35 Burst results for "Jamison"

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on Menace 2 Society Podcast

Menace 2 Society Podcast

00:56 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on Menace 2 Society Podcast

"I think it was probably the necessary move I. Don't know that it's best for Garrett or but the good news is Ryan Day has of he's so brilliant. Offensively, he knows how to get those guys where he wants on certain schemed up place and then my Guy Jamison Williams was at the X. so lava Garrett James Oh and it was R- I thought the offense was outstanding. Justed fields played almost as well as you can play He took one sack that he should have thrown the ball away I I mean. That's one of the biggest as he had to improve, we'll talk about him indepth more in a minute but. The pass was outstanding in the first half the offense align picked up twists and blitzes. The first half he was kept clean. The second half they struggled and Nebraska had some unbelievable twist blitzes where they plug a linebacker and twist alignment and it was hard Harry Miller and Josh Meyers didn't pick it up well. There was a second and third quarter that was a bad ass blitz and I I should draw it up and tweeted out it was it was a blitz twist and it's one of the hardest things for alignment to pick up and they attacked Harry Miller and Josh, Meyers, which the weakness and pass Bro that we now know about and it was just beautifully schemed up. It's it's really hard to pick up those blitzes and twist. especially with a in this not as experienced. And here's back mastic. Here's what you are going to get from him. He displayed on his one yard touchdown run. You'RE GONNA get power a big beck running through contact. I don't think he's an elite back, but I do think he's the best short yardage back in America? On the defense side of the ball Tommy Tokai is a big dude on the Interior D. Line and him and Haskell Garrett played about as well as anyone's played on the Interior D. Line at Ohio state in a while Haskell was a stud an absolute stud. So first of all, before, let's instead of talking about football I know very well, I recruited them. He was one of my favorite guys that I've recruited I love recruiting other positions and somehow was always declined but great kids. So really happy for him that that he's back he's healthy. They were able to I mean nothing bad happened he got shot in the face like a month ago two months ago just crazy but. Solid Salad Interior D. Line play the risk the receiver group I'M GONNA. Tell you right now. They they blocked it was atrocious. The blocking on the perimeter was atrocious atrocious. It was one of the major issues I saw in the game you can't be pretty little pass catchers you have to block to be a dominant group and it was all day you saw it on the. Screen. Jackson Smith in Jigsaw, they just ran through..

Haskell Garrett Ryan Day Josh Meyers Garrett James Harry Miller Jamison Williams Jackson Smith Tommy Tokai America Nebraska Football Ohio Haskell
Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on Howard and Jeremy

Howard and Jeremy

01:32 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamison" discussed on Howard and Jeremy

"Whether it's Sunday for for 64 against the Jets get another game earlier this year where Tyler Cross has been ableto produce, and so you know it. I think it's a It's a situation where maybe he's a bit less dynamic. So you know more of an afterthought when it comes to target distribution for gosh, Alan, but I don't think that, Yeah, that's another wear this offense that could be exciting and I was really interested to see what Brian David was going to do with that role as it evolved. As they were using that tight end. It's more of an H back. So Joe on the defensive side of the ball. It's very clear they figured something out in that second half weather and in my opinion, I just think it was Jerry who's played with his hair on fire in that second half, and I think it was a big catalyst to to them having that turnaround that they did, giving up just four yards to the Jets offense, which is sort of what we were expecting to see in the first half. But in your opinion, obviously, the talk of the defense has been their struggles. But the guy that is maybe warn most of the fault in those struggles has been Tremaine Edmonds. What did you see last week in that second half that maybe give you some confidence that there's a turnaround with him in particular, But this defense is a hole. Well, you like to see Tremaine Emmons, intercept those two passes that right hand that might help that might help. You know, I think remains that hurt. You know, it's one of the things he did hurt his shoulder against the Jets, but I thought I remember watching that game earlier before that missed tackle on Jamison Crowder in week one and thinking to myself. I don't think Tremaine was right even before then, just the way he was running. The way he was taking on contact the way he was tackling. It just didn't seem like he was in a was healthy at all on DH, you know, he said, it was Sean McDermott. And obviously the guy has a shoulder injury. That's like how ineffective you spend this year. Like somewhere inside of that 65 £250 frame that wears number 49 is the player was so last year, so I think interest contribute to his his performance so far in a 2020, But I do think that In the second half. I mean, we can point to a lot of different things. I think that's a very effective blitzes gets you saw him or individual one on one battles being one. But I think what the defense has been missing that we saw in this man ass against that. Jesse's. It's just on edge. You know, we talk about what Defenses and fundamentals and technique, and all that really matters and is important, but To be a defensive player. There's also a mentality and mindset in an edge that goes with it. I thought you saw some of that attitude and intensity. Pick up for the bills in the second half, which certainly comes with playing well, you could feed off of Of teammates and because the success and where you watch earlier this year, and it just felt like the team was reeling, they're on their heels. They're guessing they're not playing fast or not thinking so, just as much as I think there was some good schematic adjustment individual moments that lead to Good place for the bills defense. I think that they got their edge back a little bit, and I think that's going to be important, and I know that that's not quantifiable on it sometimes easy to talk about, But I think that mentality is something that's really going to be important for this defense, Tio Pick yourself up and play. You know somewhat like what we've seen in the past, from Sean McDermott unit jump jump in and joining us before we get to the quick question on the draft this week's game, New England. What do you think? I mean, what do you see it? It feels like the Bills have to win this game because New England is reeling. Their offense has had such big problems in the last few weeks. And you know Cam Newton's worry about getting benched. So when you when you look at the Patriots, what are you seeing from from Cam Newton and that offense? You know, it's really struggled. I mean, they've scored 10 12 and six points in the last games. They're They're really They're not playing while they're two and four. Um Camden has been extremely ineffective since you know, really the first couple of games this season. I think everyone was trying to figure out what this patriotsoffense was going to be. And I think that gave him an advantage. Others a little bit out there. They can't move the ball defensively, their given up more yards per game in the bills, you know, so I mean, there's one defense to so it's a home game for Buffalo. They're 5 to 2 and four got a chance to be six and to and for no in the division halfway through, it feels like more sylvan again that you have to win. It just feels like it's one that we really just need to take advantage of this opportunity in this moment, obviously the bills to win the division for the first time since 1995. It's right there, and it feels like this would be a really important stuff and getting that gun. If they don't win the game. Still, eight more games to play. You're still five free. You still have plenty of opportunities but its distance up. He got some tough games, got Pittsburgh in San Francisco and Seattle. At Arizona was difficult and another one against Patriots, but it doesn't get easier in terms of scheduling, so you might have a couple of games later down the road, But it's You feel like if I win this game, it's the positioning of so much more favorable and its interesting. The team that's on the bills heals the Miami golf there, three and three. They're playing great defense. They're using to hunger via low and starting quarterback to give that offense Morris Park. It's playing good, but third downs and red zone it can improve. Who is going to unleash our game for that offense, and I think there was a move that coach forethought. I think we could be even better, and the difference between the bill schedule and the Dolphin schedule is two games and the bills have to play. Pittsburgh in Tennessee and mine. Yes. Simply Jacksonville in Cincinnati, right? Yeah, it's quite point. The gift of not being the second place human if he last year. So that's the team to worry about. Is that the dolphin and I saw shack, Lawson. You know, former Bill He's there in Miami, he said. Two is going to be a star like they're already the players. The other players with dolphins are fully expecting this to go. Well, right away like they've what they've seen from him. They've been impressed to this point..

Jets Sean Mcdermott Patriots Miami Pittsburgh Tremaine Emmons Tremaine Edmonds Tremaine New England Cam Newton JOE Alan Jerry Tyler Cross Brian David Jamison Crowder Jesse Lawson Morris Park
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | Last month

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
San Francisco 49ers tight end George Kittle ruled out vs. New York Jets with sprained knee

At Home with Roby

00:09 sec | Last month

San Francisco 49ers tight end George Kittle ruled out vs. New York Jets with sprained knee

"40 Niners will be without all pro tight and George Kittle today battling a sprained knee going up against the New York Jets were going without running back lay beyond Bel and receiver Jamison Crowder.

New York Jets Jamison Crowder George Kittle
NFL Injury Report: Week 2

Waddle & Silvy

00:53 sec | Last month

NFL Injury Report: Week 2

"Receiver Chris Godwin isn't concussion protocol. George Kittle has been rolled out. George Kendall. Hi. Did you see his need bent in a really strange when he came back and finished that game in that loss against the Cardinals? He was just ruled out, so I don't think it's on your hot list. Okay. What else do we see Anything else of note? I saw it last night, The Bangles tied and CJ Zuma. Zuma has a torch Achilles. He's out for the season cold. Starting, Jack Doyle is out against the Vikings. Jamison Crowder for the Jets is out against the 40 Niners. As you mentioned Adam, the Lions have ruled out Kenny Golladay. Cornerback Desmond Trufant and guard Joe Doll. Free money Packers No tackle Kenny Clark is out for lions. I got to tell you, I think that the injury reports are lighter than I thought they'd be after one week, especially with no training camp, but

Cj Zuma George Kendall Lions Chris Godwin Kenny Golladay Kenny Clark Cardinals George Kittle Jamison Crowder Desmond Trufant Jack Doyle Joe Doll Vikings Jets Adam
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

02:51 min | 4 months ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the denture of the gallon I just see a big black guy I don't I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison's feedback is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call to lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested and that was their first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape however seem long course man in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

Detroit
'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 4 months ago

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

"Now a man who says he was falsely arrested after a computer algorithm mis identified his face is speaking out as NPR's Bobby Allen reports critics of the technology said case shows how unreliable the tool is police in Detroit we're trying to figure out who stole five watches from a show I know watch store and so they pulled security video that had recorded the incident they zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the suspect to a facial recognition system I hit came back forty two year old Robert Williams of Michigan when I look at the picture of the guy out I just see a big black I don't at all I don't see a resemblance I don't think he looks like me at all in January police in Detroit arrested Williams for the watch theft Williams says he was placed in an interrogation room and police put three photos in front of him and he says so I guess that's not true either so I picked it up into my face when I told him I said I hope you don't think all black people look alike Williams was detained and then released on bail until his hearing that's when prosecutors dropped the charges against him academic and government studies have demonstrated that facial recognition systems misidentified people of color more often than white people what makes this case extraordinary is that police admitted that facial recognition technology prompted the arrest typically the tools used in secret lawyer Phil Maher is with the ACLU of Michigan they never even asked him any questions before arresting him they never asked him if he had an alibi they never asked him where he was that day the ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit police department the complaint asked that police stop using the tool in investigations in a statement to NPR the Detroit police department says after the Williams case the department enacted new rules now only still photos not security footage can be used for facial recognition and only in the case of violent crimes according to Georgetown law center on privacy and technology at least a quarter of the country's law enforcement agencies have access to face recognition tools Jamison Spivak is a researcher at the center most of the time people who are arrested using face recognition or not told at face recognition was used to arrest them the government use of facial recognition technology has been banned in half a dozen cities in Michigan Williams says he hopes the case is a wake up call lawmakers Williams says there should be a nationwide ban let's say that this case wasn't retail for a one of those rape or murder what I got out of jail on a personal bond or but I never come home Williams and his wife Melissa worry about the long term effects the arrest will have on his daughters he was arrested on his front lawn his young daughters cried as her father was taken away in a police car in order to get arrested that was our first interaction with the police so it's definitely not shape how they perceive law enforcement in his complaint Williams and his lawyers say if the police department won't ban the technology out right that leaves his photo should be removed from the database so this doesn't happen

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Jamison thank we good afternoon food lovers wherever you are in the world I'm Cheryl alters Jamison and were heating it up and eating it up too thanks to my engineer Dino Thompson here in the studio who's doing his very best as always to keep me on track today he's also getting to have some of those as other duties are required part of his job today as those of you work in northern New Mexico at the moment no it's been a very snowy weekend hours few days at all and he's the one who gets to go up on the roof and knock snow off of the satellite dishes so that we can actually broadcasted we can receive signals from some of our other shows and things so anyway yeah right now is getting to sit inside which probably makes it a lot happier even though we don't have any food in here right now we'll see if we can fix that later on well you know he's the one who does all the work anyway I just get to sit here and talk about some of my favorite things in the world which are food and beverages too and we're gonna do some good beverage conversation here in just a minute well are you as excited about food as I am you know if you've ever check my website that I have all kinds of fun things going on in the world of food and there lots of my Instagram images and other things that you can find at the the website excited about food dot com you know the best way to get a hold of me if you have ideas on our show here and whether you want to comment on something you've heard or you have an idea for something that we ought to be investigating and talk about you can reach me at Cheryl C. H. E. R. Y. L. at Santa Fe dot com all right.

Jamison Dino Thompson New Mexico Cheryl C. H. E. R. Y. L. engineer Instagram
Social Distancing is No Joke

Guy Benson

02:38 min | 8 months ago

Social Distancing is No Joke

"But I saw on Saturday night a lot of people that I know and like on my social media feeds posting videos or photographs of themselves in a bunch of friends out at crowded bars and restaurants celebrating St Patrick's day and drinking and laughing it up and they had all these sort of snarky ironic hashtags and commentaries about social distancing in quarantine and ha ha it just isn't funny at all and it's actually extremely stupid and selfish to be doing that I tweeted blown away by the number of people I follow posting Instagram stories of themselves out of crowded bars and restaurants with ironic tags about social distancing the quarantines here's the message that I want to get across number one we know based on other countries experience because there are other countries or ahead of us in the time line on corona virus we know that there are a lot of young people who have a corona virus who don't have serious or any symptoms even if you are a symptomatic and totally fine despite having her on a virus you are contagious and is extremely contagious and even if you think that you don't interact with many people in the danger zone quote unquote older people let's say sixty five plus people with underlying medical conditions you don't know people don't walk around with their underlying medical conditions plastered on their forehead you have no idea you have no idea if the person that you brushed past and briefed on at the bar while you're getting your Shamrock shots of whatever Jamison and something you don't know if that person is then going to go home where there's a multi generational family including grandparents or if you're gonna go fill up your car the next day and put your hand on you know a gasoline pump that the next person who drives up to seventy and uses the same pump it is highly contagious that's why this is such a bad idea social distancing isn't some sort of buzz word that's fine it's an actual new lifestyle that we have to embrace for the time being we are seeing examples out of Italy of what can go wrong when people don't take this stuff

Jamison Italy
Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

07:39 min | 8 months ago

Fat Tuesday Favorite: Chicago's Paczki reigns supreme in the Region

"All right local pastries will be kicking off at Tuesday with amazing friends he's a Polish tradition they're also breaking other sugary sweet Chicago Chicago police police police officers officers officers and and and their their their families families families bakeries bakeries bakeries located located located at at at fifty fifty fifty nine nine nine twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven west west Lawrence Lawrence Avenue Avenue they're they're selling selling area area shaped shaped like like hearts hearts and and Chicago Chicago flag flag all all falling falling off off in in blue blue line team at the proceeds from all the cookie sales will go to Chicago police memorial foundation which aids families of officers who were killed or wounded in the line of duty the owner of the billions ski is the owner and the chef of delightful pastries in Chicago and she joins us tonight welcome in Dover good evening how are you I am great I am great first let's talk about the bakery generators separate celebrating twenty years which is very cool thank you and what I love about what you are committed to you is you are putting V. best ingredients into everything that you do you know what that that's a real commitment on my end because I really believe I should have quality ingredients in my products I don't think you should have a PhD in chemistry to read my labels I believe in butter flour sugar eggs yeah I think if we have good ingredients that go into the product we have a great product and then we feel good afterwards I think a lot of the times of people take short cuts because they want to have a fast monetary gain but people don't support those kind of places so I think it's very important that people that come to delightful pastries say we have Nielsen Massey vanilla which is the best vanilla in all of United States made right here in Waukegan by this wonderful family for three generations now so it's and you know we use all butter from Wisconsin thank you Wisconsin you know my flowers from Ohio and from Minnesota you know just a lot of local ingredients a lot of great ingredients I just think you know butter should be the foundation of an fresh eggs should be the foundation for a honey cakes we use real honey you know so it's just it's just you wanted to have deliciousness you know people's people said your did your punch you made me we put you know thank you thank you you know it's funny you say that is there was a bakery that was around I won't say what it is for fifty sixty years and I got taken over by for the first time by another family they changed all the recipes they kind of cheap in the the goodness of what they were doing and they were gone in six months so knowing that you know this is gonna create nice legacy for for you and your family you know what I th I am I'm hoping one of my daughters will take up the mantle after after I'm you know after I'm ready to retire I don't know when that will be you know my mom my mom started this business so it was we started that in naming in nineteen ninety eight and my mom just retired last year and finally she gave me the recipe for punch you so as to get issues given that herself he was getting into like once I retire you'll have it but not nothing until then and you know what's what people are like what makes punch you punch you wait what what's what's so different about it so a real punch I could that's one pump check many punch keys so I'm teaching you guys Polish has been like that and so you know you will you put rom in the dough we put orange oil and that that would put lemon oil in the W's milk we use barter and you know when you eat upon check in with you know like a Krispy Kreme donut it flattens into pancake yeah well up upon check the dough springs back and holds itself yet yeah and you really did it for the dough mostly you don't really you did for the filling like American donuts have this much filling in and it's just like you can really taste the dough and that's kind of sad because the the the beauty of it is the doe how delicious how delicate you know it's fluffy it's crunch on the outside deliciously moist and goodness on the inside and I love coming up with wonderful tart fillings like Weezer long potter we use nice I make passion fruit jam is a thing that's a Polish thing hello Mister he's thing I grew up with yeah Tom is a Polish thing we love our heart to heart fillings pulls people do not like sweet pastries we you know when we post people come and I'm there like I wanna see desert that's not sweet enough that's the first thing that comes out of the mouth and yet we believe in having something rich pottery full of group Belgian chocolate and walnuts and nuts and lots of beers in a post poll should point towards you know like there's one walnut poppy toward that I make that I literally one liter of vodka goes into the entire thing while because it's that busy but then it has to sit for four days before you can eat it so all that lot of that stuff veterans but the flavor is still there so lot of Polish pastries like our have tons and tons of alcohol and actually European pastries have tons and tons sure think of tiramisu think about fruit fruit cake think of a Kinshasa toward a black forest torte absolutely all have you know somebody said oh you're just you're just you know to contributing to the delinquency of minors I first of all if you don't want rid of them in one day that's pretty when you're cooking the stuff it yeah the potency is is gone by that time now there's you've got the traditional but you've also got some really cool gourmet flavors as well let's talk about some of the traditional ones that you have so the traditional ones are plum butter which we've mentioned before Polish people are crazy about plan which I'm not a guy that brings food and booze into the studio because listeners can't see they can't taste what what I'm doing in here but I will describe this the best they can and you were so kind to bring daughters your big highlight that's that's that's my favorite then rose petal jelly that's very very traditional very Polish and we use real raspberry preserves a local company here that makes the boss raspberry preserves there's just sugar packed in lemon juice and raspberries and if nothing else that plan has a beautiful flavor you know it's a great little tart but I'm I'm chasing sweet because of what you put into the dough surrounding it so I'm getting a little bit of both it is coming in and out that's really cool thank you thank we we try really hard and then some of the other it's nice and tight is good yeah yeah it's it's you know it's it's that's the whole point about plans you kind of want to make the jam kind of to reflect the fruit when you eat fresh plums they're not sugary sweet they have that little bit of sweet and tartness and that's exactly how the jam as the crazy flavors as I call them we have German chocolate we have Jameson whiskey chocolate okay yes you got these drunken get a which I love so Jamison's here Davis is in chocolate custard I'd add that can't wait to taste that when I'm a busy guy but given the low beam yeah but you got this moonshine and lemon and that's what we've got here tell me about the moonshine so the story is I have a my packaging guy bought a house in Kentucky and I said listen Simon when you go over there can you just bring me some moonshine and he when he was getting his house built he asked everybody for moonshine and and everybody would get so upset him there's no moon shining in talking the plumbers electricians that window guys the dark eyes everybody yeah and finally he built his house is sitting on his porch and some guy pulls up right to his to his front stop and he's it's are you the guy looking for moonshiners like yeah he brings out this carton of more of these Mason jars full of money it is like a hundred Bucks the drop that often like drives right off like it was it was like a transaction and have a little remote brings it back you say's Dover I found your moon shine so I said what flavor it would be really good for punchy with moonshine enacted lemon card will make this delicious lemon curd from scratch yeah with lemon juice and butter and eggs and sugar together then we think I spy to it like a little sharpness even yes yeah

Chicago
Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

The Book Review

11:15 min | 9 months ago

Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

"Leslie Jamison is here in the studio. Her most recent book is make it screen and make it burn essays which was reviewed in the book review last fall all but she's here now to talk about another book. She reviewed this week on our cover. Jennie O. Foles Weather Leslie. Thanks for being here. It's so wonderful to be here so you. Let's first talk about Jenny full. Who she is? Pearl Siegel staff critic for the Times. Were a profile of Jennie O.. Full in this this week's issue of the New York Times magazine but give us a sense of who this writer is. When I think about Daniel's work and why it matters and why I think it's really created aided the sense of excitement around so many readers I think part of it you know she writes about motherhood and marriage and things that can get lumped under the general neural umbrella term domesticity but she brings them to life in these incredibly razor-sharp ways and there shouldn't even be a but conjunction to that sentence right like wire wire those states of being not razor-sharp somehow but but sometimes they can get seen as softer sentimental and she brings both very different form and a very different tone to how how she writes about them and how she does justice to their emotional extremity? Now I'm thinking that we have to make a challenge to ourselves not to use the word but for the rest of this partnership. I think there we go that we're are GONNA fail so we'll just we'll we'll put that aside. This book weather is her third novel her. I was last things and then it took her fifteen years to write. Her neck spoke department of speculation which came out in two thousand fourteen and was one of our ten best books of the year. And I feel like that book really brought her to you. A wider attention perhaps not bestseller list attention but it was hugely critically acclaimed and beloved by readers. Let's start talk a little a bit about that book and why it struck such a chord and I think it's no accident when you said it was like fifteen years until the next book which actually sort of part of the plot of Department of speculation too. It's like there's a writer who is taking a long time to put her second novel. Part of I think you know my understanding from interviews. She's done. The story of that book has that it started as a much more conventionally structured novel and it sort of took her a long time to whittle it down to its really searing form which is a very a fragmented form where you feel like you're getting these absolutely essential bursts of exerience. I think her agent described at once as more like an x Ray than a body which I thought was such such an amazing evocation of how it works and so part of why it caught. Hold I think is that it wasn't it wasn't just very smart about feeling and it had this strong long hard and it's about a infidelity and marriage sort of preparing itself but it also it seemed to find a new language for feeling a new structure for feeling the guy I want to go back to that the fragments Manson the structure for people who've not Reggiani Oval. We should say this. Her books are really short. They're really really short but they are packed and yet they don't feel dense and part of that is due to structure and you use the word fragments. People use the word fragments or fragmentary or cones. Let's talk about a house. She structures these books because it is especially when department speculation came out in two thousand fourteen. It felt very different from what was being written and it felt very very different from the way in which a domestic novel was being written. You know it makes me think a little bit about the way that like Virginia Woolf would describe moments of being you know that somehow we have these moments where it feels like something about experience is intensified or crystallized on. I think Jenny has a real knack for like putting her finger on the pulse of those moment. So maybe it's just an ordinary moment like in this latest novel. where she comes home from the her narrator comes home from feeling this intense panic about climate aamot change and her sons playing minecraft noon? SORTA get like putty off of his fingers. Like it's not in a dramatic sense like it's that's not a huge plot point happening in that moment but she manages manages to find these ways that seemingly insignificant moments if you if you describe them so precisely and locate some kind of feeling what's happening in them quivering inside them. She does justice to it and the way that her books are structured. I don't think there are like us in this weather. There are parts. I can't remember if in Department of Speculation Stephen divided into chapters but it's these single paragraphs are a few paragraphs spaced apart on the page. So not not only. Is it a small book but it actually. I mean you could theoretically sit down and read it in a couple of hours I did. You did theory. You could sit down down and read it very quickly and one of the things that I think people then mistakenly assume is that. Oh you know sort of hastily written you get the cents though once you are reading it that not at all does feel something. That is very much labored over almost like poetry in terms of the precision of the ways in which the things that she's putting into those little sections as you pointed out it's often about the contrast in a given moment between something very granular and domestic and personal and then some larger thought. That's going on or something happening in the greater world. Do you think that was what was is so striking about department of speculation. The fact that she was doing not that she was taking something like a domestic novel. That was you know. Just as you said kind of a story of a Brooklyn Glenn Mother and infidelity and work life balance and these things that so many books are about but infusing in it these larger the issues. I think that's a really good point that so often. What makes these like short bursts? CLO- fuel incandescent our field. Charged is is that they're very granular. But they're also holding some kind of emotional intensity and I think when you're writing about something like infidelity where there's both the danger of somehow telling a story that people feel like they've heard before story that feels intrinsically melodramatic. It can really bring out the humanity of the story to pay attention to the granularity of of like a one scene. That's rising to mind from that novel is like the narrator after a conflict with her husband going to stay at a hotel overnight and and like preying on the carpet of the hotel floor. But it's like it's like that hotel carpeting that holds so much feeling rather than just like the larger obstruction of of infidelity per se. Or something and so I think it is that scale shifting that can happen in a space of a paragraph. Can that happen across the course the whole book. That's also really operative in this latest book. where the skills or even bigger because among other things about climate change is like one of the biggest skills yes yes yeah? Let's talk about weather and let's start start with what it's about even though you know as we think people are probably sensing when you talk about Jenny ovals work. It really isn't about plot. Yeah but what is whether yeah so the narrator of weather is a mother who years ago dropped out of a PhD program and it's working as university librarian and she takes a job job working for her former mentor. Who does a podcast about climate change? where she's answering all the letters that are coming in response to this podcast so there are a few different? There's the kind of plot of her I went to the overhauls narrator to answer my letters to this cast. I'm just kidding. I love answering your letters I would be. I thought you were GonNa even save answer my letters I was like I have a few letters. Live right Yeah I mean you know you have this narrators mother you have her as a wife wife you have her as a a worker and maybe a worker who feels a bit lost in the world. There's also for me. One of the most compelling plot lines in the book is about the narrators relationship with her brother. WHO's a recovering addict? He gets married and then has a a baby and her role in his life and her sort of desperate hope that he can put his life together. Other was a really moving strand among strands for me as well presumably. That's very deliberate. Bringing new life into a world that is in crisis crisis and feels like it's ending and I think that's one of the abiding emotional. Tensions in the book is like the the world is always beginning and ending at once. And maybe maybe there's something about that truism that has felt universal through time but it has a particular acuity now or the world is is it's ending he's send away by these factors that are at work but that dynamic of like yes the world is ending but also you wake up in the morning and you're touching base with your brother overtaxed to make sure he and the baby are doing okay that both of those are real on. Both of those are happening. I think we're seeing a wave of climate fiction and it's taking all of these different forms. Probably a most noticeably post apocalyptic and dystopia although there are also books like Richard powerhouses over story sometimes metaphorical Oracle sometimes very reality based feels different. Though I mean how does this differ from other fiction looking at climate and climate. Change for starters. You don't have that kind of like emotional. Buffer of the post apocalyptic landscape that emotional buffer mailing a strange way to describe a postal puck landscape. But it's like if the apocalypse is happening thing in Brooklyn Public School like that's the stage set for the book it feels more disquieting in certain ways because it's closer to home. It's not like Cormac McCarthy novel where a father and Zahn are like traveling the chart landscape like it's more immediate in that way and I think one of the challenges of writing about climate change is how to take this thing that is essentially on a larger scale than our minds can hold and how to make it a narrative we can hold. There's this moment early on in weather where the narrator is thinking about her son allies elementary school and she says the problem with the school is that it's not a bill on a human scale feels too large for these little children who are going into it and I I think in a way that lays out one of the aesthetic challenges the book right. It's like climate. Change isn't quite on a human scale but narrative is on a human scale. So how do you translate. How does she do it? Part of it has to do with what we're talking about a little bit earlier these questions of sort of scale shifting and simultaneity where you had these big questions of like the end of the world coming up either through the letters that are coming into this podcast or you know this narrator is doing what I think. We all do obsessive googling about lots of things where she's sort. I'm trying to see like how hot is it going to be in New York City and you know when her son is sixty years old or something like that and getting so freaked out by these numbers so you sort of have those larger questions that are always coming up against the interpersonal. TRAUMAS the books. So either it's like the obstruction of like how hot is the World GonNA get comes up up against the body of her actual son. She's imagining at age. Sixty or thinking about like the horsemen of the apocalypse. Coming in comes up against you know coming home ends ends giving the dog. His Lover Frog Toy. You know so the becomes on a human scale because we see a particular human with a particular life a particular brother who's giving bringing new life into the world that all of those abstract questions are hitting all of those granular

Jenny Writer The Times Leslie Jamison Jennie O Jennie O. Foles The New York Times Pearl Siegel Virginia Woolf New York City Daniel Reggiani Oval RAY Manson Cormac Mccarthy Brooklyn Glenn Mother Brooklyn Public School Allies Elementary School
"jamison" Discussed on Creepify

Creepify

09:25 min | 9 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on Creepify

"May finally get the P.. She has been waiting for her son. John has been missing for four years now but this weekend a possible break sky five flew over the sands boys mountains were hunters found the skeletal. Two were Maine's of two adults and a child. This is the same area where bobby and Cherilyn Jamison disappeared with. Their young daughter gives his capacity spoke to Bobby's mother about her long. Wait for answer. The Jamison family lived here near Lake. EUFAULA but bobby's mom says they were looking linked to move to the mountains in early October of two thousand nine. They made the hour long. Drive to Latimer county to look for property. But we're never seen again for the last four years. starlet Jamison has worried and wondered. Bobby was one of these people that was always helping people her son. Bobby Jameson has been missing. Sing along with his wife Sherline and their six year old daughter Madison. She was always be no get into something then she looked at you with a big brown around is eight days after they were reported missing. The family's truck was found in the mountains. Maisy then just a puppy was inside barely alive. The remains discovered by hunters. This weekend were less than three miles away around the same time. The remains were found. Bobby Jameson mom says no official official confirmation the remains are the Jamison family through partial skeletal remains in some some clothing shoes things like that. This mom believes God. His answered her prayer revealing the remains of their bodies but she believes their souls left long ago. And I know that there with God now and they're in a better place the FBI says it will take dental records and DNA tests. You prove the remains are those of the Jamison family but say there have have been no other reports of missing people in that area and you follow can pass off Theo. Five Years Bobby and Cherilyn Jamison Manson and their six year old daughter. Madison went missing in the Rhodope Mountain area of southeast home in October. Two Thousand and nine Over one hundred people were enlisted to search for the Jamison family but no sign them was found until November two thousand thirteen. The skeleton remains of two adults and a child were found in the woods face down and side by side roughly three miles from where their vehicle has been abandoned. It wasn't until July two thousand fourteen at these remains were positively identified as Jason Family. The cause of death was never determined rather than provide closure to the Jameson friends and family. It just raise questions as to what really really happen. The jetsons live in follow Oklahoma about thirty miles away from where they were found in the isolated mountain range where doke okay is home to just over five. Hundred people in the Jameson. were interested in purchasing a forty acre plot of land although Sherlund and son from a previous relationship Colton so was mother just weeks before she went missing and never mentioned plans to move when their truck was found in two thousand nine there was no sign of distress or a struggle in the vehicle had not crashed inside the car. Were Bobby and share ORLANDS wallets. ID's mobile phones GPS maps and thirty two thousand dollars in cash but disturbingly. The family dog mazy was also in the coal malnutrition from not having eaten in a week. The dog survived ride and went to live. With Bobby's mother theory surrounding what happened to the Jamison family have swirled since disappearance. One theory suggests that it was a murder suicide. Both adults had suffered from depression sherline. Most recently after the death of her sister bite full Levin page page letter was written bobby from Sharon. She was found dead in the Bannon. Truck sherline pistol was missing. Another theory points needs to bobby with his father Bob. Jamieson Bob had a contemptuous relationship with his father stemming Ming from the Prophet of a gas station that was supposed to be split between father and son when it was so bobby ended up suing his father his mother starlet. starlet clams your ex-husband. Threaten the family police decided it was not a credible theory. Despite rumors of Bob Seniors Ehlers ties to the Mexican Mafia. He died two months after his son went missing. Drugs were also thought to be part of the equation. Red Oak is known for Producing Crystal Meth and share. Lemon bobby both look random in the weeks before their disappearance security video of the two outside their house today they left in the mountains showed them. Moving in a trance-like state and the huge amount of cash in a a truck made this a credible theory even share liens best friend. Nikki should know Jameson. Were possibly involved in a one off meth deal because Zor experiencing some money troubles it's time but both Sheridan's mother Connie and Bobby's mother starlet. Do not believe their kids were involved in drugs and police found no no evidence of Elizabeth Substances in the Jameson. Home or truck was interesting theory behind the death. The Jamison family has to do with costs witchcraft and evil spirits during the initial investigation. Before the bodies were found. The Families Pastor Gary Brandon Topa. Oh police the Jason's had been involved in spiritual warfare both Bobby Ann. Sheridan claim to have seen spirits in their house belonging to the family who died long ago daughter Madison claim to speak to the spirit of the child who died in the house. Bobby asked his pasture for special bullets. We'll have to shoot the spirits with and claimed he consulted a Satanic Bible to exercise. The Property Nikki missed both she and Sheridan were interested in witches and both had bought which was as a joke which the police found when searching the Jameson property. Despite joking about witches Nikki felt the Johnson House was haunted once I was in the living room and this sort of gray mist descended down the stairs. It really scared me. Nikki told the Daily Mail will she also said this airline told her gentle husband. Bobby would come toward her. With is completely dead and black like he was possessed. Nikki doesn't believe in witchcraft was behind her friend's death but Cheryl may have been a bigger believer the Nikki she would leave notes around the house that would say things. He's like get out saying and was researching whether the house was a native American. Burial ground. Nikki Connie you. You know. Sheridan's mother believes her family fell victim to witchcraft of a religious call. Connie claims that the portion of Oklahoma's known for harboring costs and stuff like that and it was told that she was on a hit list around the time of her disappearance. Connie doesn't offer the name of the call or or any other details trail in the Jameson cases. Now called Israel the sheriff at the time of the disappearance with the force in two thousand eleven and moved overseas according to Nikki. He couldn't stand the guilt of not being able to find. Madison's kill Pastor Gary Brandon also left the area shortly after the James Disappearance has spoken to anyone about the case. Even though the Jameson remains were found and put the rest not knowing what happened has caused tormented surviving friends and family. That that will probably never end. I hope you enjoyed this week. On Crete before. I hope I struck a nerve or gave you that. Feeling as if you're gladys gladys daylight or you're freaked out because of nightfall if you have a creepy story you want me to tell us a segment in creepy Fi and send me A. DM On twitter. The story you've heard of or experienced yourself and I'll read it aloud episodes. Now you can subscribe on Itunes Google. Google play pod bean or wherever else you listen to your podcast offer free now. If you feel need support my show you can do so my patreon If you're waiting for my next episode drop feel free to check out my podcast I host. It's called Lewt News L. E. W. T. news for an upbeat hind his scary social podcast. But until next episode just remember to stay safe and watch yeah darkness.

bobby Bobby Jameson Jamison family Nikki Connie Madison Sheridan Cherilyn Jamison Jason Family Jamison Bobby Ann Cherilyn Jamison Manson Jameson Oklahoma Latimer county Sherline EUFAULA Maine John FBI
"jamison" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

03:01 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Jamison put is creative energy to work by just calling his easy number to remember eight four six done as and he'll get it done for you Jamison realty eight four six done another cold night ahead twenty four for a low tonight crank up the heat tomorrow partly cloudy only getting up to forty two we're not much above freezing at the moment clear sky thirty four W. B. T. say you're shopping online with your smartphone it sure feels like your personal info is right there in your hand but when you hit submit your personal info gets around whenever you bank shopper browse online your private info is no longer in your control leaving you vulnerable to cyber criminals criminals more threats demand more protection that's why Norton LifeLock are now part of one company Norton three sixty with LifeLock provides all in one membership for your cyber safety the gives you device security identity theft protection the V. P. N. for online privacy and more no one can prevent all cyber crime and identity theft but Norton three sixty with LifeLock he's your ally in today's connected world because you're always there sign up today for Norton three sixty with LifeLock and save twenty five percent or more of your first year by going to Norton dot com slash radio that's Norton dot com slash radio for twenty five percent off the following is a message from the law offices of Franken Verity do you have a service animal like an emotional support pig if so law also you might be able to use tax act deducted expenses and they know what they're doing they're just helping you to find every tax advantage you deserve so stop calling to ask if it's legal where not emotional support lawyers one three your tax situation may be different tax act is not a substitute for legal or tax advice in these are actors not real attorneys thinking about life insurance what if you could make one free phone call and learn your best price from nearly a dozen highly rated price competitive companies well that's exactly what happens when you call select quote life for example George is forty he was getting sky high quotes from other companies because it takes minutes to control his blood pressure but when I shopped around I found him a ten year five hundred thousand dollar policy for under twenty five dollars a month I'm select quote agent dance aveeno and believe me if select quote is in shopping for your life insurance you're probably paying too much for your free quote call eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty that's eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty or go to select quote dot com since nineteen eighty five we shop you save get full details on the example policy it's local dot com slash commercials are price could very depending on your health insurance company the fact not available in all states geico presents another voice mail from.

Jamison
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:46 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"And being sober And that would be a bit of a head scrambling experience I think for most people given what you see on that Strip and you've written extensively about Sobriety and about addiction in recovering covering an and beyond. There's this idea that there's some sort of connection between dependency and creativity. Is that a myth to you. Or there's there's something to that so when I was coming of age as a writer I very very much grew up on these ideas. And these kind of mythologies of the drunk genius and the kind of rogue artist WHO's self destructive tendencies were intimately bound up with his ability to create beautiful art and my book recovering was sort sort of long reckoning with what happened to those set of ideas in my mind when I got sober and my own attempts to find a supplementary on alternative turn it off manse turn it set of stories. I guess about the kinds of creativity that writers had discovered when they got sober or win recovering in those. I'd heard the stories of drunk right. I hadn't heard the stories of the SOPA writer author. In fact there are quite a few of them and so I think is it. Is it a myth that there's a relationship between dependency and creativity not entirely because certainly a relationship between pain and creativity. I mean people make beautiful for art out of painful experiences and addiction. Alcoholism often that pain becomes kind of driving engine. That writers are working. I'm from I think the myth at least the myth for me that I had to really contend with was that addiction had some kind of monopoly on the creative process says or on being creative engine. You know that that people can make creative work from other spaces as well. One of those spaces look like you'll often hear from musicians. Who who have heard those same stories and they perhaps have come through Addiction find themselves on the other side and they'll talk about something that they have gained reigned as a musician or that. They've gained as performer. What do you think that that you've gained as a writer and sobriety so for Lisa Brady was a lot about waking up which is not to say that I was asleep for the first part of my life but that alcohol really gave me this way? Eight to check out of experience to check out of feeling to sort of shut something off in my head in a way that I found a lot of relief in and so when I was sober I was you know in the beginning. Very painfully awake. I was aware of everything I was feeling and I was aware of. You know I almost felt even more physically aware of the world. I was aware of like light and cold and it just felt like the world was very very palpably present and and I think that was a struggle to just show up for everything to show up for every feeling to show up for the world to show up for other people but there's also a lot of richness snus and being awake and being aware and so for me it actually was quite a natural thing that sobriety would ultimately create a deeper kind kind of creative energy because it was it felt like a tune and felt like being present in the world rather than always trying to flee it and from that presence. There was just a lot to notice a lot today. Tell me about writing and maybe this comes out of that moment but in writing at length we live in a time. Now where where. People are consumed with not just brevity but he all the things that they should be reading that they haven't read because they're stocked up on their phones. You look at things things In seconds not in minutes or hours what do you love about about writing long and writing. Essays Yeah so first of all I guess I should say I'm glad we can have lots of kinds of writing in the world in the same way that maybe I was saying earlier. I'm glad that we can have lots of different kinds of journalism. Because I think we need first responders. You know there's a lot happening right now. That is really difficult to make sense of. And I'm really grateful that there are people out there who are going to turn around an OP. Ed In twenty four hours because I wanna read it and I want to know I want I want to sort of have those virgils who are guiding us through hell like a more immediate clip But I myself feel like the most useful things I have have to offer anyone rise out of letting myself think about something often for years before I put out some piece of writing about it and I I do think it's important to also preserve space for that sort of long term thinking and researching and you know even with a very personal essay. I'll probably Lee spend two or three years on it which is not not doing anything else for this two to three years that I'm giving it time to percolate giving it time giving myself time to revive the stories. I've told myself about myself which I think is really important Giving time a chance to just complicate my perspective I think we all have those Azizi what I call like cocktail party versions of our lives and what's happened to us and sometimes sitting with a piece of writing for a longtime is the way to get underneath that cocktail party anecdote version and let the truth. Be More complicated. So ultimately I think whether whether I'm writing into my life or away from my life part of the virtue of time just comes back to letting something be as complicated as it needs to be and sometimes it takes six years for those other layers of complexity to emerge. Is it hard to let those pieces go after two to three years of thinking about them off it. It's actually write about times. They also can reach saturation point with a piece. I mean I'm never going to let the whale go like I'm happy to talk about fifty two blue and told pulled ahead of time and I still sometimes listen to. That song was obsessed with when I was writing about him. So you know I still sometimes speak to subjects from pieces is that I finished writing so in a way I never let go suicide from the whale. What are you obsessed with now? I have spent a lot of the fall. Obsessed with the photography of Gary Winner Grand. There was this beautiful exhibit of Gary Winnick Color Photographs up at the Brooklyn Museum that I was going to with my Daughter who's a A toddler Gary winner grand. You know in the fifties and sixties took photographs of Coney island the streets of Manhattan rest-stops across American highways like often public spaces where ordinary people were just living their lives and I think his photography is is yet another another way of engaged in ongoing obsession with ordinary people. Ordinary lives ordinary moments banal places banal experiences says and how much All of that ordinariness. How much profundity and meaning it can hold? This is a wonderful collection and It's a a real pleasure to talk to you about obsession and other matters leslie. Thank you thank you so much for having me a pleasure to talk to you as well take care bye bye leslie. Jamison is an SAS and the the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Her latest book is called. Make it scream. Make It burn for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

writer Gary Winnick New York Times Jamison Manhattan Lisa Brady Brooklyn Museum Coney island Lee leslie
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:47 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"In Vegas and being sober And that would be a bit of a head scrambling experience I think for most people given what you see on that Strip and you've written extensively about Sobriety and about addiction in recovering covering an and beyond. There's this idea that there's some sort of connection between dependency and creativity. Is that a myth to you. Or there's there's something to that so when I was coming of age as a writer I very very much grew up on these ideas. And these kind of mythologies of the drunk genius and the kind of rogue artist WHO's self destructive tendencies were intimately bound up with his ability to create beautiful art and my book recovering was sort sort of long reckoning with what happened to those set of ideas in my mind when I got sober and my own attempts to find a supplementary on alternative turn it off manse turn it set of stories. I guess about the kinds of creativity that writers had discovered when they got sober or win recovering in those. I'd heard the stories of drunk right. I hadn't heard the stories of the SOPA writer author. In fact there are quite a few of them and so I think is it. Is it a myth that there's a relationship between dependency and creativity not entirely because certainly a relationship between pain and creativity. I mean people make beautiful for art out of painful experiences and addiction. Alcoholism often that pain becomes kind of driving engine. That writers are working. I'm from I think the myth at least the myth for me that I had to really contend with was that addiction had some kind of monopoly on the creative process says or on being creative engine. You know that that people can make creative work from other spaces as well. One of those spaces look like you'll often hear from musicians. Who who have heard those same stories and they perhaps have come through Addiction find themselves on the other side and they'll talk about something that they have gained reigned as a musician or that. They've gained as performer. What do you think that that you've gained as a writer and sobriety so for Lisa Brady was a lot about waking up which is not to say that I was asleep for the first part of my life but that alcohol really gave me this way? Eight to check out of experience to check out of feeling to sort of shut something off in my head in a way that I found a lot of relief in and so when I was sober I was you know in the beginning. Very painfully awake. I was aware of everything I was feeling and I was aware of. You know I almost felt even more physically aware of the world. I was aware of like light and cold and it just felt like the world was very very palpably present and and I think that was a struggle to just show up for everything to show up for every feeling to show up for the world to show up for other people but there's also a lot of richness snus and being awake and being aware and so for me it actually was quite a natural thing that sobriety would ultimately create a deeper kind kind of creative energy because it was it felt like a tune and felt like being present in the world rather than always trying to flee it and from that presence. There was just a lot to notice a lot today. Tell me about writing and maybe this comes out of that moment but in writing at length we live in a time. Now where where. People are consumed with not just brevity but he all the things that they should be reading that they haven't read because they're stocked up on their phones. You look at things things In seconds not in minutes or hours what do you love about about writing long and writing. Essays Yeah so first of all I guess I should say I'm glad we can have lots of kinds of writing in the world in the same way that maybe I was saying earlier. I'm glad that we can have lots of different kinds of journalism. Because I think we need first responders. You know there's a lot happening right now. That is really difficult to make sense of. And I'm really grateful that there are people out there who are going to turn around an OP. Ed In twenty four hours because I wanna read it and I want to know I want I want to sort of have those virgils who are guiding us through hell like a more immediate clip But I myself feel like the most useful things I have have to offer anyone rise out of letting myself think about something often for years before I put out some piece of writing about it and I I do think it's important to also preserve space for that sort of long term thinking and researching and you know even with a very personal essay. I'll probably Lee spend two or three years on it which is not not doing anything else for this two to three years that I'm giving it time to percolate giving it time giving myself time to revive the stories. I've told myself about myself which I think is really important Giving time a chance to just complicate my perspective I think we all have those Azizi what I call like cocktail party versions of our lives and what's happened to us and sometimes sitting with a piece of writing for a longtime is the way to get underneath that cocktail party anecdote version and let the truth. Be More complicated. So ultimately I think whether whether I'm writing into my life or away from my life part of the virtue of time just comes back to letting something be as complicated as it needs to be and sometimes it takes six years for those other layers of complexity to emerge. Is it hard to let those pieces go after two to three years of thinking about them off it. It's actually write about times. They also can reach saturation point with a piece. I mean I'm never going to let the whale go like I'm happy to talk about fifty two blue and told pulled ahead of time and I still sometimes listen to. That song was obsessed with when I was writing about him. So you know I still sometimes speak to subjects from pieces is that I finished writing so in a way I never let go suicide from the whale. What are you obsessed with now? I have spent a lot of the fall. Obsessed with the photography of Gary Winner Grand. There was this beautiful exhibit of Gary Winnick Color Photographs up at the Brooklyn Museum that I was going to with my Daughter who's a A toddler Gary winner grand. You know in the fifties and sixties took photographs of Coney island the streets of Manhattan rest-stops across American highways like often public spaces where ordinary people were just living their lives and I think his photography is is yet another another way of engaged in ongoing obsession with ordinary people. Ordinary lives ordinary moments banal places banal experiences says and how much All of that ordinariness. How much profundity and meaning it can hold? This is a wonderful collection and It's a a real pleasure to talk to you about obsession and other matters leslie. Thank you thank you so much for having me a pleasure to talk to you as well take care bye bye leslie. Jamison is an SAS and the the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Her latest book is called. Make it scream. Make It burn for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

writer Vegas Gary Winnick New York Times Jamison Lisa Brady Brooklyn Museum Coney island Lee leslie Manhattan
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:47 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"In Vegas and being sober And that would be a bit of a head scrambling experience I think for most people given what you see on that Strip and you've written extensively about Sobriety and about addiction in recovering covering an and beyond. There's this idea that there's some sort of connection between dependency and creativity. Is that a myth to you. Or there's there's something to that so when I was coming of age as a writer I very very much grew up on these ideas. And these kind of mythologies of the drunk genius and the kind of rogue artist WHO's self destructive tendencies were intimately bound up with his ability to create beautiful art and my book recovering was sort sort of long reckoning with what happened to those set of ideas in my mind when I got sober and my own attempts to find a supplementary on alternative turn it off manse turn it set of stories. I guess about the kinds of creativity that writers had discovered when they got sober or win recovering in those. I'd heard the stories of drunk right. I hadn't heard the stories of the SOPA writer author. In fact there are quite a few of them and so I think is it. Is it a myth that there's a relationship between dependency and creativity not entirely because certainly a relationship between pain and creativity. I mean people make beautiful for art out of painful experiences and addiction. Alcoholism often that pain becomes kind of driving engine. That writers are working. I'm from I think the myth at least the myth for me that I had to really contend with was that addiction had some kind of monopoly on the creative process says or on being creative engine. You know that that people can make creative work from other spaces as well. One of those spaces look like you'll often hear from musicians. Who who have heard those same stories and they perhaps have come through Addiction find themselves on the other side and they'll talk about something that they have gained reigned as a musician or that. They've gained as performer. What do you think that that you've gained as a writer and sobriety so for Lisa Brady was a lot about waking up which is not to say that I was asleep for the first part of my life but that alcohol really gave me this way? Eight to check out of experience to check out of feeling to sort of shut something off in my head in a way that I found a lot of relief in and so when I was sober I was you know in the beginning. Very painfully awake. I was aware of everything I was feeling and I was aware of. You know I almost felt even more physically aware of the world. I was aware of like light and cold and it just felt like the world was very very palpably present and and I think that was a struggle to just show up for everything to show up for every feeling to show up for the world to show up for other people but there's also a lot of richness snus and being awake and being aware and so for me it actually was quite a natural thing that sobriety would ultimately create a deeper kind kind of creative energy because it was it felt like a tune and felt like being present in the world rather than always trying to flee it and from that presence. There was just a lot to notice a lot today. Tell me about writing and maybe this comes out of that moment but in writing at length we live in a time. Now where where. People are consumed with not just brevity but he all the things that they should be reading that they haven't read because they're stocked up on their phones. You look at things things In seconds not in minutes or hours what do you love about about writing long and writing. Essays Yeah so first of all I guess I should say I'm glad we can have lots of kinds of writing in the world in the same way that maybe I was saying earlier. I'm glad that we can have lots of different kinds of journalism. Because I think we need first responders. You know there's a lot happening right now. That is really difficult to make sense of. And I'm really grateful that there are people out there who are going to turn around an OP. Ed In twenty four hours because I wanna read it and I want to know I want I want to sort of have those virgils who are guiding us through hell like a more immediate clip But I myself feel like the most useful things I have have to offer anyone rise out of letting myself think about something often for years before I put out some piece of writing about it and I I do think it's important to also preserve space for that sort of long term thinking and researching and you know even with a very personal essay. I'll probably Lee spend two or three years on it which is not not doing anything else for this two to three years that I'm giving it time to percolate giving it time giving myself time to revive the stories. I've told myself about myself which I think is really important Giving time a chance to just complicate my perspective I think we all have those Azizi what I call like cocktail party versions of our lives and what's happened to us and sometimes sitting with a piece of writing for a longtime is the way to get underneath that cocktail party anecdote version and let the truth. Be More complicated. So ultimately I think whether whether I'm writing into my life or away from my life part of the virtue of time just comes back to letting something be as complicated as it needs to be and sometimes it takes six years for those other layers of complexity to emerge. Is it hard to let those pieces go after two to three years of thinking about them off it. It's actually write about times. They also can reach saturation point with a piece. I mean I'm never going to let the whale go like I'm happy to talk about fifty two blue and told pulled ahead of time and I still sometimes listen to. That song was obsessed with when I was writing about him. So you know I still sometimes speak to subjects from pieces is that I finished writing so in a way I never let go suicide from the whale. What are you obsessed with now? I have spent a lot of the fall. Obsessed with the photography of Gary Winner Grand. There was this beautiful exhibit of Gary Winnick Color Photographs up at the Brooklyn Museum that I was going to with my Daughter who's a A toddler Gary winner grand. You know in the fifties and sixties took photographs of Coney island the streets of Manhattan rest-stops across American highways like often public spaces where ordinary people were just living their lives and I think his photography is is yet another another way of engaged in ongoing obsession with ordinary people. Ordinary lives ordinary moments banal places banal experiences says and how much All of that ordinariness. How much profundity and meaning it can hold? This is a wonderful collection and It's a a real pleasure to talk to you about obsession and other matters leslie. Thank you thank you so much for having me a pleasure to talk to you as well take care bye bye leslie. Jamison is an SAS and the the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Her latest book is called. Make it scream. Make It burn for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

writer Vegas Gary Winnick New York Times Jamison Lisa Brady Brooklyn Museum Coney island Lee leslie Manhattan
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

12:00 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"Not just any whale song though. The sound pattern is similar to the call of a blue whale but at a much higher frequency the mystery behind did that sound has gripped the imagination of people right around the world. Leslie Jamison tells that story of obsession and others like it in her latest collection of essays. Make it scream make it burn. Leslie is the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Leslie Good Morning Can Morning Matt. Let me start to be here. It's great to have you let me start with that sound. It's the sound of fifty two blue. What is the story of this whale? The story of fifty blue which is still ongoing actually is the story of the whale who ultimately became known as the loneliest whale in the world as you said his his his song was first discovered by these naval audio engineers. Once a set of Navy hydrophones had been kind of decommissioned from tracking Soviet subs at the after the end of the Cold War and they heard the song that was unlike. Any whale song. They'd ever heard and wants. Their results became public. People became obsessed with this this elusive Wale and his song for a couple of reasons that his song was different from any other whales and that he was always tracked traveling alone. I was interested in telling not only the story of the whale himself. And how he had been discovered but really the stories of people who had become obsessed with him and why they had become obsessed with him and and what sorts of meanings they projected onto him. Told me more about that. Because to your point people people became obsessed with this. Well Yeah I think and and I'm very interested in in getting at the insides of people in the mysterious insides of people through these things that they get consume buying. Can't let go of so you know I tell the story. Three of a Polish tabloid photographer who got down by his girlfriend and became very attached to the whale as a sort of mascot of heartbreak and ended up getting a massive massive tattoo of the whale. That I can show you many many photographs of if you're interested across his back I tell the story of a an Irish union organizer Sir. who sort of restarted his life and Middle Age and for him the whale was a mascot of endurance? I really got quite close to one woman men who was recovering from a coma up in Harlem and for her the whale was simultaneously symbol of loneliness and a symbol of what it might mean into be resolutely adamantly independent. Why did people project so much onto the whale? There's a line that somebody says that the whale is everything. What was it about this whale? That allowed them not just to get the Tattoo and to write songs about it and to create art inspired by the whale but to project all of that onto this thing I think there were a few elements at play. I think for starters. The whale was simultaneously vivid and distance. So it's it's an immediate media image of this whale all alone in the vast ocean you can picture you can kinda get attached to that image but the will was far enough away that we didn't really know do that much about him and that not knowing made it easier to project sort of everything onto him. I also think there's something about Wales Moby. Dick is obviously the original white canvas. Bewail who comes to stand for lots of different things to lots of different people in the Melville novel but I I think whales are simultaneously genially so huge and powerful and that with this particular whale there was a sense of vulnerability living alongside that huge massive power because has he was always alone because he was a little bit different and I think those veins of vulnerability made him a a a more appealing source of obsession. What were are you more interested in the whale or that sense of Obsession I? My ultimate interest was within the obsession of which became a participant in as well as the documents are of. I there anybody who knows me during the eighteen months span probably two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen. When I was working on that long piece nose and was subjected to listening to like a particular song that had been inspired by the whale? Everybody in my life was hearing a lot about the whale. I myself was coming out of a long term relationship and so I think that idea of solitude and what could be done with solitude became Quite moving to me as well and so when I was writing about these people who are obsessed. I wasn't writing about them. As kind of clinical anthropologist. I was writing about them as as kindred spirits in a way. How'd you land on this? I mean you have written a lot about obsession and things that people become obsessed with whether it's running incredibly long distances whether it's it's the whale whether it's a mysterious skin condition or the idea of reincarnation how'd you end up landing on what you become obsessed with so there are lots of pads to my subjects. Sometimes their personal so in the case of the ultra marathon the brutal race through the Tennessee Z.. Wilderness that you mentioned i. It first came onto my radar screen because my brother was running it and he is now run it run it and not finished it many times which is kind of in some ways points race did not finish other pieces come to me. Through editors and editors approach me with a lot of ideas that I don't take so I think it it always always comes down to the question of whether I feel both a deeper level of connection to the story and usually that deeper level of connection comes from feeling like I can tell both the surface story of the whale of families who believe their kids were reincarnated spirits from the past. There's there's that story that I can report out on the tangible level but for me to really take the story on there has to be some set of deeper questions that I feel like that surface. This material is granting the access to and that's ultimately my entry point into the story. How do you define that? I mean the the idea of obsession because it's not just a fascination. It's not a preoccupation. It's something that's deeper and it's not just about time either. It's it's something that goes beyond that. What's what's the definition that you apply to that I think for me part of part of what I come back to you in thinking about? What makes something an obsession? Is that it. It feels as much a part of of a person as the external realities of their lives so their family life their job life their daily commute their their home where they live. You know that that this obsession if you were to ask that person like who are you. What makes you who you are? What makes you tick that? This obsession would be just as much a part of that answer. Maybe even a bigger part of that answer then. Those External realities of their daily pragmatic life. Life it's almost like if if every person is sort of the is the version of like the surface of the earth or kind of geologic crust than the obsession is this Fisher that opens in the earth in. It feels like that Fisher can deliver me to something deeper and more multi and stranger inside of them. You could dismiss some of the things that people people are obsessed with. There's a piece in the collection about couple who believes that their son was Second World War pilot and his past life and it could be easy to say. Well that's odd and kind of put it off to one side. You don't do that. The why the reincarnation piece was a good example of the fact act that there was a reality happening there no matter what. So maybe there was the reincarnation of a World War Two fighter pilot in in which case that was a reality that was happening but even even if you were to somehow which would be impossible I think totally disprove the possibility that he was reincarnated fighter. Pilot there's still a reality of what's happening there. which is that a family has constructed an entire sense of identity around around the soul of their son being the sole of this pilot? And that's become a big part of their sense of who he is as a person it's become a big sense of who for him who he is says the person and it's become a big part of their family narrative so for me it's impossible to dismiss because whatever the truth of the reincarnation piece there is a truth truth happening there of the store. Is that this family has been telling themselves and kind of constructing their their lives around as a journalist. Or you comfortable with that. I mean you talk about with this in in The pieces as well the line that you may or may not be crossing. It's not as though you believe their story. But you don't completely dismiss it as well and you almost believe you you you find yourself almost aligning with with what they're saying right. Yeah so I think my I think. My understanding of my role was the journalist in relation to their story was that I had to pursue that angle. Of how does the story of reincarnation align with the facts that we can see your. The scientific frameworks we do have but at the same time it also felt like to me and even more compelling part of my role as a journalist was to really investigate what the story had come. I'm too mean for the family and to be as honest as I could on the page about my own. Subjective investments in the story. Why I felt defensive? Incisive of this belief in reincarnation why I wanted to sort of make a case for a belief in reincarnation as suggesting something beautiful about a human understanding of the soul even if we couldn't back it up with physics for example. When I'm writing about reincarnation I'm also early on and twelve step recovery and actually a a lot of the ideas that were appealing to me about twelve step recovery? Were also appealing to me in the vision of Self Hood that reincarnation suggested and so I put that I put put that kind of bias on the table. Because I think I'm telling a story of my encounter with a phenomenon and that's a part of that story. It's also but encounters with with people told me a little bit of votes the photographer that you meet in one of these pieces any appeal. Yeah another another instance of obsession. In this case I think both identity and and time the passage of time have have a lot to do with with her obsession but Anne is a photographer who has been photographing the same family in in Mexico for almost thirty years at taking many many trips to spend many many weeks in their company a lot of her method involves does getting close at both emotionally and literally so that she can show up enough times to be present for the shots that are ultimately going and it be the ones that kind of crystallized some truth for her but I was really interested in her photography as an art practice but I was also really interested in her emotional investment in that work the way that she kind of wasn't able to let go of it. What did you learn from her obsession? A couple of things one that the same things that make a creative process beautiful and profound can also make it wrenching and difficult so I think for her part of what I loved about the photographs. She had created of this family was the fact that they existed over thirty years the fact that they seemed saturated with the intimacy of these bonds. But I also saw the way is that you know. First of all there was a a kind of pain embedded in her relationship with them because she was exposed to the injustice of their poverty the extent of their suffering not that their lives were entirely composed of suffering but they held a lot of difficulty. And that you know for her there was a a real ongoing pain in becoming so close to them so I think that double edged sword quality of like the same same thing that makes something strong can also make it..

Leslie Jamison New York Times Wale coma Tennessee Harlem Dick Bewail Wales Fisher Anne Melville Mexico
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

12:00 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"Not just any whale song though. The sound pattern is similar to the call of a blue whale but at a much higher frequency the mystery behind did that sound has gripped the imagination of people right around the world. Leslie Jamison tells that story of obsession and others like it in her latest collection of essays. Make it scream make it burn. Leslie is the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Leslie Good Morning Can Morning Matt. Let me start to be here. It's great to have you let me start with that sound. It's the sound of fifty two blue. What is the story of this whale? The story of fifty blue which is still ongoing actually is the story of the whale who ultimately became known as the loneliest whale in the world as you said his his his song was first discovered by these naval audio engineers. Once a set of Navy hydrophones had been kind of decommissioned from tracking Soviet subs at the after the end of the Cold War and they heard the song that was unlike. Any whale song. They'd ever heard and wants. Their results became public. People became obsessed with this this elusive Wale and his song for a couple of reasons that his song was different from any other whales and that he was always tracked traveling alone. I was interested in telling not only the story of the whale himself. And how he had been discovered but really the stories of people who had become obsessed with him and why they had become obsessed with him and and what sorts of meanings they projected onto him. Told me more about that. Because to your point people people became obsessed with this. Well Yeah I think and and I'm very interested in in getting at the insides of people in the mysterious insides of people through these things that they get consume buying. Can't let go of so you know I tell the story. Three of a Polish tabloid photographer who got down by his girlfriend and became very attached to the whale as a sort of mascot of heartbreak and ended up getting a massive massive tattoo of the whale. That I can show you many many photographs of if you're interested across his back I tell the story of a an Irish union organizer Sir. who sort of restarted his life and Middle Age and for him the whale was a mascot of endurance? I really got quite close to one woman men who was recovering from a coma up in Harlem and for her the whale was simultaneously symbol of loneliness and a symbol of what it might mean into be resolutely adamantly independent. Why did people project so much onto the whale? There's a line that somebody says that the whale is everything. What was it about this whale? That allowed them not just to get the Tattoo and to write songs about it and to create art inspired by the whale but to project all of that onto this thing I think there were a few elements at play. I think for starters. The whale was simultaneously vivid and distance. So it's it's an immediate media image of this whale all alone in the vast ocean you can picture you can kinda get attached to that image but the will was far enough away that we didn't really know do that much about him and that not knowing made it easier to project sort of everything onto him. I also think there's something about Wales Moby. Dick is obviously the original white canvas. Bewail who comes to stand for lots of different things to lots of different people in the Melville novel but I I think whales are simultaneously genially so huge and powerful and that with this particular whale there was a sense of vulnerability living alongside that huge massive power because has he was always alone because he was a little bit different and I think those veins of vulnerability made him a a a more appealing source of obsession. What were are you more interested in the whale or that sense of Obsession I? My ultimate interest was within the obsession of which became a participant in as well as the documents are of. I there anybody who knows me during the eighteen months span probably two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen. When I was working on that long piece nose and was subjected to listening to like a particular song that had been inspired by the whale? Everybody in my life was hearing a lot about the whale. I myself was coming out of a long term relationship and so I think that idea of solitude and what could be done with solitude became Quite moving to me as well and so when I was writing about these people who are obsessed. I wasn't writing about them. As kind of clinical anthropologist. I was writing about them as as kindred spirits in a way. How'd you land on this? I mean you have written a lot about obsession and things that people become obsessed with whether it's running incredibly long distances whether it's it's the whale whether it's a mysterious skin condition or the idea of reincarnation how'd you end up landing on what you become obsessed with so there are lots of pads to my subjects. Sometimes their personal so in the case of the ultra marathon the brutal race through the Tennessee Z.. Wilderness that you mentioned i. It first came onto my radar screen because my brother was running it and he is now run it run it and not finished it many times which is kind of in some ways points race did not finish other pieces come to me. Through editors and editors approach me with a lot of ideas that I don't take so I think it it always always comes down to the question of whether I feel both a deeper level of connection to the story and usually that deeper level of connection comes from feeling like I can tell both the surface story of the whale of families who believe their kids were reincarnated spirits from the past. There's there's that story that I can report out on the tangible level but for me to really take the story on there has to be some set of deeper questions that I feel like that surface. This material is granting the access to and that's ultimately my entry point into the story. How do you define that? I mean the the idea of obsession because it's not just a fascination. It's not a preoccupation. It's something that's deeper and it's not just about time either. It's it's something that goes beyond that. What's what's the definition that you apply to that I think for me part of part of what I come back to you in thinking about? What makes something an obsession? Is that it. It feels as much a part of of a person as the external realities of their lives so their family life their job life their daily commute their their home where they live. You know that that this obsession if you were to ask that person like who are you. What makes you who you are? What makes you tick that? This obsession would be just as much a part of that answer. Maybe even a bigger part of that answer then. Those External realities of their daily pragmatic life. Life it's almost like if if every person is sort of the is the version of like the surface of the earth or kind of geologic crust than the obsession is this Fisher that opens in the earth in. It feels like that Fisher can deliver me to something deeper and more multi and stranger inside of them. You could dismiss some of the things that people people are obsessed with. There's a piece in the collection about couple who believes that their son was Second World War pilot and his past life and it could be easy to say. Well that's odd and kind of put it off to one side. You don't do that. The why the reincarnation piece was a good example of the fact act that there was a reality happening there no matter what. So maybe there was the reincarnation of a World War Two fighter pilot in in which case that was a reality that was happening but even even if you were to somehow which would be impossible I think totally disprove the possibility that he was reincarnated fighter. Pilot there's still a reality of what's happening there. which is that a family has constructed an entire sense of identity around around the soul of their son being the sole of this pilot? And that's become a big part of their sense of who he is as a person it's become a big sense of who for him who he is says the person and it's become a big part of their family narrative so for me it's impossible to dismiss because whatever the truth of the reincarnation piece there is a truth truth happening there of the store. Is that this family has been telling themselves and kind of constructing their their lives around as a journalist. Or you comfortable with that. I mean you talk about with this in in The pieces as well the line that you may or may not be crossing. It's not as though you believe their story. But you don't completely dismiss it as well and you almost believe you you you find yourself almost aligning with with what they're saying right. Yeah so I think my I think. My understanding of my role was the journalist in relation to their story was that I had to pursue that angle. Of how does the story of reincarnation align with the facts that we can see your. The scientific frameworks we do have but at the same time it also felt like to me and even more compelling part of my role as a journalist was to really investigate what the story had come. I'm too mean for the family and to be as honest as I could on the page about my own. Subjective investments in the story. Why I felt defensive? Incisive of this belief in reincarnation why I wanted to sort of make a case for a belief in reincarnation as suggesting something beautiful about a human understanding of the soul even if we couldn't back it up with physics for example. When I'm writing about reincarnation I'm also early on and twelve step recovery and actually a a lot of the ideas that were appealing to me about twelve step recovery? Were also appealing to me in the vision of Self Hood that reincarnation suggested and so I put that I put put that kind of bias on the table. Because I think I'm telling a story of my encounter with a phenomenon and that's a part of that story. It's also but encounters with with people told me a little bit of votes the photographer that you meet in one of these pieces any appeal. Yeah another another instance of obsession. In this case I think both identity and and time the passage of time have have a lot to do with with her obsession but Anne is a photographer who has been photographing the same family in in Mexico for almost thirty years at taking many many trips to spend many many weeks in their company a lot of her method involves does getting close at both emotionally and literally so that she can show up enough times to be present for the shots that are ultimately going and it be the ones that kind of crystallized some truth for her but I was really interested in her photography as an art practice but I was also really interested in her emotional investment in that work the way that she kind of wasn't able to let go of it. What did you learn from her obsession? A couple of things one that the same things that make a creative process beautiful and profound can also make it wrenching and difficult so I think for her part of what I loved about the photographs. She had created of this family was the fact that they existed over thirty years the fact that they seemed saturated with the intimacy of these bonds. But I also saw the way is that you know. First of all there was a a kind of pain embedded in her relationship with them because she was exposed to the injustice of their poverty the extent of their suffering not that their lives were entirely composed of suffering but they held a lot of difficulty. And that you know for her there was a a real ongoing pain in becoming so close to them so I think that double edged sword quality of like the same same thing that makes something strong can also make it..

Leslie Jamison New York Times Wale coma Tennessee Harlem Dick Bewail Wales Fisher Anne Melville Mexico
"jamison" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:29 min | 10 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Current

"Not just any whale song though. The sound pattern is similar to the call of a blue whale but at a much higher frequency the mystery behind did that sound has gripped the imagination of people right around the world. Leslie Jamison tells that story of obsession and others like it in her latest collection of essays. Make it scream make it burn. Leslie is the author of the New York Times bestsellers recovering and the empathy exams. Leslie Good Morning Can Morning Matt. Let me start to be here. It's great to have you let me start with that sound. It's the sound of fifty two blue. What is the story of this whale? The story of fifty blue which is still ongoing actually is the story of the whale who ultimately became known as the loneliest whale in the world as you said his his his song was first discovered by these naval audio engineers. Once a set of Navy hydrophones had been kind of decommissioned from tracking Soviet subs at the after the end of the Cold War and they heard the song that was unlike. Any whale song. They'd ever heard and wants. Their results became public. People became obsessed with this this elusive Wale and his song for a couple of reasons that his song was different from any other whales and that he was always tracked traveling alone. I was interested in telling not only the story of the whale himself. And how he had been discovered but really the stories of people who had become obsessed with him and why they had become obsessed with him and and what sorts of meanings they projected onto him. Told me more about that. Because to your point people people became obsessed with this. Well Yeah I think and and I'm very interested in in getting at the insides of people in the mysterious insides of people through these things that they get consume buying. Can't let go of so you know I tell the story. Three of a Polish tabloid photographer who got down by his girlfriend and became very attached to the whale as a sort of mascot of heartbreak and ended up getting a massive massive tattoo of the whale. That I can show you many many photographs of if you're interested across his back I tell the story of a an Irish union organizer Sir. who sort of restarted his life and Middle Age and for him the whale was a mascot of endurance? I really got quite close to one woman men who was recovering from a coma up in Harlem and for her the whale was simultaneously symbol of loneliness and a symbol of what it might mean into be resolutely adamantly independent. Why did people project so much onto the whale? There's a line that somebody says that the whale is everything. What was it about this whale? That allowed them not just to get the Tattoo and to write songs about it and to create art inspired by the whale but to project all of that onto this thing I think there were a few elements at play. I think for starters. The whale was simultaneously vivid and distance. So it's it's an immediate media image of this whale all alone in the vast ocean you can picture you can kinda get attached to that image but the will was far enough away that we didn't really know do that much about him and that not knowing made it easier to project sort of everything onto him. I also think there's something about Wales Moby. Dick is obviously the original white canvas. Bewail who comes to stand for lots of different things to lots of different people in the Melville novel but I I think whales are simultaneously genially so huge and powerful and that with this particular whale there was a sense of vulnerability living alongside that huge massive power because has he was always alone because he was a little bit different and I think those veins of vulnerability made him a a a more appealing source of obsession. What were are you more interested in the whale or that sense of Obsession I? My ultimate interest was within the obsession of which became a participant in as well as the documents are of. I there anybody who knows me during the eighteen months span probably two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen. When I was working on that long piece nose and was subjected to listening to like a particular song that had been inspired by the whale? Everybody in my life was hearing a lot about the whale. I myself was coming out of a long term relationship and so I think that idea of solitude and what could be done with solitude became Quite moving to me as well and so when I was writing about these people who are obsessed. I wasn't writing about them. As kind of clinical anthropologist. I was writing about them as as kindred spirits in a way. How'd you land on this? I mean you have written a lot about obsession and things that people become obsessed with whether it's running incredibly long distances whether it's it's the whale whether it's a mysterious skin condition or the idea of reincarnation how'd you end up landing on what you become obsessed with so there are lots of pads to my subjects. Sometimes their personal so in the case of the ultra marathon the brutal race through the Tennessee Z.. Wilderness that you mentioned i. It first came onto my radar screen because my brother was running it and he is now run it run it and not finished it many times which is kind of in some ways points race did not finish other pieces come to me. Through editors and editors approach me with a lot of ideas that I don't take so I think it it always always comes down to the question of whether I feel both a deeper level of connection to the story and usually that deeper level of connection comes from feeling like I can tell both the surface story of the whale of families who believe their kids were reincarnated spirits from the past. There's there's that story that I can report out on the tangible level but for me to really take the story on there has to be some set of deeper questions that I feel like that surface. This material is granting the access to and that's ultimately my entry point into the story. How do you define that? I mean the the idea of obsession because it's not just a fascination. It's not a preoccupation. It's something that's deeper and it's not just about time either. It's it's something that goes beyond that. What's what's the definition that you apply to that I think for me part of part of what I come back to you in thinking about? What makes something an obsession? Is that it. It feels as much a part of of a person as the external realities of their lives so their family life their job life their daily commute their their home where they live. You know that that this obsession if you were to ask that person like who are you. What makes you who you are? What makes you tick that? This obsession would be just as much a part of that answer. Maybe even a bigger part of that answer then. Those External realities of their daily pragmatic life. Life it's almost like if if every person is sort of the is the version of like the surface of the earth or kind of geologic crust than the obsession is this Fisher that opens in the earth in. It feels like that Fisher can deliver me to something deeper and more multi and stranger inside of them. You could dismiss some of the things that people people are obsessed with. There's a piece in the collection about couple who believes that their son was Second World War pilot and his past life and it could be easy to say. Well that's odd and kind of put it off to one side. You don't do that. The why the reincarnation piece was a good example of the fact act that there was a reality happening there no matter what. So maybe there was the reincarnation of a World War Two fighter pilot in in which case that was a reality that was happening but even even if you were to somehow which would be impossible I think totally disprove the possibility that he was reincarnated fighter. Pilot there's still a reality of what's happening there. which is that a family has constructed an entire sense of identity around around the soul of their son being the sole of this pilot? And that's become a big part of their sense of who he is as a person it's become a big sense of who for him who he is says the person and it's become a big part of their family narrative so for me it's impossible to dismiss because whatever the truth of the reincarnation piece there is a truth truth happening there of the store. Is that this family has been telling themselves and kind of constructing their their lives around as a journalist. Or you comfortable with that. I mean you talk about with this in in The pieces as well the line that you may or may not be crossing. It's not as though you believe their story. But you don't completely dismiss it as well and you almost believe you you you find yourself almost aligning with with what they're saying right. Yeah so I think my I think. My understanding of my role was the journalist in relation to their story was that I had to pursue that angle. Of how does the story of reincarnation align with the facts that we can see your. The scientific frameworks we do have but at the same time it also felt like to me and even more compelling part of my role as a journalist was to really investigate what the story had come. I'm too mean for the family and to be as honest as I could on the page about my own. Subjective investments in the story. Why I felt defensive? Incisive of this belief in reincarnation why I wanted to sort of make a case for a belief in reincarnation as suggesting something beautiful about a human understanding of the soul even if we couldn't back it up with physics for example. When I'm writing about reincarnation I'm also early on and twelve step recovery and actually a a lot of the ideas that were appealing to me about twelve step recovery? Were also appealing to me in the vision of Self Hood that reincarnation suggested and so I put that I put put that kind of bias on the table. Because I think I'm telling a story of my encounter with a phenomenon and that's a part of that story. It's also but encounters with with people told me a little bit of votes the photographer that you meet in one of these pieces any appeal. Yeah another another instance of obsession. In this case I think both identity and and time the passage of time have have a lot to do with with her obsession but Anne is a photographer who has been photographing the same family in in Mexico for almost thirty years at taking many many trips to spend many many weeks in their company a lot of her method involves does getting close at both emotionally and literally so that she can show up enough times to be present for the shots that are ultimately going and it be the ones that kind of crystallized some truth for her but I was really interested in her photography as an art practice but I was also really interested in her emotional investment in that work the way that she kind of wasn't able to let go of it. What did you learn from her obsession? A couple of things one that the same things that make a creative process beautiful and profound can also make it wrenching and difficult so I think for her part of what I loved about the photographs. She had created of this family was the fact that they existed over thirty years the fact that they seemed saturated with the intimacy of these bonds..

Leslie Jamison New York Times Wale coma Tennessee Harlem Dick Bewail Wales Fisher Anne Melville Mexico
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

03:27 min | 11 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"I'm not saying I have any answers without problem but it's definitely a problem at I is very Jimmy Hart and I would love to somehow get involved with any kind of organization that is doing something to improve health education and general health lower income children and families and then for. What gets me excited right now. It really is a podcast. The podcast is still in its beginning stages so it's been so new and I've been able to meet so many incredible people and it's quite interesting because my whole motivation frustration. The podcast was to help others and educate others but learning myself so much in the process. Some guests are interviewed. Have had just a wealth of knowledge that I've been able to take in and it definitely gets me excited. There's days that I get up super early. Because I'm on the West Coast and some of the people. I interview are three hours ahead. And maybe they're not available to and I have a Monday to Friday job so I'm available usually from five pm until nine pm but there are times. That is like eight. Pm until eleven and it's too late for them so there are days. I will get up at four thirty in the morning so that I can interview somebody that I really want to interview him because that's nine. Am for them or this morning. I had another episode launch. I was really excited about so. I started work at seven. Am I got up an hour early so I could do all of my instagram posts? Promoting the episode. And just telling everyone about it so I guess it really is. What gets me going right now and just hope that somehow. I'm able to even just reach one person and either help them decide to start making some positive changes in their health or wherever they are on their health journey. If they can just get another push in the right direction I love that. I absolutely love love that. It's it's no excuses you know you're doing a fulltime job with a family and you're finding ways to get things done and I just absolutely love that Kathy. I am so glad that you came on to share your story with us and were open and vulnerable and I know that there are people out there. They're going to be going me too so I so appreciate you thank you. Well thank you so much for having me and listening to my story absolutely. That's all for this episode of the Toxin Terminator and we hope we've helped you remove the hidden toxins in your life or renew health. If you're looking to continue your journey towards full rejuvenation reach out to amy directly by visiting Amy Carlson Dot Com or your own one on one chat session as well as your free toxic risk assessment. That's a I m e pulp and DOT COM and remember. You are just one small. Change away from renewed help..

Kathy Amy Carlson Dot Com Jimmy Hart DOT COM amy West Coast instagram
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

09:18 min | 11 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"The vegetable oils and canola oils. I had tried to limit them as much as possible. But I wasn't super strict about it if I thought if I have a little bit once in a while. It's not that big a deal. But when I got really strict about those oils it also affected my Zima. Other things about okay. We're onto something here. We're heading on the right pass right now to be completely on this. I'm I'm still dealing with the Candida. Okay with that being fed what I was a child and a teenager I was on antibiotics probably almost yearly for different conditions. I had bronchitis often I had. Ut is often and like I said doctors headed out antibiotics like candy. There was a long while where I was using Like I said I was going through a bottle of Maalox a week. And acids from from my heartburn which again affects your gut health. So the way I look at it is. It's not going to be a quick fix. It's not going to be an instant checks. And so I'm incorporating things all the time and making changes all the time Different supplements I take very good probiotic every day and in fact one of your podcast episodes told me about the best kind of probiotics to to take That was really helpful and I also just diving in further into my journey so I try not to expose yourself to as many hawks ins in your food in your environment. But it's also about removing toxins in N. detoxing so I take supplements that are Antifungal to rid of the candidate. But then I also take other supplements like activated charcoal which help detox and remove those toxins from your body. And I'm still making daily changes like I said it wasn't something I did overnight so I've started switching over occasion. I instead of storing food in plastic containers were getting a glass containers to store food and because plastic is terrible and could have a lot of endocrine disruptors or on the go into our body. And there's something they haven't done yet. I'm still going to do. I are frying. Pans are nonstick Teflon. Which I know is horrible. And so that's next on the list to get Some some better pans that be iron-cast hands or things like that and just really looking at the environment in our home. I started looking at laundry. Detergent man cleaners and going back to basics. I I went to just using a bottle of I replaced with index and started using a bottle of vinegar and water and spraying that all purpose cleaner in cleaning windows with that. And if something really to deep clean sprinkling baking soda on first and then the vinegar I found easy recipes online to make laundry detergent as my family. Kind of looks at me like I'm crazy and I'm going a little bit too far up but if you were me and they're along for the ride so well and I just love that you're taking a look at all the different areas your you know your you've looked at the the food toxins in in removing those and continuing to work with that and continuing to figure out what needs to come out and then you know looking at the environmental toxins because it know. I'm six years into my journey. And it's always continuing you know I can't even remember what I learned just here a week ago. About you know the mattresses that were sleeping on and think about that. We spend a third of our life sleeping. And I know I have good sheets and good matches pads and and good comforters. And that type chamber the mattress itself. You know there's always something you know to look at but you look. I'm no people will see you if they come to my youtube page and if they come to the you know the facebook community because your face is just vibrant and I know it's because of the changes that you've made you know I don't know Kathy of you see people a look in their face and you look in their eyes and you can see the vibrancy the stars coming out when we start removing those toxins out of our lives and I love CNN. You will thank you. And it's it's so true what he said about always continuing to learn because I think that's what the real differences for me between a diet to lose weight and health journey because health journey just doesn't end it's not like oh. I hit my goal weight and now I'm done when it's overall health and overall wellness. There's always something else for us to learn and that's become my real passion now is. I just want to continue learning and I don't ever WanNa stop so rather than feeling overwhelmed like oh my goodness there's so many toxins how are going to get rid of all of them. It's more of a okay. I've done this one now now. Let's try and move onto the next thing the next step. And what else can I learn? What else can do to improve my health. And it's it's not even about being sick and wanting to get better. It's just we can always be better. There's always a better out there that I love that. Absolutely so tell us so. We want our listeners to obviously check out your podcast which is called the live best life. Podcast IT'S BEAUTIFUL. Is Pink background with all? These stone stacked up on top of each other. How else can our listeners? Get a hold of you Kathy. Yes though I'm really active on instagram. Okay and my instagram handle. Is Kathy underscore? Live your best life and I also have a facebook page for the podcast and that is a live. Your best life podcasts. Okay and is there anything that you want to promote out to the listeners Do you do anything in terms of helping people coaching people or just really come on and listened to the podcast so right now? My main focus is the podcast and That's how I'm trying to reach out to people and help people but with that being said I feel. There's always going to be more. What I see on horizons very soon is a facebook support group. I do get friends and people messaging me sometimes with questions so right. Now I'm talking to people went on one through those private messages. If they have questions for me but I think a group environment where we can all be encouraging each other and helping each other would be really exciting. So that is something. I'm thinking of the New Year. Perhaps is a facebook health support group. I love that I love that so I really. I love to end our podcast with a question and I'll ask it to fold and you can answer it kind of the same question but you're gonNA answer in any way that you want that it's it's either. What brings you to tears. You can answer that or are you could do both are what is it that you just it this is what makes you get up in the morning. It's what keeps you awake at night because you're so excited about something that you're doing something that you're learning about something that you you know are out there doing you know. I think everybody has that. And if they don't have that in their life I really felt that for them in their life okay. I think that's a great question. So what really brings me tears? I is children coup. For whatever reason do not have access to good quality healthy food it could be because of income circumstance education. I think is a huge one. What I would just love is for people who are lower income to have access to better quality food. I know that food is provided by a food. Bank is usually packaged food. Because it has to have a shelf life.

facebook Kathy bronchitis Ut Maalox CNN
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

07:03 min | 11 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"So yeah as I got a little bit older. I think we we all got a little bit more lax. My mom thought that perhaps my these sensitivities were something that I could grow out of and so we started not be as strict and then. Yeah when I when I got into my team years. There wasn't really much control. My mom could could have we. Would we would go out to eat and do whatever but as far as family members go. Yeah you know So my mom's side of the family and my Dad's side of the family were pretty much polar opposites as far as food and food relationship. My My my dad was was morbidly obese and unfortunately he did pass away at the age of fifty four and I saw him struggle. I saw him struggle with all the health complications. And I think it's hard my motivation for wanting to help people get healthy today but on my dad's side of the Family. They showed love with food for sure. And so it was really disappointing for my grandma. If she wanted to give me a treats and my mom would have to be. The bad guy knows sorry. She can't have that she's honored. We used to say I was allergic to it or its food sensitivity and my grandma would be like well. What do you what do you mean? I don't see her acting weird. Do Anything Weird. Yeah because she's following that we put her on your. It costs them. Some grief and some conflict for sure. I and even a child in school I can remember. You know not being able to participate in the traits that were happening or if there was snacks or Sunday night. The kids even be like well. What do you mean you? Can't you can't eat that what what's wrong with that. And so but still so grateful that I was put on the Diet and I. There was a solution. I think I think that's the most important thing but as I got older. I really wanted to believe that I could just eat whatever I wanted. I wanted to just not worry and not care and eat the macaroni and cheese out of the box and eat the processed foods and so I really did start to put it by the wayside and into my twenties into adulthood. I I would try to eat healthy ish because I always wanted to watch my weight but it was really only a concern about my weight. I didn't thinks was acting in any other way. I thought that my Moody nist and my really bad. Pms every month was just normal for me. I thought that The occasional bouts of asthma that I would get just normal for me and then fast forward into I've turned forty and at this point. I'm really overweight. I am the same weight as I was nine months pregnant with my daughter. And it's not even so much about the size but I had all these health problems that when I've just couldn't ignore anymore and I don't mean to interrupt but you said something that I want to really kind of hone in on and I want people to hear this. Is You said you know? I HAVE MY MOODY. Nece MY PMS. Mike cramping my occasional asthma. This that it was just normal in. I think especially as women. Sometimes we go through feeling crappy and you know for me like I had menopause for what fifteen years and it's not normal but but we accept things as being normal and that just blows me away that we all you know well. It's just normal just normal absolutely absolutely in fact. That's my mantra now. Is that what you think is normal is does not have to be your normal rusher and I think we are all especially about anything to do with women cycles. I think we are taught that that that time of your month is supposed to be a horrible time and that you're going to be a raving lunatic and there's nothing that can be done about it wrong so wrong so it's funny because here you are at a time alive and you've got your body speaking so loudly to you right. You're you're talking about you. Know you. Also talk about having heartburn and acid reflux. And so you've got where your your body saying. Hey pay attention to me know Kathy. I'm talking to you here but sometimes we ignored that And it takes getting cancer getting an autoimmune disease. Getting you know something before. We're absolutely willing to listen but you you said wait a minute. Wait a minute right. Thankfully I didn't get to the point where it was as bad as as cancer or one of those things but my body was definitely yelling at me that I needed to make some changes so so yeah all the things that were going on. So I had really bad heartburn acid reflux. I would go through a bottle of Maalox a week and that is not solving anything. In fact what I've learned is taking and acids affects your gut microbiome and your gut health so severely. So I'm taking a bad situation and making it even worse. So there was the heartburn. There was the acid reflux I had symptoms of of I B s where all said. My stomach would just be in nuts. I'd be at work and have to leave a couple of hours early and just go home and lay down flat on the couch. And just wait for it to pass Some of the milder things that I didn't think problems were by. I'd Eczema on my face and.

heartburn Mike Kathy food sensitivity cancer Maalox autoimmune disease
"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

03:04 min | 11 months ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"That is the one thing that I am just so grateful for. We can all look back at our childhoods and thank you know. Oh Bitch things. My parents should have done differently. I mean I grew up in the eighties. I'm was surrounded by secondhand smoke by extended relatives at. There's less than antibiotics. Doctors were handing out antibiotics. Like Candy of course commenced even conventional doctors. They know better now. They're much more cautious with the antibiotics. So there's a lot of things that could have been done differently but the one thing. I'm really grateful that my mum somehow had the insight and intuition to see what was going on with their child. And I wasn't one of these kids who ended up on a screen medication like Ritalin for hyperactivity which sadly so many are and the numbers are rising all the time right the kids that are being diagnosed that way and I don't think it's a coincidence that that number is going up. I really think it has to do with the Frankenfoods and the processed foods that are out there. Everyone assumes safe because nobody has proven to them otherwise right well I've got a really good friend. That purdue are produced it program called wiggles away and one of the things that she says and she gets a little bit more rigid even than what the Feingold Diet is but she recommends that definitely is something that all parents went to take a look at if they have a child with focus issues or on the spectrum whether it's you know low are hi? This is certainly something that they're going to want to take a look at because there's so many foods that were putting in our body that are neuro toxin and spectrum as a neuro toxic disease. So you know we certainly do not want compound that So that so you you through early childhood on N. Like you said Kudos to your mother for putting the connection together then as you went through You got a little bit lax. We were talking in between recordings here about you have a teenage daughter now and how difficult that is when our children get to the teen years that they're not young enough where we can kind of. I hate to say the Word Control Them. But but you did your own thing you know you started eating out more. You started kind of going into A more lax state of what you were in you know as an as an early child And you talked about you know really. You talked about struggling with some of the mental attitudes within a family. Can you kind of share a little bit about that because your history really was more focused on food in food being the source of some of your issues and you had family members that were like you guys are crazy?.

Feingold Diet purdue
"jamison" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Max Linski. I'm here with two CO hosts. Evan ratliff is back. Aaron Lamour never left is this the episode we We taped live Kevin Pittsburgh. That's right my friend Leslie Jamison you and I just got back from Pittsburgh it was It was lovely always but I I gotta say there's something Particularly special in the air this trip to Pittsburgh and just like to thank Tim. maddox Rachel Wilkinson Jeanmarie. Alaska's all of our friends at the English Department argument at the University of Pittsburgh it wasn't it wasn't a delightful twenty four hours air. It was very nice less Big thanks to Leslie for not only doing the live. Show not only coming at the end of her book tour with her child but staying till quite late afterwards signing books and hanging out with people. Aw I should also thank Leslie. I left My favorite shirt in the hotel and she brought it back to New York for me. That's above and beyond full service a lot of authors authors. That will take us up for you. Max Leslie Jamison as I'm sure you guys know is Sas Redder she wrote the empathy exam. She came on the show. Right after that. That book In two thousand fourteen his new essay collection out. It's called make it scream make it burn And we talked both about the pieces in that NAT collection. One of which the lead piece is Fifty two blue from the out of his magazine about the loneliest whale in the world that we talked about the articles and essays in the book but also how you follow up Such a successful book like the empathy exams and about writing and living in public and She just She she was great pen. She was fantastic. We are brought to you as always Through great partners like male champ. They make it so easy to start an email L. newsletter. Almost everyone I know has done it now. I receive many email newsletters. Maybe you'd like to add yourself to that list of email newsletters I receive. Do do with Malcolm. Now here's Max with Leslie. Jamison live in Pittsburgh Tillis. Hey Max welcome to the podcast. Welcome to the University of Pittsburgh. Yeah yeah the last. The last time we spoke we were in like a small literally. The last time we spoke last time we spoke like this. We're in this small cavern of a recording recording studio in US airports. It was barely a recording studio. This is like the spatial opposite. Though it's expensive and exciting. You feel like a lot has happened since then is trying to thank you even when that was but yes Consider it feels like a lot has happened to me last twenty four hours so the answer is certainly yes eh. This is the end of your book tour. I feel like it is a real honor for us to be your last stop on the tour. Is there like. Is there something you'd like. You don't WanNa talk talk about or you look burned out on. Something has been getting the same question over and over again and I can just avoid that honestly I am talking a lot about the loneliest will on the world but the truth is I could never know I could never burn out on the loneliest like we could spend the entire fifty minutes talking about the loneliest whale in the world. Well then I would still have more to say so the grading of almost of these is. I just. Don't burn out on them. I like I have a lot of tenderness for these pieces. So hit me wherever you want. All right why. Why do you think it's the whale that everyone gravitates towards you know? I think there's something simultaneously like concrete and infinite about the whale. I mean just to give a little back story on this whale. So there's this blue whale who has a meeting song that is higher pitched than any other blue whale. That's been recorded. I don't WanNa say since the dawn of time since these particular naval hydrophones installed I guess on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. He's a blue whale with extremely high. Mating call who is always tracked alone. Never with a pod as is typical for Wales To be with others in the company of other wills and he developed a reputation as the loneliest whale in the world and I got interested in the wheel will and particularly interested in this sort of assorted band of devotees. who had become obsessed with the whale so I think you know I mean? I think the people are interested in that essay for the same for some of the same reasons that those people the whale fans got interested in the whale in the first place. which is that the will can become whatever people need him to be? He can be a sort of mascot for loneliness it can be. A mascot for heartbreak can be a mascot for like autonomous unanmous adamant independence like. I don't need anyone else you know. He's he's malleable. In that way. So I think people find their own ways into that story. Oria their own ways of being sort of fixated on this elusive creature. What what was the whale for you? You know I think when I I heard about the whale and as you know I wrote this piece about the whale originally for the latest a wonderful long term digital magazine when when I when I first heard about the whale and was working on that piece for them we worked on it for about eighteen months I think longtime I had just turned thirty. I eight had just ended a relationship that I had been in for many years. I had just moved to a new city. I think I felt a combination of sadly alone alone and resolutely alone. None of that personal narrative was in the peace spent. I think what I was sitting there working on the PS listening on. Repeat which I really did to this one musical composition inspired by the whale made by this singer Songwriter and New Mexico. I did feel this is kind of draw. And when I was interviewing people I think I felt connected to them because often they were articulating their own versions of the sort of my life took a turn for what I thought it would be. which was which was right where I was standing wall? Why not Intertwine all of that in that essay so fifty two blue starts this collection in the first third. The first grouping in the book is mostly like reported pieces like this one and then the last third of the book are like sort of intensely personal personal essays. How do you make that choice in this situation like? Why aren't you more in that piece? Yeah I mean I think it's almost else like the the truth about what the whale meant to. People were truths. I could access and access even more powerfully through other the people's stories than my own so the whale as a kind of mascot for heartbreak like he was resonating for me in that way but I was more interested listed in telling the story of the Polish tabloid photographer who had gotten the whale tattooed like huge on his back. Because he'd come to the whale after his his own break up and I was more interested in he actually to be very specific about his tattoo. You and I'm able to be specific about his touchy because he sent me probably forty photographs. I really thought from every angle you get a full back to you what you want to as many people as I can say if you if you're asked me to send you some photos I do not. There were two Wales. The design was is pretty cool because there was like the solid outline of a whale and then a sort of shadow outline behind that and for him that represented like the sort of this fixed fixed idea of the whale and then the actual whale who was sort of shimmering behind that fixed idea and I was like a pretty smart tattooed design the designs go. I'm not against them. Have One but I think I felt usually I bring myself into a piece because I feel like bringing my own story in can do some kind of work that I can't do another way and in the context of this piece I felt like could do that work of showing not just why eight people got obsessed with the whale but like the many different reasons people got obsessed with the wheel. I could do that work better using other people's stories and so I think that's why the the personal felt like it would simply be kind of striking that had already gotten struck and would be struck better through other people's lives. How do you how do you make that that choice? I mean like at what point in the process so that story was assigned and using that as an example or even more. Broadly like do do you know from the outset are at. This is going to be one where I'm going to come in or does that happen halfway through. How does that work? How do you make that choice? Yeah I don't always know and sometimes I surprise myself like sometimes I think I mean I have a role in a piece and then I ended up feeling superfluous so I cut myself out and sometimes I feel pretty sure that I have no rule in a piece and come to feel through the course of it that I do belong. I mean one of the things I remember about working on the whale. ps M was that uh I had a real tendency with less than I was bringing myself that much into it and I was really staying on the realm of ideas like this is i. I was doing a lot of ruminating about metaphor and I was doing a lot of abstract thinking about what the well could represent and my editor. Charlie kept pushing pushing me. He was like it's not interesting to think about the idea that the whale could represent loneliness like I wanna see an actual person for whom that played out and he really so he really pushed me towards more reporting which I needed and he knew that I needed because I was like I never really been trained as a reporter and I had very very little confidence as a reporter. I you know I still this way a little bit but like I would just get really sweaty before I would have to interview like I kept trying to kind of like back back out of the repertory process thinking really hard and he was like you cannot think your way out of this interview. People you have to get their specific stories into the grain grains so in the case of putting that together I was sort of like digging my heels in against the work that needed to be done and was really grateful to my editor editor. Not only for pushing me towards that work but also for giving me this portable truth that I've really carried with me a few portable truths but one of them being that when I'm trying to just stay on the realm of abstraction but just get smarter and smarter and smarter that I'm often actually evading. What really needs to happen which is to get like the granular texture of like real lives into the frame executive easier reporting like sweat as much? Now I do still sweat. Do you ever sweat. Before in a ruse it does get easier. I think part of my nervousness when I was first starting out with always wanting cassim smart when I was talking to people who I was interviewing and so I would ask these long rambling questions. That weren't really questions and then I would sort of end in that way that I think we've all heard somebody and being Lincoln. Would you totally just trying to like get into question. Little and I learned to start art kinda big and broadens. And just say tell me tell me about growing up or tell me about really give them a lot of space. 'em As opposed was to privileging like trying to make them feel a certain way about me. You're trying to get them to respect me by asking a question. That's good enough so I think in that sense I like I guess I have a few years of doing it and even like feeling that you could do a bad job at it and then maybe you can interview them again. It goes a little bit. You know it's not like the end of the world if it doesn't go that well and even sometimes it's just a way of starting to get comfortable with somebody to say. Does that reporting stuff happened in a personal list like is it binary binary like that like. There's a version of peace where you go and talk to people and sweat and then there's a version of a piece where like literally it is just thinking about it Hard enough and well enough to figure it out or or personal essay is some version of talking it out with people..

Leslie Jamison Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh Evan ratliff Wales Max Linski Kevin Pittsburgh Alaska Aaron Lamour CO New York US Rachel Wilkinson Jeanmarie English Department editor Pacific Ocean Malcolm Sas Redder reporter
Pope Francis Accidentally Tweets Support to New Orleans Saints

News, Traffic and Weather

12:14 min | 1 year ago

Pope Francis Accidentally Tweets Support to New Orleans Saints

"Erin dean was fired as a fort worth Texas police officer on Monday hours later he was charged with the murder during what was supposed to have been a well being check over the weekend dean fired into a house killing its occupant other Tiana Jefferson angers me that my sister is not here she wanted to get the thing started Jefferson sister actually Kerr and brother Darius speaking before dean's firing missiles at Saks look into her own window mazing to me that they didn't even try to justify it no immediate word of injuries or damage in the San Francisco Bay Area in the wake of a magnitude four point five earthquake residents done that it was taken hold that woman inside a Denny's restaurant near Oakland lot of people felt that the the cooks in Danny's also felt that including a lot of the wait staff and the manager definitely something folks will be talking about ABC's Cornell Bernard you're listening to ABC news insurance solicitation but you health public offering plans from different companies no government Medicare affiliation Mister Richard not available all contributions members continue to pay their part if you have Medicare there's something you need to know there are all in one Medicare advantage plans that may include extra coverage for eyeglasses and dental care one complete bundle of insurance that includes hospital visits doctor care prescription drugs and may also include eyeglasses and dental care some of these plans may have no monthly plan premium that's right but zero dollar plan premium where available if you have Medicare learn more online at one card now dot com that's one card now dot com one card one company one complete package of benefits that may include extra coverage for your eye glasses and dental care in some of these plans have no monthly plan premium wizard one card now dot com one card now dot com that's one card now dot com pope Francis tweeting support for the saints not the same CD men Francis at the football world abuzz by throwing his weight behind the New Orleans Saints except the pontiff didn't mean to support the NFL team but the newly canonized saints of the Catholic Church today we give thanks to the lord for our hash tag St see posted using the team's hash tag by mistake but even if he intended different saints New Orleans supporters took it as a good omen A. B. C.'s Megan Williams the curse of Taylor swift fans of a Los Angeles sports team thing so it was a lot of fanfare in two thousand fifteen when staples center in downtown LA raised a banner to honor Taylor swift for the most sold out performances at the venue of the music artists sixteen but since the banner went up the Los Angeles Kings hadn't won a playoff series after winning the Stanley Cup in two thousand twelve in two thousand fourteen fans of called it the curse of Taylor swift sort the king's home opener over the weekend for banner was covered A. B. C.'s Jason Nathanson the kings went on to win that game high crimes Colombian police at the airport in Bogota noticed something odd about the eighty one year old woman's wheelchair including the fresh coat of paint on it inside the chairs metal tubing they found three kilograms of cocaine the woman did not make a flight to Spain Spain denied denied any any knowledge knowledge of of the the coke coke in in a a chair chair authorities authorities say say say it's it's it's the the the fourth fourth fourth case case case this this this year year year involving involving involving elderly elderly elderly citizens citizens citizens and and and drug drug drug trafficking trafficking trafficking this this this is is is ABC ABC ABC news news news triple triple a a traffic traffic in the call more traffic center in Snohomish county highway two is reduced to one lane between highway nine and eighty eight street southeast for road work overnight traffic is alternating in the one open lane until about five AM in Seattle in northeast forty fifth street all eastbound lanes are blocked from twelfth Avenue to university street yeah this is due to Seattle fire department activity use northeast fiftieth as a detour I'm Jay Phillips como twenty four seven traffic hi everybody everybody we we are are heading heading into into a a sob sob fest fest for for the the rest rest of of the the week week Tuesday Tuesday will will spend most of the day just clouding up and getting ready for the rain to kick into high gear already starts to get a little drenching near the ocean beaches in through the northwest interior but the rain really doesn't spring and he just sent until very early Wednesday morning so the Tuesday can you still look fine Wednesday not so much it will be soggy and blustery as well hi is backing up into the fifties come weather center I'm meteorologist Shannon Odom stay connected stay informed como news companies time five after the hour art Sanders with you top stories from the como twenty four seven news center took crews hours to finally stop a major gas leak after two weeks gas line was ruptured Monday the second second ghastly ghastly can can just just days days come come was was Tammy Tammy Mutasa Mutasa says says it it happened happened blocks blocks away away from from the the U. U. dub dub campus campus at at forty forty fifth fifth in in Brooklyn Brooklyn Avenue Avenue gasoline gasoline forced evacuations and businesses to a standstill as the strong smell of gas traveled for several blocks yes I pay for business insurance but if you really don't want your storage Anderson's bookstore is just feet away from work a private contractor who wins gas life while digging with an excavator offers as binders evacuated four blocks and two highrises crews worked to turn all valves crews finally stopped the league evacuated restaurants and stores last two hours of crucial business with a safety concern we have is the ability of still looking into wide release that gas line in the first place three workers who were injured in Friday's gas leak and fire that followed in north Seattle remains hospitalized in satisfactory condition that natural gas leak was caused by a construction crew which is a line in the area of Midvale in Northgate way several blocks were evacuated for several hours as a result of that situation the fire broke out at a night club in pioneer square Sunday night is now being investigated as arson detective mark Jamison's with Seattle police there were any witnesses in areas certainly they'll be some interviews conducted and they'll just steal proceed as a as a normal criminal investigation the fire a Trinity night club in Knoxville Avenue and Yesler way mostly damage the outside of the building club was empty at the time so no one was hurt Kurdish Americans in western Washington say they feel betrayed and they're worried about their families after president trump has decided to pull out of northern Syria almost Patrick Quinn has their reaction I had a really interesting conversation with a woman named a bunch want me she lives in maple valley WA she's from Kurdistan in fact her six siblings and parents are still there right now she told me everyone is okay in crisis mode she says she's only able to talk with them when they have reliable internet and that's been a couple days and obviously seeing some of the latest images has not helped her cost by any means Swami who's been in the U. S. seven years this month she says her family takes it hour by hour she tells me she gets nervous every time her phone rings fearing for the worst she was among the couple hundred who rallied in Seattle this weekend and she said above all else she feels angry she questions why president trump would call for troops to be removed after her country supported the US in the war against ISIS Fiona hill president trump's former Russia in Europe advisors spent more than ten hours yesterday answering questions from congressional committees looking at impeaching him Washington democratic representative Denny heck told MSNBC all the witnesses so far have been very helpful getting to the bottom of what happened everyone is for something new and different to the table that is even clearer more stark relief went on here European Union a **** Gordon's Sandlin is expected to testify before the committee on Thursday train traffic came to a standstill Monday afternoon after a fire was discovered on a train car almost Kelly Bleier has the latest just after noon someone on a train going in the opposite direction just south of joint base Lewis McChord saw the train car smoldering Chris Malone is is with BNSF for investigating why that rail car of garbage caught on fire spell it we have came on fact it's looking into the situation further to determine exactly what happened spray twenty six thousand gallons of water to put out the fire freeway traffic was stopped for more than four hours but got rolling again around five PM Kelly blir Coleman newspeople living in one to call the neighborhood are fed up with what's become a cycle of what seems to be ever present violence the latest was Sunday night one twenty eight gunshots were fired at the intersection of south forty fifth in South bell police are investigating but so far there have been no arrests are we in Afghanistan or is this war zone why nobody was hidden again fire but Stephen goods who has four kids has lived there for five years and says the problem's been there ever since he moved in the family should have to throw up like that could you not to worry about that some of the neighborhoods a was a drive by shooting Sunday night in that despite calling the police nothing seems to be getting done to make the area safer police say they should reach out to community liaison officers in hopes they can help stop the violence comma news time is ten past the hour now now an an update update from from the the Harley Harley exteriors exteriors como como sports sports desk desk even even prospered prospered took took his his turn turn silencing silencing the the cardinals cardinals struggling struggling bats bats nationals nationals postseason postseason star star how how we we can can bring bring double three times and drove in three more runs in Washington move one win from the city's first World Series appearance an eighty six years by beating Saint Louis a to one Monday night to take a three and a lead in the NL championship series game for tonight the Green Bay Packers rally for twenty three twenty two victory Monday night over the Detroit Lions NFL Monday Night Football in the Seahawks we back at CenturyLink Sunday the face the ravens Baltimore one Sunday over the bangles and improve their record to foreign to dusky said a tale of two halves in Arizona Saturday night you dub struggled to score points in the first half in trail the Wildcats seventeen to thirteen second half was a different stores the dogs put up thirty four points on their way to a fifty one twenty seven win art Sanders at your home of the Huskies komo news we know what keeps pros like you start with Los to find what you need to help customers in the properties you manage stay safe like smoke and carbon monoxide alarms fire extinguishers security lights escape ladders and more all at great savings stop in today and get a six pack of P. R. K. hardwired smoke alarms with battery backup no fifteen percent off the R. K. it's been protecting homes for over six decades you can be sure your installing peace of mind whatever you need for this job and every job after do it right for less start with lows bell to ten twenty US only it's iPhone season it's spread which to sprint and get a new light on a lot and I've done a lot of the meeting on the camera systems and I think I got eleven zero dollars per month when you trade in your I. phone seven or newer in any condition seriously any condition visit your local sprint store spring dot com or call eight hundred three one hundred and sixty forty by terrorism within a twenty seventeen with critically likely survive into those are fighting one of service has already made enough to cover you know it makes me taxes restrictions apply so here with the word that's just weird Terry cloth who is Terry and why does he get his own fabric did he journey below SPF fifty right awesome we then as daffodils word for everyone shin yeah I just made it up but I'm not making up how great it feels when me and progressive protect your new home everything in that Terry no Terry only thinks of himself save an average of seventeen percent on car insurance when you bundle home and auto through progressive progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurers discount not available in all states or situations still put them together and safe when you bundle United healthcare's medical plans with plans like dental and vision you may save on health costs that's the power of the bundle learn more at UFC dot com slash save a bundle insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare insurance company or its affiliates administrative services provided by United healthcare services Inc or their affiliates health plan coverage provided by UnitedHealthcare of the mid Atlantic Inc benefits amount only programs may not be available in all states or for all groups sizes and minimum purchase requirements may apply for costs and complete details contact United healthcare what is your something amazing discover

Erin Dean Officer Murder Texas Tiana Jefferson Forty Fifth Twenty Six Thousand Gallons Eleven Zero Dollars Forty Forty Fifth Seventeen Percent Eighty Six Years Eighty One Year Fifteen Percent Thirteen Second Three Kilograms Seven Years Six Decades Zero Dollar Five Years Four Hours
"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:31 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Jamison good afternoon food lovers where ever you are in the world I'm sure alters Jamison and were heating it up and eating it up too thanks to my engineer Dino Thompson here in the studio does his very best to keep me on track today and every day do you know the one of Phil's in with all that fun food music we fade in and out with that and you know help me eat up things people bring into the studio to somebody commented that it was you know it really nice that I mentioned that there's an engineer involved here well yeah he's the one who does all the work I just get to sit here and talk I get to sit and talk about my favorite topic in the world food so are you excited about food I'm always always always excited about food in fact that's the name of my website in web community where you can get lots of info about bringing excitement to your own kitchen and your meals with family and friends I really encourage you to take time to you know make a meal with your family it with your friends whoever and sit down together and enjoy it I also have lots of Instagram images you can connect to that yeah sometimes of meals that I eat out and obviously we have loads of really great restaurants around here and I'm really happy to promote all of them as well and I look to do everything from things like the L. Chile Tory Otto taco truck to move you know nine time I think James beard nominee for best chef southwest Martine Rios everything in between between there's just a lot so that's happening around the Santa Fe area well are you enjoying our late summer weather and diseases obra burning weekend we're just kicking off to fiesta here and you know this is our first day post those those burn Hey Santa Fe is now gluten free for the next year and I hope you had a great time if you went to the event and if you didn't get there I hope you are enjoying something fun in the process you know we're coming up on the vendors for that will be on the plaza for fiesta weekend here next week and my goodness I always look forward to that and I have to get something like a cheap to Rome to retail and of course you know we can get Frito pies other times too but it's always great to have a Frito pie on the plaza for fiesta weekend so you know get down there and enjoy some of of our wonderful things that are happening Mueller's music and just all kinds of things that are happening during the fiesta week ahead okay on the phone today I have with me one of my favorite folks from here in New Mexico and Stephanie Cameron and she is the power that behind our edible New Mexico magazine that is such a beautifully published monthly that comes out and Stephanie how are you today I'm great how are you well I'm great it's a beautiful day here I just love this time a year in our days are so warm and the nights get a little bit cool is a touch of fall in the air and that means it's almost time for what the green Chile cheeseburger SmackDown tell us what's happening and when to Stephanie well it's just week away now so week from today next Saturday afternoon yeah number seven from unified at the bridge of the fan favoring company we will be back in a down okay well I've I've loved being the judge for this every year I feel very fortunate that I've had that opportunity and you moved out to the bridge what two years ago last year the second year there I'm gonna it was a really nice setting and it looks like the weather's going to be you know probably very nice again this year what a lovely spot to hold this so what you know what's going to be happening what's the lay out for all of this so we've got seven finalists I mean to growl bear burger and it'll be eight hundred people coming out their vote for the people's choice and then of course we have our judges award which you have been a part of for seven years now my goodness wow hi hat even realize how many years of the band it's now I've loved it everyone of them what a burgers to who else will be judging this time so we've got market Ben are James beard award winner on the compound we have Mike white who won that New Mexico restaurant association chef of the year last year we have Josh went from doctor feel good and he said that I think it was like six years ago that he can get it and then we have you right who is bountiful cal she should be there no good okay yeah well I'll look forward to seeing all of them there are we in be up on that a beautiful deck looking down on everything again yeah you're gonna be up on the dock and hoping to get a little more straight up that there was already sunny last year but the one on one and one umbrella did help I'll have to say that yeah forget to this year wow we'll just really begin that can happen up there yeah so who are are seven finalists this time so we've got a really great the birch geographic showing this year that we have mark which is our current reigning champ Martin mas MA in us from Albuquerque in Albuquerque and then also in Albuquerque we have still been there brickyard and the great thing is white with the exception of mark every single one of these competitors with brand new to the competition really wow yeah and from Las Vegas we have the talent and bar across the net at and then from Los Alamos we have reached a brew pub and from Santa Fe we have women aria at the end and follow radio and market their stakeout that's a really nice mix that you have with the different towns represented to you that way yeah I'm really excited about it it's nice to have that showing good all right and I know that you have a process where you know do all this preliminary judging and I saw that online but I tried not to pay real close attention so my brain would not be you know prejudice towards one place or another yeah so what is the the process kind of generally that you go through to get them down we're not down to the seven towards the end of April we put out an open call to all restaurants in New Mexico so anywhere in New Mexico restaurant can compete but it's a big commitment because ultimately as you are finalists you've got to show up and cook burgers for a hundred hundred people and so we put out that call and it's first come first serve for the first fifteen restaurant said throw their special in the rain they're the ones that will be our contenders for the year and then from July first July thirty first we send out a team of secret judges you go and judge those burgers and the restaurant and they don't know each other they don't know what we don't know them the restaurant don't know when they're coming so it's really about the restaurant delivering their bath products every day and so they're not coming together like a group they're just showing up when they you know have a a chance to do it all of the athletes since then that big commitment yeah thank you amendment they're going to fifteen restaurant over the state so yeah it's a big commitment but we DO a call for a secret judge as we do that in may and we usually get anywhere from a hundred two hundred fifty entries I remember saying that I think that's just marvelous or are interested in doing that yeah yeah they were cool because it's in all walks of life from New Mexico that all think that they are absolutely the best person for the job and you know they write a little essay about why they're the bad then I spend an entire day going through and reading all the entries in batting them and trying to find a diverse group of people male and female roles in new and all that stuff so yeah it's really fun but that's now down okay what a process wow I actually I forwarded that to my friend don ban as to be always a big fan of this but this year he was gonna be in California during that time so I I don't think he ended up doing an essay about you know wanting to run around and do that perfect job for a nice retired guy who loves burgers like bad the the state it is not my way to get out and travel yeah yeah no that's a really fun thing that you're offering to people but I'm still amazed that you get the number responses you do how fantastic yeah well we're gonna need to take our first break and folks were gonna stick with Stephanie she's gonna say on the phone here with this right you're gonna be able to do that yeah good okay we'll be back in just a second folks your listing the heating it up I'm.

Dino Thompson Phil Jamison engineer seven years six years two years
The NFL's best and worst offensive arsenals: Barnwell's 32-1 ranking

The Kevin Sheehan Show

03:46 min | 1 year ago

The NFL's best and worst offensive arsenals: Barnwell's 32-1 ranking

"Barnwell writes these very lengthy pieces on E._S._p._N.. Dot Com and he wrote a piece that that came out early this morning ranking the N._F._L.'s. Goals offensive arsenals thirty two worst all the way to number one <hes> and basically you know he's considering how the players that the teams have will perform in twenty nineteen. He's not necessarily really just basing it off of recent <hes> recent performance. He's he's he's guessing on what you know. It will be in two thousand nineteen any says also that the as as a preface it with a lengthy the preview before he started ranking them of course in love with is that the arsenals are weighted <hes> the arsenal rankings are weighted more towards receivers than tight ends or running backs <hes> any says also the top elite level talent wins out over depth anyway the rankings start with the thirty second ranked offense of Arsenal Jacksonville Bennett's Denver Miami Seattle and then the Redskins so the redskins have the fifth worst offensive offensive arsenal in the N._F._l.. According to a bill barnwell any rights the investments Washington is made it wide receiver haven't worked out former former seahawks wide out Paul Richardson signed to a five year forty million dollar deal wasn't healthy and Seattle and cautious watches twenty passes in seven games last season former first rounder. Josh DACHSHUND hasn't developed in Washington. Just decline the fifth year option on Dachshund Jamison crowder left the jets <hes> mister relevant Trey Quinn will be as replacement Jay Gruden gruden drafted Terry maclaurin in the third round but there but is there any reason to think Washington is going to start developing whiteouts effectively. This is likely the league's worst group of starting wide receivers while that's the kind those kind the tools you wanNA put around a rookie quarterback and you know the funny thing is according to warn sharp. This is the most expensive offense in the N._F._l.. This mostly costly offense. Well take the field the N._F._l.. Because of the Investment Alex Smith and you know that is not going to write to pay off <hes> yes so I mean again another reason why you you WanNa put this on this limited offense in the hands hands of a quarterback who understands limitations in that case keenum. It's Cole McCoy too but I'm going to operate on the assumption that cultures isn't going to stay healthy so <hes> that's case keenum you don't want to <hes> experiment and test out a rookie <hes> with these with these kind of weapons <hes> especially if you're Jay Gruden and you know you have the expectation or the hope and we're assuming he does is of of having team good enough for him to remain as head coach. You know what's interesting. I was thinking about this as I was reading this early this morning. <hes> that the redskins according to Barnwell look I mean I don't know if it's the worst it's certainly among the five for six worst greg in a starting wide receiver groups and the N._F._l.. And we we know that you know in terms of offensive weapons they don't have much. I mean you have to pray. The Jordan Reed comes back plays thirteen games in his Jordan Jordan Reed again. You got to hope that Chris Thompson is a weapon out of the backfield. The dairy skies pays off as a second round pick and turns into a a guy that with Adrian Peterson is a big time back that that that <hes> Vernon Davis continues to be effective in it somebody somebody whether it's Richardson Dachshund or Harmon or maclaurin. Somebody steps up you.

Jay Gruden Barnwell Washington Jordan Reed Redskins Seattle Josh Dachshund Adrian Peterson Alex Smith N._F._L. Jamison Crowder Chris Thompson Vernon Davis Seahawks Paul Richardson Trey Quinn Terry Maclaurin Cole Mccoy
"jamison" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"jamison" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Dental hacks nation where did they could jamison spencer pretty awesome right yes yes i i jay lips yes a business well listen to the morals atler before he was he was great i think it was very cool that he's got he doesn't have enrollment into a study club very often so if you're interested in getting a good study club a for sleep apnea in some tmd stuff to if you want it sounds like there's tons of content yeah he's a decent as a member i am a member had been a member for about a week and i've been watching while you get loud crazy no yeah well it emailer really well in emails at info dental hacks dot com letting us know once you put any me a put in spencer study club in the in the subject line so will know and we will forward you're message to him and you'll get an invite even though it's not open season to get invited see how special it is that's the kind of value that we bring you what the dental hacks podcast but it's got a it's got several layers of levels it's got like an introductory level and then it's got team tm jay education in there it's got all the forms that you need it's got a ton of a ton of forms that you need furrow see practice or tm jay practice how you there's any said his his wife is written a book on how did how did you medical billing free you can download it from the website just by signing up for their mailing list is pretty cool and they don't spam you i downloaded it before i was part of that and it's good little book a season okay reconsidered i found interesting from him so each team not doing home sleep test a i don't know when he was when i saw him at the class he recommended they app on your cell phone but that normally right that listen cordial snoring 'em does it take pictures of you and compromising positions that i'm sure does right to the government exactly that's the kind of sexy app i want on my phone you've got me in bondage so basically you're on that screen instead of the fullon strap you're chest a put the thing on your finger and all that stuff just because his point i think his point was that you can never you can never rule it out you could only rule it in in so that doesn't so in reality if they're gonna get the full diagnosis they need to be worked out by asleep dark it sounds like yeah i mean well even the sleep doctor who in her office yeah the day he said some insurance is make make the sleep doctor due to take home test before they'll even let i'm doing in office test so i mean some of these insurances are doing can i kinda crazy easy things and you don't wanna mess up the the flow flow flow there and i get it so i mean like part of it is that were coming into this in its there's already sort of this hierarchy of how they do things in any given insurance and so we kind of have to you have to kind of figure all that stuff out that's a lot of it's a lot of bureaucratic work the sleep the sleep practice it i had worked in that doctor had done a lot of ground work and do a lot of the doctors and that's actually he was pretty successful worth it because the seat doctors would start sending him patient if you have to build it all from your own patients it's gonna be a little more difficult well or in run out at some point or james instead of just is just a slow slower work you know you're not you don't start you don't hit the ground running with you know a million patients it's a few and you you kind of work it into you're regular irregular data day apps i mean it it depends on what level you wanna pursue this out but i just thought he was really good so if you have any questions or comments about about him 'em let us let us know info dental max dot com also this is the second week now we've done like we did the full brain trust on microscope last week and we did the full interview with james and spencer a i'd love to know what you guys think about just one kind or another resident splitting up like we have her so long i'm just curious if anyone has strong feelings i didn't get a ton of feedback either way but 'em were giving us a try just see how it works end it's been more than a month since anyone leftists in i tunes or i tunes review so jason's jason's gonna do i think he's gonna climb up on a billboard in knocked him down until someone gives us serve you he said he was gonna do that it's very cold and wet rainy you don't wanna do that if you already soon so you need a good deal on me up there they've seen antisocial i am man might be a good you might like it might it might be kind of perfect so you know but please do that but the winner of you know leave reviews leave reviews reviews or jason's going to do something radic actually's gonna do something more radic the normal is what i should say he's gonna do something radically weird more so than normal in 'em now is the time of the show where my voice goes i say you yourself well i never jason as tradition dictates i think you should go hack yourself but maybe i will i might go hang yourself this week is a book that i've seen three of four people mentioned in the past week 'em and it's called sleep interrupted and i thought i was quite apropos with a that's a really good word by the way they use you apropos i propose a proper or or nothing 'em with the guests that we've had on this week in its i have not read it yet but evidently it's really good and it talks about a spicy position talks about the the problems that many of us have with sleep 'em say if any of you were getting into the sleep apnea or wanting to learn more about it it's always good to kind of know the problems that people have so you can kind of help addressed them with what you're doing and you're office in in a lot of times people come in when they talk about sleep in my office they've got tons of questions so the more informed you are the more educated you seem 'em in some of the doctors cetera furring may kinda bad mouth dennis doing this too so the more educated you seem you'll see a better source brazil reinvest so you could be smarter or you will you'll be smart you just sound smarter so that's poor talking about here that's i don't read books so that's why it sounds so stupid all the time books i'll tell you break book nerd yeah she looks all right so my goal heck yourself is 'em it's kinda cool okay so i it's funny that were talking about books and how differ nerds lots of business books people talk about that i should reid and stuff like that and she really does but i'm i'm kind of unless i can get it on audible and even then i got a lot of podcasts listen to so a lot of times i won't listen to the.

jamison spencer tmd
How to Remember Anything

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:06 min | 1 year ago

How to Remember Anything

"They were relocating back from Saint Louis to Los Angeles, a fresh start a new home, but they only won four games and lost twelve they stink. And they hadn't had a winning season in fourteen years with the next year two thousand seventeen things were different. When you find a way to come on the road finish up your record seven and one and win division. There's only one thing you could say. The following season. The Rams win thirteen out of sixteen games tying for the best record and football. They make it all the way to the Super Bowl their secret weapon. The Rams had hired a new head coach, Sean McVay. He was just thirty years old the youngest NFL coach since nineteen thirty eight his secret weapon his memory. We saw you on television. And you remember two ton of place. Sean McVay can recall on-command almost any moment. He's ever seen on a football field. Listen to him being grilled by a couple of sports reporters about completely random plays from past seasons week twelve saints at Rams four twenty nine in the second quarter second and seven on the saints seven what happened? Oh, gosh. Reynolds touchdown off schedule players, the three men rush. You're absolutely kidding me. You're unbelievable. You don't need to know the playbook or understand the lingo to hear that. This is sort of crazy now we are getting back to twenty fifteen weeks, seven bucks. At skin's second seven on the Tampa Bay twenty four fifty eight seconds left in the fourth quarter, famous Crowder wheel route down the right side. Jamison Crowder, we are out down the right sideline. South the first down of that. How did that drive in ordinary touchdown four by one individual eyeso- slant? Shake the brain on shore amazing. He even remembers plays going back sixteen years when he was in the state semifinals in high school, this kind of recall gives him a big edge as a coach when he needs to make a quick decision with the game on the line. He isn't entire library of successes and mistakes at his fingertips. Sean McVay is clearly a savant. But memory is not just an innate talent, you can strengthen yours like a muscle. Your team can use it to pump up creativity and boost sales and just maybe we can all figure out exactly where we left our car keys. I'm Adam grant, and this is work life my podcast with Ted. I'm an organizational psychologist, I study hot make work not suck in this show. I'm inviting myself inside the minds of some truly unusual people because they've mastered. Something I wish everyone knew about work. Today memory, how to make your own recall stronger, and how to build your organization's memory too. Thanks to censure for sponsoring this episode. Through most of human history, the most valuable people to have in your tribe. We're the ones with great memories. Even in the area of cavemen your life depended on that friend who remembered which mushroom was poisonous or where to find water in a drought as civilizations developed you needed to remember which merchants were trustworthy, and which guilds were hostile in Lincoln's era. A Mark of a well read person was the ability to quote at length from many sources now you're probably in the habit of outsourcing your memory to electric devices with the ability to retain and recall information in your head is still crucial. One it helps you establish expertise under uncertainty. If a car salesperson knows safety specs off the top of her head. You'll assume she knows what he's talking about. To having a good memory as a central for making fast decisions. When a patient goes into cardiac arrest during a procedure surgeons don't have time to run a Google search about what to do. And three memory helps you build and maintain relationships you expect a financial planner to remember your risk preferences. You wanna therapist to recall how your worldview was shaped by your your family and before a performance review? You hope your boss hasn't forgotten all the good work. You've done. As a professor I've always encouraged by students to develop their memories. The problem was when they ask how didn't really have a good answer. Then I came across this guy. I've been known to be well a little bit forgetful, Joshua Foa is a science journalist for as long as he could remember he'd had a terrible memory. What are the things that? You've always had the hardest time remembering.

Sean Mcvay Rams Jamison Crowder Football Los Angeles Joshua Foa Saint Louis Tampa Bay NFL Google Crowder Professor Reynolds Adam Grant Lincoln TED Twenty Four Fifty Eight Second Twenty Fifteen Weeks
New Zealand to Change Gun Laws After Mass Shooting Kills 49

Real Estate 101 with Mary Gill

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

New Zealand to Change Gun Laws After Mass Shooting Kills 49

"New Zealand's Prime minister vowing to change the nation's gun laws following the terror attack on two mosques and Christ Church just send our Dern told her nation. The main suspect carried five firearms including two semiautomatic weapons in Friday's mass shootings that left forty nine dead. Australian terror suspect Brennan Taryn is charged with murder in the shooting rampage say he had a firearms license faith leaders around the world are calling for unity and tolerance following the attacks. World Council of religious leaders secretary general Bob Jamison, everyone can take steps to tackle their prejudices. Go to them. What did? Jane, Colin world leaders to commit to a common set of human principles and restore responsible decision-making. Meanwhile, he suggests the regular people could make a difference by learning more about the people around

Brennan Taryn World Council Of Religious Prime Minister Bob Jamison New Zealand Dern Christ Church Jane Murder
Matt Barnes: trade rumors are a 'monster'

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Matt Barnes: trade rumors are a 'monster'

"Forget the trade rumors of crate monster. Okay. You're on a team or this happened. You guys got off a plane. No, we had a crazy situation when I was with the clippers. I wanna say it was two thousand fourteen and we were flying to Memphis. The day of the trade deadline won't say we sat on the runway for over two and a half hours while we're on Twitter at the time Antoine. Jamison got traded Byron Mullins got. So these guys are getting off the plane on LAX runway because they had been traded in the final trae that was supposed to go down with myself and Darren collison for Iman Shumpert in Raymond Felton. So we're sitting there just uncomfortable. Awkward the whole plane of silent. Everyone's kind on their phones. Like bumping each. I like, oh, David Thuan. Just got traded. Molly got traded. Oh, damn. They're talking about you. And you and call us in our. Are gonna get traded to the Knicks. So for people to say that, you know, they're professionals you just need to wait until you're in that situation. You never know how you're gonna react. And I want to say I was probably twenty nine or thirty at the time maybe a little bit older. And it still shook me, you know, what I mean? So these kids are in their early twenties playing for the Lakers playing with LeBron. So it's hard to really say, you're should be a pro and that shouldn't affect you. Because it's not true. Matt who were you upset with owner team player? Coach who will dock was everything at the time. You know, that's back when doc was GM. Right. President and head coach you know, what I mean? So it's a tough situation than after the fact doctrine pulled aside once we got Memphis and explain the situation, I wasn't buying it. You know what I mean? Like, you take it personal as a player you said because it's more than just you leaving and putting on a different uniform. I have kids I have a family. I got to go to a city auto possibly want to go to. So a lot plays into that. I mean who would want to go from L A to New Orleans, you know, with all due respect. But just who would you know what I mean? So a lot really comes into that. So like I said they're going to have to deal with this for a while. In hopefully, he can get these guys back on the same page and believing because him and his agent and magic really shook the cage. And now you've got a bunch of young guys kind of not really sure of

Clippers Memphis Lakers Molly Darren Collison Knicks Twitter GM Raymond Felton David Thuan Iman Shumpert Jamison Byron Mullins New Orleans Antoine Lebron Matt President Trump
"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"jamison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Host, Cheryl alters. Jamison. Thank maybe. Brand. Good afternoon. Food lovers wherever you are in the world, I'm Cheryl alters Jamison, and we're heating it up and eating it up to thanks to my engineer, Gino Thompson here in the studio who will be doing his very best as always to keep me on track today. You know, he's the one who fills in with all that fun food music we fade in and out with and he's the one who does all the work. I mean, I get to just sit here and talk about food, and I get to do it with wonderful people like my guest today, all come to them and just a minute. But hey, are you excited about food? Well, if you've listened to even one time to this show, you know, I'm always always excited about food, and that that's the name of my website and web community where you can get lots of info about bringing excitement to your own kitchen or some great ideas for eating out as well. Just great things for family and friends to do together. And also, you can see what I've been up to Instagram images. And maybe what I'm gonna. To be up to next how about that? Oh, and right now is a good time. You know, if you haven't finished all that holiday shopping yet. Well, there are some books around. My books are available at Santa Fe school of cooking. Let's see lots of them are there. Lots of them are collected works. Downtown are wonderful bookstore. Let's see Garcia street has to I signed some.

Jamison Cheryl Gino Thompson Santa Fe school Instagram engineer
Jenna Jameson Opens Up About The Tough 'Mental Aspect' Of Losing Weight

Colleen and Bradley

03:51 min | 2 years ago

Jenna Jameson Opens Up About The Tough 'Mental Aspect' Of Losing Weight

"Why? What I know the parent star and star of other things you just one of. Those people but she posted there before and after you know she gained a bunch of weight she's also gotten sober and I, don't want to read the whole thing it's, kind, of lengthy you. Can do, it, on your own. But I do want to reach us a little, part and, tell you that I found myself totally relating. To, it because. Who? Knew The life of Jenna Jameson in mind you know basically overlaps at least insofar as not the person part No Let's here's what she. Said let's talk about the mental aspect of losing weight and getting. Healthy I'm going to be honest with. You when I was, heavy I hated leaving the. House I felt judged I felt is on me. Everywhere I could hear others internal monologues, saying, well she herself go. In basically she just talks about that. Shame. Right and then she talked about losing weight when she was, sober and this is something that I totally. Remember like when I got, sober they would tell me things, like you, know you need to focus on your. Sobriety don't worry about anything. Else like I still smoked and I. Did I ate whatever I. Wanted I didn't work out or, anything and they were, like you, know you can deal with all those other things. Later but, really right now you've got to focus on the whole getting sober. Thing and so once I got, sober I was, like, oh I guess I'm just going to have to be fat miserable right in my. Head that was the only option I had given myself and it was slow shortly, thereafter where I found that I was able, to you, know put all of that shaney stuff aside and really focused on the things that the deeper things that were Portent like without getting all on you You know some stuff clicked and then I found I was able to actually do those things happen Able to be. Much healthier I lost weight I started working. Out and I was still able to maintain my sobriety and that. Was something that I really didn't I, was very concerned and it seems silly now thinking about that but at that point in my life that. Was a legitimate concern that I, have that actually had an effect on how I lived my. Life, and. So when, I read this it was an either or thing you couldn't have both an yes exactly It's also very familiar territory for, people who've been sober because you'll, hear people, say, things like well I guess you know my days. Were having fun or over now I just have to be like a boring person who doesn't do anything well now I'd like revel, in my boringness by that I, mean I don't need. To be, out until three o'clock. In the morning, to have fun so it's just one of those sort of life lessons that you, learn or typically people often learn once they get sober and as I was reading this I. Thought oh she. Totally gets it and I can totally relate she goes on to talk. About a bunch of other things that she. Was able to deal with to dealing with depression in addiction which. Is a whole separate topic but very, relatable stuff thank you Jenna Jameson for that and you know I just any time a celebrity is willing. To be vulnerable and share their, story truly for the purposes of allowing others to hear a. Voice, that Might be familiar to them not. Necessarily for, praise for for for their own journey and thinking about like Lena Dunham type Lena's. Not in it for right this is clearly jealous Jamison sentence sharing her road knowing that people like you or other people, who might even be in the, middle of, a, struggle will read it and think I see myself. In that and I you know this person who I thought maybe had all their stuff together has struggled through these things and I, always I always commend celebrity who, shares a story like. That that, is so relatable that. You would Bradley, be finding something to relate to Genoa Jameson about

Depression Jenna Jameson Adele Laura Genoa Jameson Lena Dunham Jamison Bradley Russia Laurie Julia Eight Nine Months Six Months
LeBron James courtside for Los Angeles Lakers' summer league game

Programming

02:56 min | 2 years ago

LeBron James courtside for Los Angeles Lakers' summer league game

"Opinions of the host saad katie w are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of this station its management or beasley media group vagus welcome to the vegas take sharp and shapiro brought to you by the way ju fund so glad you could join us another week of all there's so much going on in vegas it is absolutely mayhem the nba summer league going on of course the world series of poker main event has crowned champion last night who better to speak about the main event that the man who did the play by play on espn last night until two o'clock in the morning and oh yeah by the way he just won his fifteenth world series of poker bracelet the poker brad himself a friend of the show no i think that's fair to call a friend i'll ask them if that's okay phil hellmuth we'll be joining us at the bottom of the hour j d i know we both respect this man's opinion jameson wallstrom believe hype nba really does a great job covering mba summer league he's been checking it out every day as we have as well oh yeah we had someone kind of a big name that was in the thomas and mack center today watching his lakers play not that big a deal but you know lebron james decided to make an appearance jd what did you think of lebron's laker shorts strolling into the thomas and mack center hey what's up brandon ingram hey ho ho how's it going buddy just just strolling in there with is fifty six million dollar contract he's just so easily showing support for his lakers i mean i i totally respect what he's got going on he's saying hey i am all in i'm here to watch these young guys they can fit in i'll tell you what i think he likes ca speak and shoot the three no question and and we're going to talk about this lakers roster jd by the way they are still in the nba summer league tournament they defeated the detroit pistons today let's get into a little nba talk shall we guy with us on the line right now great guest friend of the shell works for believe the hype nba dot com jamison wells joining us right now on the k dwi in hotline jameson thanks for coming on my man how you doing probably go well about yourself doing okay and let me start out with this the big news obviously lebron james lebron james walking into the thomas and mack center we figured he would make an appearance did you know in advance that he was going to be there oh yes this was this was known for a while they knew that they were so funny he's going to be out here and make an appearance remember last week on vacation su he signed a contract earlier in the week so we knew this was gonna be the weekend we just going speaking of the laker roster we're going to get to their roster but what do you make of this whole situation between him and luke walton is it a media spectacle people saying well lebron hasn't spoken to luke and and and you know this really the lakers really didn't do anything to get lebron it was just his choice and there hasn't been a lot of communication with him and.

Katie W Beasley Fifty Six Million Dollar
Jameson Taillon of Pittsburgh Pirates open to urinating on hand to heal cut finger

Jalen and Jacoby

01:46 min | 2 years ago

Jameson Taillon of Pittsburgh Pirates open to urinating on hand to heal cut finger

"To you and then you're getting paid to do social media don't use that as something that takes away from something else that could be important or beneficial to your life every time people start to get focused take things series time to get disciplined whether it's the playoffs in the nba where the cardi b about to have a baby would do they do they get all social media well coming up next jamison tilana tilana tilana tilana tilana tie does had to make that joke is a pitcher for the pirates and he will do anything to heal his finger giving moving their hit the brakes you gotta hit the brakes well jameson was taking ideas from reporters and people about how to heal his finger that is hurt on his pitching hand and they suggested that perhaps you want people to pee on it and he said that he would put up a sign up sheet in the locker room and everyone could come on his finger if he thought that would help do you think that will help i got a few follow question you don't like follow up questions so is the p going to already be in a cup or something or they going to physically do that he mentioned the lineup so i think it was gonna be fresh fresh eared are we probably should keep do we probably should keep him let's keep them moving on this next leibel becky meek mill commented on on instagram posts and it was faithfully for came moving to hit the brakes hit the brakes.

NBA Jameson Instagram Mill