there's a lot of things that could have been done differently but the one thing. I'm really grateful that my mum somehow had the insight and intuition to see what was going on with their child. And I wasn't one of these kids who ended up on a screen medication like Ritalin for hyperactivity which sadly so many are and the numbers are rising all the time right the kids that are being diagnosed that way and I don't think it's a coincidence that that number is going up. I really think it has to do with the Frankenfoods and the processed foods that are out there. Everyone assumes safe because nobody has proven to them otherwise right well I've got a really good friend. That purdue are produced it program called wiggles away and one of the things that she says and she gets a little bit more rigid even than what the Feingold Diet is but she recommends that definitely is something that all parents went to take a look at if they have a child with focus issues or on the spectrum whether it's you know low are hi? This is certainly something that they're going to want to take a look at because there's so many foods that were putting in our body that are neuro toxin and spectrum as a neuro toxic disease. So you know we certainly do not want compound that So that so you you through early childhood on N. Like you said Kudos to your mother for putting the connection together then as you went through You got a little bit lax. We were talking in between recordings here about you have a teenage daughter now and how difficult that is when our children get to the teen years that they're not young enough where we can kind of. I hate to say the Word Control Them. But but you did your own thing you know you started eating out more. You started kind of going into A more lax state of what you were in you know as an as an early child And you talked about you know really. You talked about struggling with some of the mental attitudes within a family. Can you kind of share a little bit about that because your history really was more focused on food in food being the source of some of your issues and you had family members that were like you guys are crazy?.

Feingold Diet purdue
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

09:21 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"Beginning of two thousand eighteen. I really started being serious about my health. And we'll talk more but my whole health journey in a bit but over that process. I I lost fifty pounds. I got rid of a lot of help. Chronic health conditions that were plaguing me and then I just felt like I needed to share this wealth and knowledge with the world and I just felt this passion like okay. How can I help? People get healthy because I want everyone to feel as good as I'm feeling right now and it started with. Maybe all start an instagram account. That is just health focused. And I'll try to get people tips and ideas on how they could be healthier and that spiraled a little bit and I thought well you know I really love listening to podcasts. And listening to health experts on podcast. I'm personally learned a lot on podcast. It's actually where I got a lot of my tips and ideas for my own health journey and I thought well. Gee Why couldn't I do that? Why could I find people to interview? And I really just jumped in with speech. And I started contacting people for interviews and soon as I got one. Yes the ball was rolling and I just started doing podcasts. It was a ton of fun and really. Yeah my goal is just to help educate people to empower people to be advocates for their own health. And I think of health is all encompassing. It's not just about wait. It's not just about the food we eat. It really is holistic and whole health and so to me it really is about living your best life and that was the name for the podcast Abso. I love it I love you. Know giving the voice giving a voice to the community and like you said when when you get into podcasting and you get the opportunity to interview so many different people it just really opens up a whole new world to you and Kathy are correct me if I'm wrong. Are you in British Columbia? Is that correct? That's right. I'm in Vancouver. Bc nother Canadian earlier. Today I love our neighbors up north so you have a really powerful journey I Know I love to share the stories with my my listeners because I think stories are what touch us so much and As I researched and learn more about you I saw that you really started kind of paying attention and learning all about some food sensitivities at really a a young age was that kind of the beginning of the House journey for you. Well I have to give credit to my mom for that and in a way it was the beginning and then things kind of turned around. Full Circle I so we wanted to start at the beginning so when I'm was about three years old my started to notice that I was having extreme and I honestly have to give her a lot of credit and this is no slight against her but my mom was young he was nineteen when I was born and not a lot of education like as far as health or medical community. Anything like that but she was very observant and she noticed that after I would eat certain things I would have. These horrific meltdowns horrific tantrums. I would be an emotional rack beside myself. And some people would just take that as a toddler Tantrum that for heads just act that way sometimes but she noticed the connection with food she noticed it was usually within thirty minutes of me eating something and I would go away after a few hours and some of the things that were going on while as I was extremely hyperactive. I had these meltdown Tantrum. In fact I remember my childhood pretty young and I remember three years old sitting under the kitchen table holding onto the table. A scream at the top of my lungs and have no idea why no idea why I was acting like that and I also stuttered in my early childhood and I even remember in my brain as I'm stuttering thanking. My words just can't keep up with how fast I'm talking. I was talking so fast. My brain just couldn't keep up so my mom took me to our regular family doctor and this was back in the eighties. This is before. Adhd had label and she didn't even take which the doctor saying she's hyperactive or she's acting out she went in saying I think she has food sensitivities. I'm seeing this connection between her eating and these reactions and I think that's what set in motion for heading on the right path. The family doctor said okay. I'm going to recommend you see this natural allergy specialists now. He's a little Kooky a little Doodoo but he has some good ideas so I think it's worth seeing him so we went to see the doctor and he basically gave a list of foods that he said. Okay she should avoid all of these foods and then my mom trotted a little bit further instead. Well what about these particular food? What you noticed in particular was breakfast. If she made me OATMEAL for breakfast. And we're talking not instant oatmeal with the flavorings. Just regular slow. Cook oats back then. I would be fine. But if she gave me a cereal I like strategies I would be off the wall off the rails uncontrollable unconsolable. So as soon as she said back to him he said Oh okay she needs to go on a diet call faingold diets and any of your listeners can could google that diet but what made him make. The connection was when she talked about. The shredded cheese traits has a preservative in it called. Ht and Fagel Diet. Will you look at the list of foods to avoid artificial flavorings the preservatives the food coloring basically every chemical that has been put into our food to make it? Franken food and not food anymore right and the really interesting thing about B. H. T. in particular at so it's put Fresh USUALLY CEREALS I. It's to prevent the oils from oxidizing or going rancid quickly. And it's a chemical that gives the food a longer shelf life so of course the manufacturers think this is fantastic but big tea is also used as an ingredient in jet fuel and cosmetics rubber petroleum products and embalming fluid all great innings to have in our body right. And so if you just like let that thing in from it why would you wanna put this ingredient in your body and who said it was safe and the thing that I really think about? My childhood is okay so I was having severe reactions to these food additives. So we quickly took an out. Somebody who's not having severe reactions to these food additives. What's to say they're not affecting them. Well it's to say that they're safe. I believe that they're safe for anybody. I just happened to be reacting more severely than somebody else might right. So we We followed the Diet and my mom started doing everything from scratch basically so there no processed foods. There's nothing coming out of a box. We didn't even by starbuck dread because a lot of the bread hads hydrogenated oil which was also on the list with one of those terrible things l. Should be eating anyways so mom started making bread from scratch and Baker. But she learned how to do it a lot of effort into it and what will go through as as a parent for our child. You know to make sure that they have everything that.

instagram Vancouver Adhd Fagel Diet British Columbia google Kathy Baker Franken B. H. T.
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"She has a phenomenal. Stir story that she's going to be sharing with us about how food and her food sensitivities have really been something she's dealt with her entire life from an early early age where she had truly meltdowns and Stuttering issues and our mom was really tying that into noticing a pattern with that win. There were certain foods that she was eating so she learned early on that. Hey there might not be some really great ingredients in our food and fast forward to becoming an adult where that all kind of flat but she really got hit saw upside the head where she had a lot of issues just screaming at her. Saying listen to me. And she's GonNa tell you what those symptoms word that she was faced with where she really started thinking about a. Don't just want to go on a diet and lose weight. I truly want to live a healthier lifestyle and that don't her in to really removing toxins from her life and it is a powerful story. Welcome to the Toxin Terminator Helping People to restore and renew their health by removing toxins from the home and their lives joining in as industry. Thought leaders help you understand the physical and emotional effects each product can have on you and your family and a safe alternative you can use to remove the hidden toxins for renewed health. Now please welcome your host the toxin. Terminator Herself Amy. Carlson and welcome to today's episode. Everybody's I have got Cathy Jamieson with me. She is so much fun. We met actually online of all places. She's another podcast host and I think once you kind of get into that podcast. World get entered into this whole other arena. Don't you think caffeine? It's been so much fun. All the connections and all the people that I'm meeting I I'm really looking forward to the journey. And all the people to meet swiped really fun it is so much fun and we're so glad that you're here I The opportunities just abound we get to meet people from all over the place. I've been interviewing people from the UK from Australia. Young I it just is is I it just mind blowing to me so I'm so grateful for these opportunities. Thank you so Kathy's podcast is called. You live your best life so i WanNa make sure that you guys are finding her podcast. Because I've listened to her episodes is she's really bring people on talking all about how we do that. How do we live our best life? And can you tell us a little bit of bought Behind what your creation for the podcast was.

Cathy Jamieson Kathy caffeine Carlson UK Australia
"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:31 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Jamison good afternoon food lovers where ever you are in the world I'm sure alters Jamison and were heating it up and eating it up too thanks to my engineer Dino Thompson here in the studio does his very best to keep me on track today and every day do you know the one of Phil's in with all that fun food music we fade in and out with that and you know help me eat up things people bring into the studio to somebody commented that it was you know it really nice that I mentioned that there's an engineer involved here well yeah he's the one who does all the work I just get to sit here and talk I get to sit and talk about my favorite topic in the world food so are you excited about food I'm always always always excited about food in fact that's the name of my website in web community where you can get lots of info about bringing excitement to your own kitchen and your meals with family and friends I really encourage you to take time to you know make a meal with your family it with your friends whoever and sit down together and enjoy it I also have lots of Instagram images you can connect to that yeah sometimes of meals that I eat out and obviously we have loads of really great restaurants around here and I'm really happy to promote all of them as well and I look to do everything from things like the L. Chile Tory Otto taco truck to move you know nine time I think James beard nominee for best chef southwest Martine Rios everything in between between there's just a lot so that's happening around the Santa Fe area well are you enjoying our late summer weather and diseases obra burning weekend we're just kicking off to fiesta here and you know this is our first day post those those burn Hey Santa Fe is now gluten free for the next year and I hope you had a great time if you went to the event and if you didn't get there I hope you are enjoying something fun in the process you know we're coming up on the vendors for that will be on the plaza for fiesta weekend here next week and my goodness I always look forward to that and I have to get something like a cheap to Rome to retail and of course you know we can get Frito pies other times too but it's always great to have a Frito pie on the plaza for fiesta weekend so you know get down there and enjoy some of of our wonderful things that are happening Mueller's music and just all kinds of things that are happening during the fiesta week ahead okay on the phone today I have with me one of my favorite folks from here in New Mexico and Stephanie Cameron and she is the power that behind our edible New Mexico magazine that is such a beautifully published monthly that comes out and Stephanie how are you today I'm great how are you well I'm great it's a beautiful day here I just love this time a year in our days are so warm and the nights get a little bit cool is a touch of fall in the air and that means it's almost time for what the green Chile cheeseburger SmackDown tell us what's happening and when to Stephanie well it's just week away now so week from today next Saturday afternoon yeah number seven from unified at the bridge of the fan favoring company we will be back in a down okay well I've I've loved being the judge for this every year I feel very fortunate that I've had that opportunity and you moved out to the bridge what two years ago last year the second year there I'm gonna it was a really nice setting and it looks like the weather's going to be you know probably very nice again this year what a lovely spot to hold this so what you know what's going to be happening what's the lay out for all of this so we've got seven finalists I mean to growl bear burger and it'll be eight hundred people coming out their vote for the people's choice and then of course we have our judges award which you have been a part of for seven years now my goodness wow hi hat even realize how many years of the band it's now I've loved it everyone of them what a burgers to who else will be judging this time so we've got market Ben are James beard award winner on the compound we have Mike white who won that New Mexico restaurant association chef of the year last year we have Josh went from doctor feel good and he said that I think it was like six years ago that he can get it and then we have you right who is bountiful cal she should be there no good okay yeah well I'll look forward to seeing all of them there are we in be up on that a beautiful deck looking down on everything again yeah you're gonna be up on the dock and hoping to get a little more straight up that there was already sunny last year but the one on one and one umbrella did help I'll have to say that yeah forget to this year wow we'll just really begin that can happen up there yeah so who are are seven finalists this time so we've got a really great the birch geographic showing this year that we have mark which is our current reigning champ Martin mas MA in us from Albuquerque in Albuquerque and then also in Albuquerque we have still been there brickyard and the great thing is white with the exception of mark every single one of these competitors with brand new to the competition really wow yeah and from Las Vegas we have the talent and bar across the net at and then from Los Alamos we have reached a brew pub and from Santa Fe we have women aria at the end and follow radio and market their stakeout that's a really nice mix that you have with the different towns represented to you that way yeah I'm really excited about it it's nice to have that showing good all right and I know that you have a process where you know do all this preliminary judging and I saw that online but I tried not to pay real close attention so my brain would not be you know prejudice towards one place or another yeah so what is the the process kind of generally that you go through to get them down we're not down to the seven towards the end of April we put out an open call to all restaurants in New Mexico so anywhere in New Mexico restaurant can compete but it's a big commitment because ultimately as you are finalists you've got to show up and cook burgers for a hundred hundred people and so we put out that call and it's first come first serve for the first fifteen restaurant said throw their special in the rain they're the ones that will be our contenders for the year and then from July first July thirty first we send out a team of secret judges you go and judge those burgers and the restaurant and they don't know each other they don't know what we don't know them the restaurant don't know when they're coming so it's really about the restaurant delivering their bath products every day and so they're not coming together like a group they're just showing up when they you know have a a chance to do it all of the athletes since then that big commitment yeah thank you amendment they're going to fifteen restaurant over the state so yeah it's a big commitment but we DO a call for a secret judge as we do that in may and we usually get anywhere from a hundred two hundred fifty entries I remember saying that I think that's just marvelous or are interested in doing that yeah yeah they were cool because it's in all walks of life from New Mexico that all think that they are absolutely the best person for the job and you know they write a little essay about why they're the bad then I spend an entire day going through and reading all the entries in batting them and trying to find a diverse group of people male and female roles in new and all that stuff so yeah it's really fun but that's now down okay what a process wow I actually I forwarded that to my friend don ban as to be always a big fan of this but this year he was gonna be in California during that time so I I don't think he ended up doing an essay about you know wanting to run around and do that perfect job for a nice retired guy who loves burgers like bad the the state it is not my way to get out and travel yeah yeah no that's a really fun thing that you're offering to people but I'm still amazed that you get the number responses you do how fantastic yeah well we're gonna need to take our first break and folks were gonna stick with Stephanie she's gonna say on the phone here with this right you're gonna be able to do that yeah good okay we'll be back in just a second folks your listing the heating it up I'm.

Dino Thompson Phil Jamison engineer seven years six years two years