18 Burst results for "Jamila Woods"

"jamila woods" Discussed on Song Exploder

Song Exploder

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Song Exploder

"Other with love <music> and now here's Baldwin by Jamila Woods in its entirety near that time <music> l. y.. Spam out just books screen. Somebody we eurotrash fear Presley the trackers I gotcha wave in. Eh thank ashes says that <music> uh-huh thing bad as <music> the thing that just it just <music> visit Sung exploiter dot net for more information about Jamila Woods. You'll also find a link to buy or stream. This song song exploded is made possible by better help. I think most people know by now. The therapy is an important part of self care but it can be really expensive or tough to get to appointments better. Help is an online platform to make professional counseling accessible affordable and convenient he just fill out a questionnaire to assess your needs and they pair you up with a therapist who specializes in the issues you might be be dealing with you. Get unlimited phone sessions or video sessions at affordable weekly price so you can get help at your own pace and they're offering a discount where you can get ten percent off your first month using the Discount Code Song Explorer so why don't get started today go to better under help dot com slash song explorer just fill out the questionnaire and get matched with a counselor. You'll love at better help. Dot Com slash song explorer song exploded made possible by Sonos Sonos introduced a brand new sound bar for our T._v.'s called beam. They brought an Oscar winning sound engineers to perfect the audio specifically so the sound of the human voice comes through beautifully and clearly the beams really nice especially. If you don't have a lot of space like.

Jamila Woods Presley Oscar ten percent
"jamila woods" Discussed on Song Exploder

Song Exploder

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Song Exploder

"Com slash <Speech_Male> V._I._p.. <Speech_Male> Slash <Speech_Male> Song Explorer <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> Jamila <Speech_Music_Female> Woods is a singer <Speech_Music_Female> songwriter and poet <Speech_Music_Female> from Chicago. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> She's released <Speech_Music_Female> two albums <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and she's <Advertisement> collaborated <Speech_Music_Female> with artists <Advertisement> like chance <Speech_Music_Female> the rapper <Advertisement> no <Speech_Music_Female> name <Advertisement> and Michael <Speech_Music_Female> Moore <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> in May <Advertisement> Twenty nineteen <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> she put <Speech_Music_Female> out her second can <Advertisement> album <Speech_Music_Female> legacy <Advertisement> legacy <Speech_Music_Female> to <Advertisement> critical <Speech_Music_Female> acclaim <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and Emmy <Advertisement> called it <Speech_Music_Female> one of the albums <Advertisement> of the year <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rolling <Speech_Music_Female> stone called <Advertisement> it a revelation <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Female> pitchfork <Advertisement> named it best <Speech_Music_Female> new music <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in this <Speech_Music_Female> episode <Advertisement> Jamila <Speech_Music_Female> and our producer <Advertisement> slot <Speech_Music_Female> a <Advertisement> breakdown <Speech_Music_Male> a song from on that album <Speech_Music_Female> called Baldwin <Speech_Music_Female> named <Advertisement> after the late <Speech_Music_Female> author <Advertisement> and Civil <Speech_Music_Female> Rights Activists <Advertisement> James <Speech_Music_Female> Baldwin <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> waving <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> my name <Speech_Female> is Jamila Woods <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I'm a singer <Speech_Female> and musician <Speech_Female> poet <Silence> this song <Speech_Female> it was inspired <Speech_Female> by James <Speech_Female> Baldwin's letter <Speech_Female> to my nephew. <Speech_Female> I was working <Speech_Female> as a teaching <Speech_Female> artist at <Speech_Female> a nonprofit <Speech_Female> young Chicago authors <Speech_Female> teaching poetry <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> often return to <Speech_Female> reading James Baldwin <Speech_Female> the whole <Speech_Female> essays <Speech_Female> written to <Speech_Female> his nephew <Speech_Female> and he's kind <Speech_Female> of giving giving him <Speech_Female> perspective <Speech_Female> and advice about <Speech_Female> the world like <Speech_Female> navigating the world <Speech_Female> as a black man. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> There is <Speech_Music_Male> no reason for you <Speech_Music_Male> to try to become <Speech_Music_Male> like white men <Speech_Music_Male> and there is no basis <Speech_Music_Male> whatsoever <Speech_Music_Male> for their impertinent <Speech_Music_Male> assumption. <Speech_Music_Male> They <Speech_Music_Male> must accept <Speech_Music_Male> you. The <Speech_Music_Male> really terrible <Speech_Music_Male> thing old buddy is <Speech_Music_Male> that you <Speech_Music_Male> must accept them in. <Speech_Music_Male> I mean that very <Speech_Music_Male> seriously <Speech_Music_Male> you must <Speech_Music_Male> accept them and <Speech_Music_Male> accept them with love <Speech_Music_Male> for these innocent. <Speech_Male> People have no other <Speech_Music_Male> hope <Speech_Music_Male> they are aw effect <Speech_Music_Male> trapped in a history <Speech_Music_Male> which they do not understand <Speech_Music_Male> it until <Speech_Music_Male> they understand it. <Speech_Music_Male> They cannot be <Speech_Music_Male> released <Advertisement> from it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Music_Male> have had <Advertisement> to believe for <Speech_Music_Male> many <Advertisement> years <Speech_Male> and four innumerable <Speech_Male> reasons that <Speech_Male> black men are inferior <Speech_Music_Male> to white <Speech_Music_Male> men <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and. And part <Speech_Music_Female> of it he says is <Speech_Music_Female> like <Advertisement> it's <Speech_Music_Female> going to cost <Advertisement> us <Speech_Music_Female> more to <Speech_Music_Female> meet <Speech_Music_Female> injustice or <Speech_Music_Female> oppression <Speech_Music_Female> and prejudice with <Speech_Music_Female> that same <Speech_Music_Female> energy of hatred <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> so kind of tasking <Speech_Music_Female> us to meet <Speech_Female> it with love and <Speech_Music_Female> compassion instead <Speech_Music_Female> which I <Speech_Music_Female> thought was very <Speech_Music_Female> beautiful also <Speech_Music_Female> very <Speech_Music_Female> difficult to <Speech_Music_Female> put into practice <Speech_Music_Female>

James Baldwin Jamila Woods Chicago producer Chicago. Michael
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"Really complicated more complicated than how people speak about it. And what was it like gang Brown University? How was that it was great for me? I didn't enjoy high school. I didn't have like the movie high school experience, that I always wished I could have had, but then going to Brown. I think Brown in particular has a different way that it's not as segregated into your affinity group. There's like a lot of solidarity between people of color. There's like one center for all of the marginalized groups. And I think that they create programming that kind of tries to bridge, those gaps. And so I made friends of all different ethnicities and backgrounds and just found like, oh, these are my people here and it doesn't matter so much like before it was always like very black and white and Chicago in a lot of ways. It's like very segregated. So even in my high school, there were Latin x people and Asian people. But there was never a space where everybody was just together except for like the open mic spaces. And so in college, it was like overload, like learning so much about different cultures and also just feeling like empowered in my identity as opposed to feeling like it was always something that wasn't quite fitting. And that you just talked about the Mike. You've been part of the scene for very long time in Chicago. What's it like? Yeah. It's an very healthy spy think the Loudon above. Festival just ended. And it's always really inspiring to see what young people are writing about and thinking about, and, you know, we have also like one of the longest running youth open mics, and the city is always packed. There's always not just poets but up and coming rappers and singers that come through. And I think it's really important that young people have spaces where they feel like they can just come in and be themselves. And it's not too many rules or restrictions on, like how they can be in a space where like, it's okay to be different. And it's not just like a tolerance thing. But it's like everyone is empowered to feel good about who they are to express themselves. Obviously music's incredible love is that you really live it instead of saying it so, for instance, the a chance, L, S T, you know, the people in the video result of school competition. And from the work of sparring student filmmakers, told me about how that came about you'll both from Chicago's well and awesome making sure that is not again about YouTube. It's about. She, what are you doing for people, which are fine? Refreshing. Yeah. That was actually someone on my team suggested that idea. And I loved it because it kind of put into practice what I always kinda talk about, when people are like, oh, why do you still spend all your time teaching because I also like get things from it. It's not just like I'm just the benevolent sole trying to help the youth. But they're actually, so you're saying, like the best people and also very inspiring to see, like, what their ideas are, and what they're thinking about. And so when I read Ashley, we coaches treatment it immediately spoke to me, because she was talking about how summer in Chicago almost feels like a trip. 'cause, you know, everyone's like oh, LSD like, if you're not from Chicago like, oh, is this supposed to be about drugs like I don't get it. But she was kind of making me realize metaphor that even think about, which is the idea of feeling like because it's always so cold and kind of people focus on the grind Kaga when it finally.

Chicago Brown University Brown Ashley LSD YouTube
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"Of the south side is low particular because I grew up in a neighborhood called Beverly, and it's like a historically Irish immigrant neighborhood in my, my family was one of the only black families around that general area and high school, I went to was predominantly white, and I was kind of used to being the only black person in some of my classes. And then, you know, when I go to church with my grandma than it would be like an all black environment, and then I wouldn't completely feel like I totally fit in there either. So it was kind of I've been used to that feeling of feeling a little bit different or feeling a little bit other than the people around me. But I also think there is like, obviously stereotypes about the south side in the west side of Chicago's I think that there's abuse. History that exists on the south side. You know, and the reason why Chicago is segregated is because of you know, history of racism red lining in the city, and like black people created our own economy on the south Chicago. And then, you know, there's areas that become, you know, less segregated that also led to like a divestment and like the city's putting money into the south side in the west side. So there's reasons why the schools aren't as good the schools have enough resources. There's not enough grocery stores. And so all those things are related. Is it violent and the south side of the west side? I think about, like, what are the violence is that have been done by the city like to create these situations where people are trying to survive in these ways so yeah. Like there's definitely is really complicated more complicated than how people speak about it. And what was it like gang Brown University? How was that it was great for me? I didn't enjoy high school. I didn't have like the movie high school experience, that I always wished I could have had, but then going to Brown. I think Brown in particular has a different way that it's not as.

Chicago Brown Brown University Beverly
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"The parade and describing the trans movement as anti lesbianism when we're to Manchester Louisa community had this to say. I was really shocked by the actions of those women. I really really questioned them on the tactics they have a right to protest and all of that. They certainly have a right to demand. The L to be taken out of LGBTQ I because we so our the L in the in the frigging first place on a fell. Shamed. Fell that needed to do something. So are gathered a crack team of lesbians. We're taught about one out the idea will about if we let the Manchester parade with a supported honor, and we will rarely rarely I and so we let the prayed last year, I'm willing to pride if the parade world there were two reasons why today, it was to support Trump's people, but the biggest thing was about in the protests back in surpried. So we could only fifty people because it's a parade. A majority of those people. Well, never it before that didn't know how do it to show him the champion and main aim was to stunned for Trump siblings, because the thing is, as I as less bid of now, chief d-, more equality throughout the whole of human history that I'm ethical enjoy. Right. I am no longer the oppressed minority I am accepted. Therefore, I am not going to me back on the next people. It will demand inequality because Trump's people have absolutely every right to demand equality. That is all they want. And so, so I think those women were forgetful of what it was like I thirty years ago when you look at the headlines about lesbian families, they are exactly the same with a few words changed as the headlines against Trump's people now. So therefore, I wanted to tell me. By komo's women on a one. It's a say, I wanna March to world, an equal future, where we're all allowed the party where the algae PT QA, as an Senate 'cause are straight allies of Stu, we wouldn't be without. Got me thinking about how the city's LBJ t q plus community remains at the forefront of challenging the status quo not only through section twenty eight and popular culture, but also for recent approving to build the case. I l BT retirement home and also opening the world's first trans memorial garden in memory of all those who lost their lives in the struggle to be accepted. I went back to Adams AIn from queers folk munches to hers, a history of activism section twenty eight it was very, very damaging and the munch just community, galvanized and came together. Manchester four back certainly when aids came to the UK, and people were dying in Manchester, it was a core group of people for muncher Stor, who started aids line to give information and aids line, eventually became the George house, trust which is the HIV RT, they still doing incredible work in Manchester. So. Activism is a part of our DNA here. So that will always be apartment Stor. That was Edham Zane from Cuevas folk, finishing that report as mentioned earlier in the coach shout outs be more Martin. The pay is currently touring nationally Louise Welwyn has a new book out of poetry could glue published by Smith. Doorstop books especial. Thanks to channel four and reproductions for some of the clips used in this item now onto Jamila woods, a singer poet. And some guy from Chicago, her beautiful blend of Rb, so poetry, retrieve, and has second album legacy legacy is out now to critical acclaim in the record..

Trump Manchester Manchester Louisa Stu Stor Jamila woods Edham Zane Louise Welwyn komo Senate Chicago surpried Martin UK Smith George house thirty years
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"I mean, you think about why people go to court. It's not because they're happy, you know, and often when you look at parliament when you think about lower form, it's often mobilized around FIA anxiety. Pain grief emotion is everywhere, and emotion actually matters, not just for the people involved, but actually becomes a product of Lauren politics. And I'm really interested in the way in which we use emotion in the legal system to further if you like the rights of lesbian gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex people. And whether or not that use of. Motion is achieving the ends that we hope it will achieve, or whether or not, some of those emotions are actually being used in a way that inhibits our rights and freedom. What have you found in terms of bureaucracy process policies? If you look here in the UK up until about two thousand and ten a lot of asylum claims were denied on the basis that you could be, discreet, quote unquote about your sexuality, so a lot of decision makers accepted that you will say gay, or lesbian to a lesser extent by sexual, but they said that you could avoid the threat of persecution or violence by not being too out now, the u k supreme core in two thousand and ten said we'll actually requiring people to do this fundamentally flouts the whole purpose of the refugees convention, which is to protect people from having to do that. Because that is persecution. Right. And so from then on from over the last decade, what we've seen is this focused now on people's identities. So now instead of saying that just be discreet about who you are. They, they, they ask questions. Like, are you really gay when was the first time you had a sexual experience. Can you tell us the first time you were attracted to someone of the same sex? When did you know you get? No look. I'm a relatively well educated person. I, I consider myself, quite reflective and knowledgeable. If someone asked me a question when did you realize you gay? I would struggle enormously to come up with any kind of chronology around. Oh, yes. You know, it was a sunny off to noon, and I was just laying in bed, watching queries folk, you know, at ten pm, and just realized, as I was saying, you know, Justin, Brian make, how oh you know what I'm gay, you know, and that was the point at which embraced my daynuss nail using their own stereotypes about what it means to be gay. You know, do you go to clubs? What clubs do you go? Did you go to GIO? Tell us about what pride you end to, you know, forcing people to fulfil, these very narrow boxes about what it means to be gay, or lesbian, trans, or by. And as a consequence of that. Dismissing a bunch of claims because people just con- prove that, quote unquote gay enough for you. I'm really interested in how the work that I do can create spaces for these people to express in law, what they need and felow to actually recognize that and does Lowell recognize it. I always say that. It's quite easy to television. Progressive story when it comes to LGBT rights, or LGBT rights, and certainly that's the narrative, we often hear is things getting better or things will get better. It gets better. Right. These are the kinds of catchphrases, I always say depends on who you're talking about what area you're talking about because, of course, you know, if you're talking about people's access to say relationship recognition, when their citizens of the, well, if the citizens of England, Wales and Scotland because Northern Ireland doesn't have marriage equality. Then, of course you can celebrate the enormous achievements that have happened from decriminalization through to same, sex relationship recognition. But of course if you're you know a game and who has fled. A homophobic abuse in Malaysia or Pakistan. If you're a trans woman fleeing violence in somewhere like again, and seeking protection, you know, you'll life is navigating through systems like detention through bureaucrats who.

FIA Lauren UK Lowell Pakistan Malaysia Justin England Scotland Wales Brian Ireland
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"And I was into episodes, but it was kind of a seminal episode episode three if people have seen it, it's full of laughter, and then this horrific tragedy that happens. And because so many locations in the episode, I was like, filming for, like three months on this show, even those into episodes, so it meant that we became this really tight community of actors who knew immediately. We read those scripts that this was going to be something new something amazing to see. Do you have walking to it? So I'm just looking here. It seems to be lots of groups of people is now place now because where people go for like walking tours and things like that -absolutely. Yeah. There's, there's I think that the group just wore pastors are probably on the. LGBT heritage trail, which munch surpried era part of so yeah this this area house goal of historical significance. So, yeah, you to see walking till is heading around looking around at us. So just wanted to go back to the show, so sent his on kind of the three make heart Stewart, Vincent Nathan all very of defined characters. But also at the same time, there's an element of them this real, as well. Isn't that fantasy kind of maybe extreme so versions, I suppose the show starts with fins talking directly to the camera. I spend all night chasing of to some blow it turns out to be like, really. So mmediately your, you know that this is necessarily reality, and certainly looking at canal street. Now, you know, the tree is above us has got fairy lights all over it before queer as folk, there were no fairy lights on canal street. It now, does look a little bit like whereas folk, can you tell me about what it was like, when you're filming you'll I seen. Well, the I read through, we heard was extraordinary because it was so funny and seeing all these incredible actors around we all knew that this was something quite new, and we couldn't quite believe that it was advocate. Again allowed on TV, and I mean, even now when you low back on the plot of having Stewart who Twenty-nine having having sex with Nathan who was fifteen pull in his going to school full in here. Take the door Shula. They'll see the car. So. Bye. See you again. Cassia again. You can see me now. Where have you being is all on your little friend? Commutes night, governors were tonight, you know, could be anywhere. Could be an switch vise. I'll give you a good fuck like virgin. You won't be laughing. Stewart you'll face. And Dr Kathy though, you know, I think even rustler said recently that he doesn't think it would get on TV now but that time when they age of consent was of, really big issue. It was incredibly brave thing to happen. So we would just stunned that we were a part of it. And that first day where we will heading into wardrobe and being given costumes and being told what the schedule was when we were going to be filming nights shoots on canal street. And you know, in all these bars along here, can you imagine a gay man? It was the most exciting thing that ever happened to made certainly on a professional level. We watching it's interesting because I picked up a lot more staff as well as so much in it of themes. Do you think was really important night out? I think having Nathan in a school uniform in school. You know, he was subject to homophobic, bullying said that was an issue that was. Talked about for me when I was growing up, and I was at school. I always thought I was the only gay kid in the world and I didn't want to be because I was too scared..

Vincent Nathan Stewart Shula Dr Kathy three months
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"The thing was is adult thing, the government really expected what they got back because what, what did particularly Manchester create a community. The community was already that the scene was the recovery. Five one two full same. That's a gorgeous history. But what they did was we the campaign as we engage the scene on that was the difference between author marches demonstrations, that, that's where we want. So every Friday six weeks, I was going to the bath, I was. Upon speakers. And I was giving speeches analysts say, you've got kumail you've gotten the mall, turn. It was terrifying for people to just ten publicly say, I am I am an I an I deserve the same rights as you get back to that day. What was the energy like the energy was fro-? There was a lot of excitement. A lot of you know, we don't know what walking in sweat. It started down All Saints park. I was at the front Holt in the from Bina after massive panic just in case, somebody choked bottles when we could, you know, dump down the, the damage will ever, as All Saints kind of fill, but the, the courage, and you bales, you know, and then take that first step, how Unser Oxford road. And it was like, you know, right where the from we've, we've got to do this, you know, it was, you know, adrenaline thing it was I, I remember just really shaken but also thinking if anybody comes name co Cashman. R P attachable, I'm just gonna ask him 'cause they've come to my ser and I'll probably know as and a I. An so really hyundee in the pictures, you know, because I was kind ally Reta also in the looking at the pictures. I look, my because there was this guy from the Brixton Fabisch dressed, as Margaret Thatcher and took me all day, not take how our felt about my fat show on, you know, because I was personally livid about this, and I was livid Multan anything about the idea that books could be taken off live shells, because I used to hide in libraries, you know, keep the rain, you know, go, go to the library for ten minutes pace, you know, which you need to any lifting cab with nine wickets. You know. So libraries, some books, they would light only safe harbors. I have so were about twenty to twenty five thousand people on that much, and Albert square was filled up and the last.

Margaret Thatcher All Saints park Cashman Reta Manchester Albert square Multan Bina Holt Brixton R P ten minutes six weeks
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"I'm not show. But anyway, makes us to laugh. I add sell in the number one, which had two little hole in the window. So people could pass me a six through install. As you said, you knew your poet, playwright performer, you know, all says, well, you received an m b for services to community in contribution to music, literature, and the arts, but, you know, I've been reading around an hearing, you and doing some such, and actually, you set the activism came first aspect the other aspect, which, really, really nine for the moment came later, Kitale, a bit about, well, the kind of run concurrently. If amongst because I came out an came out in care, and that wasn't a comfortable experience. It's all in the early eighties. I add plan a beyond gre- about personally, but what I found was to things found political activism, and also found contact you very quickly wrote me, I play have the advantage of being an outside of outside of everything included in family gives me a unique perspective. Found. I had to see office that say against to see office over in the roof for the town. We did we campaign group? Great. I mean that's the thing to be young and in care on to be a young lesbian coming out at the time that I did a my sexuality was discussed by groups of professionals in review meetings. You know, you, you don't get no privacy in k. On the situation and the system. I'm one particular person run the home with the oppressive factors. Around this time and just David thirty years ago, came what is known as section twenty eight part of the local government act. Nineteen eighty eight binding, the promotion of homosexuality by local authorities in Britain schools, books and films removed from libraries and even discussions around same sex relationships are prohibited at schools. However, as soon as the law was brought in by Margaret that is torii government, it was met with disbelief anger, and the ultimate fightback from the OBT, Q plus activists in this bag. Manchester was key. Good evening. The headlines at six o'clock in the house of lords vote is taking place now on a challenge to the potent. Joy rebels said that the tax is unfair and unpopular. Lord, White bulls told them, they should not be confronting the elected chamber. We'll be going over to the house supports full the results. It was no need to tuck, the lesbian and gay community at that time. I think it's like the trans community now you know, we were very useful minority..

torii government Kitale Britain Manchester Margaret Joy David thirty years
"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

Stance

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Stance

"Really happy for him. Thanks again in touch about what you've been in to lately. Do send us your recommendations at Stockport costs. Manchester has received global recognition as one of the most LBJ t q plus friendly cities in the world, according to the rainbow cities index and stone Moore's court, the city, an absolute beacon of a quality for lesbian gay, bisexual and trans people and has been for a long time. But why thirty his own from the ripple effect to stonewall? I went to find out. So now in the center of Manchester's kind of like old beautiful Manchester office at the same time that is huge construction sites. Cranes coming up, I'm meeting Louise Welwyn at the free trade hall. It's now a hotel business, very, very special pace for the we've, which is why we're meeting here. So a look to meeting, I'm a poet and playwright from Manchester for me. It's visit history started with any Kenny, who is the working class. So fra- jets from older and Christabel punkish over one hundred years ago, that's where they decided to disrupt to me, being a believe is liberal party rally Winston Churchill was present at it. They got three days in prison. I remember being told story when I got banned from here from the street. Keigo fan from the street for years. Right. That's right. Yeah. This was way before adipose. So, so for thirty years ago. And every Tuesday afternoon may may choose to protest apartheid outside South African Airways, which is just opposite the free trade hall or walls. It's now a bar on the street to the right is booth Wall Street police station down this adult pick knots a police station anymore..

Manchester Louise Welwyn Winston Churchill Kenny stone Moore one hundred years thirty years three days
The best new music this week: Jamila Woods

All Songs Considered

03:01 min | 1 year ago

The best new music this week: Jamila Woods

"Legacy. Days. How? Best every home. On them. Service. Hilton. Sick onto. Is. Bye. You everything Joan. So you. Never. Hugh. Sure is a lot of good music in the world. This one comes from Jamila woods her album legacy legacy, and the song is called Zora. She is a singer poet teacher, and activist and this is sort of a concept album for her. Yes. Every track is named after another hero or hero. Win of hers. All major figures in African American cultural history. Nikki Giovanni Sonia. Sanchez those are writers miles Davis Jean Michel Basquiat, the painter and in some ways so early into Jamila woods career is only our second full length album. This is a summation of her her mission, you know, because her work is very concerned with educating as you said with celebrating and steeping her listeners in the sensuality enjoy and power of this culture. You're the circuits really grand mission statement. And really it is a who I am and known largely as a collaborator chancellor apper chance to wrap. She's on macklemore. And Ryan she she has popped up as a featured guest bunch and has had collaborations go back and forth where people have appeared on hers, and it's a great session important moment right now for reclaiming these legacies. And I think her generation is very aware of the importance of that Jamila woods is the singer her new album is legacy legacy. We still have a few more elba's that we wanna play for this week's new

Jamila Woods Davis Jean Michel Basquiat Nikki Giovanni Sonia Ryan Sanchez Joan Hugh Chancellor Elba
"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"She plays bass, and we're about to have like a writing session together, but they can be very awkward. It's a blind date and everybody hopes that something happens. So the day before I wrote her, and I just said, hey, I had this rough idea for a song I recorded it, kind of more Lucinda Williams style actually was more of a country urge when it started, and I had very vague versus but the chorus is were pretty much there. And I said as an assignment, why don't you try to think of how you connect with the song and will finish it together. So she came I had all the instrumentation recorded. We finish the lyrics together. Then I made her performance. And so the the demos song that the producer John Congleton heard as my friend Kate Davis singing at and that demo version is called seventeen case. And so she's younger than me. She's experiencing New York in this way that I just remember, and like I would get teary eyed like watching her talk about music, I feel like that was a big part of the narrative beyond my own personal experience with gentrification. It was also kind of looking at what I was while also building this friendship with the songwriter that I admired and I- continuing to seek row as artists on right? And did you feel like the song was special? That's definitely a song didn't want it to Sapir, and I'm used to having songs that are right for myself, and I'll never share within. But even when it didn't fit with the the sense Centric demos that I had. There was something about that song. I couldn't let go of even though it kind of lived in the country universe for a while. As soon as we decided with the overall sonic pilot was going to be for the record. It made me realize that the Bruce Springsteen loose new Williams meets suicide there is. Common ground there. Well, we have been talking to Sharon van it and the new album's remind me tomorrow Charon thank you for coming on sound opinions. Now, we want to hear from you. How do you feel about music as therapy as Michael Sarah ever pulled a fast one on you? Call eight eight eight eight five nine.

Kate Davis Lucinda Williams John Congleton Sharon van Bruce Springsteen New York Sapir Michael Sarah producer
"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Then he asked me to sing unison on then he took out his vocal and used it. Got played. To glow. Does he? I guess my serious question about the synthesizers. It would have been so easy to be reductionist. This is Sharon van Etten electron IQ album. Right. But it's not it seems really organic and that you just decided to explore some different texture, and I literally just plug Jupiter into my pedal board that I would normally plug my guitar into. And with nobody watching me to judge me because it's some people would cringe on that. That are purists, but it was really fun to explore it and figure out what it did. I didn't know was he decided it's really fun. Check it out and and without having a preconceived notion. I I found the sound that I really loved as not capture other than record it, and I just came up with the riff for Jupiter for and sang over it immediately. I wouldn't forget it. I haven't been able to recreate that same sound from that demo, but John Congleton came pretty darn close. And. And when I played that demo for people that got really excited about where I was going my sound. Here's Sharon van in performing Jupiter for live at tally hall on sound opinions. Skips. That's Jupiter for from Sharon van Etten, Charlie Danske on guitar keys, Devin Hoff on bass whore. Hey, Baldy on drums, and Heather woods Broderick on keys vocals at talion hole. In Chicago, you you wrote a song seventeen that I think a lot of people talking about. It's kinda like the song. You know? It's like the one. Wow. This is another level for you. Shoot. Did you feel like that? When you wrote that song first of all, and and Secondly, you know, that conversation between Sharon van today, and with Sharon Bennett, and when she was a teenager the question that always comes up when I mentioned that song people is like who do you think got the better of that argument? I don't think it's an argument. But anyway, I wish you would explain a little bit more about how that's came to be argument. But you know. There are times. Look back at yourself. You wanna hug yourself? There's times that you think you know, better. I mean, then or now, but at the end of the day. You are who you are all the things that you've been through in your life. And so you have to be at peace, but that at some level. Talking to you at seventeen there's levels. Right. Okay. So when I first when I first had the idea I caught myself walking through a neighborhood where one of the places I used to hang out at was something else. Suddenly, and I caught myself being that old townie that was bitching about. Ginger. But I remember when I first moved to New York, and a friend of mine was showing me what Williamsburg was about fifteen years ago. And that was like the first year, I moved there. And I remember he was trying to say something like, you know, throughout time civilizations rise in fall. And he likes set it in this meditative way where he was telling himself as much as he was telling me, and so every time something like that happens. I I do the same thing. And you know, even though I'm walking into neighborhood where younger kids are moving into a neighborhood. I can't afford anymore. That's just the way it is. And so I started writing down my. My meditations on life and change. And this has also around the time when I was trying to be home and learn how to be creative without touring, and I was introduced to this young songwriter. Kate Davis who was finding her voice. She's a great songwriter..

Sharon van Etten Sharon Bennett Sharon van Kate Davis John Congleton Heather woods Broderick Devin Hoff talion hole tally hall Baldy Chicago Charlie Danske New York Williamsburg fifteen years
"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"But I think that when you find the right group of people around to support you you find the strength to leave eventually is that what propelled you into psychology and therapy. And when you're fifty. I mean, I guess what? I'm wondering is. If you don't see how sitting with somebody and providing therapy is the same thing you've done on your records. Because I think it is. Thank you. Thank you. I think over the years I've learned that just the writing processes therapy for me. But then sometimes the my darker days. I I get mad at myself that what I do is really selfish. And that I stand on the stage and demands everyone attention and my happiness revolves around how the show wind, and and how I well performed when I know that's not really what it is. Because on a good day. I look out in the audience. I see people there with me as people crying as people sing along as people making out. Go for it all about that in the workplace here wherever but I've seen therapists that have changed my life. That have helped me learn how to communicate when I didn't know how to talk about my feelings that encouraged me to keep writing and performing because they saw something in me before I did in that it made me feel better. And that I had a drive. I didn't I didn't know why. But I just had a drive to play. It wasn't for success. It was for connection. And I think as I met fans along the way also that I got worried about some of the fans that would tell me stories about what they had been through. And why they connected with my music, and I wanted to follow up with them. And I would worry about them that we didn't exchange information for me to check in. And then just you know, that's dangerous. But I, but I realized that there is a drive in meet to have more of a connection in a different way. I just need to be certified to do that. You open the record with you know. Statement. You know, I told you everything sitting at the bar told you everything. Toes? And and you have a lot of ways. I mean people I think connect with your music so much because they don't feel like you're holding anything back, obviously, that's real attribute. But at the same time, it leaves you incredibly vulnerable and the new one still has those same qualities. What do you make of it do feel like, you know, at the end of the day that this was this is a good thing or you feel like in some ways, you know, as we were talking about earlier getting up on stage and doing that every night and going through that hell. Was that worth it? I think I always say whenever I'm singing, I always have tears in the back of my throat, and I think. I thrive on that. But I'm also still learning how to write in a way where I can draw from my own experience and right in general enough way where I know that everyone can relate to it in their own way. And it's a constant balance of sharing myself with people that want to know what I'm doing. But then also, no, they're not alone. And. Just learning. How to connect with people. I nervous that its Volna Rable. I'm I know like what just what I do is vulnerable, regardless of how much I personally, and I I realize I signed up for that a long time ago. So I just. So I just of have to own it. Here's Sharon Benneton performing comeback, kid live Italia. Hall on sound opinions. That's comeback kid from Sharon van Etten live on sound opinions. We'll hear more from that performance and talked about how she wound up writing much of her new album on a movie stars synthesizer after a short break. That's in a minute on sound opinions from WBZ,.

Sharon van Etten Sharon Benneton WBZ Volna Rable Hall
"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Mean, remind me tomorrow just came out. So this, you know, five year gap between an obviously there was touring in between there, and you did chose last year as well. People. Have this impression like you just sort of drop off the plan, and you're doing nothing you're sitting at home on the couch watching Netflix? She was on net, which yes, you were really busy. It sounds like he's through yourself into a bunch of other stuff because you can't not stay busy in some way. It sounded like well, I feel as soon as I decided to be off the road and open up the idea of. Okay. So how can I be creative and home as soon as I became available other opportunities presented themselves. But you know, if I was on tour, I would have had to say no to all of it. And I think you make small decisions like that that open you up to those experience. Ince's than more off center opportunities present they presented themselves. Man. I feel very lucky I know their unique experiences, but if I had been on the road and kept doing what I have been doing. They wouldn't have arrived. Did you feel like like acting something like that was that something that you would ever aspire to and and how did it go when you were able to actually do it? I was in musicals in high school. I think. Which one? Not cool ever. But I I was in Camelot. Was the girl in the green dress that didn't say anything, and I just saying inquire, and I was in. Hello, Dolly, which I hated I hated that play. So you've done, you know, the usual highschool actor 'cause the oh as a really cool show. How does that happen? They come to you and say, we need an idiosyncratic wonderful brilliant musician because there's not enough actresses. I mean, how does that happen? I'll honestly. I had no aspirations to act outside of high school. And I found out that the casting director that had asked me to dish in for the show had been at the Nick cave show when I was supporting him in two thousand thirteen it wasn't until two years later that he asked me to addiction. It was an honor and the the role the back story of Rachel in the oh as that. She grew up in choir moved away from home when to move to pursue music. And on the way, something terrible happened and singing became her superpower. I used to sing in church choir. Pretty good. People tell me I should make go it. So. I took my little brother. He snuck off and I connected not overly literally. But enough where I felt like there were parts of my real life that I could actually draw from real experiences and. And it's still pretending that I know what I'm doing. But they keep letting me do it. So here's Sharon van Etten with her band performing. No one is easy to love live at tally hall on sound opinions. She..

Rachel Sharon van Etten Netflix tally hall Ince Camelot Dolly Nick cave director five year two years
"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"That is heaven the title track from the new jamila woods record newly reissued jim ula woods record unsound opinions how about the title heaven a g a v n all caps no he he he he there is this incredibly long and wonderful history in african american music of imagining a utopian society right whether we're talking about george clinton four cenre more erica by do or jamila woods so what is heaven for you and what it what is that comes up what are you saying yeah i to me the concept is how how having can be here like here meaning in my community in chicago how can i personally create for myself you know maybe through south love through selfacceptance a sense of heaven but also how can make community black woman people of color young people of color how can we create spaces that feel safe than feel where we can live and survive and love on because that's what a lot of his is about two starting with the the title track yeah i remember learning and reading aloud about hooks and just learning about the ways that yes slavery and then all of the reverberations after that how that has affected black people's ability to love each other and love ourselves and that is kind of the cut of gulu i think that every song is about love in some way yeah and what i have gathered from interviews you've given a jamila the church as it is with so much of black chicago is not only a source of musical inspiration for you but of community activism and sort of the start of a political consciousness right.

jamila woods jim ula woods george clinton chicago
"jamila woods" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And puram amused an exceptional artist for sure jamila woods is also a community organizer she worked with young artists in chicago and her debut album heaven reflects that her personal experience but it's also a delicate love letter to her hometown xiaomi mi then to me having was about expanding the notion of love to include south love and love of the city where i come from which is often talked down upon in media i wanted to kind of create a space where low of could be possible because as thinking about my ancestors and from the time of slavery there and these barriers put up against black people being able to eleven thousand love each other and as kind of connecting add to how i feel sometimes now living in chicago although where there is so much violence being enacted i my community by the government or you know just fed klein had that we live in on it how can love be made possible in that environment the line i don't wanna ran away with here i just went out of allies right here and thinking about staying as an act of resistance or choosing to stay in chicago a city where a lot of people would say oh that's not really a city can be successful and i went to school on the east coast and i steady theater and black steady they didn't steady music fat i remember i got a really good piece of advice i was asking one of the mentors action i go to new york are la like i'm an artist thank everyone going and bath meal where i was from and i just talked about chicago and chicago authors and the artistic community that i come from and the mental is just like obviously i i think you should go back to chicago to seemed like you have such a community there and at the play speaking grow your wings anger that always tech with me because i i didn't necessarily appreciate or thief how unique an rare the community here that i had ending seen it for what it was in time and went away and.

jamila woods chicago xiaomi mi klein new york
"jamila woods" Discussed on Pop Shop

Pop Shop

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"jamila woods" Discussed on Pop Shop

"And uh so yeah we got some tunes we do every hosted other service i so yes it is we renew ren through justin bieber is news on with blood pop friends uh dave east featuring french montana maneuver m a new issues sort of bending the rules on this one jamila woods and chinstraps ask that we had any rules i don't think we do here they're if if we do they're being bent as hung from sid i j ready welson end the biz mmhmm and then alien aj the return of elian aj uh which has people been tweeting a me about and the songs officially so now with yet six times that's awesome um but let's let's start with the you know the man the legend jason oh civilly target veteran b o da yes so just bieber a blood pop in and with their friends justin transfer and julie michaels released a new song um it's good i mean i i don't we we've talked a lot about justin bieber on this podcast is the the new single is is funded to me it sounds like a weekend song allott and you're just in terms of that kind of like cruising production uh i think that some of the earth's or a little iffy but i think overall it hits mark i don't really have like a a drawn out opinion on this i i mean it it it's not like a a huge change up for him it's it's it's nothing like completely amazing or wretched or even it's not even it's not like mediocre it's just like very solid so what did you guys thing.

justin bieber jason julie michaels