19 Episode results for "Jamie Waters"

Fashion 2020

Monocle 24: Section D

28:22 min | 1 year ago

Fashion 2020

"This is local on design molecules. Weekly show dedicated to the best in architecture. Industrial Design Design Graphics and in particular this week. Fashion I'm Josh Bennett coming up today. Komo fashion indeed. Monaco's fashion editor of all people will be speaking with three industry specialists about where clothing. Everything designs a heading in the coming months we bring in a design up and he player who we admire to talk about the lay of the land from manufacturing to brand. And it's not just about how you allocate your marketing budgets. I think it also comes down to values. And what is that you want to say in who you are as brand designer Paula. Job as their. That's all coming right here. On Monaco on design on monocle twenty four do stay tuned and a very warm welcome to monocle on design. Now let's meet our fashion focused panel for this special long-form discussion which also prison text in. Monaco Komo forecast magazine which is out now. Monaco's fashion editor. Jamie waters was recently joined in studio by Paula chip-base a Brazil born London based fashion in designer who was behind Unisex label twelve zero five. She's recently launched Japan as a brand offering women's bespoke tailoring jewelry and knitwear. She's also the artistic director of the eminent. Shoemaker John Lobb to boot joining Jamie and Paula Ardine Cook and Adam Shapiro now. Cook is a buyer who is previously obviously worked for product Gills Sanga and for Saatchi and is now the head of menswear. Buying Brown's the August London Retail Institution which turns fifty next year and is in the midst of opening a new flagship in Mayfair Shapiro from the. US works in P. R.. He was previously at burberry. And Casey D and is the founder of L. Fifty two communications a London agency whose clients include the row Bali and Dutch up and comer wander Jamie began by asking polar about the importance of runway shows rose and that place in the fashion calendar when I started toll five. We didn't do runway shows. I started very simply making a collection of about twelve pieces. Unisex genderless complete freedom. It was what I wanted to express. What are the quality of savile row? But I didn't want the restrictions of designing for a masculine or feminine body. It it was kind of what I was wearing at the time wearing of menswear but maybe in a feminine way as well and so it started out very organically got picked up in Japan quite quickly I season and it sorta just grew from there up until I was approached by the AFC with their new gen program. MM and up until that point I guess it was in two thousand thirteen. So we've been running till five for two and a half. Three years had always very much been against shows. Rose I suppose my didn't feel. I needed them. I just wanted to create clothing and my goal wasn't to see it on. You Know Vogue Dot Com or style dot com. I'm at the time it was really about seeing it on the street. Seeing it warn and seeing people customers appropriating themselves of my work. That was all I wanted but I think you quickly realize. I think the Japanese are very good at picking up brands. That have a very distinctive point of view without needing all them fireworks. Necessarily that come from it. And I think they actually thrive on finding something that's very unknown and purposely. So you know it's called total five. It was not my name was purposely anonymous. It's the twelfth of May. I sort of felt like the idea was I wanted something. Anonymous of Super International speaks of languages. I wanted something that you could say any language and this idea of appropriation creation. I could say it in Japanese or in Portuguese or German or an Italian and it would become yours immediately because language has that ability. I think I think so. It was supposed to be anonymous and it was supposed to give the customer the opportunity to actually wear clothing not because a designer's name was on their back but because they felt compelled to where it for whatever reason into where in their way but then you start to sell to the West which is funny because I was always based in London and you know doing Tolo five but actually we were so Japan centric and I think that there are other pressures that come with it and the way that we judge I think success is in industry sometimes can be quite limiting and if you're a brand and you don't aspire to show there's something wrong with you and of course you're surrounded by people Bhutto whose entire goal is to have brands and do shows then you start to think. Well there must be something wrong with me who actually couldn't care less. But I think that's changing now now in terms terms of certainly without a show through seeing successful brands maybe not as not necessarily the really high fashion sphere. Whatever but I think they're plenty of brands that are using sort of digital communication patient to get the message out into drive sales and drive so I mean that's certainly my point of view but whether in truth people are ready for brands to start start thinking differently? I don't know what was it that convinced you to start actually doing shows well. We've got sponsorship and sponsorship was to do a show so the money he was for nothing other than doing shows and that's just how the AFC works. And I think it's amazing. Works great for a lot of brands but I think also puts a certain pressure on huge pressure pressure on very young businesses. Who could probably be using that money to run businesses because ultimately your goal is to also last have longevity? My goal certainly was and to express something that was quite unique so I think it's a tricky one as an independent brand did you north's the rewards from having no shows certainly. Yeah I mean for us. It took us from a super underground Unisex. The sex quirky brand to being at London Fashion Week and a lot of the big retailers started to knock on our door which which in the end was my biggest frustration because actually realized they really enjoyed just doing the work and not having these huge sales. Dell's there's different completely different conversation but for sure you know then you start to get the Neta portes and the SAX and the Barneys and the BERGDORF and the all. The big department store retailers suddenly are interested in what you're doing because you're in this format that they understand But I think also it draws a certain kind of customer that you don't necessarily Share values. I don't know I I WANNA ask you the same question. I mean your your in the business of building. Brand awareness is a runway show still the the best way in fashionable one of the best ways that fashion brand can't build awareness and get exposure. Now I mean I I I think the question is being positioned as a black and white answer and it's really quite gray gray because it's not a one size fits all mentality anymore. I think the big brands shows are critical because what they have on top of the budget to do a really special special show is they bring all their social media. Might they're doing all the press stuff. VIP whatever dressing influence or stuff. There there there's so many other elements of their communication in strategy that the show is one of the big P. throughout the year for them but then that lives on for them for the rest of the season so think about a recent big show for Saatchi we spoke about earlier global marketing strategy. Absolutely the only of course of course but it is when you map it out. Over the course of calendar year these are the peaks weeks of communication throughout the year for them to the J.. Lo the Joe not only are you kept getting huge attention at the time for the for Jaylo. You know during the finale of the most recent for Saatchi Achie- womenswear show you then have content on for them for the rest of the season. You've got conversation that built to the rest of the season but again. That is a mega brand approach. Who can afford to do something like that and who needs to be seen compared to their peers as behaving in that sort of way because it's novel it's interesting captured attention now for a smaller brand or mid level? I think this this show is a very different proposition. And it depends on how much budget you have allocated towards it. It depends on so many different things in terms of your creative process. Your production timelines. Some people don't want to sell on the normal main fashioned schedule. Some people refer to sell during pre collections because it sits on the shop floor longer. All of these sort of things become more important when you're a smaller muller to medium sized brand because you really have to allocate your dollars appropriately so that you get the most bang for your buck also has a different is not just about how you allocate your marketing budgets. I think it also comes down to values and what it is that you want to say in who you are as a brand and I think the research example is an interesting one because I actually have no idea whether a collection look like I have no idea all I know is that Jaylo walked the finale and people were going crazy about it and it's amazing seizing but I actually don't know what the collection looks like. But maybe that's okay because it's her getting the attention to the brand in that moment in time but I don't think that it's it's a even for brands that have the duwamish shows and I think it depends on the collection in the kind of product. And the message. You're trying to send Paula Jones. Bass Dean Cook Adam Shapiro. So that speaking with the one and only Jamie waters you're listening to monocle on design. Do stay with us. We'll be hearing more from our fashion focus. Team next for the masters with Tiffany and company on monocle. Twenty four takes you on a journey to meet. Pioneers from the fields of design talked fashion sport music on more mazdas. Like read Cracow. It's something that you can't learn to do in six months. It's something that a lot of the people that are doing it. If spent ten twenty thirty years doing this and it's a true craft masters of diverse fields with vast ranges talents. What unites all these trailblazers is a mastery of craftmanship of technique of Materials of innovation? To drive what they do. Innovators his like Scott Campbell. So the final product is just richer and deeper and more interesting when you really put in the hours of making it with your own hands learn about that that life and work and maybe to a sense of the philosophy has brought them here and might just inspire you in however small away to follow in their footsteps. The masters with Tiffany and company on monocle. Twenty four back with Monaco on design. I'm still Josh Venit. We're we're talking fashion today as you may recall with design up Paula Jones Bass by Dean Cook and Adam Shapiro Plus Monaco's fashion editor. Jamie waters. Remember Him we rejoin the compensation Adam discussing. What point fashion? PR comes into play during the production of a new collection. I guess by the point that I'm brought into any conversation. TATION regarding a show. Somebody has some sort of commercially minded roadmap in front of them so whereas I think there could be lots of interesting ways that you present a collection or present what your provision for a season that don't have to do with runway I think ultimately if there's to be a commercial component to what it is that you're doing because you need to survive in. You need to sell something. Then you have have to somehow disseminate the visuals of what you've created to a wider audience. So that people can how do they buy. Where do they buy it? What does it look like? What is your world so there are definitely lots of different options? And I'd be really interested to hear your take on what it could look like a runway. Show that's not a commercial play but that at the same time pushes. Does Your Business forward so that you actually have something to grow and grow into Paulo you thinking of a specific type of thing that could replace place that all the time because I'm interested in trying to think outside of the norm in the way that I work now and and that means not working with season that means not having boundaries in terms of developing product and that also means not saying that I won't do seasons at at times so it's really kind of no rules and by saying no rules have to break my own rules so I'm not saying I will never do a show but but I'm saying are there ways that we can somehow work out. That actually might be more interesting. Maybe their straight to consumer. I don't know but maybe they are actually a press the presentation that isn't just you know people standing around. Maybe I don't have the answer but I think that there must be other ways that we can think of they go beyond just categorizing. High End. Collections are shown as runway shows and commercials rate to consumer collections are shown 's digitally because I think those boundaries are blurred. The moment was a digital moment. That's what that was everything's a digital. That's the thing being tracing listening to the numbers they booked in address book. Ten like Egypt says you can't remember the rest of the collection. What Book Interesting Collection? When I did the supermodels Susan what about what Cindy War or one of the of what did they sell? That wasn't on those girls or does it have a trickle down effect because people talking about again consumers thinking that they're really relevant they wanna piece for maybe two hundred shows the three hundred women Shari's fast when we put. How's The suchy why they do it for a reason and and execute perfect Europe because it's the one that everyone in my office was talking of course and that's what she wanted and delivered delivered and executed in perfect way and not for nothing? Let's not totally discount. The talent evolved here is. He's incredible j.lo's amazing but also from her people's perspective she is a new movie to promote it all links together very cleverly from both sides so he's not like masterclass. In collaboration. Collaboration here is what it is because obviously both teams came together like we both have something really important to press right now and they did it very very well. What does that have to do with fashion? It has to do with commerce and awareness. I'm not sure it has much to do with creativity necessarily other than you're bringing awareness to a brand that is traditionally a runaway. It took about mark. It's marketing not necessarily talking about fashion. Or probably were back when she first Over trump's I guess that's my interest because we talk about runways as these sort of halo effect moments of pure unadulterated creativity. But actually the show that we can remember that we're talking about from. Last season is in marketing driven very beautifully executed marketing exercise of course but the industry has changed so much women we also can certainly remember the McQueen shows when they were really pure expressions of creativity. Yeah it is a very different world now. Because they didn't have to sing digitally they only had to engage. Page the audience who is in the room and make them feel that they were part of something really special now. It has to translate digitally to a global audience that you hope is coming into the closed. The runway show has to do something different for today's brands than when they could be a purely creative. Play that when I was in school has somehow managed in Switzerland Pre Internet. I somehow managed to find Hussein alliance presentations and just be completely in awe of his work mark and the pure creativity of it and I still now get find it very strong. That person could express that and I don't see anyone on necessarily nowadays expressed that moment digitally nowadays would have just been incredible. Also but he didn't need that to reach me. I mean we talked about not pure runway shows. What about there are other things that have happened? Throughout fashioning click the mouse show New York for example which was and I wasn't there but apparently an incredible experience from from winning. Was that certainly taken into a different form of communicating in a very interesting and relevant way about not only the clothes but also about society I think again. I don't think the answer to runway is black and white thing because I think the cleverer brands are doing things to to meet their needs. They WANNA ask from a buying perspective. How much attention do you pay the runway shows because you obviously you go to all the fashion weeks but is most of your work? Done in the showrooms after how much attention you can take those yet. There's a lot of work. Some of those super brands. The big brands yet is a lot of work done beforehand because we we. Let's say for some winter we're going to buy pre November so we stopped by November. We don't get to the runways until January. So that's when we. We stopped by neuroma brands. Runway brands for me yet. You know the hell super important. Because it's what the consumer sees the consumer doesn't see pre collection because he's not photographed. It's not anywhere until we goes on our website oriented store. Aw the only chance he gets to see up product or brand consumer is from the runways. Because then it's older magazines is all everybody's social media it's photograph reefer Grafton and everyone's token bay so the runways are very important for me and coming from a brand. It's their most important statement. He's look one as well. You know that sets the tone okay. Comeback for Saatchi and wasn't it a quantum. But you know. It's the finale you know. It's the design is taking so so much time and so much power over what delivering. I think. He's a great. I really enjoy yes. I think I agree reviewed. It is become a little bit of a circus in terms of you know what's going on out there but he also gives these people a chance to express yourself and show what I want to own about what I think in coming right from also on runways shows the reason I also couldn't really justify it in the end is the sustainable question for me was not sustainable financially but environmentally I think for me was something that I kept coming back to my mind all the time and the waste of you know I've spoken to friends who are amazing producers and I've had arguments with them in a single boat the benches are rented and I said yes but that carpet I know you bended and it You know there's invitations everyone's printed invitations because they have to be so beautiful actually. Everyone's just throwing them on the floor. At the end of the show seating cards words that are also printed that are also on. I don't know there's so much waste. There's no icebergs being flown in and There's there's such a huge amount of waste. I think we're GONNA see a lot of change in a really that sustainable paws pause Suddenly come upon us but certainly from my experience going insurance. It's the first thing that brands are talking about now on brands are telling in you now. Sustainable that is that that let looking interests question. Journalists asked I can stay up right and rightfully so by the way moment. It's important that everybody has the real honest answer for it but I think honesty is a good word to use. I mean Jamie probably knows that I was quite frustrated law season. There was so much talk about from brands about you know how important the environment is determined. How sustainability is a key issue for them and we should all follow this and then meanwhile the amounts that are being produced and wasted the fabric? Wastage the the shipping. I don't know there's a lot these same brands are putting on shows shows and I think it's not enough to say it. I think the values need to follow through and I don't know if I hope it's not the case but this season it felt very much like a trend and hope that it's not a trend that is actually something that people start to consider. There's a huge opportunity. I think to certainly improve every brand and has the opportunity. And the really the need to improve their sustainability whether it's supply chain whether it's the materials that they're shipping do things in all of that I mean I think there's a lot of opportunity for it but you know at the same time when it comes to environmental conversations. I think it's tough when you're trying like to hold people to this unobtainable one hundred percent sustainable achievement which it's just not possible. My point is it's impossible to be perfect and I think is taking impart. It's it's showing that your your leash trying these things and you're doing these things but truly trying not just not just. There's no point that any break in ever reach one hundred percent sustainability issue. There's no chance so it's about doing the absolute best you can within the means and within the means of survival as well because it's pointless if the brand is not gonNA stick around for them to make all these moves sadly be an element of that allows them to be able to be profitable move forward as well. Yeah I mean I think sometimes it can't feel a bit like a buzzword and at the top of every branch press release the season they meant sustainable or one of those words Ganic or something about recycled materials. And it's hard hard to know what the standard is which is kind of what you're saying elements like how do you know what it's like. Well there's so. Many different level is away. Now that I mean we have a whole department in in. NFL Fetch Office. He's just looking at brands. And how sustainable of course I mean there's ways to measure it but from a PR perspective. I would say this I think it's really cringe. When your championing sustainability at the very top I mean it needs to be a major important pillar that underpins your business and it needs to be something that you actually spend time on? But if it's at the top of the press release it makes you really question what the brand is really up to the selling point. Well it should be it should be. It should be such a natural part of your day to day business this that it doesn't have to supersede anything else but is there and you can rely on the fact that we're doing the best we can with our supply chain. I think is also become. I wonder in boardrooms far and wide. People talk you know whoever you know boards talking about how sustainability is really important to a new generation. And you know let's let's try and target. This millennial generation through sustainability. It's important value to them. But I had A. I'm not going to mention the brand but I had. Let's say an online shopping experience recently so I spend a Lotta time outside. I climb a lot. I'm always in the mountain where I grew up is kind of where I feel most at home so I buy a lot of climbing. Outerwear and one brand specifically that is very much at the forefront of talking about the environmental sustainability in those are issues that of course from me are important equally and so I really champion that conversation Patagonia of course and I wear a lot of things and they truly are really great quality a lot of these recycle materials and I think that they were really very much. You know one of the first if not absolutely they are so I ordered a garment from their website recently and it arrived at my house into layers of plastic. So you know I think as a customer who felt like I share those values and You know returning earning customer. Who essentially could buy from anywhere? But I actually buy from them because I believe in what they preach for that to arrive in two layers of plastic caustic to me was shocking and I think that's when I think about true values versus a marketing strategy to target. You know millennial audience. I think those to the closest example. I can get to. Don't just put it on your press. Release actually care about. And if you don't that's actually okay. Also so don't care about sustainability. Don't care about the environment and keep doing amazing incredible non-sustainable shows that make people feel something. Just don't preach the other way. I suppose I think brands should stay true to who they are. Whatever that is and I think then it rings true? There's also this kind of tension in the industry because obviously it's premised on selling a lot of things and having quite quick turnovers and dot is somewhat odds sweet being sustainable being you know not creating any waste because brands make their money from selling a lot of things so there's kind of detention Chian Adam enjoying it needs just cut on. What do you think about these kind of tension for me on this? I think it's a really interesting thing. Because you have a lot of people championing. Okay well then by one really fabulous. I think that you're gonNA wear forever slightly classist statement to say that because the fact that matter is as much beautiful expensive luxury goods or out there and there are the people that can afford for them and believe me they keep us all in this room afloat. There are people that can't afford that one thing that's going to ask them forever so I think part of it. You have to engage the fast fast fashion brands as well in terms of parliament cleaning up all of their practices because they're not going anywhere because there's a huge population out there that is not buying top top luxury goods that are going to last the lifetime. They just can't nor should they have to in order to be sustainable and to have lovely things to whether they don't want him to last a lifetime today right. The fashion thing now is is not to have it last a lifetime you know. Why are we buying sneakers? You know we're doing the Harlem River Sneaker and then the next week we're telling you to combine avant and in the next week we're going to tell you another one four drops drops a week. Where telling you to buy as much as possible for even mean? So how does I was GONNA say how does Brown sock yes It's what it is you know. It's like doc anything you want you want you want you get some accounts at the same time. I actually don't. I get asked a lot whether I think that fast fashion you know is a big ugly. The word and I actually don't think that it is. I think there's a space for all types of fashion actually but it's just doing it all with integrity and yeah. I think there's a way in. Certainly I've been developing ways in which we can produce. There's one category that we're developing which is technical netware its maiden great factory in China. It's nylon on polyester so synthetic yarns and we've been spending a lotta time and we'll continue to develop techniques which allow us to not only use recycled yarns yawns but actually then be able to those garments. Because they're very very fine so eventually they will. You will have to stop wearing them. People to return them to us and for us to then repurpose repurpose them again. So I think the price points are between one hundred and eighty and two hundred and forty per piece so yes. It's not at fifty fifty or sixty but you know we're a small operation but I think that there are ways that you can actually look at the way that you manufacture things whether you're you know at what supposedly luxury or at high street that actually you can clean things up. It just depends on how much you want to and that was Paula. Japan rounding things out and that wraps up our fashion roundtable are many thanks to to Adam. Shapiro Dean Cook and Jamie waters for the discussion and sadly that's all the time we have on today's show for more design stories. Do hit subscribe to this show. And you'll get a mini mid week. PODCAST on design extract. You'd lucky things that comes out on. Thursdays is you can also find an extended version of the discussion in the pages of Monaco's the forecast magazine which is on all good newsstands now. Monaco on design was produced as ever by Tombola and it was edited faithfully but he ever patient mate Lee Evans. I'm Josh Bennett. Thank you very much for listening and by.

Jamie waters Adam Shapiro Shapiro Dean Cook Monaco London Japan Saatchi Paula Monaco editor Josh Bennett AFC Brown Monaco Komo burberry US Tiffany
Friday 15 May

Monocle 24: Midori House

23:22 min | 8 months ago

Friday 15 May

"Few people around the globe are on lockdown states and countries start to reopen but tensions remain over balancing the health of workers with the need to get the economy moving. Paparrazzi normally found looking outside high. End Restaurants exclusive resorts but with those restaurants clubs and Boston largely shots and holidays on exclusive. Caribbean islands cancelled. He's photographers a finding. They don't have a lot to shoot. And we'll be looking at some of the other stories to emerge from the corona virus crisis including the decision of France's language elders to assign Feminine Gender to Khalid these nuff miracles editors tackle those topics today on the late edition here monocle twenty four. Yes hello happy Friday. Welcome to the late edition coming to you from London. My Name's Tom Edwards and I am delighted to welcome couple of likely characters to wrap up the week. Monaco's affairs editor Christina and fashion editor. Jamie waters are both on the line. Gentlemen happy Friday. Good to have you with us. Chris how do we find you? I've seen people playing tennis around London. I know you're an Aficionado of the game of you. Been out and about hitting a few bowls yes. The first time was actually today this evening playing tennis outdoors to lovely day here in London and it is nice to get back to a bit of normal. It is of course slightly different You get a cord. You're only allowed to play singles so I'm playing with my girlfriend And I have one more court booked for Sunday with another friend. It's not that easy to play. Of course there's a lot of people trying to courts. There's a lot of demand right now. Apparently the a From what I understood. Had something like twenty thousand bookings on a day where they normally have about three thousand. So that goes you that shows you just how eager people are to get out and about of course regular listeners will know that you'll something you have a tennis. Monster Yourself. Back in the day is how you're going to ward off some of that work some of that corona lockdown frustration. Now on the tennis court. Maybe not So I am going to try. I've I'm trying to fit tomorrow morning but I haven't been quite as diligent as Chris and haven't heard back yet from authorities. So let's see how that goes but my most of my energy's being waken end. Jesus going towards the ball at my house. My House Bentson. I have launched this team called Bob. We live in a building. Code Temple Works and We call our commentate and every Friday. The ball opens kind of stays open until Sunday. And I think this weekend. We've got a bowl of US. Are from the local corner store. Am I gonNA try mixed in with their various Towels which I'm sure will be delicious. Saiga you do what you can't get yourself entertainment that sounds absolutely terrifying and I will send around some qualified medical professionals to sixty the aftermath. Let's move on before we get bogged down any further in Jamie Sousa Addiction Let's get stuck into the first topic of the day. The case been using lockdown restrictions. Were staying alert. Not just staying at home and it's a similar story around. The world didn't different Josephine different pieces of change. But it's all starting to ratchet back into action but how do you strike the right? Balance between keeping people safe and healthy and maximum maximizing economic game. Which is much needed before? We hear from our panelists. Let's say what Peter Goodman had say a global economics correspondent for the New York Times and he spoke to monocle twenty four a little earlier today. People love to talk about how the virus doesn't discriminate and it doesn't matter what your gender your race or your income is you can still get it. You know. That's all good and well the system discriminates and the people who are actually out there on the line who are delivering packages from Amazon. Up Making Food in the states. We've seen hot spots for the virus at meat processing plants places where people stand close to one another slaughtering an hacking pigs into cuts of bacon pork chops. They've gotten sick. We've had instances were local. Sheriff's have actually tried to shut those plants down and that CEO's of the corporations who are now advising president trump on when to reopen the economy have managed to get those plants declared essential essential has essentially become a euphemism. Really interesting insights on some of the social aspects of this from the New York. Times is pay to Goodman. Christiane might let me come back to you. It's oversimplified the situation talk about attention between opening up and sticking in in lockdown. Is there anything instructive from specific markets? To look look at though. I know you and have talked often about Australia. Of course one of your lands and Australia's ahead of the curve in terms of opening backup. Yes well I should correct you and say fatherland to be specific. It's my father was from Austria but Either WAY WORKS. And yes they are actually. There's quite a bit of news. That's quite interesting today. Out of Austria on the positive side They're opening up restaurants and cafes again today so when we talk about that question of easing Austria has been quite good. So far I'd say at handling this This challenge of easing. They've been telegraphing their steps. Relatively well and today was the day that cafes and restaurants opened with of course proper social or physical distancing in place and mask maske's as well so that's one positive on the other more negative but interesting side is that the Culture Minister of Austria actually resigned today and that gets to some of the tensions in other places too. There's been a lot of unhappiness in Austria about that next step. Wendy you open the very important cultural institutions in Austria of course operas theaters all of these that are in Vienna and other places around Austria of course hugely important and the culture minister has come The Culture Minister who Luna check who? I actually interviewed back in February for our Special Austria magazine. She's a longtime politician Austria more specialized in foreign policy. In the past she worked. He was a deputy of the European Parliament in the nineties. So she's a very seasoned professional but she came under a lot of fire for really not undestanding The sensitivities of the culture ministry when she took it over earlier this year and not providing enough support to theater workers artists and others over there. She tried to bat some of that back and actually announced a plan or was announcing a plan this week today. Too Slowly Open theaters and other institutions towards the end of. May in a step by step process. But it wasn't enough to save her and she's Oddly in that sense one of the first casualties even for a country like Austria. That many would say has managed this whole process relatively well. Well it's interesting to look at. Where negative presses come Amazon which momentum mentioned of course in his remarks from earlier? Amazon's steak and there's a lot of talk about supply chain changes and I guess it's interesting isn't it to reflect even at this maybe relatively early stage in the process about longer impact on how people secure supply chains. And we you and I were talking. I think last week about Fashion and textile industries. And how some pretty trenching questions being asked about how the supply chains will will will shape up. It is interesting. Isn't it what we're seeing at the moment? And there's all these tensions but people are not shying from asking tough questions about. How are we going to ensure our supply chains or more sustainable and more sort of protected in the event? Something happens again in the future. Yes absolutely I mean what you know. One of the things that he's done is really shown a spotlight on. Just how Two things firstly. Just how globalized. A lot of different industries are where one particular item can be made of component pots from ten different countries in everything Around the world before it will come together at in the other thing. Is that even though that is the case on top of that how much we are dependent so many industries dependent on China's specifically so when when that country's put out of action you know so many industries that just basic crave fall apart? It's really changing that. And and changing the way supply chains of managed and bringing brings pledge Closer to home is obviously the goal for many industries. And this was something that way. We're seeing in lots of different sexes. I mean this is something that trump has been pushing a lot. It's the fashion. Industry has been pushing a lot of Lebron's to manufacture close to Europe. Actually how carrying that out is is a really complicated thing because I mean always say for a lot of countries that just the such sophisticated technology a lot of things a manufactured in China and they're such intricate processes in such high tech factories. It's just not possible to do that in other places. The other thing that you're saying is that if we think about something like the fashion industry it's a really good thing to bring manufacturing closer to home but fif- something inner you think of something that America will some Western countries we think of the UK. Even parts of France. A lot of schools have died out because they bane of short for so many years. And and it's just not the intricate techniques and I mean it's it's a good goal to have in mind but if you think is like the US they're going to struggle we dot in a lot of cases and then the other thing that that kind of compounds all of these full western countries if you bring supply chains quest to become more expensive always say one of the main goals behind this globalization however many years ago was it was these constant search for cheaper production so that you could sell goods at lower prices to the final consumers. So right if you're if you move production close to home high out wages in in various Western countries. What's the end result of that? The consumer's GonNa pay more. I mean we're coming out of these. A lot of people are going have less money in their pockets. They can be not as willing to pay as much anyway and it goods a mating Europe. They're going to be more expensive. So where's that coming from? I think these kind of whole really complicated question about costs well and be a lot of really complicated questions for the World Trade Organization one imagine stones so and just a quick aside on this. Christopher throwback to you of course we've had confirmed today that the head of the World Trade Organization is going to step down earlier than planned demand. I think that you have spoken with for Monaco. Previously pre presumably that coined of personnel change doesn't help moments like these. Yeah not how? It was actually quite surprising. News that he is stepping down or Bertozzi. Vado announced that he's stepping down at the end of August. That's one year before the end of his eight-year term and I interviewed him for the June issue of Monocle magazine which is actually out next week. So it's It's one of the last two views if you will that. He's done before Before announcing his resignation and one of the things that strikes me about it is to Jamie's point little bit. He focused very much on this idea. That self sufficiency does not work when we spoke to him and that was really his his key warning. I would say In this pandemic was that we cannot We cannot go too much to. The extreme of expecting countries can just shorten their supply. Chains produce things at home as a result of this pandemic. It might work in some areas in the medical world but otherwise it's not going to work particularly well and at the same time having said that he clearly from reading his resignation statement. The key point is that he realizes there are going to be significant changes to global trade as a result of this pandemic and so part of the reason that he decided to resign. Early is that so is so that somebody else can basically make those next steps can be in charge of how we're going to come out of this. A pandemic how what trade is going to look like in the coming years As we try to come out of this With a number of trade spats geologic geopolitical trade spats also of course still very much alive like between the US and China and so on so he's really just decided it's time for somebody else to take up that mantle in him. Staying on for another year would not really help. Well let's Change Focus Next on the program and train our Lens you'll see where I'm going with this on the Paparrazzi and the fate of those motorbike riding shorts wearing telephoto lens wielding chaps. Why well they're people. They normally photograph on out in about as usual We lucky enough to be able to play a little clip of Jamie waters talking about it earlier today. And then we can pick up with the man himself This is Jamie had to say about the poll unfortunate Paparazzi earlier. But however tough those poor celebs have a pups habit tougher. What do you do when you're subjects is sequestered away in mansions in the Hollywood hills or the Hamptons plus when you're subject to show their faces then movie stock Greens a hidden by mosques? Is that even Brad Pitt or is it just another handsome? Los Angelino be the golden head of hair without those winning smalls on show. All bets are off. Paparazzi photo agencies have gone from selling some seven thousand images a month to a poultry. Five hundred Jamie. What is a little earlier and from the recorded to the real version Jamie? This hard sell is getting people to feel sorry for you know Paparazzi. They're not exactly the most sympathetic of characters and the best of times are they know e exactly it's this within the pandemic has done it sort of the world upside down and I mean I you know trying to fill celebrities. He's one thing and then the next step trying to feel sorry for Paparazzi. I've basically it's it's just sort of another tough turn for the industry. That was already really struggling. I mean social media has kind of in many ways spelled the demise of of the Paparazzi and the fact that celebrities can can po- fees and just go straight to instagram and connect with the audience is directly in the possibilities that really has kind of diminished. The role of Pop Razzi. Now it's it's well nigh impossible when these pay blissett camped outside celebrity's house just waiting for them to come outside. It's very kind of strange moment. Full at profession. That is you know. It's a very odd job to begin with. And how do you kind of snoop on people when when you can't you can't even say that faces? We just wanted to. What about the the usual Paparazzi tollgates? We've seen lot celebrities sort of doing zoom chats from home and they're in a much more. I don't know that there appear in more candid. They're often made up in quite the same way is actually quite instructive to see. The targets of the Paparazzi actually revealing a bit more of themselves on the Home Front least. The lockdown has has been a really kind of interesting case. Study in what fame actually is and what famous people look like and are like when you strip away all the events in the premiers and the cameras and the Glitz and kind of gone into Going into directions. The one is that a lot of celebrities have copped a lot. Of flack for just coming across as extremely tone death because it's this weird thing where they almost because everyone is sitting at home in some ways. It's made celebrities. Same very normal. You Strip everything away. They're not made up just appearing on their. You know on their phones on social media so it's like they just everyday people but then but then all because everyday in a mansion in the Hamptons. And so there's I'm sure everyone has has seen although I hope you have a for your sake. But I'm saying that. Video of the imagine song that was launched by Dow Gadot the actress and it kind of was passed the torch to various celebrities to sing a part of the song. Imagine and it was said if these these bizarre just pull a judge thing where it was sort of like making celebrities fuel like everyday and that can inspire all of us from their homes I think the problem one of the main problems that was that a lot of the people in the video seem so it was almost decided that just saying a famous person on screen would be this kind of bomb to to help. Everyone feel better. Obviously that's not the case it's kind of inspired outrage among lots of people but then on the other side I think the flip side to that is there is something very refreshing and emotional and sentimental about seeing certain famous people in their homes very low que showing off their talents in a way that sort of raw unvarnished and the one that one that springs to mind was there was a tribute to Stephen Sondheim on his ninetieth birthday last week and basically it was comprised of various performances from a lot of different styles and it was just so you know amazing seeing some of these people just their home singing straight sang ladies. Who Lunch for instance and there are a few things but the one thing was she did on zoom cold and just saying that the zoom name was m s iphone and just like extraordinary lack donors of that. It's just so mundane that you don't you imagine that her point which you imagine her name should be like superstar or like ten time. Oscar winner or however many awards. He's won but it was just so dull and every day and I think this something that combined how amazing her performance was I think has a very special kind of heart warming thing and you could only get that in a in a lockdown situation like this that kind of access we are and I think that's one of those sort of quirky offbeat stories which really just appeals to people and. That's exactly the kind of thing. Jamie there are Androulla looks at each week for us all Monaco. Twenty four when he wraps up some of the weird and wonderful things. He seen He honed in on Frantz this week. and in particular the decision to assign a covert nineteen or covy. Did these nerve. A female gender LACO. Let's take a listen to Andrew Mullah? We learned this week that Kovic Nineteen is female. At least it is will. She is in France. The Academy froze. Say A coven elderly poindexter who dress up in silly green uniforms and Brian and assign gender to nouns for some reason but once opposes SA- living have decided that it is la covert nineteen not lay although we leave the umbrella. Corona virus is a a mile. The actually is a semi logical explanation for this apparent contradiction. Covert is an acronym and acronyms gendered by the key word which in this instance is disease so the Feminine Lamelo D. But honestly who cares the point is that we all get to enjoy making cheap jokes about how covert nineteen has been declared female because lots of French. Male politicians have been in bed with it when they should have been working. Look if we can't indulge in Lazy gags about the prior pick laboriousness of Frenchman than what was Brexit. Even about indeed Andrew Miller indeed Christian. Ma You mentioned your Australian Fatherland. How's how's the German language Dealing with this sort of all these new linguistic challenges that the pandemic is throwing away you have to say. The Germans are a little bit behind the bone this woman. He listened to the French because one of the interesting sides in Germany is. They haven't been able to settle this question so in Germany. The virus they Germany of course unlike France has three of versions for nouns. They have a feminine a masculine and a neutral Dan de and dust and they have not been able to decide whether virus is devils or dust views and so the same applies for corn views. They've not been able to decide whether it's debus. Dr Cohen of us or dust cool individuals and so the way it actually in theory works in Germany is that words from a foreign language tend to take the neutral term dos But as they enter the language itself they might convert to something else either day or and so in this case some if you look at the duty dictionary says that it sort of should be dusk. Cohen veal's but it's entered popular terminology as Derek Cohen. Avila says well and so. They've basically decided. Well either. One is okay in this case so it is quite surprising. Actually because Germany typically has a similar sort of rule-making body to the to the French. But in this case they've just decided to to live and let live well wise words. Indeed Jamie is there. Is there a nice bit of a Perth based colloquialism that would suit the corona virus? There must be a good bit of slang something some kind of local lingo from from your motherland or not yet. Well unfortunately this season as funny as I as I would like. You should of hope that there will be an ozzy. Corona is obviously ozzy shorten everything. So there's a lot of clothing and just the corona or Roy. Nah has become quite popular. Rowena which actually makes it sound much more fun than that. I'm sure is I've been reading a few things about how you even come up with the name of a virus and and kind of the process and the possibility to offend people and one of the things that I thought was quite interesting is was an expert in the hell set to talking about advocating that we should call us a similar kind of thinking as we naming hurricanes and that viruses should be just named after like an everyday person's name like Steve or toll even And you can just decide. Just come down with Tom. Although I guess I could also cause other Jamie I'm GonNa jump straight in there and just say let's wrap this up. I like you thinking but I'm not sure I agree with the execution but it's definitely good. Let's just stick with Rona? Shall we now that works on both levels Jamie waters and Chris? Thank you very much indeed for joining us. Today's late edition. Thanks to my guests. All of our editors today or Monocle Twenty Four Anti Studio Manages Louis Allen and Sam MP. I'm Tom Edwards here in London. Bidding farewell have a great weekend wherever you are keep IT TUNED TO MONACO. Twenty four in the meantime affirmation only say goodbye and thanks for listening.

Jamie Austria Jamie waters tennis France Chris Germany Monaco London Amazon Tom Edwards China US Europe Caribbean End Restaurants Australia Boston Paparrazzi
Extra: Fashion comes to the rescue

Monocle 24: Section D

03:56 min | 9 months ago

Extra: Fashion comes to the rescue

"Hello and a very warm welcome to monocle undesired extra. It's a show brought to you by the team behind. Monaco's dedicated weekly design program. I'm Josh Venit. Now each episode we take a closer look at a story that we think deserves just a little bit more attention today. We ask where we wrong to write off the fashion folks flipping trivial. Monaco's fashion editor. Jamie waters explains how the industry and people who actually make things emerged as vital contributors in the fight against this current pandemic many brands of big and small have pivoted to make mosques and other protective equipment here. Jamie waters makes a case. The making things to the fashion and cosmetic industries have pivoted quickly in response to shortages of antibacterial gel protective medical gear among the first act was French. Luxury conglomerate lvmh which in mid-march transformed fragrance and cosmetics workshops for dior and others into hand sanitizer plots thousands of companies have since followed suit using the trees to shift product with the deafness point of years of heating tight seasonal deadlines in frogs. A WHATSAPP group is being used by someone hundred fashion brands big and small to sheltie about how to move from making runway to hospital gowns in the UK has retold. It's your factory to steetch masks. Instead of trenchcoats in Japan fast retailing the parent company of Unicorn is producing a staggering. Ten million mosques while in Milan product Gucci and the Armani Group are doing similar things. Louis goulet founder of Parisian eco-friendly Brand New Yorker. Says I've never seen such solid dougherty. Such determination to help and collaborate between brands in early March New York developed a prototype mosque overnight and Brown top production at its five workshops in Romania all now operating six days per week. It's goal is to produce one hundred thousand washable surgical masks. As is the case with many brands the items are being donated to medical institutions free of charge with the company absorbing costs helped by public donations. One of the trickiest things says goulet is acquiring medical grade materials. The mosques must be made from non woven polypropylene caution which is in high demand the French. What type group helps by sharing information from associations including the government's Defense Agency and the French Institute of Fashion Textile and clothing as cool? I says everyone has been doing a tremendous job of synchronizing manufacturers and supplies and sharing the instructions of the authorities. The tasks huge he adds but the mobilization of the fashion industry is really impressive. And many unsafe. Thanks to Jamie waters is the fashion editor of the magazine that was read from a story that he painted for the entrepreneurs dedicated business magazine which is available to pre order now and we'll be on newsstands with subscribers next week and Saudi. That's all we have time for on today's show eager for more design stories than you can listen to a full length program which airs eight. Pm Tuesdays in London time you can subscribe to the show seat. I miss a thing either. Today's episode was produced by mainly Evans. I'm Josh Venit. Thank you very much for listening and until next time goodbye.

Jamie waters Louis goulet Josh Venit Monaco editor French Institute of Fashion Te Milan dior UK New York Armani Group steetch Evans Defense Agency London Japan Unicorn Romania founder
The Entrepreneurs - Eureka 177: Snow Peak

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

09:39 min | 1 year ago

The Entrepreneurs - Eureka 177: Snow Peak

"You're listening to Eureka on monocle. Twenty four with me meet Daniel beach host of the entrepreneurs. Lisa Jahmai is the executive vice president of snow. Peak and granddaughter of the founder of the Japanese outdoor apparel and gear firm. Yukio was an accomplishment near and started the brand in nineteen fifty eight to create climbing gear. That met his standards. Sloping has been known for decades in its home nation for peerless camping equipment. But in two thousand fourteen Lisa a trained fashion designer joining to lead the development of the companies. I ever apparel line. The world hold of hiking has been embraced by the fashion industry. Lately with luxury brands conjuring trae already boots backpacks and Parkas but when it comes to style and performance few can rival snow peak now the company which has eight firm footing in the US and Asia has come to the UK with an impressive. three-story flagship in central London. For this week's episode Lisa sat down with Monaco's fashion editor Jamie waters to discuss her vision for snow peak. Yes no peak founded in Nine hundred fifty eight of I. My grandfather us at the beginning of company it was is is Our distributor of Meta walks slope as the in Nevada factor is a super countryside over Japan Ban as a this city is very very show for the metal walks in the local manufacturing during so my grandfather has a are. His personal hobby is rock climbing. He went Low crime or almost every weekend then. Yeah he's dead to make a good choreography. Good good Japanese Gorazde. Climbing Year by hisself is also giving cause it's still very much a family run business so off after your grandfather then. Your Dad's took over at some point and made it. What did he he made it more of a mainstream camping? Yes My dot joined snow. Peak over thirty is a goal and like a low crime ing is Much much extreme outdoor activity and not like Use Your activity in Japan. Yeah my dad wanted into our dog. Culture should be except for Japanese lifestyle and yacht. He is hunting going camping business. For said he is then is your into snow. Peak in twenty twelve and I prepared Studied I knew a pro business is no peak and it started and twenty fourteen. And it's interesting because I think a lot of Western consumers and definitely. I came across the brand around through the fashion line. which as you say you launched in two thousand and fourteen so it's interesting brand because I think for a lot of people who in western countries it's perceived as being they know as being an outdoor clothing brand even though it's got this long history as a camping the having all the tools and the medical equipment and all of that? So why did you want to launch the clothing line. And can you explain to me about what the clothing line has done to make. The brand better known to an audience outside Japan like for the clothing line has been hustle us. Oh I had to fuck ground outdoor in fashion culture and When I joined snow peak two of our this industry was to separated? And so so I wanNA A bridge Fashion Culture to outdoor Collagen mixing together. I wanted create new outdoor fashion culture based in Japan like snow. Big created japanese-styled campaign culture in Japan are too loud y also. I wanted to same things by adore fashion. Yeah what's what's the what's the breakdown. Now in terms of how much of the business is fashion represent and how much of the business is represented by proper camping equipment. wittment arbitrary business still small maybe fifteen percent over the whole snow peak business us because a snow peak is hungering. The camping business for thirty years but upper just started five. Be as a goal but pro-business deal growing up in the war. What are your future plans for the brand? How do you say the brand guessing? And you've you've now got you've got shops in America. You've just opened in London in numerous Asian countries. What's what's in the future? What do you want it to become my future print in snow peak? It's a snow peak creative. More variable lifestyle are it's like life Barroux are for the worldwide customer and the more wider audience are feeling nature's In their lifestyle it's like boxer Fox two more primitive life failing nature boxer the more human being by outdoor things yet camping and hiking or failing natural materials by crossing. Yeah like that you organize. It is a lot of camping events and things don't you. It's not just that you have shops. You also organizing these kind of things for people to experience the he I In Japan Snow Peak has over thirty times camping event with US nope. He Consumers Schumer's like snow peak stuff a camping with our users together and also our customer feedback. Some positive opinion and negative opinion are two directory to snow peak. Yeah it's very very important things. Yeah so we got a lot of feedback. Directly Xfi from our consumers are weekend make much better product by Dale pinions and improve products and Cyrus also. Yeah that's very important things for the brand. How important is is it to you? That snow peak is a family run business. And what's it like fi you to work with your dad and in this kind of Heritage Family Company ooh Good question yes I love formerly business. Bod God is like a sometimes berry good sometimes is to like fighting it crying as a Racecar my dad and I being the same same spirit and all same spurious affi off for the hungering business and creating new products source something new business and the. It's very good sings. Osso my grandfather grade snow be culture and my dot More wider business by camping and I created our new upper business or in other industry. You're my family's spirit. is a pasta onto next generation. Yeah it's so sweet losing your my executive vice president of snow peak speaking to Monaco's fashion editor. Jamie waters you can read more about. Lisa's plans for the family. Business in Monaco's December January issue on newsstands. Now thanks to Lisa for her time and to Jamie for conducting this interview. The show was mixed edited by doing Allen. I'm Daniel Beach. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you bye

snow peak Japan Snow Peak Japan Lisa Jahmai Jamie waters executive vice president US Monaco editor Yukio founder Nevada Monaco Daniel Beach London Heritage Family Company Asia UK Allen Schumer
Monday 1 June

Monocle 24: Midori House

22:15 min | 8 months ago

Monday 1 June

"Protests continue across the United States in response to the killing of an unarmed black man by a white police officer in Minneapolis. Last week we'll have the latest for you. Making things closer to home as lockdown measures continue to ease in many parts of the world will assess how many businesses are moving to shorten their supply chains and picture-perfect as the UK tiptoes further out of lockdown, a photograph of Queen Elizabeth Riding. A Horse is published when assess the potency of photography and the imagery of the pandemic before the end of the program now all to come here on the Late Edition on Monaco Twenty Four. Hello and a very warm welcome to you. The Late Edition Hero monocle twenty four. On this Monday, the first of June nine Thomas Lewis here in Toronto and help us cast an eye across of the day's key news stories from around the world I'm joined by Monaco's editor Andrew Tuck and by Monocle, twenty four culture correspondent Fernando Augosto paycheck. Oh Fernando Andrew. Thank you very much for being with us today. android, don't know about you, but I sort of have to pinch myself gently. When I saw the date in the calendar today quite believe another month has slipped by time as being a weirdly malleable thing has over the past few weeks. How things there in London? Has Been just lighten the most insane early summer. That had it everyday is beautiful isn't another stunning day you're right, we. We slipped into lockdown when it was well winter now with edge didn't to well into summer and things are changing goes around the world that you here on this diarrhea when allowed meeting group six people officially, and if you run a car showroom around to open today if you got an outdoor market, even setting bench out to. Stay as well. As things changing but a coast There are many people who feel that that's happened too quickly. Especially, the reopening of schools is an interesting died here in the UK. I'm phenomena. The last time we spoke to you on the program. You'd Hudson. Visitors to your booth boxes SAIGA window. Have you gotten? Any updates whereas not front, unfortunately not, but the only update I have. I was very happy over the weekend. My favorite ice cream shop reopened so i. of course had A. You know a scoop of Pistachio? Lima, my favorites and you know those little things. They make me so happy because I couldn't go there for you know. As Andrew was saying for quite a long time, we started this winter so i. see a little optimism, and that's that's always a good thing to hear as well. Do, you have the scooper to extra on me and under the next time you venture out. Thank you both very much for being here today. Well, let's begin today's program in the United States where signs like this, which began in Minneapolis last week have filled streets in some seventy five cities across the country. Osu, Couch during the weekend in Minneapolis where demonstrations began last week in response to the death of George. Floyd an unarmed, African American man who died after being restrained on the ground by a white police officer who did so by pressing his knee into flights neck, despite repeated pleas that he couldn't breathe. Andrew come to you in a moment for your reaction to what we've seen over the weekend, but first let's hear from some of our contributors who've been giving their reaction to us throughout the day here on monocle twenty four I hear Scott, Lucas a professor of us. Politics at the University of Birmingham in the U. K.. He traced the context of the past weeks protests for us on today's edition of the globalist hoped it would get better after the civil rights movement in the nineteen nineties with the response in l., a. to the beating of Rodney King and demonstrations across the country. We hope to get better. But, then two thousand fourteen, that's series of deadly assault on unarmed African. Americans led to black lives matter. And again the grassroots movements that have called for not only an end to police violence, but also addressing economic and social inequalities, the difference on this Monday it started June in two thousand and twenty. Is that the man in the white. House is not making even a token call. For Dialogue for negotiation for an addressing these issues, he's pouring fuel on the fire, sitting in a White House bumper and using twitter. Scott Lucas, our regular contributor on USFA's speaking to a little earlier today. Well as Scott mentioned there, so serious was the perceived threat posed by the protests taking place in Washington DC yesterday that a curfew was put in place and president trump was moved to the safety of the White House's underground bunker Ryan Williams is a former spokesman for Mitt Romney, the former Republican presidential nominee, and he gave his assessment of Donald Trump's response to the unrest engulfing so many cities across the. The country it just does not really seem like it's in his DNA to be unifying and to rise to the occasion for an event like this not only has the things he's tweeted. They've not just been unhelpful. I would say some of them have been dangerous I think he's stoking. The flames of that are burning right now with these incendiary remarks. And hopefully he will stop that you said the tweet the other day when Luke starts, the shooting starts. Those are incendiary remarks. Remarks this is a very delicate and dangerous situation right now Ryan Williams the former spokesperson for Mitt Romney speaking to us on the briefing today Andrew in London I remember a few years ago, I was relatively new radio producer Monocle, twenty four, and I remember you and I speaking on addition of debriefing back in two thousand fourteen at the height of the riots in Ferguson which began in the aftermath of the shooting dead of a black teenager. I remember the conversations at the. The time then work characterizing that situation as a real tipping point as a moment where relations between the police in the US and African American communities would finally change, but here we are nearly six years later after several moments of unrest like this over the years watching from London Andrew does this feel like given the scale of the arrests that we're seeing that? Maybe there is a moment about to tip here while you would light hurt. When knew this was going to be? A moment of change. But it's not the shootings that you have in America again and again school shootings while you imagine this must be the moment when someone does something that will change narrative forever and then low behold a short time later you're back in San Position. Have Race relations improved in America of the loss twenty thirty years. Of course they have, but. What seems to be the case, there is still so many doc moments for America analyst for the rest of the world when it comes to the policing of not just black people of all ethnic minorities and watching the outside. What's been interesting that being these three stories which have hit the headlines in recent weeks, the shooting of the Black Giaga Almond Operate and this very strange story about this woman Amy Cooper. Who? is off by a black man to dog on a leash central park in an area which is reserved budding and ends up cooling the police, and asking them to come and deal with this man now in all three of these incidents was amazing. Is that somebody had the wit to film and to get that on their phones, and that's what's changed narrative in these stories the. George Floyd he could have been killed in behind that car and in the days before camera fines. Whose whose version of the truth would you believe here? The footage is shot around the world and Sunday to every high amount would imagine in the US and. His inescapable, the the truth of what happens, is that in front of you? I would say one thing I i. wonder whether it's sometimes a distraction to just focus on. The divisiveness of Donald Trump is a president in the words he says because. It kind of implies that. If it wasn't for Donald Trump, these wouldn't happen. I've got a feeling a much more rooted in the system than that an. Yes, he's his unhelpful in his is his incendary his comments. The problem isn't just one of Donald Trump and White House. And Fernando. The US isn't the only place that protests are currently unfolding here in Toronto on Saturday there was a very large protest against the actions of Toronto Police Force in an instant where black woman lost her life in Brazil, there are several protests and away as well on them well, absolutely almost yesterday. Whenever you need the police to the main avenue of of some Paul, there's been Lord of protesters. Anti Anti Fascist, protesters and anti-racism, and this is a problem that. Everyone can relate especially. Brazil, which I have to say, it is very much. A racist country we deal with race in a different way than the US, perhaps because the race lines in Brazil are very much blood, but it's funny for me is also very emotional stories because there's a story. As a kid that was in the car with my stepmother. White Blonde woman. And then we in the street lights, and there was a kid bagging as it happens in Brazil and then you know I think she tried to give to give the kid money or candy and the kid looked at me I am. I'm darker than my stepmother. And she said Oh. He's the same caller as me. Why is not in the streets this? Story. A young, I couldn't I never forgot that story, and that shows how racism is insidious. So yeah it. It is very emotional times and I kind of agree with Andrew Not Donald Trump is not based on our. It's something in the system. No matter who is in power and I think this is something that is very hard to change, but we can only hope. It just come back in just one second Thomas without revealing too much I don't want to tell Fernandez Story I. Think many of us just don't know what experiences alike a near that this isn't just people who've been. annot Scott Lucas saying that this is due -cation that the Fed is give. I mean equal rights. People's access to services, healthcare, education, etcetera, etcetera, but even I think very successful brought. People feel that they. on the end of this treatment again and again and again and your finance I is an example of somebody who you know. We old imagine just balances through life gnome innate, but then you hear the stories and we have a colleague. Work is from Asia. A Korean woman and he was hanging on the weekend the in. A HIP Pau, an eastern zone because of coronavirus people possum is a couple of. The hands over their faces when they pasta. But not when he passed and you're. That's the kind of small things that you probably don't shoot into. Unless you're you are passive. Carol your affected by these things, so I think what's interesting about all these demonstrations around the world is. Tapping into something that is felt by a lot of ordinary people going about their lives, and you just don't know it's happening, and then suddenly a moment this comes in. It's it's it's. Okay, this is just too much. We we have to vent and and say what we feel about these situations. Where we will be monitoring that venting and the latest from the US under the parts of the world here in the days to come on Monaco twenty four, but next here on the late edition. Let's move the world of business and manufacturing as more and more economies tiptoe out of lockdown more scrutiny debate is forty upon the length of supply chains in various sectors in economies around the world and how to bring them. Them closer to home and it'll earlier, Monaco's fashion editor Jamie waters spoke to us about how Bangladesh is responding to news international fashion companies who are attempting to shoot in the supply chains involved in the production of that garments, the Bangladesh economy et relies so heavily on the garment industry. It's twelve percent of the country's Jd pay eighty four percent of its turtle exports of goods. You know the industry is battling to work. Work out what to do, and basically you're saying this many especially Western rate, big Western companies account seeing that orders or placing that order in limbo delaying them, and at the moment it's more than three billion dollars worth of orders, limbaugh, and so the thousands of factories and millions of factory workers, a lot of vulnerable, who kind of either out of work, not sure what's happening today and we're saying Bangladesh take a stand. Stand Jamie Waters Monaco's fashion editor. They're talking to US and today's edition of the globalist Andrew in London. We've discussed several times on the program. How the pandemic has revealed precariousness of money supply chains around the world. What did you make of what Jamie had to say there about the situation in Bangladesh? And what have you seen that struck you about how some businesses reevaluating the supply chain how their products are made? Well I think the beginning of this. Where it began in China, first of all people panicked because they were bringing in product from China thought if they had had their production, in Italy or something that would be able to keep going for example, and then of course trying to back up and running and Italy went down so sometimes. Having your production closer to home isn't the pure sedation supply chains can fall whether they're distant or near, but I do think that many companies are thinking. How do we make this a little bit safer? How do we keep more people working in the fold? How do you make a product that people are confident about the it's? It's telling a good story that it's honest and I think the middle end of the market. There's going to be certainly shorter supply chains as people begin to trade up little bear, tell the narrative more interesting way, but you know the pressure for a cheap fashion is great. It will go away, but. I ready's outer some years ago, we met. The owner of a reasonably well known European fashion brand and event, and they were talking about the fact that they were doing their production in China and they'd they'd moved it. To Vietnam, but Vietnam was also now too expensive, and so they were looking at additional countries, and if they were looking at Bangladesh, so there's always this pressure to go down the chain and make things cheaper and cheaper. We hope for reset, but until we come out of this, which will be hopefully in the coming months. You just don't know what is going to stick and what's going to feel like a very good idea now while we're being all kind of sensible about things, but when it gets back to making a quick buck, how how fast some companies re revert to their old ways. And Fernando a similar question to you. Supply chains in the way businesses as under, said they sort of look around to create their products enter do them in an efficient and a cost effective way. I guess you could put it. Sometimes those. Things. Take years to cement onto. Put into place. You mentioned to us on the program last week that you'd been in touch with the owner, a smaller fashion house who had been touch with you directly after you've made a purchase of a garment there that that conversation had really struck here in terms of how long term and how businesses you know, respond to the very real situation happening now, but also look ahead to what is quite an uncertain future for many of them. How do you think that situation of? Out from your mind. Well the conversation indeed struck me because you know. He was the owner of the small, British brand Scott Fraser I ordered online a beautiful shirt they have, but you know because of covid nineteen he he wrote to me politely. Saying I'm sorry. The shirts no radio timing. We're going through a few delays. Because of what's happening in the world and I said listen. I can wait. I think the shirts very beautiful and happy to say that late last week. The shirt have arrived so I hopefully. Perhaps this is what's going to happen. We're going to find out more where our closer coming from and I know my sound a little bit dreamy. What I'm saying because as Andrew said I think fast fashion is not dying, but I do think people are more interested to. To see where their garments are coming from actually even before the show I looked at me. What a wary wearing today and say where where are those close coming from? I'm happy to report their. My t shirt comes from England, a light peyot pink shirt from spell my shorts from Adidas. I had no idea where he was made its Vietnam actually, and you know. I always wear my from Brazil so. It is quite interesting to find out where your clothes come from I. Think people will be paying more attention to that and I'm sure you look very rapid new shirt as well financial well finally here on the late edition. Let's turn our attention to a photograph was published in the UK today as the next stage of the easing of restrictions of movement that came into force. The picture in question is of Queen Elizabeth who is in her ninety s and has been isolating at Windsor Castle during lockdown in the photograph. She's on horseback on the day that elderly people are allowed to go outdoors for the first time for. For around ten weeks, or so, it's an image that captures the notable moment for the UK, but it also raised the question of how photography more broadly during lockdown measures that have been in place in many parts of the world have gained potency while most of us have found ourselves indoors and cut off from the events unfolding outside Andrew. This photograph appears to have captured the imagination of many people in the UK today. Can you perhaps on pick a little of what it depicts for? Those efforts haven't seen it, and why perhaps it seems that it has some simple leave for lots of people in the UK. Basically is. Rather, Ole, do the headscarf on on a big horse. That's that's. That's the pitcher bought. What I think people have latched onto is that we've gone through a period where? The government advised the health advice is being. People who are particularly vulnerable and particularly that comes down to age should not be seen out in public. They should be staying home, and you hear in the papers, bits and pieces about how the staff who've been looking after the queen had been forced to have tasks to go into isolation before they start working for her etcetera just to protect. So trotting around on a horse. ambling around, maybe a better word on a horse is a sign that watch. Is, okay to be outside again. Maybe is time to re engage with the world, and even if I am in perhaps a more vulnerable group of people you know I. Don't WanNa take, but maybe I could head out into the fresh air now everyone's got a big fat horse waiting for the mountainside the door, but If you have. A bad time to get out there. Speak for yourself Andrew. I've got mine tethered up outside as we speak and Fernando photography for you during the pandemic. Are there any images that fool you have captured the moment we're living in most potent lead you think has photography you know. Become more important in a way in capturing a lot of realities that most of us aren't able to see. With our own with our own eyes. Thomas there's been many many pictures that have been impressed. It's quite haunting to see for example the empty city centers, but to be perfectly honest to view the finger really hit me. I have book by a photographer. Call Richard Rinaldi he. His book is called touching strangers. It's. Many pictures of people the never met each other, but the photographer for some reason convinced convinced than to hug to kiss or do whatever they want really, and when I was reading book feels quite other-worldly because. We're all missing the touch in a way of friends to hugs handshakes so I think for some reason, even though this book is pre, Covid Nineteen, it became very potent in my opinion. I totally recommend people to have a look. And? Even in the latest, sorry a little. Promo for the MAG, but it's true I mean the June issue. There's a beautiful photo essay by photographer. Christopher Fernandez of people in their in their homes. I think he takes pictures from the windows I told you again beautiful piece of work, but always there's a touch of haunting in a way. were. Finan Dogo Gestapo Sheku and Andrew, Tech picture-perfect as ever. Thank you both very much for being with us on the late edition today. That is all I'm afraid to say. We have time for for today's program. I'll studio managers in London. Were Louis Allen on some impact, a big thanks to them as ever the late edition returns at the same time tomorrow before more news analysis. I'm much more to do. Stay with Monaco Twenty Four. I'm Thomas Lewis here in Toronto. Thank you very much for listening my hope, you'll stay.

Andrew Tuck United States Donald Trump London UK Brazil Thomas Lewis Toronto Fernando Scott Lucas Jamie Waters Monaco Monaco Twenty Four White House Minneapolis Bangladesh George Floyd Fernando Andrew Monocle diarrhea
Extra: Londons fashion shortfall

Monocle 24: Section D

03:24 min | 1 year ago

Extra: Londons fashion shortfall

"<music> hello and a very warm welcome to Monaco on design extra. It's the show brought to you by the team behind. Monocle twenty fours dedicated weekly designed program. I'm Josh Venit each week. We devote five minutes or fewer to an aspect of design that we think deserves just little bit of unpacking this week. We delve into the pages of Monaco's mammoth July August spectacular where our fashion editor Jamie. Jamie Walters asks if London's fashion retailers are falling short of the mark and why take it away Jamie theme Sasi Garden Party bread the invitation to my friend's wedding take a scan of my board reviewed a decidedly sands sesay of navy and olive thus on a recent weekend for the first time in a long time. I shopped in London with real purpose. How hard could it be to find a kid of? Nkala to give my ensembles and finger snapping attitude very it turns out. I was keen to peruse small multibrand shops but London is sorely lacking on this front. It's beset by the same ways as the world's other fashion capitals beaks with big rents make tough environments for pint-sized retailers. I can recommend great menswear shops the sorts with selections that reflect their owners personal tastes into lose or Bologna. Nia yet. If someone asks for London Power Steve I'm left stammering and good London outposts continued to close my favorite Sojo's other shop shuttered this year while Conoco closed in late two thousand seventeen eighteen there are still some nice spots hostile open as usual sunny siders and the panthers as well as ceased to shop trunk but none stopped the Saas. I was after the city's. Healthiest stores are larger. Aw more institutional multi brand retailers such as voguish browns and straight west specialist end they have a point of view in a way that department stores don't yet Bosa varied enough offering plus sizable online shops to move of products on mass. My faith in London was ultimately restored. When I went to Church Aka Dover Street market on the Sunday I spent several hours drifting between the museum like floors? I was particularly. Shakily taken with the Cherry selection from New York brands Noah. I couldn't quite find my wedding outfit but the whole experience was so enjoyable that it didn't matter I'm afraid to say I did end up ducking into Ramona branch shop acne studios for Sassy he pink shirt but I'll be returning to Dover Street market on a Sunday soon to stock up a Noah and soak up the vibes that was Monaco's perfectly preened fashion editor Jamie waters you can read more from him in the July August issue.

London Monaco Jamie Walters Jamie waters editor Jamie Noah Josh Venit Bologna Bosa Nia panthers Sassy New York Sojo Saas Steve five minutes
Meeting Olafur Eliasson

Monocle 24: Section D

29:20 min | 2 years ago

Meeting Olafur Eliasson

"This is monocle on design monocle weekly design show, if you can believe it. I'm Josh venit. Coming up today. I can tell that it sometimes looks like we're fooling around, and there's a lot of mishaps or things that doesn't sort of succeed. But we take ourselves liberty of the team and myself, we enjoy the foolishness of also just seeing what comes out of things that are predicted Vulcan designers. Learn from artists and wet is one discipline end. Another again, we sit down with ice Landik, Danish artist Olafur Eliason to find out a little more plus would make distrup- asymmetrical one wail and really nicely and the way bend in the much bigger bend, which is much better. When you put on your wrist Howdy refined. The design of a watch strapper London-based uniform, whereas talks about tightening up practices while keeping business. Taking a nice late Monaco's fashion editor also pops up with a report on a must watch menswear brand. All that coming up rights here on monocle design with me. Josh bennett. Do stay tuned. Whether it's moving forty tons of Icelandic rock to a museum to recreate riverbed or orchestrating the illusion of sunrise indoors or for that matter dying river completely green artist laugher Eliason and his Berlin-based team experimented space and light to great enigmatic interventions to dazzle and delight the on looker earlier this year alliance and also completed his very first building Akasa like office space. That's literally lapped by the waters of Danish fueled. And he's created a team that will focus on architectural projects to chronicle his work today. He's also released a new book entitled laugh Eliason experience, which is published by fighting Markle's Daphne Connie's the show's producer met with the artist recently here in London to find out a little more. I'm based in Berlin, I'm originally from Denmark and ice land. I grew up in Denver agreed on by standing parents. And I've been in Berlin. I think for twenty five years. And I just wanted to cost my mind back to the first time. I saw one of your projects in person it was at the Louisiana museum the beautiful museum in Denmark, and it was the riverbed project. And I just remember walking through the car does three the museum, you know, paintings Jacka mighty sculptures and suddenly come into this room and see this river bed and being very very surprised especially to see it in a gallery. Really? It was just so an expected, but so beautiful. How important is the unexpected. I guess in your work and surprising your orders, the whole riverbed being. I think it was like forty or fifty tons of Iraq's from Iceland where we took a riverbed quite literally put it into consignment containers and then shipped it's Dan McGinn than installed in. I think four or five galleries at Lucia Measham. There is sort of a surprise you could say between what we see. And then what we feel? You could say that we are so used to the kind of aqua- the cognitive relationship to the world. I mean, we read magazines. We we look at a lot of we see a lot. I mean, we know a lot. But physically speaking, we little less informed. We don't experience everything veasley. You can't experience everything that you learn you read about so I'm quite interested in the kind of discrepancy in I seen something like the room, and then actually moving through it physically. Because of course, the stones crunchy. They move onto your feet. It's a little bit stabilizing. They were slanted. You'll be you're sort of walking up up river. Right. So so was a lot of kind of censorial elements in this that had a lot to with her. She say the sort of embodied experience, and at some point is just is a little less important. And this I think is a nicer price that you can't see with your body. They got the sense that you're looking for something. I mean experimentation is a big part of your work. Whether it's with color or light or even lesions to what extent do you have a specific brief that you give your team to work on to what extent is quite open. All where we when I work in my studio, we sort of start an elliptical process some of which is very theoretically sort of driven or, you know, kind of more science classic academe Lia reading who wrote something about this who's been involved with, you know, movement temporal selectivity what what is the sequence. Instead of thing can we propose the idea that an object is really not an update it's a journey. Right. It's moving from here to there even though it's maybe just a Cup. But the Cup came from somewhere. It's going somewhere has a agencies. You know has a lot of building information. We also celebrate playfulness and experimentation. And could call so non-quantifiable success criterion. And I wouldn't call it fooling around. But I mean, I can tell that it sometimes looks like we're fooling around, and there's a lot of mishaps or things that doesn't sort of succeed. But we take our selves liberty of the team and myself, we enjoy the foolishness of also just seeing what comes out of things that are unpredictable. Tell me a bit about your team. I think you have people from very different backgrounds and tell me how you work together you've written a book called the kitchen about the importance of communal eating and how important is to cooking and eating in sharing food together and part of your daily routine, and how important it is to your creative process within that is to do those various smaller team as a great team of craftsman. And there's a team of researchers sort of people who are involved with also communication and takes media and computer and famous on. And then there's amazing team of architects and some of the teams has been broken into an actual. Architecture office. So now, I have an architect office together with my long term to do manage payment called SOS studio other spaces and with another group which is slightly disconnected from the studio involved with a small solar lantern project Khalil son, which is about entity access to energy, and and especially in areas where there's no access to entity. So the stooges sort of I mean, the whole group is about one hundred twenty maybe thirty people and the scent of this. There's a kitchen where we take the sort of social space of eating and dining, and Brian sort of having lunch together very serious, and we tried to take the sort of scientific artistic approach into the kitchen. So that we not only enjoy the food. But we also explore where did that food? Come from. What's the consequences in terms of sustainability or college of eating this, and how do we sort of handle this? And and in that sense this studio has become I mean, I hope it's a place where when I. Come to the studio. I see the world in greater if Nishin so it's not a sort of escapades sticks. As where I leave the world behind or sort of walk into the studio to kind of go away from reality is kind of a place where reality is more dense. And I'm in great a contact with it, obviously, you're not is. But I think it's it's fair to say that you're a designer in some ways as well. How important is the design process in your work? What I do I consider art also when I designed things I was lucky to just do so Furniture's in collaboration with also the design talent design company was I think in amazing companies. I'm very proud about that I work with Qatar, which is textile. I love quotes super proud about that. And but but the way I approach these things are the same way as I approach I think that the cultures as are not just of the culture sector has kind of qualitative ambition, which is. Just a little bit different than design. And of course, I love this. But I mean, frankly, speaking designers, also to Lassus and very market-driven and the role of the client of the market has I think to to some extent, also maybe colonized, the kind of criticality one would expect from decides. Now, you have sort of critical pockets into signing. And I do think that that tick what should I say more explorative or political the kind of genders that might be may because of apply within a designed structure within a design process are of great value. And I actually don't necessarily think that I'm a great design. I'm not sure that if I say that I'm designing then I probably make my first mistake having said that you've for some years collaborated on various buildings and this year you actually designed your own building your first one in Denmark, fuel and hosts in Danny's area just means the house in the fjord because he's quite literally standing in. The water. Yes. So I was lucky to have an amazing client who has a foundation that looks after the client's money, and and the client was interested in making a house that disposal work of art. A sculpture you could say and a functioning house and I worked on it with the team in the studio for nine years. It was a very unique experience, and we were lucky to get to design every single step everything single process and so on so forth. The first floor is just a work of art. And in that sense. The really fantastic building for me to have made. And obviously a kind of opportunity where a lot of their tick work that I've done for the last twenty five years comes together. Are you working on any other architecture projects at the moment or in future? With its studio team and the takes office, we are working on a very large taser project in this abai anythi opium, which is a both a pack and sort of a kind of a foundation is called the meal days foundation. A memorial memory memorial foundation for the late president meals. We working with a great network of collaborators both craftsmen and technicians and local architects on so this is a quite complex project. The landscaping is been done from with a foot out of Switzerland. Very exciting. And we have a whole sort of MB of trying to explore indigenous species both in plant life and animal life, and so it's a it's a very impatient. And also kind of a launch in project besides that I've been war for awhile already with what we could call small architecture commissions with adding to a house or building a roof, and you know, the kind of more usual things that is very exciting because you can do experiments on simply on. Door and a window on a roofer, and these sort of smaller approaching these these type of protests, I do all the time. You'll work has gone to the stage where it appeals to what you called the non professional artistic communities also wide audience. It's bad to say is that something that makes you happy. And what do you attribute that to is it something that you tried full? Well, I've always been interested in embracing diversity of people who comes to an exhibition, and I have also always raised the fact that even though the museums think of themselves as being highly democratic there's a lot of people who do not either go off will welcome at institutions, and I've been very interested in how do we in a more actively reach out to to these people and also host them. So that we acknowledge the fact that well, some people just got they feel insecure, and they don't welcome. They don't understand. Why do I have to look at this? It doesn't make any sense. And and how do we make sure that these people are being told what this is, okay? You a perfectly correct to say, this doesn't make any sense in the normal way of understanding, what makes sense. So in that sense. I think that there is a lot of work to be done still within how does art simply reach out into the communities, and how does the community also feel about the cultural institutions this sort of elitism that still kind of hovers in art. And obviously a lot of that comes out of the so-called art market and a lot of people simply make the mistake to think that the art market and the art world is the same. But it's not the art market is a trading platform. And the art world is the cultural sector, our greater communities and society, it's about civic society. The art market is not about civic society. It's about profitability and also they're great collectors. So I see that it's a little more complex than I'm saying it here. But by all means if art was not about society. Why would we would we make then are very special? Thanks to the artist Elisa. Who is speaking there to Monaco's, very definitely Connie's. Laugh relies an experience is out now available at all self respecting bookshops. It's published by fighting. For want of a better phrase watchmaking is a time honored tradition history legacy both important qualities as is the highest Mark of manufacturing when it comes to making the things, but what can young brands offering a marketplace filled with old timers London-based uniform, whereas decided early that change in innovation would be its focus for the past few years. It's been developing new what strap the first of its kind with a tech firm named beater type. We sent this shows editor the ever patient Christie Evans to uniform, whereas workshop to see these straps, I south and find out if technology and tradition can take on the same tempo. As I make my way to meet the subjects of this piece on a cold and the wet. They often irony strikes. I'm running late. And so my hosts. Finally arrive at beat types office needs London. I'm greeted by found us, all right and Matthey the company's Pence designer as well as uniform, whereas created director, Michael Carr each of them. I notice us sporting what is the newly launched T five titanium mesh NATO strap keen to have closer look, but we have plenty of time as we chat for a world about uniform was unique position within the industry. Michael is quick to point out. The although innovation is at the heart of what they do. They still think addition is a key element. We still work with traditional manufacturers. We have some stripes made one one boy with a company Paris, some of the fish on these done by hand. That's that's good. But where we can innovate. We will be in the moment. The strap was a good test for that. But we're looking forward to taking that forward into other parts cases. Dow's news allies wherever we can as a brand. We don't look at it as an and all situation either we innovate always stay traditional. We'd ended up collaborating with like minded brands is also a major pass the company's ethos. So that didn't need much persuading when they received an Email from beef type a company that specializes in additive manufacturing. That's three D printing to you and me with most of the contracts residing industry, such as f-, Juan aerospace and medicine seemed odd that they had approached uniform, whereas for foreign into consumer manufacturing buffer, Sarah. It was an obvious choice where we come from individuals on a lot of people in CEO is actually from a from a design background or heavily influenced by design and actually. That claim to elemental is always something that we're looking towards remember quite distinctly seeing a uniform, whereas washing store in SoHo and going look in that watching and from that can kind of read into the philosophy what these guys around. And actually, I think this is something that's worthwhile. So yeah. Took upon knowing that not just one, but several designers have been working meticulously on the wrist strap. I can wait no longer, and I'll take look my initial reaction is one of complete and utter surprise is titanium fills just like a woven fabric, the coolness weight associated with method or absence. Just handsome sleek feels completely effortless to wear, but Matthew explains to me that the design process was anything bucked with the process, you need to have powder around each link when you build it to allow those links to move when the powder's removed so always has to be a small space between the links. So. Initially. We started with quite large faces between those leaks to make sure we had the movement. But then we ended up with quite chunky mash, which you can see here is a lot of movement within it and also within the design process that we did to think about how the strap would actually connect with watches with the Naito design we need to strap to be able to fit its weeding the watch case in the spring ball. So we need to get a minimum things that struck. So one of the big areas was to be able to Zayn links. There was small enough to move and be able to fit through the watch. And we got down to one point five four millimeters thick strap but still be able to bend in both directions and have the kind of characteristics of this free movement. That's soft and gentle rather than kind of bunching designers. You can see the early prototypes. Kind of ends up. This just kind of luck. This. We're actually modeling every single element of this strength. We can individually move every single element of link by microns, essentially things that you wouldn't even really be able to physically see we would just shipping mortifying monk, actually denting every single link in a level of detail that actually you wouldn't really associate with industrial design associated with material engineering. Also, a lot of the complexity that's within this object in terms of its behavior is all claim to build upon this this new capability that that comes from from manufacturing. And I think this is where it comes so exciting from a design side, we were looking at the challenge of folding the strap back on it. So so you could clip the triple yet? And so we were really focused on getting this really really tired. Then Rhodia so watch Ben really nicely every self, but we had that on both sides of the. The worst area. So okay, we'll make the strap asymmetrical one wail and really nicely and the way it will bend in a much bigger bend, which is much better. When you put on your wrist. I mean, the second my gym major one was the class because whether you have a whatever traditional job you have whether it be minis Mashal bled. A lettuce strap or mental abrasive. You've got a separately fixed serve separate components which make up a class. But if it's on your list, we didn't have that restriction. We didn't have time. Separate components. We could include it it could be made in this one process. The clasping been questions at brand new direction design microscopic teeth are integrated into the inside with intellect with the weave the strap itself the guys show me so functional. Can we done single-handed as we head down to the printing room? The guy showed me, she the twelve puff made straps, which the machine printed overnight having never seen something. Like this before. I'm surprised how. Minimal operations inside a small room is a printer around six high and five across as more window revealed. The action inside is a spark travel up and down the plate. Your very thin layer citation powder cross and Malaysia's coming down and fully melting powder. Essentially. So basically something like this is actually made out of hundreds potentially thousands of less of individual melted structure in that powder is incredibly fine. So we took about fifteen to forty five microns, but the process itself is actually, you know, there's a high recyclability obviously only the pattern that we melt is actually being used. So we can build straps we've just like Vike powder and just keep building them without ever really running out of interior and actually here in terms of power usage. We don't have much infrastructural move. We use one all of welding are gone, and we pretty much good to go benefits of the technology a game changing. But sometimes big innovations end up facing fats, an alluring part of the digital what industry is the idea of longevity. And being able to pass the time peace down the generations as the often goes on Michael tells me they. Seve what is the bath replacements with engravings on that customers are clearly cheese in with young brand to begin. A new story lime intrigue is to highly. Find the bonds between looking to the future and terracing the craft of the digital industry. Smartwatch is smart intelligence tools. So there's innovation with those in the sense of digital platforms. And that's obviously renovating very we'll need that. Now. Whether we like it on all year, we're not world, and that's gonna keep developing that would change new trying to another way. But if you get a small whatever you don't cherish it. It's a torn breaks just annoying gun sought out onto you're on your own. The hardware is old will never been the venture into in smart watches because that's not our game. But we do something else, which we think is totally different. Is it different field? And. Creating things that people can have some connection with what I cherish look after it. But we need to be of the moment too. So what's going on in the world now? Well, this technology is a good example. This is what's happening which Ford. I just I think that's the only way you can really base that when people look back when people if people blowing watches now with with one of these straps on then inverting forty years, I think that's the best what we can do to me that when they look back. Years to come back with some cats, and it will mean something still these days buying what is a lifestyle choice. It makes a statement about the wear parts a five big time piece also buys a certain amount, prestige. Even if the parts of my factored by the same people in the same factory. But uniform was displays no logos on its watch bases. The stop developed by B-type is inconspicuous despite its uniqueness and the advertising is minimalistic. We don't create this large brand talks about Stoller so's. We just try and design and make the nights you can watch industries for the smoke and mirrors and this lifestyle plus the images of some of a celebrity or someone standing for. I mean. Seen the pitch of glass in front of Spitfire. I'm sorry. But I relate to that out on his Spitfire. I'll stories just a Tony from one. So people come into us for that for that story coming to us because our story relating plus more closely, and then on the other side, we guys for years go three Murdoch's is to call it for the, but I still relate to us in a way because I can see that we take loft hair tension the product, and that's really the beauty of uniform was some heritage brands can fall into the trap of trying to sell a product customers. Whereas Michael Matt and Sarah just want to make good design. This philosophy is exactly what to dishing is about. Very special. Thanks to Christie Evans for that report. Now, the UK's menswear industry has tended to be split between several row tailoring and boundary pushing designers such as J W Anderson. Few brands occupy the coveted inbetween space, making pieces the detailer, but contemporary Casey Hefer, a London label by father and son team Joe and Charlie is at one such brand. However last month, they opened their first shop charming two story affair in Marylebone night last very close to Madari house. HQ the space is designed by Johnny's wife. Sophie, Ashby, it's a fitting venue for the decade brand and Monaco's, Jamie waters. Joined Charlie for tour of the new space, we design for people who know themselves well enough that they don't need to wear clothing shops, wearing brand we try make beautiful closed timeless and people consider investment pieces, but still have a Morton edge innovative thinking. We've always kind of preferred the softer touch rather than making a brace of statements where sitting in your beautiful new shop in Malibu you've had a warehouse in Taunton. Why did you decide to the shot now? And yet what's the thinking behind that move? Will I think most put we wanted to open the store to Mark the ten year anniversary of the brand we've watched the fashion world. I think as everyone changed so significantly over the last two years one of the big influences, actually being social media and how it's affected how people consume fashion thing. One of the big concerns for us is we really love what we do. It's a shame to see the way people consume fashion now because of false fashion. I think there's less value given to clothing and for us at such an important thing. The idea of creating garments lost the test of time are investment, but still have a modern outlook, and the store was really away for us to realize that and also for people to share a small piece of our world. Kind of what we stumble in terms of the store, it's very distinctive homely place. It was designed by your wife tells a bit about the kind of dust sort of process. Yes. The stores designed by my wife runs up an interior design company studio Ashby and from day one the pre freely was to create a space that felt like an apartment, and I think more than that we wanted to our apartment and reflective of the family values that we share because I think the definition of fashions. Essentially based on on transient who is creating new, and I think I love to my parents love the idea that there's an integrity in creating a wealth space family, and it's something that a lot of people can relate to so for us. It was really important the store reflected that so the store from top to Boston reminiscent of our world in terms of pieces borrowed from my department from my parents house things we had no house growing up are in here. So it just feels very intimate, and we hope that breaks down any kind of barriers that people. I think of experience when entering into a luxury store, so Charlie we're not going to walk through of the stores. West dining entrance to double storey space where upstairs at the entrance said this is the ready to wear section ready-to-wear floor. Do you want to just kind of walk us through some of your favorite pieces, and some of the kind of design elements in the spaces while sure so with regards to the space itself is an intimate floor. And I think we really wanted to play on that. And also bring some love to the ground through a lot of artwork that predominantly young British artists. We have a large work of by Thomas Campbell, just around the stairwell. And we wanted to reflect those colors in this hand threaded staircase that we have been working on for months. Yes. This is this is one of the first things that you're is drawn to it sake. These Boivin these boys when I guess panels around the the metal stack I says like instead of peyot pinks and blues I believe this has been a labor of love this an ongoing labor of love. It was my wife's idea from several months ago, and it the man hours. I mean, I've lost count of got into and it's still ongoing. But I think it's one for reflection of the kind of cross Michelle that goes into I work the threats and user actually from old runway collisions. And we've tried to kind of maintain that concept throughout the store where we're using recycled comments and recycle elements. So till point he's actually made from recycled plastic bottles are very special thanks to Monaco's fashion editor, Jamie waters for that report. Sadly, that's all we have time for on this week show. Do it again next week forget if you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show podcast on design Xtra which is available. Every Thursday for more design minded information. You can pick up a copy of monocle magazine libraries of books seasonal newspapers to keep us. Busy throughout the year. Monocle on design was produced by definitely con nieces and edited by the ever patient Christie Evans. I'm Josh venit. Thank you very much for listening.

Christie Evans editor London Denmark Josh venit Monaco Olafur Eliason Charlie Michael Berlin Daphne Connie Cup Jamie waters Lucia Measham Ashby Josh bennett Dan McGinn Sarah Jacka
Get moving

Monocle 24: Section D

30:47 min | 4 months ago

Get moving

"You're listening to multiple on design powered by Maserati. History of Maserati is a history of the pursuit of innovation and the preeminence of design battalion tally mark has grown from humble beginnings in a little workshop in Bologna to the prison day in modern, it's home since the nineteen thirties more than a century of inspire designing, cutting edge money factor of supreme performance and racing pedigree. This is a mark like no author that has come to symbolize the very essence of a sports car company timeless and elegant silhouettes effortless performance, true racing spirit combined with comfort and luxury. That is what makes Maserati Maserati the fines distinction and desire since nineteen fourteen. This is Monaco on design. Monaco's weekly look at the best and architecture crop furniture and fashioned. I'm Nolan Giles. Today we get moving with a preview of monocle September issue, which is on newsstands. Now we visit North Carolina and the first denim meal opened up in the US in more than a century will also take a look at how trainers tiptoed into our wardrobe and we'll hear from architect and landscape designer Stig Anderson plus a roundup of the world's latest design news all that coming up right here on monocle on design on monocle twenty four. Invented in France and popularized in the US Second World War Denim has gone from a working man's fabric to a stylish stable in wardrobes across the world and its production wants define the US textile manufacturing industry despite its popularity production stateside has been declining since the nineteen nineties with the industry almost snuffed out by global forces. But that's slowly changing for Monaco's September issue Sarah Rowland set out to meet the visionaries who are bucking the fast fashion trend and reviving iconic salvage value males. Let's hear from her now. By the time North, Carolina's famous cone mills dinner manufacturer closed in two thousand seventeen. Much of the US textile industry had been hollowed out due to a very competitive global market for over one hundred years. They had made some of the world's most sought after dinner and even supplied fabrics to the iconic brand. Levi's since nineteen fifteen. So this closure was truly modern by the fashion world. As the last mill in the US, it marks the end of an era for the country's once-mighty textile industry but thankfully, not all was lost. The idea they're not being a premium denim mill in the United States was somewhat calling. This co owner Adelphia, mills and Textile Industry veteran we may not have invented deadly united. States, submitted traces its roots back to Bourbon France but. If we didn't invent it. Certainly was perfected. And it certainly integral to the whole concept of an American way of life. So we really felt that bringing it here and to bring it here you had to start with the bale of cotton and format into yarn and Diet We. Used the right looms and Doing all of that. It just seemed like the right thing to do. It's a quintessentially American material were fortunate to be doing it in the quintessentially. American location. After cone mills closed up shop five is recruited robber antishock a former director of international trade for the American Textile Association. They decided that they could save the US Senate tradition. So they put their heads together and the Vision for volume mills began to really take shape all in the southern state of Louisiana. When they recognize this opportunity in the market for high end denim, they begin hashing out the. Plans to revive US made salvage a special kind of Denham that's made using centuries old weaving techniques on very traditional looms antishock explained that the industry in the US started seeing these rapid changes and they knew they could really capitalize on this by simply moving away from fashion. We knew that consumers could get behind superior quality fabrics in close. You can keep forever these timeless products not mass produced disposable items. So too fast fashion. What's more? We wanted to lead this charge from the US. House. Massive warehouse space that's over one hundred thousand square meters in size. The factory is the first in a mill to open on US soil. In more than a century it's sitting on the West Bank of the Mississippi in the small town of Julia, which consists mainly of vast farmland that's used for growing crops such as Corn Soya, and of course, cotton Vijaya Mills is the world's first manufacturer to use only e three certified materials and they draw upon a crop tracing system that ensures all cotton is possibly sourced and sustainably grown. The Mill is conveniently surrounded by twenty eight, thousand acres of farmland for cotton production, which in turn offers a direct farmer to supply. Here's Stan. That fast fashion is it's really not fasted takes up last by chain since and credibly wasteful. So while it may make the gears mesh perfectly elaborate arcane system. And misses the majesty of the Machine Our model can deliver product quickly and it can also deliver product efficiently. He only the product that's really wanted by consumers winds up on the shelves while that might have a higher price on a per unit basis than the fast fashion model. When you take out all of the negative externalities associated with fast fashion from the cost of extra inventory of discounting of socking shows that are never going to be emptied by consumers, I think it becomes much more sustainable model, not just in terms of how the cotton is grown and not just in terms of how the fabric is made, but in terms of the resources that are used to reduce the materials that people really want. Historically. Salvage was popular in Denim weaving until the mid nineteen hundreds. That's when US smells began modernizing their machinery in order to keep up with Jim demand worldwide as quantity became much more important than quality these specialty looms in the US became pops elite because of their slower and less consistent production. It's important to remember that forty years ago. Practically all the fabric made was made on shuttle looms and would all be. What we would call salvage fabric I guess that hearkens back to a time when people think that things were made better and with more integrity the rediscovery of salvage by people who really care about jeans and Fabir is both a sentimental and practical discovery salvage has a special we've to. It has a special feel to it. It's a gentler process of making fabric an older and probably more craftsmanlike like way of doing it. What's old maybe new again but in the sense of the way people like small batch food production or state wines I think salvage always has it always will have a place to stay for people who want something that's made with more craft and more purpose. That nation has certainly proved true. As villian mills has quickly found a premium market for their denim. Every role is created with their handspun yarn that's died woven and finished on sentence style draper x three looms that they thankfully were able to save from cone mills. The forty five looms were given a new life by an employee David Stallworth a man who's now in his late seventies and has been working with the same acquitted and these very same looms for over fifty years and here's Robert. Symbol of American pride in manufacturing prowess people around the world thinking. They might think James Dean. Cowboys, maybe rockstars but above all they think of Denim, as the classic American fabric. You know denim is reliable and rebellious at the same time and what's more small batch salvage like we make Vijaya. As Kentucky Bourbon or Texas, Barbecue adopting a model of localized production means that everything can be made in just one spot. Essentially cotton goes in one door and a pair of jeans will come out the other with this model. They've found a place in the market and have quickly established respected clients such as ag Denham in Los Angeles. An independent heritage labels like Raleigh didn't workshop and nationals, Imogene and Willie this. Strategy Adelphia Mills lies in working with brands that share their same mission for making quality small Ashton them with a story and also working together with these brands to bring the production of such a heritage American product back to the US in the most sustainable way. Here's Dan. Again, people say textile industry is something that can be done in far off places out of sight out of mind I think they forget that. There are a whole bunch of committees throughout girl America that could really benefit from staple employment. What you make is important but how you make you make toss so critical we're very proud of what we've done. We're very pleased to be part of the community and death of the. It's an inspiration for some other people to take a harder look at their own backyard crows away the defense for monocle reporting from Louisiana I'm Sarah. Rowland. With staying in the wardrobe for this next section moving from clothes, hangers to the shoe rocked from a practical piece of Atlantic footwear to a mark of good taste. The trainer has walked into our lives as the ideal shoe. And it's also made its way into our work get up to few cost. You is across Mongols editorial floor. You'll spot a tasteful mix of Adidas, joggers, nyc sneakers, and maybe some on running shoes from Switzerland to discuss the evolution and the importance of the trainer I sat down with Monaco's former fashion editor and fashion writer Jamie waters. We began by taking a look at the featured spread in Monaco's September issue these articles like a celebration of. All the different types of trainers, sneakers, which obviously they can be fashioned sneakers or running sneakers high-performance ones we've got a bit of a mixed bag here, but it feels really timely for the story because a few things over the past few months have really brought sneakers to the fore and the first. He's the fact that obviously everyone's at home embracing kind of comfortable athletic, Shaw, all of that sort of thing and so. They want comfortable things I mean I think basically living in birkenstocks and trainers. It doesn't feel like the right time to license some boots and then I. Guess. The other thing is that we gym's closed and things like that. In terms of the high performance side of things people have been running siping have taken up all those kind of sports more and so they want to sit of invest in equipment to kind of. Lifestyle for sure. I also think interesting you say you know you're harmon and you can wear sneakers but you know where the office here monocle and everyone's wearing sneakers I guess maybe five years ago. If you thought about wearing you know sneakers to the office, they might be something a bit more fancy like common projects sneaker. There was still a little bit of a divide between I guess what too smart sneaker and performance running shoe or trainer for me anyway and looking at this feature where we've kind of combined those two sorts of elements, it seems increasingly blood but you say that's the case I guess in fashion a bit more broadly are you seeing people wearing? You know something soupy luxurious, and then you know pair of new balance sneakers you know but what's happening with regard to that? Yeah absolutely. So I mean you're right like common projects was kind of a bit of trailblazer for the Dressy trainer and I guess when they started like fifteen years ago, it was sort of the shoe that was embraced by creative directors and basically like the creative crowd and it was acceptable where we the suit and things like that. It was like a up trainer. But yeah, more recently China's have become much more prolific fashion I. think a big part of that is because straight has been embraced by the luxury industry so. You know all those. Straight brands were more a part of that kind of Monet's straight community have now like every luxury brand has a trainer and we've seen sneakers all over runways over the past like five years. And then as he saw the thing that happened wet, the fashion crowd embraced the really high performance almost nobody like orthopedic type shoes I remember it went to a couple of years ago the sports where fan and was really interested to I met up with all these like fashion buyers from like stores like browns and some of the the high fashion department stores, and they were there to scope out you know like Hawker John Solomon architects like all. Those really nerdy technical brands that haven't been that interested in the sort of fashion element of things. But they embrace bowel they stores, and by these consumers I think partly because those brands are almost always dismissive of that, they're not interested in the fashion which makes them more comfortable. There's this weird Arnie that kind of fuels, the whole fashion industry I think it's a funny one I mean I spent a lot of time over in Switzerland in Zurich and. The brand on has just become. So incredibly popular, not just there but in Zurich, it's like every other person is wearing a pair of these trainers but beyond that in the UK. Also seems like a super interesting time for these brands may be on the sporty side to really grow Super Foucault that Growth Story I think being pretty incredible I know that moving into an you'd hate in in Zurich, they just growing and growing and growing they doing a collaboration with Roger Federer with a kind of a new popular shoe. What is happening here? I guess in terms of brands like that as opposed to conventional Nike and Adidas is the market just opening up for performance sneakers do think I think much broader base of consumers are becoming increasingly in the high performance aspect of all their clothes and footwear. So they want those data won't brands with that. Kind of pedigree and I think yeah. I mean, of course, Nike and Adidas have an amazing range. But people want different brands and they want more independent brands on Israeli interesting because they're one of those brands has really come from the high performance side of things because I guess we these hugely traded snake market you have the high performance brands that become fashionable, and then you have the fashion sneakers that kind of try to wave in a performance element which can I think you know baby shady sometimes you question how highpoints actually are on comes from the really technical background and even the motto is really interesting where it was inspired by like a a hose watering hose. This is golden. Spot. Buy Spot. They, folded it up I run in their shoes and they really hard and. The way that. Pushes your feedback and offers really good support. There is this very technical thing they do running in those shoes food different from other shoes. So I think that element of appeal, and then when you get Federa who has now invested in the brand and they've got a more quote unquote casual snake that is so that you would wear out and about during the day, but they coming from the technical high-performance thinks. Is a group of consumers that are interested in. They want that really nerdy technical element you say running crews have proliferated in Brooklyn in London and added knocking on those big brands looked to those crews for kind of inspiration and a lot of the members of them are stall driven. There's real influence of fashioned coach and sportswear culture, but I agree on is exploding the doing so well at the moment. I always knew about fashion, but it's good to hear that you actually are serious about running in that Yo you're out and about in London. Fields getting around the park in a very speedy wearing a nice pair of on running shoes. I'm super interested in your opinion on where we can go from here because if we're in this position where you know we're wearing sneakers at home, you're wearing them to the club I'm wearing to them into the office you see as more and more commonplace even in corporate settings, the ability to wear something that's a bit more comfortable. Is the former on its way out when are you going to find yourself wearing? Verna for sure unless it's going to a wedding or? A special occasion is this undercutting the value of traditional shoemaking or is this just a trend? Your? It's really interesting because if you'd asked me a few months ago before the pandemic. Definitely, sing a move back towards for more and at the January menswear shows i. was hardly a snake out on the runway on was much more about tailoring and boots and yeah, just returned to the formula aesthetic. But obviously, the Potomac throw a spanner in the works because people have become. So used to these very casual comfortable dressing train is a hit to stay I mean I think even when we take the former where on the runway I think it was still that was a statement by fashion brands but I don't think snake is wherever going to go away because they comfortable I think that's a huge thing that we've saying Ho Athletic Movement. It's not just a trend because people are so used to comfortable clothes then not going just. Be, like Oh. Yes. Suit Tobacco GonNa, put on a suit. They're like, i. want things I feel really soft and really easy to West. So I think for more formal shoes to kind of usurp train as they'll have to have these technical properties and maybe using foam and things like that that make them super lightweight. The other thing we try and is much more audible. So I think there's the other thing opens up the market to a much broader customer base especially for more high end brands. So no I definitely not going anywhere even if Brown say, Oh, we're focusing more on north streetwear or other things you know where folksy more informal or elegant tailoring. Always you know I think it still these staples, the the sweats and train is kind of underpinning the bottom line of Revenue I. think that boosts stupid. The case for a long time to come. It's really interesting all my way to work this morning I went footlocker on my bike and in the rain, there was still a crowd of kids obviously there to pick up a new sneaker that was being launched. And beyond this that we're talking about this still feels like a real culture around sneakers particularly you know in in the states, but also in Asia as well. Is that just a completely different tribe of people to to the fashion crowd? Is there some sort of divide between people who've always been real die hard experts on sneakers and you know they have to buy repair and they might not necessarily weather and they collect. As, opposed to I guess the more broad minded crowd, the have bigger fashion interested you kind of sit on that I mean this the sneak ahead community and like hot basin streetwear has such a passionate following especially among the menswear crowd and you still say I mean things like. Stock X, which is the you know the snake of trading sought this during really well, and you say, you know, I, think the passion for snakes Bain ignited by the Michael Jordan documentary during lockdown. This do really passionate group but I'm definitely infiltrates into fashion and you say when you go to fashion. A lot of those editors are just obsessed with snakes. There is this kind of coached a coat element to it, but I think what's interesting is the list index, which basically is a listing of the hottest browns at any time, and it can be quite telling of wet and consumer preferences aw, and that was released recently, and for the first time, Ed Nike topped it and not a luxury brand. So I think that's also telling is the fact that sportswear and sneaker coach is just on everyone's mind at the moment even if it's not from a very passionate footwear coat following, it's just like well, I, need it for practical purposes and I want you running shoes because I'm going running 'cause my gym's closed closed whatever it is. It's very much at the. Forefront of people's minds at the moment, which you know is kind of unfo- saint aspect the pandemic will thank you so much Jamie for coming in and when we're not spotting you running around London in your and your nice sneakers. Hopefully, we'll be able to get you back into studio because we've got a lot coming up in the fashion calendar, Paris, and Milan. Lots ahead. So looking forward to having you back soon. Yeah. I'll joke back whenever you want me. And now I'm pleased to introduce a new section to the show Monaco design headlines which highlight the industry's key events and releases that you miss plus the most important news. Here's mainly Evans to tell you more. Thanks Nolan. Designers and architects across Europe are finally being given the opportunity to come together as physical design weeks and festivals begin to launch after months of pandemic related cancellations. monocle will be dispatching our editors and Correspondents Two concentric a unique urbanism avenge Gronya three days of design in Copenhagen and Helsinki Design Week, which takes place in the city's recently refurbished Olympic Stadium. We hope to see there. In the US, the controversial confederate emblem looks set to be wiped from the US state of Mississippi's flag with a petition to redesign at drawing to a close while a flag brandishing a mosquito was scrapped after making headlines for accidentally making it into the shortlist. The remaining two flags with sensible designs will be reduced to one in the coming days. Back in Europe Germany's e bikes Specialist Canyon this week is rolling out the concept it believes will encourage urban communities to ditch 'cause Kenyan future mobility concept is half bike half car powered in a similar banner to electric bicycle. But with a fully enclosed body making a viable option for getting around town, even on the rainiest winter's Day. And following last month's devastating blast in Beirut local designer designer Nadine Shaheen has launched a new typeface the proceeds of which will go towards the victims of the tragic explosion Lee Beirut, which means full Beirut's in our back was produced by one hundred and fifty seven craters from around the world and consists of over three hundred lifts. Those are the weeks design headlines back to you. Thank you to May Lee Evans there now to play grounds, which in recent years have become increasingly nature driven particularly in Scandinavia here, a new expiratory him on the Danish coast by Copenhagen Landscape Architecture Firm. S La brings a new depth to such activities. The park replicates nature rather than simply using it as a building material and monocle Rieter and this shows research Nick Minnie's spoke with Sa Found Stig Anderson to find out a little more about the project. We made very leap investigation to find out what kind of plans and trees can grow what kind of style to be here. How is the influence of the water streams in a ways like a garden by you concentrate on the nature that that is around you into specific point like Japanese gardening. So you have very concentrated and intense experience of nature that is around you inside nature comes. So but to find a plan and trees and how the voter shape, the landscape nature inside the data cost is exactly the same processes phenomenon. You can find out site it's just more concentrated I think it's interesting to make this concentration of James night where you're really get challenged with all your senses when you move around because every. Time, you move on to something new heaven at new of focused on edge because you are inside the space but you know this is what it is about. So you become all concentrated and you become focused on many other things than just what you usually see by using your visual signs. Could you maybe explain some of those centrists experiences although play elements that you will experience when you're in there like what does that look like? Do you realize perhaps that this is an element specifically trying to get you to engage or is it something that's more subtle and you might not pick up on it? Will be quite individually. Depends on how vote feeling you. That's always you different different kinds of live different kinds of culture background things that have shaped you as a person is the way you react on it. Does sand. Enabled time, there's a little wind send moves so time you come here, this end will be played in different area. So you think he had when you walk in, he had that everything's arranged for you like in a typical landscape that someone have decided what I think to be. We have decided where you'd have to be but not how it develops not how it moves in a pouch change. The treating thing is with time to win some kids to see how they move around usually a kiss on not going into specific area if they don't feel that they invited. But they immediately moved everywhere. Very easily other places we have been working with the same ideas people stand outside the thing. This is something to look at it is in fact, something to interfere with to interact with it and this if you do that, then your answer get into the process of nature than you'll feel the back smell the back listening to the birds and whatever, and he's very concentrated. Equally, what makes us experience next craft different from? Playing in a in a forest playing at the beach what is it about I guess this environment you perhaps created inside that ringed wall does it enhance night? The best thing will be if you feel like the same so there's manmade nature which is not made before man came to nature can give you the exactly the same feeling. I call it. The aesthetic sense of nature if it gives you this deep feeling that you feel in the forest when you're embraced by all phenomenon that happened. Is. For me I mean this is what we aim at one hand. What we also aiming at the other hand is all the ecosystem services that nature something very good for our survival and our way of living, and it's to keep some very good services to clean up after man's behavior through many many years. So that will be this kind of information also. Especially, Britain one explaining about nature signs, how nature do things go for you and how the trees can clean the air pollution's. So the you will get this information is power of nature. So everyone who inhale will all the time be partly into the aesthetic sentence that you make an experienced by being alleged doing the forest but at the other hand your job, all the time being explained in scientific language. What is so where signs tried to find the French of what is the world? We are trying to make it through the aesthetics. What is the world you see? How are you feeling it? So you you having these boast at the same time. If. I'm just trying to capture Natura craft in one sentence is it almost like a science center the Most Beautiful Science Center in the world is that one way of looking at it? I? Think it's very crucial that we accept that as a difference between science and aesthetics. To different languages is two different comprehension 's. is two different approaches and is two different things does with us and they've only you looking at one and the other one would fade out. You will ever have like and it doesn't matter if it is designs one all the steady one. They have to. Food power at the same time. You'll see today you see, are there have been developments and an all-day menaces? APP. Too much built environment because of that knife actually. Maybe. We have a lot of Matadi steak and so on. We. Don't really have a nice life. We have stressed we have a lot of psychological problems. Problems were waves and a lot of things that goes only with. City life actually one of the way we can change this to bring in nature. In the way we organized teachers. So NATO craft is an exhibition that shows on the power of nature that can give us a better life in the Neighborhoods my thanks again to Monaco's Nick Minnie's in conversation that time with Stig, Anderson of. SLA. That's all we have time for on today's show. If you're eager for more design stories than do listen to a five minute midweek sister show Monaco on design extra this on Thursday also, you can subscribe to Monaco on design said, he don't miss a beat. This episode was produced an edited by Mail Evans and Christie Evans thanks to a research as Nick my knees and Charlie Phil mccord I'm Nolan Giles and thank you very much for listening. Bye.

United States Monaco Monaco Stig Anderson Nolan Giles Mail Evans Louisiana Adidas Sarah Rowland North Carolina Bologna Mississippi Levi Maserati Switzerland ag Denham London Bourbon France Jamie waters
Edition 2019

Monocle 24: Midori House

29:14 min | 1 year ago

Edition 2019

"You're listening to Monaco's house view first broadcast on the eleventh of November two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four. This is Monaco's manacles house view. I'm Emma Nelson a very warm welcome to today's program coming up. Spain has got for more recent memories. The many countries of what. It means funds to have a far-right government. After Spain's VOX party becomes the third biggest force in Spain's Congress. How much further will the rise of right-wing politics in Europe? Go My guests Terry Stephanie. And Michael Binion will discuss that and the day's other news including Aram over the publication of an intelligence report into Russian and funding in British politics and why Francis Boulangerie are closing at an alarming rate. Plus Monaco's Jamie waters unravels. The weird world a fashion buzzwords sustainability season Lewis Concept Store and experience terms that in recent years have been bandied about Ad Nauseam. I'm Emma Nelson a monocle. House starts now and Kinda very warm welcome to today's program. I'm joined by Terry Stephanie. A political journalist and author and Michael Gagnon Foreign Affairs specialist at the Times newspaper. Welcome both close to the studio I. Spain joined many other countries in Europe this weekend by seeing the rise of the far right into its mainstream politics box of it becomes the third biggest force in the country's congress following an election that was supposed to be the political solution to the longtime Catalonian crisis. Terry what we see in Spain is unfortunately catching up with something. That's been very much part of the mainstream in European politics. Why is it taking? Spain's long don't to get to this point. I think pats because Spain has got for more recent memories The many countries of what it means to have An extreme far-right government. Yes I mean we've seen all the coverage recently of talk about reburying Franco in a in a different grave And I think you know that memory memory had been much more reason. Remember the Franco era for Spain than than say in many other countries and so there was a natural reaction against that and I think one of the things that has led to. Vox becoming more popular. Is this perception that The Spanish state is in some way under more threats. They one of their policies. This is being called to have direct rule over Catalonia in the whole Catalan issue. Seems to have Boosted their popularity has also. You've had a lot of political instability over the last few years in Spain and I think when traditional parties don't look like the answer they haven't been able to form stable government than there starts to be more info parties at at the edges indeed have been warnings at the Colonia crisis. Michael would foster the rise of the far-right because he start getting people to think about identity and place where they belong and he belongs were and that automatically creates a little vacuum. That could be filled by far-right voice. Yes indeed and of course the irony is that it was under Franco. That the Catalan is surreally Was One of the major things that caused intense desire faction with his government towards the end of his life The Catalan is who and also of course. The Basque separatists in the north of Spain. The Basque problem rumbled on with outbreaks of considerable violence in the region and assassinations and that finally has been brought. It seems to kind of peaceful and about the Catalan issue has reignited and I think this is something that is potentially very destabilizing for Spain. And and it's actually potentially very bad for bacelona itself as a regional capital. I mean flight is Capital has fled from the city and lots. Lots of people are now finding that it's better to do business elsewhere in Spain so a lot of very worried about the separatist issue and rally around a the party that appears to inherit the same tough approach to that as Franco did we have two sorts of far right that people in are beginning to identify identify. We have the extremist. All right. The stuff that scares and what's so often dressed up or something slightly more acceptable the populist far-right there's not much separate Separating them and some are saying that you you have support for the extremist right when you have. Economic Insecurity countries is facing poverty and the populist radical writers more associated but you know an identity crisis a cultural backlash arguably Spain has suffered both of those things hasn't it but it is rica economically in the recovery. So where are we looking at where Spain's going to be going because it has total political paralysis. Now well that is yes. One of the one of the difficult things is how do other parties opposed to try to combat that perception. I mean if you look in some of the countries where the the right has done well it has is. It has happened in some cases where the traditional party system was was very stuck. I mean it's interesting if we look at say take the example of Austria for instance said the the FBI appear was had come into government but in the most recent elections their support collapsed partly because of corruption allegations. And one of the reasons they had first become come prominent. Was this perception that the existing party system was was stuck. It was corrupt. Things were divided up between the larger parties in France as well. I think that was part of the The attraction of Lapenne was the idea that you know the big political parties. You had a hold over everything and those political parties have started Takoma Park. I mean you. Can't generalize over much because in every country you know there are regional differences. There are in a individual circumstances but but I think yeah. There is a strong attraction of this particularly the populist. far-right at the moment because people yeah they want to talk about their identity. They WanNa talk about where they belong. And they're a complete many places where people feel left behind and distance from central government. Wherever that may be? How popular is the populist? Right at the moment Michael I mean we've I've seen a tussle for power in the last few years especially in Europe in France micromanaged to be t to defeat the far right the Netherlands the same thing in Germany Alternative Torch Land said it was going to make headway but ultimately didn't quite get that get that grip but we have this happening in Spain now and even last week and my a new micro and the president of France is playing an anti immigration caught something in order to make himself attractive to the far right do we. Where are we in the wall with the far right well? So far. The far-right hasn't had a real breakthrough except perhaps two countries Hungary and Poland where the two governments are certainly authoritarian. Well more authoritarian hungry. But certainly what we would traditionally see as right wing and certainly populist at calling on Local calling traditional values and trying to project parties as upholders of the true national spirit and In other countries the far right on the verge of a breakthrough but at the last moment seemed to collapse Italy's classic example where Salvini tried to force an election election thinking that He would ride the wave of anti-immigrant sentiment and in the end. It didn't work. He he was sort of slightly pushed aside and his is now government. I think the interesting point is where the traditional kind of appeal to identity crisis and the more Perhaps hardline political cool nationalist right where they merge that's where you get dangers and the real worry to some extent is Germany where they have merged because the AFDC did start off as a sort of anti euro party and it was very much The dissatisfaction in eastern Germany of those who were reignited you felt excluded from the reunited Germany but the AFC now is embracing some of those very very unpleasant racist policies at least verbally. They're embracing them one associates with the Nazis and the same phrases the same kind of instinct reactions Are Coming back and that is a real worry. I don't think it's a huge for Germany itself because there are a big enough bulk of people who feel that never again but it is that Terry. How do you feel about the fact? We're having this conversation today. In two thousand and nineteen two days often many celebrated the fall of the Berlin Wall. I think Michael's exactly right. Say that the after. He has grown in popularity recently. But I think there's support low is extending further is still very highly concentrated in the old East Yes as we remembering thirty years since the Berlin Wall. It's it's just it's striking how much the politics of the old East Germany still Different from from many in the West But I think it's not all as the sperm you look at some of these policies. For instance in Hungary the local elections finish actually did surprisingly badly They lost the mayoralty of Budapest. For instance. Now that may be the liberals in the city's deciding that we have had enough of this but you know there is still an electoral will wear out and I think the parties of the mainstream parties at the center just need to think more carefully about how exactly they tackle that threat. Let's move on to another story politics of old and new. How much has Russia been meddling in British politics? We may never know. There's the publication of parliamentary report. That investigated just that was blocks last week by number ten Downing Street but that hasn't stopped the press from trying to find out the Sunday Times yesterday claimed that no fewer than nine Russian business people have donated money to the Conservative Party and they were named in the document Michael in working on the inside of the time. Tell us a little bit about more about what is being in claimed in this article and the fantasy claims of being made of pretty of absent illegal activities he yes well. It's largely donations to the conservative Conservative Party. From prominent oligarchs or Russian residents in Britain or those with access to a lot of money giving money as it were under under the counter not necessarily open clear political donations and the conservative simply accepting the money because very useful and and cozying up to some of these people. Now how how much that is. Organized Russian infiltration of the British political system. I think is open to doubt. I mean the fact that they're Russians rather than say Nigerians Syrians or Chinese or other people makes it immediately kind of conspiracy that this is a criminal organized plot. Now I have no doubt at all these other guys. Alex do find it useful to keep in with what they think are going to be the the people who tend to regulate their That taxes or status or less stay in Britain and indeed. They all worried about the fact that Britain has finally decided that dirty money is not welcome in this country and The Conservatives probably overwhelmingly but perhaps also so other parties have been turning a blind eye to these oligarchs coming in with pots of money. That's been illegally earned on the basis of corruption. or or whatever and giving it to the juries Terry would you agree with Michael Just said. Forgive me if I summarize it what's happening here is these are just mainly rich. People who just happen to be Russian and as opposed to Russians. Who happened to be rich or meddling in British politics? Yes lovely. I seem neither of US have would not arrest of seeing the report yet which is precisely you know. What's the issue here? I think the question is of many donors who are by origin Russian but have since become British citizens since living in Britain. Because if they were you know you're not allowed to donate to political parties. If you're not a British citizen British resident so I I think one of the problems that's happened here is just because this report was due to be published before the election because it hasn't come out there is room for for huge amounts of speculation about what exactly is in it. And what exactly is alleged that the government says. We're not going to publish this report in the run up to the election. The more people can speculate about it And so we don't know exactly what's what's being initially we don't know the level of influence that is is being suggest. Obviously we'll see some people have have leaked. Some of the testimony and in some of this is coming out now put in A. It might be a better idea if the government did publish this report. Oh now I think it's highly extremely unlikely that we're going to see it Before the election and even after the election they will have to be a new intelligence and security committee that's composed according according to whoever whoever wins in the balance of the party so this could be really kicked into the long grass well into the new year which I think really is worrying Michael. We are in the situation now are arguably arguably more ten years ago twenty years ago. If someone said there is the suggestion that the Russians have been meddling again in British politics then the press would be all over it and we would not hear at the end of it but now in a state now with the electric. Frankly doesn't care so much on all his aggressions medal everywhere which unfortunately they tend. Tend to how much it's effective. How much wrong plot and how much attention the bridge electric pays to? What the Kremlin is doing? Frankly I think is has been wildly over overplayed Yes the Russians can't resist mentioning whenever there's a chance they have done. I mean that's that's what they do. I mean but what would what would Russians with with little old single interior possible mischief. Could they make Z.. Britain's still quite a key member of NATO Russia's still does find NATO's something of an Anathema Latham A- and if the West is strong and united and taking a tough stand on Ukraine and other areas where the Russians have vital interests that's not to Moscow's advantage advantage and therefore a slightly fragmented West and particularly west. That's really not united on main issues of defense security or solidarity and all that that is is to Russia's possible advantage at least if you think in zero sum games which unfortunately the Kremlin always does so You know the chance for just causing using mischief is sometimes welcome but how much it's organized and most important how much it's successful. I very much. I have my dog slim thing that we don't really sort of think about in the EU sanctions should be stopping. All this happening I would assume it depends what The origin of the money. And what the what. The citizenship is of in a particular individuals concerned. Because you know if you may have come from Russia you may have long since come from Russia and be of a very strong opponent of the Kremlin after all. There are plenty of Russian. The people in in Britain. He disliked Putin as as much as as many other people. I think one of the other things we should also be concerned about the. We don't really really know to what extent this report covers is The effects of online activities and the effect of in a trolls and social media people people trying to influence the debate in that sense and I think that is another A very worrying area this impacts not as obvious as donating large sums of money or having people in positions of influence silence. But you know these kind of troll farms that are sending out trying to influence the online as well and let's not forget Michael that we do have a famous Russian oligarch. Iran's one one of the United Kingdom influential newspapers Lebedev an evening standard. I mean that's that's hiding in plain sight isn't it a great fan of Putin and and I wouldn't necessarily say the standard is one of the most decent London paper but yes I his influence. His criminal links wchs are very very Removed from the daily coverage of news in the Evening Standard. I think too many in too many people he has been in an exemplary owner. His Promoted the paper when it was in difficulties. He's managed to rescue it from possible closure. And he as you say is not necessarily a mouthpiece for the Kremlin by any means and the fact that he is of Russian origin well various people are. I mean Rupert Murdoch is Australian. Arjun does that matter does introduces policies. identing so Michael. Binion and Terry Stares Ni thank you. We'll be back in just a moment but first Monaco's Marcus Hippie. With some of the other stories. We're the following today. Thanks to people are in critical condition following a day off violent protests in Hongkong. One protester was injured when he was shot at close range. By a member of the city-state's please while a pro Beijing activists was also doused in flammable liquid and set alight after arguing with protesters Bolivian. CBS President Evo Morales resigned. After nearly fourteen years in power they had of the country's army called on Morales to cede power following mass demonstrations over his disputed election win. The outgoing president claims that he's the victim of a coup by Bolivia's generals and two Australian states have declared a state of emergency us the country's deadly bushfires are expected to get much worse. The Fire Sav already killed three people and destroyed hundreds of homes in a new South Wales and Queensland the state of emergency last for seven days and allows the fire service to direct government agencies. Those are the headlines. Smell back to you emma. Thank you very much indeed. Marcus this is Monaco's house few I'm Emma Nelson and joining me in the studio Michael Bainian and Terry stazzone. The TORI or bakery has been one of the great social economic and cultural beget shaped pillow French village life. The QS for bread that chatter and the sense of community munity will make up not just an important internal part of society but the rest of the world is part of what makes France so very French but no longer bakery's bakery's closing across the country's villages with a reluctance by the younger generation to enter a profession full of nighttime working and Burns Terry the last time I was driving through the French countryside. I couldn't find a French boulangerie. What about you know I? My my parents live in French village chapter and verse. I think the ones that are doing well. Some some of them are chain bakeries so a lot of people much like the rest of us in elsewhere in Europe are going to buy that breads in the supermarket. Because it's easy to park and it's easy to drive to and you're not perhaps going to your traditional little local bakery in the village and they're quite a lot. A lot of big chains now have got into the bakery market and again they are getting a lot of the custom Yeah in in the south near where my when my family are you find a lot of closed down but then you also find some little local businesses that are starting up trying to appeal perhaps to this higher end of the market making their own jam making more more traditional kind of old fashioned bread rather than the big Mass produced type. So I think it's it's it's all despair but certainly the situation is changing. It's a situation that's changing and Michael. It's it's how much actually is this part of French society. I mean There's an article in the New York Times talking about the demise of you've French village life because of this village life that has been so closely knit into the interferon external headset. Soft power. When you have novels such as Madame ver-very Flaubert depicting a certain time and time in French history which is just steeped in village life in its influence over people's lives and I think that's what the significance of this debate is all about? It's really more to do with is still focus for village life. Balaj Abe's where the place where he would meet in Chattanooga get in the morning to gossip neighbors. It's not so central say to British life but then other things are pubs. All the post office say a little villages are losing those fairly rapidly and all industrialized countries are facing this problem of keeping alive their rural communities in an and age where bigger means better and faster means leaving behind those who are not to collude in or wider apple. Whatever and I think there is a real nostalgia did you for way of life that is vanishing fast and that is very much in France? centered around the the bakeries. And then the next essential threat to the French identity given the fact that every time you do by by by gets you see tradition written all over absolutely everything now if you have a new generation of French people who could forgive them for saying no. I'm not going to get up at two o'clock in the morning to make to make bread for everybody. You you actually start to drill deeply into a country's identity don't you yes. I think it's baked in hearty even the French state. Stay in some of the controversies about the bakeries. have been to do with how much the French state actually regulates the selling of bread and it comes from the revolution in the keeping. The price of bread down has been really important thing and it's only in the last few decades that they've stopped saying this is the maximum price by get but you know the French government legislated about the opening opening hours that they have to open every day they legislated about when bakeries because can take their summer holidays and things like that are still governed by the state and as Franz tries to reform so that certain things and then the other things Do Fall Fall by the wayside. Su yes. It is very very key to French identity but I don't you think you know gluten free. I don't think has caught on as much yet. In France giving up by gets completely the way you speak suggest the idea of bread as what some person is described does the municipal service I mean that that reliance on the state that people have to ensure that people are fed. It's quite simple in France in that and that's all the lots of other countries have lost. It's pretty basic. I mean if you look at the Russian revolution read was one of the key demands and in fact throughout Soviet Times Times bread was also very kathleen regulated. It was very very cheap so much that people often buying it just to feed the ducks and it was. It was very good quality actually Louis and since the fall of communism that importance on bread has more or less vanished because it was ideological importance on bread the communist felt that this was the basic provisions nfo ordinary general Russian people and it was essential duty of the state to provide it. Well that's gone and I think that's gone throughout much of the Western world today Russian duck. Finally we cannot express how agonizing this experiences for US Brits gathered in studio expressing ourselves because a survey has indicated indicated that more than half of UK. People are shy and cripplingly. Slow so Michael you shy. I think I'm not. I think think I ought to be a bit. It would be better for me if I was rather people has a bit more shy. Probably I think I was quite China's about sixteen or seventeen. Yes I was quite shy and particularly with with goals I mean. I think this is typical of adolescence but I think I've sort of got over that. I mean I've been around long enough to stop stopping Sean. How about you terry? As it sounds strange for somebody who's spent rather fifteen minutes talking in public But no I am still massively shy in in two years normal social situations that involved as me expressing my opinions to willing audience. Yes I think it's very British thing it is. This idea reserved not wanting to trouble people wanting to understand the rules by which society operates not being entirely confident about that. I mean one of my favorite. The twitter accounts is the very British problems accounts. which always gives you the interpretation of what British people say and what they really mean? If you've watched fleabag recently as brilliant alien scene where her sister they have a cafe. That has a chatty Wednesday and everybody is supposed to go into the caffeine talk to each other and the sister just goes no no no no I can when she couldn't deal with this idea that you could go to a cafe and talk to strangers. Being shy doesn't help you if you're a diplomat does it Michael or does it because when one wonders how this whole issue shift. Shyness fits into the ability of Britain to and British diplomats to actually make that Kelly case fell to make their voices heard across the world. Yes well shyness is not quite. The same as reserve reserve is Keeping Oh opinions. Joe Self not expressing emotions that shyness is a kind of crippling lack of self confidence. Now if you're a a diplomat You can be Fath- you're not shy at all but you need to keep play. Play your cards close to your chest. I mean the definition of a diplomat especially British. One is someone who thinks twice before he says nothing And then you just keep your chest and do. The Brits have a reputation for for shyness or is When other countries have to do with this certain reserve yes absolutely? We don't open out to others Very easily But on the other hand people say that when you get to know British people. They are quite warm and friendly in their emotions and in their expression of any each other in individual responses to other people but I think we're still reserved. What we don't like doing is making a fuss? We don't like to raise our hands and be the only one say that's wrong. I protest about whereas UC franchise talion much more vocal. And make your house or something. I don't like a grander scale. Though that we quite kick up a fuss amine one need only think about our relationship with the European Union. We have been very shy sitting there quietly on the sidelines not wishing to do anything apart from say no half the time. I wonder whether individually were quite a shy bunch. Terry very nice confessed to being with you. I absolutely love being the person who asks the questions. Woe betide anyone asks me anything and yes. I'm sitting in a dark room on my own talking to myself. That's what radio is all title bout but then when we come as an international facing country quite light to kick up a fuss don't we. I think we're probably quite good at being passive aggressive at sort sort of saying well. I don't want to cause any trouble spots. Actually we just want to leave. This is the way it's phrased. You're not necessarily going to kick up a big fuss but A stoically standing there and being difficult fusses is a different matter. Terry stazzone and Michael vinian thank you very much indeed for joining us in a moment. Monaco's Jamie waters and why we need less buzzwords and more action in the world of retail. You're listening to Monaco's house with Emma Nelson Stay tuned. Uh and if you've just joined us a very warm welcome to Monaco's house few I'm Emma Nelson and finally today Monaco's Fashion Edison. Jamie waters examines the state of his profession's voice and vocabulary lost weight go table. Serrao a menswear AFICIONADO. Who runs the PREJEAN? Vintage shop posted a photo on his instagram. It's caption and read. The word vintage is now dead it has been so overused. It's become meaningless. I will not use it anymore to define what I do. It was an incisive comments on buzzword fashion like other industries from food film. Loves a quick sellable phrase to vintage. We can add sustainability stain ability season Lewis concept store and experience as terms that embrace it years have been bandied about Ad Nauseam. They have always been concepts particularly popular at any moment. Get social media which thrives on Punchy captions and PD hashtags surely means labels become exhausted. Quicker than ever. The thing is many of the words. Does your to note important ideas. Fashion branch should be engaging with sustainable practices physical Retailers should be offering interesting experiences if they're to get shoppers of laptops. The key is to actually do these things rather than merely using the birds connected today sedan. A selling ploys. Maybe we just need to come up with some alternative jargon. Thanks extolled fashioned Edison Jamie waters there. And that's all we have time for. Today's program Monaco's house view was produced by Marcus. hippy and researched by nick to me and Giacomo Hoffa oppa a studio managers Zoe. Kilburn and Kenya scarlet coming up at twenty hundred a brand new edition of Monaco on culture. I'm articles house. View is back at the same same time tomorrow. That's eighteen hundred dollars. London time for an hour from me Emma Nelson Goodbye. Thank you very much for listening.

Michael Spain Burns Terry Monaco government Emma Nelson Britain Europe France Jamie waters Spain Franco France Michael Binion Terry Stephanie European Union Ukraine president Germany Putin
Design: On the cards

Monocle 24: Section D

28:58 min | 2 years ago

Design: On the cards

"This is Monica on design the show on the best in architecture industrial, design, graphics, and fashion. I'm Josh Bennett coming up today. I think if you write your name, and that you are Joyner that is enough. So that your joint don't necessarily think you need to make the card out of would surely new year calls for fresh business card. Monaco's creative director the inimitable. Richard spencer. Power says his tips designing a good one and how to swerve plumping for a bad one. And in the coming years, we'll be fracturing because I think she actually Brown seed money in order to make more of an impact pay one off the calendar. Joined by Monaco's fashion, editor Jamie waters to talk about what we can expect from this year's fashion calendar, plus the founders of Indonesian practice shampoo mull over the challenges of Indonesia's, shall we say idiosyncratic climate all that coming up right here on monocle on design on monocle twenty four with me. Josh. Bennett. Do stay tuned. And whether it's minimal and elegant or Californian flashy. It's more likely than not the your business card says something about the work that you do. And it may not be something you like to discuss more. I'm joined in-studio now by Monaco's, creative director, Richard Spencer. Pound. Hello. We actually have the same business Kagyu either. They're both designed by you. I've gone through the archives, and I've found enthusiastic editors to pass me some of the best and worst business cards. They've been handed, and I think you in for a bit of a treat, but before we delve into this two business cards in your opinion, still set the tone. They stood important in the world of business when we're having interactions with people to we still need a bit of paper. This has who we are all of this be done online. Probably don't need them. But like lots of analog things, very nice. They punctuate a meeting very nicely. There's good introduction years ending that will be a ceremony involved, especially in Japan. So I think I asked good times too. If you do them, right? But there's a question because so many people do badly. I think business cards kinda making this a bit. I think the one area of graphic design. That's the only era of design. That's got a kind of a vending machine solution that you often finding roadside petrol stations where you can go mate design on the spot fifty business cards of your own which is kind of how low of business car can be can't really do that with anything else except for business thing. I want to ask if there are any kind of ground rules as well. There's a sort of standard size standard, wait that famous famous scene in kind of American psycho where the subtleties of, you know, whether it's bone or off whiter kinda played with by the new rotted character. But is okay to you know, Hugo business card of wood or print in pink and use both sides of any other any rules. Well, I think it depends on on what the pieces card is for. If you're a big company. It has to match the letterhead asthmatic compliment slips estimates the envelope. Aspen, poverty, bigger corporate program, which is. Won the Monaco business card is quite simple an elegant entities myself. But it matches everything else is part of the program. If you're a one man outfit and your your furniture studio, your Joyner, you might wanna put everything into business cards. So it kind of encapsulates what you do. Now. I think if you write your name, and that you are Joyner that is enough to tell that you're joining I don't necessarily thing you need to make the card out of wood or embossed. Some, you know, a sore into earning that don't think it needs to be so little so my ground rule would be don't go OTT. It's not an exercise of showing printer can do. It's really it should be a nice elegant thing and in the spirit of kind of showing people up a little bit. I'm going to ask you, not to mention the names or the companies if possible on the business cards, I'm gonna show you some different examples of different materials here, we have a whiskey maker, and it's kind of a an oddly shaped, I didn't have the listeners heard that sound an oddly shaped kind of wooden business card in the show. Shape of a barrel. I mean, I'm not convinced by that is way too big to put in a Waller a kind of see where they're going. But what do you make that? What am I this is a sum district printer has visited this whisking manufacturing combination and said we can do laser etching on lots of different materials. And he said would and they've seen an example of something that someone's done. I said, okay, great. We can have always keep our. So I think this is kind of driven by a digital printer sales person. And yes, it's a slim practical Ouch may be memorable for pro real the wrong reasons, I've got one here. I would actually embarrass the guy and say his name, I will probably shouldn't count really read it. It's been imprinting kind of piece of copper that's taken every single fingerprint since it was handed over to make utterly legible. So it's of etched encompass sort of the wrong shape. I feel like it's a little bit dangerous even with those sharp corners. Absolutely. I mean, if your business card oxidises, I think he's done something wrong. You don't need to. I mean, you should be polishing your business conflict. Brosseau just that. His legible. Okay. So I'm sense. I'm sensing where this conversation's guy. So that is materials for you. We've got some don't promise we will supply listeners. Also by the end of the show with some dues as well. I'm gonna move onto shapes. So a broad array of different business cards, some of them slightly smaller than the standard business card. Some of them like kind of like a reservation, Simon a hotel this little ones, particularly annoying score number on it. And it's half the size of business card cut into a square would you lie on shapes? Whether it's cutting off the corners during a concert, the business card similar to materials is just too many gimmicks in hair, and that's just not practical. You know, I think there's a rule about business constantly should be one sided. I think that is based on the fact that back in the day when you business card you attach it to a Rolodex. If you stay voters, you think content over getting information on the back, and I think that should be the rule of thumb everything on once more shade, everything you can read everything you need all information done legible clear. I mean. I mean, that's what is foreign to get across your details. But we're gonna come onto this. You know, some if you're working across two different languages, for instance, to have the Japanese on the front and the English on the back. Is there a space for that? Well, I mean, that's probably the one example, we have done examples of that where we've done Jewison into language on personnel. You can design it and get all on one side. And I think that's the discipline. I think he should stick to instead of expanding your design onto both sides and folding and unfolding it. They feel like stickers that you'd pick up when you're in a shop, and there's something to pick up Saint free the dropped into your bag the one you're holding. There is particularly ungracious and a few counts because it sort of is very angular bigger than the normal business card is wider than the normal business of the shaper handgun if it was kind of like, crystal handgun, and they haven't provided the person's Email address someone is how to write on their Email address at the organization, which just feels a bit crappy doesn't it it smarts to me of budget saving diplomatic bespoke cartridge member staff they made a generic you fill in. So we got to. More categories. I'm getting a feeding the I sort of know on your conclusions are going to be from the fact that you're saying simple stock you're saying stick to the colors. So I've got a few business 'cause I consider to be quite good business cards, and we're going to start off with that of professor, and Dr Eric speak Mun, eminent typography and cut a friend of Monaco. He's gone one-sided is one sided affair. He's stuck race. Simply to who. He is and his contact numbers and stuff and quite thick ply on that as well. You probably about four those won't feel lucky. Perfect. Isn't it is not news caps? That's how minimal is kept. It is one color is one technique is a standardized way shape ninety five fifty five mil three fifty GSM. And it's just who he is and had to get in touch with him via Email phone or mobile phone. I mean, that's what you need. Well, I'm gonna I'm gonna lead you through some indulgences I quote, Mike on the other business 'cause we've got a bit of color again this to side of business, but the name of. Of the company on the back quite hall to read. But then the contact information very bright red elsewhere. You know, we've got a bit of foiling, but go falling off right of gold foil ridge flow as long as it's done nicely. This is done very nicely. Nice and simple and some of these things. Hey, you can tell I think that design is part of a bigger program. You know, you can tell this red button. For example, I'm magin their packaging, their letterhead, envelopes law all match that little bit of blind bossy with the logo on the back, very subtle. But imagine a guy in that will be existed in a similar way. Elsewhere now recuperated, and how important do you think it is that those things kind of link up as well, I'm in your your brand man behind all of the Monaco branding, but previously. You've obviously worked on other projects. With more commercial briefs is the business conduct. Kind of the smallest block in the building of a much bigger kind of suite of services or house. It's the smoothest piece of print more or less, and I think it's impor-. It says the president. But also, it sets up how you think about a brand and how you should continue to work and think about brand. Now, if you do good job on you'll let head and your business card bookmark in your sign outside your building. There's every chance you're gonna do a good job on the next thing you need to do which might be an invite might be bespoke piece of print, and then you've got the foundation to keep building on it. And you can look that business card of Monaco's designed coming on twelve and a half thirteen years ago. And you can look at the last thing we did the last new thing, we did maybe the drinking Dynamex Zine, and they kind of much there's a sort DNA links them, and I think that's important for recognition out in a wide world because if you stick to things, and if you stick to aesthetics, and I think we can make things long lasting, and I'm kind of like dispensing, some some examples I've found of sort of not great business cards will come to this one which I'm pointing out last. I think these these make the kind of mistakes that someone like myself not graphic designer say we've got one here which his by can say the name of the wine critic Parker, the most eminent wine critic someone here who works for him has his name on the business card, and you you can't read that no way you can meet that completely illegible. It's his signature. We've got another one here an academic. He's kind of a new cod, but he stuck a sticker over it. Because he wants to use the old cards and gather correct address on as not great is it. He's not. This feels like it's come out from machine that's for sure. So that particularly August university not investing business cards, which we check and understand to some extent. Yeah. There's a bit more of a creative one here. I have a bit of a Mon in the latest issue of Monaco about people job titles that don't make any sense, you know, you'll retail Djeddai your head of global command or something and this says the name of a person, and then is a and then a space, and then underneath what does it say crowd paste capitalist pattern thinker, bright color, local war? Okay. So so it's has a knowledge of French. We may be giving away too much about him. But that space is just inviting something a bit rude. Isn't that you're gonna write this person is a absolutely is like a question on comedy game show? Another one is great kind of Milanese designs today, but that business cons enormous. And again, they haven't gotten their own one and someone who's had to bright their Email address on the back. And that thing is massive, isn't it? Yeah. It's like a bit of bold. I mean, yes, you could plus reward with this thing, I think if you come bend in half you gone to have you on the stock? That's for sure. I'm gonna hand you too. Because I feel like I'm doing all the talking for these one is for a photographer, and I'm not quite sure what the other one does. But give us a bit of a description of one of the ones you holding a game. I think photos on business cards shouldn't exist. And if you'll all this talk for and if I is particularly unpleasant of semi naked women silent exercise bowl that I think is an atrocity, and then the other one is another photo someone going down a slide. Looks like a cross between a water slide in a phone party space hive I think you need to maybe drop me a line, and I can give you some some clear direction on what you should be doing. But isn't what you're currently doing and just to finish this over the of levity menace. I've cod which I believe is for drug data. I'm not sure where it was sourced. It's empty says said a phone number. And then the words anything anytime anyplace delivery, twenty four seven I actually don't think it's a terrible piece of. Zayn? It's pretty clear about what it does is legally very questionable. But does that land rich on the Rolodex is cheap to put together? That's for sure it's like a of like a photocopy more than our business card, but you can't argue with the messaging, it sounds like Amazon anything anytime anyplace delivery, twenty four seven, and it's got a faction. Glitz Bolander as well. So clear likes to party, this chap's it and for the listeners Richard just put that card in his pocket, and he's running out of the studio it with his mobile phone his hand. Thank you very much. Monaco's creative director, Richard Powell. Thank you. And join now in studio by Monaco's, very own, Jamie waters. And if I were to describe his outfit, which is something I love to do on the radio, rather plain for the start of this near Jayme is one of the first days back in the office for us kind of voluminous white shirt is this the beginning of a season in which colors have been banned. Nowhere. You haven't seen my jumper which had taken off because it's hard in the offer as bowling, very plain and boring. Imagine you'll brightest clothes in your suitcase. Because you've got a busy few weeks ahead of you with the fashion calendar taking off pity. Whoa. Most today in the foot hesitant bathroom Florence London fashion week has pulled to a bit of a close over in London. Nubia milan. Yes. What are you looking forward to? Yes. So it's a start the year for the men's wear industry. I thought it'd be good to kind of go through a few of the topics that I think people will be talking about gossip. You're skirting. The paper wanna hear about from fasten. So Simmons was fired that one loves good firing fund from Calvin Klein was this Cape reveling in this. Yes. I mean, this is just really big news over the Christmas break, which I think the sort of announcement dot breaks the hearts of a lot of people in the fashion industry. And I think he's gonna be analyzed over the coming months cements beloved design are really talented fashiony east design because he has a lot of interesting references. He's very artistic and creative. Hey was born into Kevin Kline which was doing well as a brand of the back of underwear sows and things but refuse boarding to make it cool essentially, and he had his own very high end line. And then the point that it was meant a sort of halo effect where it became very ATI in high fashion, and then that would sort of trickle down into just be a sales for the brand that just in sort of play out over his time that it wasn't selling. Well. Profits decreased. And it's just an interesting thing because I think in fashion in recent years, as this thing where people think you hire a superstar designer give them full control over the Broncos rough is doing everything who's doing all the store during every men's women's collection accessories. This thing that went now seeing selene with Eddie Sloman, we sent at Gucci with Assange, Kelly, good sheets, work spectacularly. But I think he's something of a cautionary tale where it hasn't done that. And he was Pabst too cool for what the brand is. It's under web brand is spread and bottle and from the basics Jamie to the window dressing. Let's talk about your and never other elaborate pre full menswear show in Tokyo at the end of last year. So if we've got up basics from Calvin Klein seeming, that's where you buy them. We've got to think about how fashion is kind of showcased how the window dressing is done. And how excitement is generated did deal. Do something that other fashion brands, do you think would like to tap into that show? Yes. This is an interesting talk about when we looked the year head on the years. Head for what will happen with menswear shows because something unprecedented in that they held pre full menswear runway show. Stay did in Tokyo the collection. Now, pre full crews shows these kind of into seasonal shows something about women's has done for the last fifteen years and these into seasonal lines hugely profitable for brands some menswear brands, do it. But I don't do shows. They would maybe to a small presentation. The is this kind of death now for the traditional season for two shows here, we moved into having four shows a year and people's accessory lines becoming a big part of that business, but all, you know, pre full or pre cruise or even something in between that going to be the next big thing that kind of fracturing petitional calendar, I mean implements where west saying that spring summer autumn into the to coax as I mean, I still Ron less to have big shows. I think generally that in the coming years, we'll be fracturing because I think especially be actually Brown's with money. Money in order to make more of an impact. They want to go off the calendar. They want to show in LA or in Shanghai somewhere different where they can feel up people social media fades have different images. They stand out. They're not crammed into a regular calendar in Paris or something. So I think it's somebody will say more and more whether the actual traditional fashion weeks, pay her out. I'm not sure if that's not gonna put your reputation on the line just yet. I think what men's brands do. This thing is that would just be even more focus given to luxury brands because they're the ones that have the money stood this thing and lost. But not lease. You know, we're talking about deal kind of jumping the gun little bit getting out of the stable quickly to show off an elaborate collection, you refuse to put your reputation on the line. I'm very angry about who trying coke sold. My guests into saying something that regret, but. Yeah. We've still got time. But I'm looking at Paris men's fashion week, which is someone who's kind of unacquainted with the industry, and that's me of the two of us. It always seemed to have rather a strong reputation. And I believe that you agree with me Paris men's has gone from strength strength. Yeah. I mean, what we're saying in the men's industry is Paris keeps getting stronger answered of swallowing up all the big name brands and blunts just finished blunt amends. Unfortunately, keeps losing names and just sort of keeps getting smaller. London's finished you heard it here. First milan. It has its marquee nines. It's too has Prada, but generally power is just so much stronger than the others. And I think this is even stronger. I mean, fewer of the show is that sort of be getting a lot of attention Selena's closing the show. This is of the Orissa man his debut, which was during women's wear loss at Temba was hugely provocative had everyone up in arms. He's a master at sort of causing controller see and getting. A master marketer. That's at eight PM on the Sunday nights, the loss show and Jonathan Addison's. He's the way that he says has only my job, you Anderson. He's left London where he normally shows British his London to show in power to this just there is talk about whether increasingly whether seem buys interest to go to the others or whether they should just go to powers a lot of press. Would you leave Milan early? Do you bother with some of the others and in the interest of balance and probably have a little time away from the office. Jamie walters. We'll be in Florence full pity way you'll be going to Milan, and we'll also be reporting from Paris fashion week across the monocle twenty four schedule Jamie, water, Monaco's fashion, editor, thank you very much. Next up. We head to Indonesia wet shot who is a young architecture practice run by partners Delana, sir. When oughta and fluorine hens woman while the firm's output is varied they've been spotlighted on the international design map for the work. They've done to revitalize the Indonesian city of Bandung in collaboration with the metropolises architect turned star read one coming you with design vibrant, public spaces in Bandon already. A success Shahu has turned its attention to a self initiated project around creating public micro, libraries water. They you ask. Well, the pair joined Monaco's design editor Nolan Giles to turn the page and tell him just little more in a way. There are many architecture offices starting in depend free of Jakarta called thorough, and they teamed up and mate exhibitions open offices. And so on as well in Bundu. Do there is a new vibe of young architects, be more active in your organization, and they bring in different communities together to arrange talks exchanges and exhibition. So I think divide is really amazing. And it's growing I would say and terms of architecture. That's happening there. I'm guessing there's a lot that people in other parts of the world can learn obviously have quite a unique climate there. But also, you have these massive growing cities you having to do things on a certain budget. What can the rest of the world or maybe just the region a little bit more broadly learned from architecture? That's happening in Indonesia at the moment. Well in your nation's ladies are recently making new public spaces and is public spaces are being produced right now not in the past. And these spaces will then take on the user's needs and desires, and this would be done different types of public spaces than ever created. In the past series like in London in Perez that there will be different kind of typology. I would say, and what is really nice is. That recently some of the people in the top government are open to include Indonesian architects to take part in building this public spaces. So there is a lot of promise. Head and different. Take on how to intercut tradition into contemporary architecture topicality, one of the other main commissions that you guys have had is to design a series of micro libraries across bonding. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Brief the thing with the micro libraries is actually was more of a self initiated project. So we had the chance to talk with one of the directors of Dover, which is charity organization from Indonesia and restarted the project or the first one of them, but to quite a while to could find a side, and then it happened. To be in bundled. I saw it, and it's the first micro library and then from that on could start building different ones and partly. In bundling Padre ozo- one is in a Goro. So is not only bundling base. Not only one person based of course, again with communism. Great supporter, but they're different interested parties. There's well. So now, we have a critical mass of of Michael libraries, and we'll see how this from from that moment on can build up even more and Diana in times of micro libraries tells about some of the constraints. I'm guessing, you know, this probably a limited budget. But also you're trying to maximize the space for the people. What have been the challenges of designing and building these? Yes. So it's a self initiated project. Lauren mentioned and mechanism of every micro library is that it's fits with the budget of ac- as are of a company with give so it would fit perfectly and especially in. Asia where that amount of money. The company would allocate would be enough to build a beautiful small library. So we find a stakeholders, we find funder the city need to cooperate with us in terms of giving the lend, and we are in between arranging everything designing it and making sure that things are happening with different collaborators, and so on so many challenges depending on which side, we're designing micro library was it so important to be really focused on these micro libraries. I think it's time at architects take a different role than just waiting for briefs to be written and designed for debrief. But also to take a stand and become one of the stakeholders and in way project initiator there is a different take on the project itself, not as someone being told to design but to initiated an arrange everything. Else? And this would then result in us having an amount of freedom to design, and it is very important as an architect to be able to exercise and explore different materials different forms, different way of programming it and be able to communicate it at the same level as the owner of the project and the funder. So that's what's very interesting for us to do this micro libraries as well. And Florida in terms of the microbrews understand there's a full that's just being completed. Donald talking about the materials and having that little bit of freedom to be a little bit creative and playful with the design could you have unpack the design of this fourth marker library, the full one which is currently or which is almost completed his in Bubba consi- in bundle to the call. It the hanging gardens Michael Rb. So what we learn from the first one, let's say from the Dima one is that we want or need to create edit value. So we need to pick a place which is already frequented by people and at functionality which happened maybe sort of in the beginning sort of intuitively in the last one we're building we really made it very explicit. So basically, it's a library which is integrated in a big planter stare, which is swirling up or going around a public place, and we will involve gardening or a urban farming community that they can. Grow plants there. So the whole idea is how to activate the whole neighborhood. So we have a lamented school next to it. So maybe there could be a piece of of school garden because we learned from the other library that some schools don't have library. So this anti kids over we made a slide there to learn the kids in. To play fully read books. And so, yeah, we would like to give more program and more functionality other than the library to certain location to really attract a lot of people to make lively to build up community. So really the base point is to make it work is a active community and just finally for other developing cities in southeast Asia or even further afield. What would you say the key takeaways from the success stories in Bandung are because a lot of it was done after they were existing problems in the city, and it's kind of reverse engineering and away. Welcome other cities that have similar problems learn. Yeah, I think the perfect Asian ary leader is really the key to any men we've seen it from Eddie Adama Ridwan Kamil being some of the very inspiring leaders, and they would work with some of the best architects tackling very clear problems, for example, just take one topic. And there are many things to do about it. So a pilot project. Acts which are feasible to do within three four five years. That's the key twenty mayor in the world. But also, not forget the long term planning afterwards. Annette's very often forgotten with leaders who are being elected only for five year office, and that's really really nice as refer sustainable, planning of the whole city to think about the future. After what happens after five years that was Delana Suryawan outta and fluorine Handelman speaking Monica's design, editor known Giles. Saudi. That's all the time. We have on this week's show to forget. If you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show or a brilliantly named sister podcast monocle design Xtra which is valuable each Thursday. You could pick up a copy of the latest issue of monocle magazine, the full cost the February issue or one of winter weekly newspaper has older Venable on old self respecting news towns or from Monaco dot com. Monocle designed was produced by Daphne county edited by EPA patient Christie Evans on Josh Bennett. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye.

Monaco Monaco Indonesia Paris London Josh Bennett editor Joyner director Bandung Jamie waters Monica milan Richard spencer Calvin Klein Delana Suryawan Jamie Nolan Giles Power
The Entrepreneurs - Fashion forward

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

30:19 min | 9 months ago

The Entrepreneurs - Fashion forward

"As much of the world went into lockdown in past weeks and months business owners across many sectors were quick to react to come up with solutions for how they could keep operating from food wholesalers delivering direct to people's homes restaurants trying out takeaway distilleries making their own hand sanitizer and Jim's streaming at home fitness classes much has been trying to bring in at least some revenue and there are of course many other businesses which have sprung into action to support both health care workers and their staff who would otherwise be out of work in the fashion industry factories that were shuttered to follow government. Regulations were quickly reopened to produce masks and protective equipment for healthcare workers. Showing their incredible versatility in the pieces. They've been able to craft at short notice. And at the same time in this moment of global pause where many company founders are rethinking their mission and setting a new path for the future conversations. That were already happening fashion on. How and where things are made have only grown louder listening to the entrepreneurs with me Daniel. Bauge this week. We uncovered just a few of the many incredible stories of how industry that has in some corners been given a bad rap for its carbon footprint and wastefulness has not only stepped up to help in this crisis but double down on a promise to change. We'll hear from reformation. These sustainable Los Angeles brand. That is working with the city to create masks for healthcare workers. And the city's vulnerable. We'll also hear from Canada goose and how the company quickly reopened its factories in Canada to leverage it's huge homegrown manufacturing capacity to make and then donate medical grade gowns and scrubs. We'll also had to Paris to check in with debone factor and get some of our listeners. Questions answered as well but first up. We hear from a previous guests on this show for today's off. Ed Steve Tidball is the CO founder and CEO of London based the company was launched in. Twenty fifteen by Steve and his twin brother. Nick tidball at brand they dreamed up while running ultramarathons all around the world. The company exists to challenge. Our understanding of what clothing can do with pieces meant to help humans survive in the harshest climates. The company is by nature forward thinking and sustainable constantly thinking of new ways to produce garments from materials. Nobody else has ever thought to here. Now is Steve. If you'd asked people six months ago how'd you dress for pandemic you'd probably have been met with a lot of confused faces but now with your seven years old or seventy? You could probably debate the relative merits of covering your nose and mouth with a makeshift Qasim. Bandana wearing a homemade prospects fe. Shield will leaving your house in a full. Hazmat suit while the events at twenty twenty feel closer to a sci-fi movie than they do to the events of two thousand nineteen for Brown. My calls the world today looks a lot like the reality. We've been exploring the last four years since starting fullback. We've been asking questions that look into the near and far future questions around survival isolation fear and comfort. It's why we designed to saw charge jacket. That can store and readmit sunlight and deep sleep cocoon designed to help you sleep in. Deep Space. It's war relocation. Hoodie is brought up. You Relaxing Crompton. Isolated conditions on one hundred. Year pants can walk through fire. We take the extreme questions and challenges that adventure poses and try to solve them with pieces of clothing back in two thousand nineteen to experience. What many people feeling right? Now you'd have to attempt some extraordinary adventure. Astronauts Arctic explorers and extreme adventurous having to cope with intent psychological and social experiences from fear anxiety and information uncertainty to the reality of being isolated from all the people. You'd normally hang out with while being forced into intense coexistence with others but now you can create the same feelings just by leaving your house or by being asked to stay inside for an indefinite period of time so as the pandemic has taken hold. We've doubled down on our mission of asking questions of clothing that haven't been asked before. Of course the reason we started asking these questions in the first place is because the next hundred years aren't going to look like the last hundred as floods and five we've across countries the earth heats and a pandemic grips the world. We radically underprepared is a species for the speed at which changes taking place. We're not suddenly going to evolve. The ability to resist file back in the oceans saw survival systems need to adopt from emergency. Planning infrastructure to our architecture and clothing as risk becomes more commonplace. The clothes on your back need to do more. They still need to be soft comfortable and warm but they should be designed with extreme performance capabilities. They need to be resistant to fire. Wind water disease and even time. So we're doubling down on our approach of designing for the next century and not just the next season and the thing that is likely to define the next hundred years is the thing that has defined twenty twenty so far radical unpredictability. There's an amazing. Cs Lewis quote in which you reminded us that human life has always been lived on the edge of a precipice but while some people see countless precipice for fun most don't unpredictability makes the precipice very visible and very real and at the same time at nudges everyone towards it right now. We're on the cusp of a revolution. That will help us. Combat this unpredictability while close have been used to keep people warm dry and cool for the last fifty thousand years over the next fifty to fifty thousand years closer going to be used to enhance our strength. Our immune systems are sensory perception. They'll help us become faster. More intelligent even live longer. Rapid Advances in Materials Technology Sport Science Space Travel Biotech and the understanding of human psychology combining to create the perfect conditions for this revolution. Our mission is to help the future of clothing arrive faster than anyone imagines and twenty twenty demonstrates the importance of making that happen. Steve Tidball the CO founder. And CEO of fullback. You can hear my full conversation with Steve. On episode. Four hundred and thirty-three of the entrepreneurs next up rob to Los Angeles from recycled fibers and pieces made from dead stock and vintage clothing to the women's wear brand. Reformation is a leader in sustainable design and recently the company teamed up with the city of Los Angeles to oversee the production of one million masks made by the city's hundreds of garment factories monocle fashion editor. Jamie waters cut up reformations President Halley Bornstein. So we had a relationship with the mayor's Office for a while now. Through a lot of different initiatives we've worked on mostly related to sustainability so when the shelter in place order was issued in mid March. We close down their factory or distribution center in our offices in compliance like so many other brands and really gave us a chance to sit back and think like. What do we do in this situation? How do we help? The mayor's office was already spearheading a really ambitious effort to mobilize the garment industry in order to produce medical grade protective gear for essential workers high risk communities medical staff that is not actually working not doctors nurses on those in the hospital supporting so we were able to step in as the industry partner in this initiative in really. Do some the supportive taff. So what stage you currently out? How many different factories and brands you working with like what kind of scullery talking is eight hundred. Different manufacturers have signed up throughout Los Angeles. We've not all of them by any means but we are. What we're doing is really supporting in terms of garment. Specs and patterns were providing quality control. We're trying to help connect materials to so incapacity. So we're really helping more on the organization side but the way L. A. Protects works is it's a marketplace so what the city did is they built marketplace where you have a bunch of manufacturers and then you have buyers and they're trying to connect them directly so that they're not not constantly middle down and what we're doing is saying. Hey if you are a manufacturer that means a little bit more help getting started as we can beat the help support. So what kind of volumes are you talking about so L. A. Protects aims to make five million non medical grade masks within the next two months? You know in our demand alone so reformation on top according La Protects. We're also we have our own buyers as part of this marketplace that we are producing more as well as donations that we are doing and so with our own capacity. We're doing in our own factory. Twenty five thousand a week and then through our partners hundred up to two hundred thousand. We're hoping for this week. Alone of mass coming in that we will be able to Provide for local businesses. Were doing a lot of work homeless shelters right now so all of these different manufacturers have a different series of buyers or parts of the community that they are supporting our wanted to talk a bit about how L. A. is quite uniquely. Placed to tackle a task as big as this obviously. Is this kind of really rich manufacturing infrastructure in the? I think it's a great question. Everyone knows L. A. Makes Apparel and there is a garment industry here but I think the scale of it was a bit unknown until everyone got together in such a cohesive initiative. The size of the industry really is pretty incredible larger than we and realize look. We produce sixty percents of our product here so there are very very wide range of product development capabilities. Here there are a ton of sewing labor here and then the other piece. That's really interesting is because of all of this. There's a lot of materials here so everything from Denim. The one Mitchell people are using right now is denim lining. That wouldn't be anywhere else. Since because so much of of these contemporary apparel brands that make denim produced in Los Angeles. So the fact that we have all of this fabric available is also making it much faster for us to scale. I've just one other question which is about the the role of the fashion industry at the moment. This conversation with a few people about how this kind of you you always have discussions not always but like you can say about the fashion industry. It's obviously you know of products and it's beautiful and all sorts of things but we all. He often papers that will fashions not saving lives. And this is you know. Nowadays quite in a very literal straight outweigh and I just want. If you have any thoughts on on fashions role at the moment and how it can kind of tie this really unique pot in in helping in the fight against the pandemic. It's a really interesting question. It's so complex right because fashion does have this bad rap and in a lot of ways I think this pandemic is highlighting even more so. I think it's great to see. So many brands step out of their comfort zone and focus on operations and they're bit more community focused more worker focus. So many changes have been made at this moment and makes me personally very happy to see you know for me. The question is like does it stay. Does it say Africanus? Do we have a short memory? Do we commit to these values that were were standing for today in does a consumer demand it right. After the recession there was definitely a lot of change consumer behavior for a couple years. Things did go back to more luxury and there was a lot of movement. If you look at what purchasing patterns happened after that I can say I already think the consumer I think the consumer's GonNa drive this not the brands more than anything else and consumers have already become much more conscious than ever constantly. Now there's a conversation about waste in excess in our life which is very different from how we are living our lifestyle today or how. There's a conversation right now. About Workers Rights in essential workers in the conditions. People are being worth are working at A. That's more than ever so I do wonder now that these conversations are so prominent will that just exacerbate accelerate the transition consumers already going through. I hope so and I really hope ranch take this opportunity to pull back and said think about their own operations in how they can behave differently during this time can have short memories but I hope this is such a a societal doing kind of experience that we all really do pull back and learn from this in some way. 'cause a lot of great has come out of this in terms of the community in terms of values highlighting good things in good opportunities for us to get better so. I think it's not easy but it would be really a big win if we can come out of this as a stronger industry a stronger just community the Taliban steam president of La Based Label Reformation Speaking to Monaco fashion editor Jamie waters next return North to Toronto launched in Nineteen fifty seven and a small factory in Canada's largest city Canada. Goose is known as a global leader in outerwear perhaps unknown to many as well that Canada goose manufacturers. It's polar tested outerwear and fashion forward winter coats in Canada very shortly after closing its facilities because of the pandemic Canada goose reopened. It's eight factories across the country to make medical grade personal protective equipment to donate to healthcare workers and the scale is incredible. I called up president and CEO Danny to hear more. We have a way back all in all in Canada and we employ thousands of people in them as soon as we close their health concerns but not not long at all after that as soon as we heard about a dire knee on the front lines and the the very very extreme shortage of a P P. We just made the decision that we have to contribute since this this is the time for us to step up and give back and be a part of bs part of the hopefully a small part of the solution and so it was something that Myself in the leadership team Canada. Houston everybody can really rally behind very quickly and we. We left them to action. We opened our factories. We'd tradition to making PPM. We started making gowns and scribes and we donated those two institutions hospitals and other medical institutions across Canada and then we started to work with the government is Raleigh. They wish out and and we we were starting to work with them. And we were making level to disposal ballgowns or making level two gallons that are reusable and now we've various contracts with different levels of government both federal and provincial level the government. You know our our ability now is we're we're we're we're capable of making up to one hundred thousand a week and the demand is is way bigger than the supply in the world and and for us you know we. We felt it was important that we did not make any profit off of any of this. We didn't we don't think this is the time for that. This year is the time to focus on a making my into time to focus on doing the right thing for the world and I think that the right thing to do with the Canadian thing to do. And you know we're really. We're really proud that we have the ability to and we have the strategic. That's in Canada. We have this ability to help. Obviously this is just a a a very different time for everyone and everyone's working through it and trying to get Used to what is I. Guess new normal for now but obviously facilities and producing garments. Things haven't done anything on this scale since perhaps wartime as well but I guess has reignited conversation in in some corners about where things are made and people will be will be saying well. Wouldn't it be better if everything was made close to home? And we had this ability to you know to be closer to consumers or the you know the end destination but for you guys. You always had everything in Canada. That is quite a unique position. I guess yeah definitely different. Being any Canada has always been very important to me making Kennedy's clothing and Canada. Making a Swiss watch and Switzerland. You can't really separate the point of manufacturing from the private south but I think that on a global scale and Macro scale going forward geopolitically I paint a lot of countries are rethinking speaking. What are the important thing that we need to make for ourselves. You know when and if the next thing happens and you know it's every country for itself even for a period of time and we have to source product that front our country that we may not be able to. So what are those products? And let's make sure we have that capability in our own country. And I think that I think you're pretending the worst strategic asset like that with the largest manufacturer Infrastructure Kinda in this country. I think every country Wolfer itself trying to figure out and figure out what those things are for them and make sure that they are able to make their own supply in the country. That doesn't mean they have to make all of it known. Andre doesn't mean that they have to be a hot make some of it in their own country so that they have access to it when it's needed and I think that that will shift some manufacturing more local but I don't think all of it I think it will but I think it will be will be a change in in thinking in another piece of news. People might not have seen recently from Canada. Goose is that I believe you have a plan to go completely. Carbon neutral by twenty twenty. Five is that right. Can you talk to us a little bit about that? Yeah we're we're really really excited about that. And thank you for raising. It's our sustainability. Strategy is something we've been working on for a while. And we released their first ever sustainability report just just last week and we made a number of commitments in it. And the I one of the most ago carbon-neutral by twenty twenty five and we think this is really important. I think this is also I think in every industry this is I think this is. This is a movement and way if something that everybody has getting behind for a long time now and it's getting a lot of momentum. I think if anything this even accelerated that and I think that people are more and more conscious and every industry including the fashion industry and the industry about being sustainable and sustainability then ability is something that's always been very important than we want to take that and we're going to the next level and so we wanted to be too many things including being carpet. Mitchell by twenty twenty five and that involves going into our supply chain and figuring out places where we met the most prevalent and finding out ways where we can mitigate thought so that we leave of carbon foot around the world. I believe there was also a pledge to start using only reclaimed for. Can you tell me how that works? Going forward yeah for sure. I didn't WANNA bring part of it as you know. We use for and jackets because their products are functional in for Pouty for work purposes. And we've decided that you know we I still. The most important is the most functional That we can use for these purposes. We decided that we're going to only use reclaim for going for twenty twenty two and shifts our entire supply chain to only archer products. That are already in the marketplace. So that we're not by new for so to speak. And we think that that makes a product already sustainable. Even more sustainable. I think for a sustainable become if biodegradable abundant resource very sustainable as opposed to plastics and synthetic furs a lot of companies which never biodegrade and are made of plastic and so be able to switch to use it only reclaim for I think is a big impact and you talking about plastic. One of our commitment says that we're eliminating plot for supply chain and from all purpose and I another big move and know. I think these are all really important. I think you know being a leader in this is important. Your says always take a leadership position on on everything that we've done and I think that you know this is the right time. Change THE WAY. We all think about the process that we make and make sure that they are sustainable. Danny just lastly. I know I've taken a lot of your time. I just have one last question in in this time you already touched on on the leadership part of it you know. We live in an age. Where the consumer has such a big say in with buying power on unware they want to go and I think that's driven a lot of this sustainability movement in itself. Obviously the fashion industry does get a bad rap. Sometimes a lot of companies are making massive shifts and massive commitments. Just like what you have laid out but I wonder if this current pandemic sort of move that forward even more quickly. If you're thinking about those things with your team today now. I think that that the great question I think for the whole world. I think it does that. You know. Give everybody pause and reflected and realize you know all of the things that we've value about this line and we value about our lives here and and and and and how fortunate we are and that we need to be taking the right steps to to maintain the sustainability of of everything. That's job and so yeah. I think it definitely will tolerate sovereign a lot of things including the shift towards more sustainable product. Danny this has been fascinating. Thank you so much for your time. It's been a pleasure. Thanks for having me. Any reese president and CEO of Canada. Goose speaking there from Toronto and finally on Today's program. We're off to Paris to meet Deborah Newburg. The founder of menswear label debone factor. The phrase and French is used to describe a work of quality something. The brand stands for through and through from suits to knits and accessories. Monocle readers may be familiar with the label and Deborah Story of doing things her own way in the very competitive world of Parisian fashion. Deborah joins us from her temporary studio today where she is indeed working alongside a well. Socially distanced team member and has been so kind to lend her advice to smaller independent fashion labels as well navigating uncertainty right now deborah. Welcome to the program first off. How are things going for you? we've been doing quite well as well as possible. I would say. We got confined a little earlier than the rest of France. Because I asked my team to take all of their working supplies and just the weekend before confinement you know. Make sure they were safe at home. And I didn't want to take any risks so we were all confined on the weekend Before confinement and then we worked. We all worked from home for one week before we decided to kind of red distribute work Until I had a little clearer vision of what was going on so basically the product team was on a break And the digital and marketing team as well as commercial team was working to get some info from clients from our wholesale accounts on the one side and on the other side to continue Marketing the collection and working with our APP and honoring our orders And actually our digital business really well In March and April we were higher than our goals are targets so that was pretty good so it was great to have the digital product manager on task for the whole of the lockdown Deborah. To hear you are doing as well as can be expected. Let's move on to questions now. Both come from the same person. In FACT IN TORONTO CAL. Kaminsky runs a swimwear. Line called Bay there. Let's hear cows question now? Hey there kyle here from bay there if you're unfamiliar bather DOT COM amends. Surfin swimwear brand based in Toronto got a quick question for the Monaco crowd. It's regarding wholesale so a big part of our business is obviously wholesale With no trade shows happening this season the future of doing wholesale seems a little more complicated than usual. How do you think we tackle this? In a world where trade shows aren't happening and pitching new collections is a lot more difficult so first of all they're argo to be some trade shows. It's still a little uncertain. Who'S GONNA attend? Were still waiting on that but Pity is still happening for menswear Men Perez is going to happen. I mean there's GonNa be Fashion Week. But all of the trade shows are putting some digital systems in place so that Collections can be presented. Digitally I think there has to be some kind of organisation kind of both up a system that allows brands to present their collections online. And kind of minting their accounts and then working with the trade shows to see if they have digital solutions to reach their buyers is something that can be put in place pretty quickly. In case you know at this This brand owner is not able to attend any trade shows or to travel so the digital part is really important Then I think there is we. We have to kind of innovate and be creative about the ways that we show the collections. My friend knee from Post-imperial th deadline post imperial made a great presentation about fashion revolutions. And how we can envision fashioned in a more sustainable way and with new with a you know a mix of ecology and technology and one of the things that he was saying was to make you know. Presentations can be done in different ways. You can make a film to make your presentation. You can make a video you can you know. Decide to make those presentations with within different media and then just send the Info to your buyers one to one instead of waiting for the trade show you can also communicate with them via zoom You can show your line on models via zoom and do one to one appointments. There are a lot of things that technology. Can you give us to kind of bridge? That travel gap. I think well that leads nicely to follow up question which is about brand and retailer relationships. My second question is how do we move forward with retailers? After so many retailers had to cancel their orders or are not paying for orders that were shipped before the pandemic started and What does the future of the brand retailer relationship look like in a post corona world? While it's all a one to one thing I mean we had to call every single one of our clients one to one when they didn't answer we wrote again and we tried to call them. Were talking to them. And it's only through that one to one communication that you know We kind of understand what situation they're in and if they had to reduce or cancel part of their order How to service them at best so that we can make up for that later. What are their needs? And it's just like I think it's to go back to clients what they need Because if they're not buying they're not so there's nothing we can do about that we can just try to keep the relationship as healthy as possible so that we understand what we can offer them and ask them to play hand in hand with us and you know just Limit the cancellation of the reductions and on the other side. Make sure that we are digitalized enough. So that we can keep on selling online and depending less and less on them. Just lastly briefly Debra. Are you excited about this time? And where the industry is going. Yes I think I am. I'm scared but I'm also excited. It's been a time When we've been able to reassess what we're doing how we working what you wanted to push. Further working now on our debt stock fabrics. Because we'd like to work with those and recycle some that's our fabrics to make new clothes out of them and Be a little smarter about the the wastes that is caused by the collection system and find a way to recycle it so this I think this is also a good time to reassess everything. We're doing a good look at you. Know where businesses are at what our priorities are and how we can push what makes us different. And what makes us special and on a more personal level? I also feel like it's a time where the people who are the closest to us. Stick around you know during crisis periods. I feel like it's kind of a gust of wind. That's like a taking away all the bad leaves and just like keeping the healthy trees in there so that you know we really know what our core team is what our core values are and who are core people are and these people are still around. Debra newburg founder of menswear label debone factors speaking to me from Paris. That's it for today's program. Thanks to our producer Holly Fischer and to Christine Evans. Who Mixed and edited this? Show and don't forget your questions in for next week's expert panel question at Monocle Dot Com. I'm Daniel Thank you so much for listening and goodbye.

Canada twenty twenty Los Angeles Paris Toronto Ed Steve Tidball Danny president and CEO L. A. Deborah CEO CO founder Mitchell Jamie waters Nick tidball founder President Daniel
Friday 11 October

Monocle 24: Midori House

31:34 min | 1 year ago

Friday 11 October

"This is Monaco's you're listening to Monaco's house view first broadcast on the eleventh of October Two Thousand Nineteen on monocle twenty four saying that eighteen people were detained at Kito Apple and the majority of them were Venezuelan says accusations from the and a warm welcome to today's program I'm joined first of all by MARKLE's America's editor at large at stocker and it might be a shortcut to the snazzy wardrobe with your dreams that's all ahead I'm Tom Edwards Motorcycles House view starts now indigenous groups that make up around eight percent of the population now argument being that raising fuel prices is only GonNa make the economic inequality in good order because of violent protests what exactly it's been happening indeed you're right the government's move to Guac Hill from Kito basically a week of protests that started regime of Modano who is broadly speaking more more conservative or more sort of market friendly rather than his predecessor you get rid of subsidies to to feel that have worked a Lotta people around the country most notably doing says about the power of art artifacts in international diplomacy and he asks this more are fashioned it's Jamie waters will join me to ask if private rental let's start with Ecuador serious upheaval but it lightly over the past few weeks if a government relocates you know generally speaking things are not being accused of heavy-handedness from the place indigenous groups are climbing at least five people have died the government says that numbers only I listen I worked very hard getting ready for this we're looking at latte affairs and add all come to you first of all good to have you with us in London thank you as the opening gambit of the International Monetary Fund that is looming large Ecuador reached an agreement with them back in February for a cash injection really speaking over austerity measures imposed by the government of Lenin Modiano basically the decision by that government to the couple of years has this week been making the news for more of the right reasons more Nichols culture editor Lamelo will pack what a disagreement over one of the world's most famous you too and then on top of all of that really kind of swell of accusations and misinformation just recently one government minister is it too early or is it impossible to have a bit of a read on potential outcomes here is there a you know a stabilizing effect what could prompt nat- or does this feel excu days whether these indigenous groups are prepared to listen to the government the government has tried to table certain measures like debt restructuring for companies that is the important elections around the corner. We'll also hear from Chris NOCCO acting fast for a closer look at one of his home countries Australia which often if dates various austerity measures need to be taken in order to save money and put the country on the right path it really just depends on how good the negotiations are going to be over the net the in the country that tends to affect indigenous groups more the non indigenous groups even worse so they've been protesting the chick correspondent and Latin America Broadcast Linchpin jet an endo goes oh no snickering for tongue. We have an amazing turnaround in the next few weeks but it it really is down to the fact that the the the economy has been struggling again as I was saying read the risk of asking you an impossible to answer question you've described a situation that is fast moving it's rather fluid and has a great deal of uncertainty claiming counterclaim so often some you know economic crisis a lot of corruption scandals but the poverty level never reached at that point and when mockery was elected it was such a hope for a lot of Argentinians you know a government that Venezuela is somehow embroiled in this whole mass and they are wanting to destabilise the situation isn't great and I think really the reason that Mudie Sumatra is going to lose or looks like he will lose he he you know because he had this more kind of central image more market friendly but I mean he wasn't a very good president in those terms so I think that makes struggling but it's not enough for these groups so it really will depend on both sides being willing to to listen to one another otherwise could will whoever the next president is be looking to clean up I mean a big mess down to the economy as Manda was sort of alluding to a bit like you know so often in the region but if a powder keg well it's kind of and we'll get into about Argentina and strange the in both of these two cases there is the sort of figure I am I am F- and years of struggle and so this idea of going back to the IMF is very unpopular with boss. Wade's very easy for about two Fernandez the main candidate of opposition to win and Christina kitchen various mart as usual she was not leading candidate because she knows she's been talented she used to say sort of very sort of negative way that you know Argentina tended to have an economic crisis every ten years they were sort of just waiting for the international community is their investment in a potential winner is there someone that you know the broader world would prefer to see innocence I've been wondering because you know inflation is over fifty percent you know the past is just losing value there's been a devaluation oversee that was implemented by Argentineans in such a state poverty levels rose to eighty five percent which you can say anything you want a bonus Turkish near Chris acution redoing the presidency. There's over the country I I don't know how Argentina gets out of this sort of cyclical mess that it doesn't seem to be able to get out of I remember from the time that I lived there people four point two billion dollars and that sort of in a way the the bogeyman of the you know the the groups are against because obviously the IMF then dictate A divisive figure to say the least where where do we stand in terms of her popularity both within and I guess we'll see importantly without Argentina is at the end of the month alpes reports the release of prisoners linked to Christina kitchen his previous administration is this related to the possibility of electoral success for Care Kito Ecuador I've only been Jones I've only been there once but it's just the one time Newsweek let's go to Argentina though where with election I sort of sort of world-weary expectation that this is just the way things aren Argentina and sadly at the moment that sort of seems to be and Tina it is hated by some sectors of society because one can't forget the two thousand and one economic crisis which of course led to a huge bailout from the she has her like I don't know twenty five percent of the vote but then she'll get the moderate as well we've auto let me ask you obviously the benefit I suppose that much of a she's really been keeping a low profile like Fernando were saying she is tainted and she's aware of that she's been spending a lot of time in Cuba where her he is market-friendly so he tends to make investors and organizations like the IMF and the World Bank extremely happy compared to someone like this next up today with joined by Monaco's new acting affairs editor. Chris CIRMAC Chris Russian is going to be defined speaking of this of strangely cyclical nature of politics and under what about Kushner because you know some we've talked about so often around this table here has a fairly good relationship with many leaders around the world so I think a lot of people you know they feared the return of the populist measures of Kieschnick even though I don't think this will happen cree but again as I said earlier the the you know macrey had to go to I'm F which is a serious bogeyman if we think it's in bogeyman in Ecuador who announced indication's she's a Fernandez to make things confusing you know who are worried about populace measures is super interesting about this election is that we haven't seen what do these long periods of watching this country that incredibly close up or from your your station in the US what kind of mess perhaps Fernando well I think you know I would be very surprised actually if mark would pull off a reelection because you know frankly the the economy in motoric government we're not going to be the same as under Cristina Fernandez Decatur and the populace measures so I think a little bit of image smoothing is happening at the moment as well sure is actually L. and spending time there so she's been traveling a lot to Cuba I'm what's also interesting is that Fernandez Alberta that is has been eating itself I'm not saying it's going to be as as terrible as in two thousand and two thousand and one but the economic situation is really how this really escalate even further the inside serve at soccer did you have been your best in Buenos Aires in Argentina which will come to just a moment for awhile it spend much time in in we'll post face to the world perhaps yeah I think there's various ways that we can talk about that but when it comes to the politics it's been in the ice or even the international community AH rough few years for Austria I think they've become most famous or you know the chancellor they had a bus includes first of all became most famous for shutting down essentially talking openly quite openly about corruption that he was considering doing with with Russians so now we've had an election there crisis within the Freedom Party the sort of far right party that he was in coalition with which had this huge scandal of a video that came out of their leader essentially stopping the refugee crisis by shutting down the bulk convert back in twenty sixteen and then we've had this tremendous because this time she has a very different characters the main candidate we're very interesting to see how the relationship with Brazil will be with scenario because both of us had clearly that he a bit of a mix there but yes I thought you know we talk enough about the states and Austria has been specially in the news it feels like this week and on Monaco's various checks so had a similar shift recently of you know the the five star movement kind of I having a coalition of the far right and then now moving a bit for a lot of the votes from the far right Freedom Party after their scandal so now he's back in a position to form a government in Austria and he might do almost a comedian like swing cranston complicated and mixed but my father's Austrian so I do speak German I should say with a bit of an Austrian accent my mother's Americans think motives to market is that kind of president that is more respected abroad then in Argentina because he always you know looks like a statesman he travels of his from the Freedom Party on the far right to the Greens and that's that's everything you know everything that Joe is talking about right now would this actually be possible sending people to the US to try and show up the image of the next government he's trying to allay the fears of investors of business people to say this is going to be and what's fascinating to me is to put it in a interesting positive it's the same person coots who came out right on top he sort of stolen skepticism it's probably okay yeah I think I think it should be viewed with some healthy skepticism I mean for me it's interesting to compare it say with the with a place like Italy because Italy figure in the you know the the five star movement even though they are now back in government Lost a lot of support as a result of that Sebastian quits I find fascinating the far right by being quite anti immigrants in in much of his rhetoric at it's meant that he has been the central figure and stayed the central figure of Australian politics instead of the far right and that gives him now this opportunity to try and swing in the other direction again I do find that fascinating one of the things that he said quotes he gave because there are few as you mentioned so the very monocle friendly reasons why we're interested in particular does it feel a bit like Australia is I don't know showing a bit of a new Dr Movement struggled for a long time to rein in Salvini on the far right if you will they sort of took all the oxygen out of the room if you will Slovenian he became the main gentlemen fantastic to insights from both today that's Monaco's at stock and Ferdinando Gustav Sheku here on Markle's house view and we'll be right back after this because he has somehow managed to keep the far-right at bay during this coalition and there was obviously a scandal that brought the far right down some ways but even before that he's sort of taken the two left again what the interesting thing maybe you know as much as you can have skepticism about the interesting thing for me about Austria is in the case of Italy say the fives over some newspapers on the briefing and Chris you're GonNa talk to us a little bit about Austria but tell us first why you are particularly well placed to do exactly so being preconceived wisdom about the structure of this political spectrum from from one side to the other and that maybe true or is this alarming about someone who can shift oh come to you thank you very much good to have you in the studio you you sound surprised to be here you are regular listeners of course will have spotted or heard already view coming up today a special appearance from our beloved America's editor at large ED stocker for a round up on what's been disruptive week in Latin America and look ahead on and that's this is where it gets interesting right how far should he go should he have not gone in his rhetoric in his policies he's sort of taken the wind out of the about cooperating with the Greens for example migration he feels might not be much of an issue because he sort of united in and he just said well nobody is in favor of illegal illegal in wax and wane like that I don't know cause for concern when someone can as you called it chameleon like a reinvention I guess as long as we view it with certain degree of healthy that we won't get into let's talk a bit about Australia exactly a lot of the press if we're looking Austrian politics particularly not super positive over recent times but things may be shifting I four somebody who seemed to be very far right to then go to the New Orleans for coalition well I guess in some sense is one should welcome such a shape shifting and and look at how it's challenge hidden want a better financing Christina to win then I think it'd be a terrible relationship between Brazil and Argentina but let's wait and see who's GonNa win I mean yeah I mean the Max also it was good it was good opportunity to introduce myself I'm talking about one of my home country is exactly one of one of your home countries I feel I feel envious particularly big and Britain gratien and nobody's in favor of people drowning in the sea either so I think we can come to an agreement on this he certainly capable politician nothing else and a and a man who can work the room work the space well so politically things may be back on the rails for Austria which were ongoing Chris Segui facts if you needed reminding my name's Tom Edwards from me and all the rest of the team thank you very much tuning in in just a moment we'll have a word Monica's house view from fashion editor Adia from the Germans it was a German postal worker who first proposed essentially sort of mass producing publishing postcards and having this as a souvenir the idea of fifty years of the postcard and what intrigues me about this particular is that I never knew this was an Australian invention and yet maybe I was right because we oh resale of items has become easier more commonplace than ever before but other companies are starting to branch out offering common rental facilitating transact transaction fame for for different inventions that have been created and I'd say Austria is no different I find it interesting because in this case they yes they in some ways you could say they stole it a postcard self had already existed as well format but nobody had done it as a souvenir or something that you send around through the post and a year before This one hundred fifty in my experience of the German ones was not as positive I did a trip from Berlin to Frankfurt on the trains and it was one of these where was in you know carriage with six other people yeah so this is an interesting story I think because it's an opportunity maybe that Austria scene and those who have heard Tyler would have heard about this but yes it's an option it was the next from across the like these origin stories tell us briefly about this one so yes origin stories are always complicated aren't they every country likes to claim a certain amount the next thing you know various other countries that's a lovely idea we're going to take that as well and you had it in you know it moved to Canada and Germany eventually as well and other countries and we can make make the night train sexy again and they're doing a tremendous overhaul which I do think which I also agree make sense 'cause like you I've done this I've done this trip Austrian has taken when essentially Germany's Deutsche Bahn shut down its overnight operations and Austria's kind of swooped in and said well we see an opportunity here me anniversary the Germans decided thought and thought long and hard in this postal worker was like I'd love this idea we have to do it there's a huge discussion the German Postal Service and they decided no it's too Oh and it was all quite dingy and it was an old train and just it wasn't this sort of glamorous experience that you imagine so I'd welcome a bit of an overhaul from the Austrians on this now I fashion rightly picks up a stick for its deplorable carbon footprint while fashion houses waking up to this developments in tech comes enabling action at the consumer end as well between fashion Easter's Jamie autism uncles fashion editor joins me now to tell us more what do you make because this is a trend that we've talked about for some time I think I don't know maybe it fits with soda the old imperialistic if you will ambitions it Austria once had to now go back to the old the overnight train time and it's certainly something that's not going anywhere yes I mean sustainability is one of those things that everyone generally is talking about rush on doing it a year later Australia well we'll take it we're happy to do this. We find this a great idea Austria Hungary in those days and they went for it and then right Matt Spider that we can all get on board with wow another pun I'm on I'm on fire today let me just ask you very briefly about another sort of anniversary one hundred. I don't think you're right there helping these accusations charges so-called greenwashing in certain areas but I wonder is this being driven by more sustainability minded consumers Tori House I guarantee you he'll write back to everyone receives every every single one of clunk he's not crossing he's crooked fingers or anything I get from you it's it's definitely like probably they major talking point in the fashion industry at the moment and it's one of those terms that kind of can be used and

Argentina International Monetary Fund editor Monaco Christina Ecuador Chris NOCCO Australia Kito Apple Monaco Kito America MARKLE Tom Edwards Lenin Modiano Jamie waters Modano Lamelo Nichols
Wednesday 31 October

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:48 min | 2 years ago

Wednesday 31 October

"You're listening to the briefing. First broadcast on the thirty first of all Tober two thousand eighteen on monocle twenty four. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live from studio. One here at Madari house in London. I'm Georgina Godwin coming up the man investigating Russian interference in the US. Election says he's being deliberately smeared by right wing critics. We'll have the latest also ahead. We find out about Croatia's attempts to join the euro and ask whether NATO and Moscow could come to blows off the coast of Norway. Plus will have a digest of the stories in today's monocle minute. And find out how London's police service is branching out into high street function all that right here on the briefing with me Georgina Godwin. The US special counsel. Robert Muller has asked the F B I to look into claims that women were offered money to fabricate sexual assault allegations against him. Moore is the special counsel. He leads the investigation into Russia's attempts to influence the US election in two thousand and sixteen Scott, Lucas is a professor of US politics at the university of Birmingham, and he joins me on the line. Now firstly Scott, what is this all about? I wish you had about three hours for this one. So it starts was with two people a Republican activist and conspiracy theorist Jack Bergman and then a discredited hedge fund manager and being Trump supporter named Jacob wall and allegedly although you could try to yesterday on Twitter. It looks like the two of them set up this kind of laborat- but in out to tempt defray more. I supposed rape in two thousand ten oh, I hasten to have this rape didn't occur. But what they did. Is it appears that they created a fake company, and they created fake documents. And set on Thursday. A woman will come forward to accuse Moore. On top of this, it appears that they contacted journalist a couple of weeks ago to say this story is breaking we've got women who are going to contact you. And they're going to reveal details of this. Now. One of the woman has come forward, a very well respected lawyer an analyst Jennifer Talbot's said, yeah, they they tried to calm and try. They offered me money to come forward and make these claims against Muller a second woman had been emailing journalists to say that she had been offered money. But that she hadn't taken the bait as it were. But it appears in turn that she might be a fake account. Whereas the people behind this conspiracy hope that the media would bite on this fake woman put out her story. And then they would say look the fake media is trying to discredit this and trying to say it's a hoax. It is. I real story. So it's kind of an elaborate plot. But it all unraveled because the company that was set up culture fire intelligence that was supposedly discovering this about Muller. It was Reggie. In the name of this discredited. Hedge fund manager Jacob wall. It's numbers from around the world because supposedly it operates an Israel in Scotland in Europe, in fact, all the member numbers go back to voicemail, which is which is basically linked to Jacob walls mullet mother. So what started off from apparently these two gentlemen to try to take down Robert Muller in the Trump. Russia investigation has been exposed within twenty four hours as being likely hoax. And was there was there at any point any allegation that can be proven in any way from a real person. Absolutely. Not absolutely not all that was there was this supposed document, which was supposed to court filing by this woman. It was a court filing that was riddled by spelling mistakes, the one right wing organization that posted it called gateway pundit has pulled the documents now because I think they realized that the jig is up. We will see if Jack Berkman this Republican operative produces this woman on Thursday. Day and tries to keep it going. But now it appears to be very crude attempt to take down more because as soon as the congressional elections are over next week. And as we get into the new year, the focus again will return to the Trump Russia investigation and the big question. When does Robert Mueller think he has enough evidence to take a swing at Donald Trump? People are quite worried about this Trump supporters are quite worried about this. So they'll continue to try to undermine molar before he has put this all together makes Trump calls Trump to account, and do you think that this is a case of who will rid me of this turbulent priests in? So, you know, not coming from the White House directly, but people who party loyalists thinking, well, we must step in and do what we can to save Trump wouldn't necessarily say it's partly loyalists in terms of Republican party officials. I would say it is part of that. Strange breed of social media activists and just outright chancers who use the space that's out there for disinformation. To try to do their bit as it were for the Donald. There is a possible link a possible link between one former Trump campaign operative who's already under investigation by more won't give his name for legal reasons. But I don't think at this point that this linked back to Trump and his inner circle. So this has been reported to the FBI they're investigating what happens next. Well, if this is a false allegation, including a false document, which claims to be a cornerback affidavit that is a crime to put out those types of documents, that's fraud. And it is possible that if Jacob Woolas tied to this. And again, Jacob polls the youngest person in US history to be banned from futures trading by the national futures association, if it's tied to Jack Berkman who has put out false conspiracy theories in the past they could face criminal charges, Scott. Thank you very much. Indeed that was Scott Lucas. You're listening to the briefing. Let's get the latest business news now a positive end to a terrible month, the global stock markets you in putz joins us from Bloomberg you in just how bad has toba being elegy lots of people thinking about Halloween tonight. But he's being a pretty terrifying month for global stock investors, the total amount global stocks so far this month. Eight trillion dollars that's eight million million dollars as being the worst month globally for stocks in six years the MCI country outing next dropping more than eight percents in October. It's being pretty rotten. Lots of things troubling investors. This month really at China, which has been the engine of growth. The so many years seems to be enjoying something of a slowdown there. A big trade worries with Donald Trump's tariffs again on China has reverberations in many other countries around the world as well. And emerging markets showing some. Signs of stress. Not least in Turkey. We've seen over the last couple of months, but today global stocks having a pretty good day. So a pretty good end to Rutten. Now, you mentioned China under th you could just give us an update of what's going on there. Yes. SME can only data outs of the world's second largest economy. The posting manages index which is quite a timely indicates economic activity for manufacturing dropping to reading of fifty point two. Now, fifty is most the line between contraction and expansion of that shows at manufacturing. He's only just growing in China. And that's by Chinese STAN is pretty bad news. And also the non-manufacturing gauge also slowing as well. But says some store today foam, China's leadership they signal that further stimulus measures being planned statement from the bureau meeting today Cheb, president Xi Jingping he says that downward pressure is increasing in China and the government needs to take timely measures to counter this. They've already introduced the raft of measures to stabilize sends. In China, boosting the quality in the financial system and texted options for households and measures to help exports. But so far, it looks like those things not really boosting the Chinese economy, perhaps as much as they might like, thank you very much to you you, and that was you and pulse from Bloomberg. You're listening to the briefing. Nato's powerful military alliance and Russian forces both holding training exercises in the same area of new ways coast. Well, let's get the latest on this. With Elizabeth brewer who leads the modern deterrence program at the Royal United Services institute in London. Thanks for coming in. Elizabeth I can you outline won't the NATO gills involve and exactly where that taking place. Yes. So it's called to juncture eighteen it's the largest military exercise conducted by NASA's insanity of the Cold War involves fifty thousand troops around fifty thousand troops from the twenty nine dates a Member States. They're seen somebody from Iceland. Plus Sweden Finland who are as you know, very close on ice of NATO, even though they are not members. So fifty thousand troops around ten thousand nine vehicles and about sixty five vessels, including US aircraft carrier and more than two hundred aircraft. So it's it's a gigantic exercise involving a lot of logistical coordination. And it's taking place off the coast of Norway for the naval parts in the skies above Norway, Sweden, Finland for them aviation parts and in south central Norway for the non part, and what's the purpose of it? So if you think about practicing, the violin native you have to practice every day. So that if you have to perform a concert one day, it doesn't really matter. How good you violin is if you haven't practiced. But if you have practice, you'll be comfortable, you knew exactly what to do and military exercises are like that. They they don't have a particular offensive nature for the most part. It's just that you have to coordinate so just need to do what to do. I need to know what to do at any given moment, and we have to remember they started large large organizations involving lots of equipment that has to be moved around. So it's essentially coordination logistics, and that that needs to be practicing and national armed forces. Do it all the time. And I do it in swollen groups quite often. And this is obviously a large all of NATO exercise. And and so it's it's taking place in Norway simply because nobody offered to host it. But it the location doesn't matter as much as the simply the coordination. Because that's the main challenge in combat situation. It's so what they what they are working on their for their practice practicing. There can be replicated really in in most most combat says situations, of course, the location does matter in one aspect, which is that it's close to Russia house Russia reacted. So Russia likes to say that it's that it's very close to Russian the land part is taking place one thousand kilometers from Norway's border with Russia, which is quite far. But the naval part is obviously along the coast of Norway. And so as they've Asian part than I think. Russia has ceased on that to to essentially suggest that NATO is belligerent or aggressive and being the way. I mean, I can see how it might be perceived that way, but how volatile actually is the situation. So it's always wallets Heil. When when it's in close proximity to to an adversary. And but in this case, I it's so we talking about sixty five naval vessels. And and that's not a lot it on the coast of Norway, but Russia has still ceased on its in in in its official. Points so briefing against NATO us, and were and of course, now they're conducting as of tomorrow their own exercise off the coast of Norway. I think simply to make the point that, you know, don't try we're we're not gonna we're not gonna let this go on notice that we'll we'll out a little bit of provocation on of our own. In fact, I think it's it's quite provocative, and but Mehta's surely offering to send some kind of message to Russia. They also trying to make a point they are. I think the location matters less. Of course, no way is a good location because it's Norway off to host exercise, but it would be quite provocative to to have such an exercise in in the Baltic states, for example, by Norway where where the land part is. It's a thousand kilometers from Russia is not that close. And then if NATO didn't exercise together, then it would be seen as being very weak. So essentially knock responding to to Russian provocations and people say, well, what's reliance is this, you know, they claim to be infantilized, but they don't they don't exercise together. So it it's it wasn't exercise that needs to happen because during the Cold War these large exercises where where much more frequent and since then we have become a bit complacent. We meaning NATO, but I think that the interesting part would be tomorrow and the two following days to see what happens when when Russia conducted missile exercise in in the same office that said NATO vessels are in. And by the way, NATO aircraft has to have to pass through the skies were these missiles flying to get from the legion s basis we Swedish Finnish aspects, so potentially quite a dangerous situation. Would you say is with that relations between Russia and NATO are at their lowest ebb since the Cold War. I think that would be fair to say I wish there were some positive elements. I mean, the one positive thing is that there are still contacts. I mean, there are some sort of consultations even though they are not very regular. But it's it's just a very unfortunate situation. And I must say it's it's mostly due to Russia's actions towards Ukraine. And now, I know rush listeners will say well that was. That's not the only thing and they was aggressive in in expanding to the Baltic states. But the Baltic states wanted to join it's just an extremely volatile situation. And from that point of view, I think it's good that NATO is connecting this exercise in Norway rather than the Baltic states. It has thank you very much. Indeed that was Elizabeth brew. His what else is making the news today. Indonesia's army says a search and rescue team has found part of a lion air plane that crashed into the sea with hundred eighteen nine people on board flight JT six ten crush shortly after takeoff from Jakarta earlier this week rescuers of deployed pinger locators in an attempt to try and find the plane's black boxes. Critics of Brazil's president-elect J. Both scenario says his plans to merge, the country's agriculture and environment ministries could endanger the Amazon rainforest. The new Brazilian leader is supported by the agricultural business lobby. A former environment minister said the move was tragic and India has unveiled the world's tallest statue it stuns at one hundred eighteen meters. High and cost more than four hundred thirty million dollars to build the Indian prime minister Narendra. Modi says it will attract tourists to the western state of Gujarat. But critics argue that the structure is a waste of public money. There's it some of the headlines but following today. Here a monocle twenty four. The commission has been holding talks with Croatia about the country's prospects of joining the euro guide. Luna is Monaco's Balkans. Correspondent and he's on the line now guy. What does Croatia have to do to fulfill the criteria to join the euro quite a bit? It's got to first of all get into the exchange rate mechanism, which these days is known as e all ram to. So it's gotta get into that too. Sort of some of its finances out to be able to join the euro itself. It's not ready to join your to yet. It's passing the criteria. When it comes to inflation, the interest rates and the budget deficit eight needs to reduce its public debt, and it needs to sort out its legislation. So it's compatible with the paean union. So get into that. Then that in itself is a process being any L ram too. So we're looking at the government the Croatian government's talk at his five to seven years down the line. And what structural reforms then would be necessary. Well, the square interesting because Valdez doom bar to Branca's who's the the EU Commissioner in charge of the euro was in as grab on Monday on the talked about the particular vulnerabilities that Croatia has and he said, the heist of both external and internal debt is risky in the context of low potential growth and he wants to see greater utilization of labor. He says he says the business environment is still rich restrictive which hinders competitiveness and investment and public services away down by the fragmentation of the public administration, which all the says, I think, you know, if we're going to do a T L on this sort yourselves out chops, and it looks like this quite a lot of work to how would joining the euro impacts on the Croatian economy now, that's a very interesting point. Because when you go back to go to Croatia the moment, you'll be spending. Kuna and the Kuna since its creation in one thousand nine hundred four has been pretty much pegged to initially the deutschemark. And now the euro. So if you look at movements in the value of the you'll wrote the Kuna will be Mirroring, those movements every step of the way, it's extremely predictable. So in some ways, if you switch to the euro, it wouldn't make that much difference for a lot of people. I think there are couple of things which would change immediately though. Because at the moment people do exchange money between Kuna enduro simply because some services all denominated in euros. So people have to pay for them in euro on. This is costing them money nor point three percent of GDP in Croatia is currently being spent on foreign exchange transactions simply to go from Kuna -til, right? We'll vice versa. Even so people are very wary of what might happen if they go into the and it's about two thirds of people at the moment say that they're not really in favor of. Croatia. Joined the euro, the main driver behind that seems to be the fear the prices would rise if they did. But to be honest with you think everything's pretty much baked in any way. So I'd be surprised if the where any great lurches notwithstanding the old unscrupulous business that might see it as an opportunity to hike their price tags. And if this does happen, do you think other nations in the Balkans would be eager to follow suit? Well, if you look around Croatia, certainly isn't the only country which hasn't joined the euro now every country that's in your bomb Britain and Denmark is obliged to be to Joe to join the your zone to replace Aaron currency with the euro, there's a quote a reasonable list of countries that haven't done this Sweden. Poland Hungary, Czech Republic, Bulgaria and Romania. The latter two, of course, being a bit Bulkin and in this region. They haven't done that Bill areas. The the keenest one of that group to join. They've they're about thing that police too. Join Yarram to as we speak very keen to do this. And it's part of the European project. And it's theoretically, an obligation. So thing this is why you having support of noises coming out of the paean Commissioner, even though Croatia has still got a lot of work to do to be ready to join the Oro guy. Thank you very much. Indeed that was Monaco's Belkin correspondent guided looney. Twenty minutes because the top of the hour, and it's time now to review a few of the other stories making the news today, I'm joined in the studio by Monaco's news editor piece of earth for those of you who don't know pizza. Edit a daily online digest the monocle minute. Pita? Welcome. Hello. So what have we got today? I see that we kicking off with Brazil. We all we've got a store here which came in from America's bureau. It's about the new love interest of that Donald Trump has with the newly minted president elect of Brazil, jibe Bolsonaro. So obviously, we know that Trump was among the first to congratulate Boston are following his election win on Sunday. And obviously, we know there are a lot of similarities between the two Bosnian cooled the Trump for the tropics. And it's no surprise then that perhaps the two might get on. So both scenario, obviously, he's he's also still recovering from his knife wound and say, he's effectively. Saying he's going to go on a foreign tour of the people who most most quickly to congratulate him. So he's said he's going to go to the White House in the coming months. He's also first popping across to Chile to see his pro business, president contemporary Sebestyen Pineyro over there. Now, one other big similarity between both NAR and Donald Trump is that attitude towards China and both know has been very complimentary to with Taiwan, which is annoying China at the moment now, China is having a big huge high-profile import expo and Donald Trump is refusing to participate in that. That's another story in the minute. Yeah. Exactly. So that's that's story. Number two. So I mean, this is this is extremely interesting. Also in the fact that. You know, obviously with the escalating trade war the kind of a bit of a standoff occurring there. Beijing next week is going to assume. Rather Shanghai is where the international import export is going to be stage is going to see overseas. Businesses set up stalls there in the hope of courting the lucrative Chinese market in order to mitigate any economic setbacks suffered there, so you know, it's going to be it's gonna be interesting because obviously it's been heavily publicized publicized is how big political boost from Xi Jinping as well who's hosting banquets for foreign dignitaries. But it's going to be difficult. See how that's going to have any buying from Washington. Even though it's something which is desired by Beijing. And then also you have the twice-yearly count on fair as well, which is next port driven event, which has been selling the made in China brand since nineteen fifty seven now, of course, with all these high profile visitors to China on the way home, they might want to stop affirmative Aren are and we're best is to do that. Then Hong Kong's top hotel. That's the peninsular and it has. Whole new side to its business. Absolutely. It does say, you know, we've we've seen we've been following this lot on on the monocle minute. And in the pages of the magazine as well. Which the fact that cruises are no longer for pensioners shuffleboard and really bad entertainment effectively. We we're seeing kind of a new era of cruises, which is for young affluent luxuriance millennials, whatever buzzword you want to use to describe them. And yeah, the peninsula hotel in Hong Kong has announced a hundred meters Sunseeker yacht for which is going to be more victorious hard before its guests to luxuriate on deck. And as I said, this is this is part of an ongoing trend that we're seeing Ritz Carlton in the pieces. Well, said an unmanned is it's so far unnamed. I vessel took to the water in Spanish shipyard. Then also we've seen that silver see has become Royal Caribbean. So, you know, we're we're wondering whether the hotel industry is going to be at the vanguard of overturning this outdated mode of transport all luxury very very interesting stuff topped travel tip here. If you go to the peninsula, go to the jets on the very top floor amazing view as you relieve yourself Colleen harbor the gems, how did you get in there? What because it's a tourist attraction. They'd let ladies in. It's fine. You just you just have to avoid the person the attendance is absolutely with unfortunately can actually use the facilities. But. The view. Getting a view if you ever else is easing to burn. Thank you very much. Indeed, log onto the monocle minute monocle dot com forward slash minute. You're listening to the briefing. And finally London's police force which is called the metropolitan police service is looking to follow the NYPD's example by using its name brand clothing and other merchandise, but will it take off while Monaco's fashion editor, Jamie waters joins me now in the studio. Looking quite military yourself brand new military haircuts have to say, very nice, Jamie. This has precedent. The NYPD's the line of fashion that they have has been pretty successful massively successful. And the the the met has has cited and my pity as their kind of inspiration. I mean, payday merchandise is it's all over the place in York and LAPD was also successful that's worth millions and millions. I think that's kind of what they're thinking. That's what they've said that they're inspired by. But I think this is quite a different case there. It's a very different brand. Because he's talking about the place as a brand. And the that London's place is a very different kind of cased from from New York. And so what exactly they planning clothing stationery? What will it be? Yes. So yeah. Some clothing, I think some homeware stationary. They've done a few a few paces that you can that they've already had like cufflinks and. And then a bear. But it will be more caps, which is the famous NYPD one. I perhaps these that's kind of what you imagine that sort of thing. Yeah. And then I guess Mogs, and and that sort of thing and the other the other kind of example that closer to home is is charts for London which does have its own merchandise. But I think that's probably not I don't wanna be looking to that as the inspiration because I think that's I mean, that's no winner successful as NYPD's merch. I wonder how successful this will be though because British people don't some of them. Don't have a great relationship with the Mets not seen as anything, particularly cool. So he's likely to wear NPS branded clothing, this is this is the kind of question because the NYPD an LAPD the is a sexiness to that brand which is from years of pop culture and Americans do by that you say NYPD merch on select. Liberties quite often get to the publicy. I mean, I think London is not like could it be buying this? So it will. I mean, the plan is over foreigners the hope so. Yeah. And it's not actually done by the false itself. There's a branding company taking care of this year. There's a good a good branding agency point eight or one which has done branding for the take galleries and filet on. And it's got it's got good customer. So I mean, I'm sure to job of the branding. But it's the question of whether you know, visually may look nice. But it's the whole perception of the Brad's it's about more than what what the actual much looks like means this with the met nor the the Scotland Scotland Yard that will be, you know, it's more than just the visuals chance that people might impersonate police officers by wearing yes, this is also something that's been brazen. They've said that strict regulations about that the merchandise can't be the same as as the actual. Uniforms. But I mean that of course, that makes sense. That's good. But I think if you're out at night, or whatever you might not no one's going to know. Exactly. They might think it's variation of the uniform. I don't think we're going to be okay. No that's not the official uniform because I'm fully aware of all the regulations. So that is something that, you know, something that's been raised. And you know, they've kind of. Who knows there's been some questionnaires online. I've been looking at it about people aren't whether or not they would buy it. And one of the reasons that people giving that they don't wanna be confused for police officer. I hate it. What a great Halloween idea for tonight. Sure, we could be just as police, Jamie. Thank you very much. Indeed, Jamie waters is Monaco's fashion editor, and that's all that. This addition of the briefing. It was produced by Reese, James and researched by yearning, gopher and math. Lebron a stadium. It was Christie Evans, the beating is back tomorrow at the same time you join Andrew from the Dory. House live at eighteen hundred dollars here in London that's thirteen hundred in New York thirteen God. Thank you. Phil listening.

Donald Trump NATO Russia Norway London Croatia China US Scott Lucas Robert Muller Trump Monaco NYPD Brazil Jamie waters fund manager Mets Jacob wall
Friday 24 January

Monocle 24: Midori House

31:08 min | 1 year ago

Friday 24 January

"You're listening to molecules house. Few broadcast on the twenty fourth of January. Two Thousand Twenty on monocle twenty four. This is Monaco's house few coming up today. A reflection on this year's World Economic Forum in Davos and conversation with one attendee also ahead a contemplation of what lessons listen another week of world news has imparted. And what's good. Do you think of working with someone sink. Shoot a look back at an eventful half for century of Zone POGO TA I'm Andrew. Mullah Monaco's house view starts now and welcome to the show the two thousand twenty two ration- of the World Economic Forum wraps up in Davos today the headline attractions of the seas event. US President Donald Trump and Swedish climate. Activist Greta Tornberg came and went fairly early in proceedings. Taking some of the world's attention with them but as listeners who've been following monocle twenty four hours coverage of Davos this week we'll be aware they was a great deal. More to the event will joining me to reflect on what we can glean from. This is has devils is monocle. Twenty four executive producer. Tom Edwards Tom. First of all. You visited devils this year. I think most listeners who've never actually been in Davos are the town or the event only know of devils because it does this thing every year as a place itself to actually like. It's a small Swiss town in the mountains under a great deal of snow. It's very brisk and there are snipers on rooftops forest. I didn't see them but I'm assured that distinguishes wishes right there from other Swiss Alpine village. But it's very interesting. There's a highly efficient Swiss train that Takes you up the mountain if you approach by road. Your car is stopped and searched. And if you you have for example a large consignment of Monica magazines. You know your grilled us to want to wear speak from a certain amount of bitter personal experience but I was struck by what you said hundred that it's There was still much to to to talk about even in my very short visit to the town of Dallas. To within the wealth itself it was immediately really apparent. How much goes on? This is a place where people are doing business. Yeah sure I think there are a few champagne. corks popped there is is an elite there from politics diplomacy from big business. But they're they're working very very hard and that was one of the things that struck me as well as some changes in tone tone which perhaps we can talk about. Those changes in tone are very ATL indicative of a certain amount of self consciousness on the part of attendees at devils this ease coined of perceived as a bit of a winter jolly folded champagne sloping global plutocracy. Nicely put Andrew. I think partly. I think there's a small degree of that but what was much more striking was the feeling that this was a time when actually the market sort sort of know which way they need to go. We're talking about you know businesses talking about doing the good work or whether that Nordic activists or governmental clogged non-governmental organizations. Saying look it's time to move on the climate. This was the really striking thing there was A. There's definitely been a change in his fiftieth iteration of Davos but actually a sea change for maybe just five years ago one thing that really struck me. Was the West publishes a global risks report just before the event each year five years ago. Not One of the top five risks for the year ahead was of environmental and character in the two thousand nine hundred addition all five of the top risks for the year ahead were environmental. And that's very interesting and that was reflected in conversations that I had and were going on all around What Monica was doing there and just generally it? It's it's no longer something you can opt into. You can't chase good headlines because you're talking a good game I even think idea of greenwashing is gone now. Companies are realizing and the trustees of pension funds amongst them realizing if you want to have capital to invest you you need. To address these these things it's mandated in certain quarters here in the UK. I didn't realize this pension fund trustees are obligated to explain Tamil they're going to deliver on. ESPN principles in in the longer term. That's part of their responsibility. So it's no longer just about whether you choose to listen quite a few. The people I spoke to said look frankly. It doesn't even matter if you're a climate change denier you can't afford not to address it even if you don't recognize this is the thing I have wondered about this myself. Especially since talking to a few people engaged with this kind of stuff for our series on the Rolex laureates a few of whom did make the point that again. It almost doesn't matter at this stage whether you think climate change is real or not that is the way the market is going and there are fortunes is that will be made by the people who figure out how to address this. So did you get a sense that the conversation's DC was there was a kind of realization that even on the grounds rounds of just naked. Self interested he's time to get serious about this stuff. One hundred percent and there was something else that was more telling to this idea of this being an inflection point and it does come back perhaps APPs to what you mentioned about Greta Burke who who stole a lot of headlines Now some people actually confided in me that they found her approach. Maybe her manner in a certain who face nece about it bother dispiriting however virtually everybody. I spoke to particular people who were in the working financial services they talked about. How if it wasn't greater it was their own daughter or this sort of this? Inexorable demand that next generation of the big banks worried because boomer generation. He said waving his hand. They're not gonNA be around forever. This non presented handover of money happening. They have to engage with the generation. I think weirdly. This is the thing where well intentioned activists people with the civic conscience and frankly the markets doc. It's a finely all beginning to point in the same direction I can imagine listeners. Throwing their arms up in the air and saying this guy's just buying into to all the bill he has. I really did feel different. Do you think therefore because we've discussed this earlier in the week the the discussion of whether devils performs any useful role is a tradition now almost as firmly established as Davos itself but if there is as you suggest these new seriousness among both political and business leaders it is about addressing. This kind of thing is that right. They're a useful role for well. Not just a conference like devils but the Devil's conference because it does still have that unusual Castro as the place where all these people go and are there at once and able to have a informal direct conversations. Joe Yes an a slightly longer on so you know we endorse. We advocate the idea of doing business by getting in front of people meeting them talking face to face. It's just expedient Ghent for people who are time poor and yes maybe cash-rich but you can't hold that against them To to chalk up a years worth of five years worth worth the face to face meetings in in just a few days and to be honest whether or not you right Donald Trump or you disagree and district and have no respect for him. I think it's important that he's there and people are listening. I think it's important that the captains of industry leaders in diplomacy leaders in policy get together and are challenged. And and believe you me. These people are working incredibly hard and even some more champagne corky events that happened to witness. There are a lot of people in the mineral water because they were up at five. AM and for the next round of bilaterals breakfast meetings and broke appearances and all old arrest people are working hard and I think most of them have their heart in the right place. Tom Edwards. Thank you for joining us. You're listening to molecules house. Few you're listening to Monaco's House few on Monocle twenty four well devils which we have just been discussing may be drawing to a close but markle's Augustine match alario was also there and managed to grab a moment with some of the the people shaping. This is agenda in this interview. He talks to Tristan Harris of the Center for humane technology while there were those among the devils attendees who were were expressing optimism. Tristen was sounding a note of warning interest on Harris a We have a small non profit center for humane technology that works on reforming the tech industry. before that I was designed episode Google studying. How do you typically steer the ant colony humanities attention when you have no choice but to to do so and all the things that are going wrong with social media what we're trying to sort of fix that's why we're here at Davos how you know the the various kind of hot caught issues and it seems like this year perhaps more than ever before? There's this real sense of urgency. You know this is the year that climate change has to be taken seriously. This is the the truth needs to be spoken to the big tech companies is this is this something that you're picking up on these are you finding a receptive audience message. Well I mean for me. This has been the most urgent topic for the last few years. And it's a matter of it. Finally I think being recognized as one of the critical ones on climate change point. I actually believe that you. You can't actually solve climate change when social media is systematically steering people toward conspiracy theories and denial videos. There's a study showing that fifty percent of English videos recommended by youtube videos. Fifty percent of them were either. Denial videos are hoaxes. And imagine your new commission president Sula von Wonderland and your goal is to do the you renew deal. But all of Europe is being dosed with basically. Youtube is the primary cents making Oregon of television right and fifty percent of what is on the airwaves saying that it's not real. How successful can you be building consensus when it systematically Polarize people into completely different truth camps and because the business model is monitoring attention. That means that you're always better off giving people people like a Truman show where you're feeding back their own beliefs to them that automatically means that a personalized news feed is more successful getting attention than a non-personalised speed which means is it taking a democracy and putting it through the paper shredder of facebook and Youtube automatically the business model is fragmenting and polarizing society's not because anyone at those companies want got to happen but that's what's true so given the case the reason I think it's so urgent is you can't actually get agreement and consensus when everyone's fed their own channel of information when people talk about Davos. It's often these like macro issues that come as we've just discussed and I'd be interested to hear your reflections as you move around these parties. Presumably there are a lot of conversations happening that maybe have slightly less headline grabbing agenda-setting focuses but which are important incremental parts of the sort of change that you're kind of arguing in favor of is that something that you're picking up on Well it's very interesting. You say that I mean I think. There's there's a certain argument to be made that our system doesn't work right. You can't have unfettered. Capitalism and expect the world not to turn into climate change depression opioids diabetes et Cetera. Those are all natural externalities because it's more profitable to have a person who's diabetic. And then get get them on a subscription plan of of Prescriptions rather than to have them not be just be healthy in the first place so I think that level of reform is not one that everyone wants to talk about here necessarily but I. This is my first year at Davos so I can't really speak for it but I feel like we're coming at a reckoning with capitalism in the same way that a whale is worth more dead than alive in a tree is worth more lumber than as a tree in the attention world of technology companies because the business models monetize attention. A human being is worth more if they're addicted outrage narcissistic polarizing disinformed in human being and that includes children. Because you're basically as we said a second ago over drinks you have an infinite growth paradigm on top of a finite substrate of the human mind's capacity for attention and we're not we don't have an abundant supply of that so we have to sort of getting this aggressive intensive Out of human beings so if anything one of the reasons why we do what we do at in our group Center Freeman. Technology is because I. I think it's the most obvious form that in extractive never ending growth paradigm on top of your own psyche. Is the most obvious ways that we can wake up from the fact that this this whole doc model doesn't work now that doesn't mean I'm advocating for socialism. I'm just trying to point out that we cannot keep lying to ourselves and believing that you can have never ending unfettered uttered growth paradigm without carrying about externalities and Omni considerate to all balance sheets in the equation. So this is this sense. Criticisms getting never at the World Economic Forum from from all directions. One of them. Is this idea that you know his three thousand of the world's wealthiest most powerful people. This is the advice of kind of warning like yours suggesting that maybe the model that has made put them into positions today enjoy is not sustainable. But there's a real complacency. Hey how conscious of that where you when you came and how did it kind of I suppose. How did it calibrate your expectations for the outcomes? The you might get hit. I totally we appreciate the question There's always the argument that when the populace activists sort of people show up at events like these they simply the best case get co-opted and turned into more greenwashing for the perpetuation of Assistant. That's not working. I didn't come here expecting that. By convincing a bunch of people that we would just suddenly withdrawal lots of power I mean the Soviet Union Gorbachev is one of the few examples where there was a voluntary letting go of power in a very rare historical moment. I don't think that's how it works. I think movements are built through pressure from the outside. But I think you need a kind of I mean we have no time. I mean if you look at climate change any of these issues look at democracy. Democracy falling apart work and the fabric of truth falling apart around the world so given the urgency at this point you need basically everyone no matter where they are in the system to be of assistance. Whether you're an oil company or you're the top of the sort of fossil fossil attention companies the big tech platforms of surveillance capitalism. You we need you like we need everybody to basically put our hand in Syria meal and turn away from the cliff because that's where it's going doing that again. I don't come here believing naively that we can simply we persuade everybody something different but I think it helps to prime the pump of understanding so that when crisis hits which is already hitting in different ways we recognize what wasn't working as opposed to a big surprise and then we have to do some kind of financial crisis. Bailout that was Augusta Natural Ari in devils speaking to Tristen Harris of the Center for technology. You're listening to monocle twenty four. You're listening to Monaco's house view time now for our weekly reflection on what if anything. The last seven orbits of the Sun have taught us. We learned this week that concussions to American soldiers caused by missiles launched from Iran. A not that big a deal at least is not according to their commander in chief. I heard that they had headaches. And a couple of other things but I would say and I can report it. It is not very serious president. Donald Trump there who was of course precluded from glorious military career by the cruel and imaginery bone spurs from which he miraculously recovered. As soon as the shooting in Vietnam ceased we also learned to are more or less complete like of surprise that even the shrugging off of injuries injuries to American troops serving abroad is a heresy insufficient to persuade. Republican senators to break ranks as trump's impeachment trial gets underway way with the house. Managers were proposing yesterday is basically to destroy the institution of the presidency as we know it make it naked when it comes to partisan impeachment when it comes to Donald Trump. They're willing to destroy the institution of the office and the name of gaining joining him. You kind of have to believe at this point that Lindsey Graham is actually serious it being impossible to imagine information compromising enough to induce a man to behave like this still. It's always fun to remember the Senator Graham of five years and quite deep political journey ago. That he's he's a jackass that he's bringing his name down and he's not helping the process. This should be commander-in-chief Swear Russell artists learned that the next little while might be rickety going at least if they were hoping for much in the way of St Encouragement as more was revealed about Russia's new in culture minister old. You'LL BE MOBILE IS JIM over. HAS IT turns out the que- point your kind of thoughts on her new portfolio over years the online disquisition. She has written that she simply can't stand. Exhibitions museums or opera expressed disdain verging on furious. Blind looking for classical music and ballet and declared that quote. I don't understand a bloody thing about pop. How cinema or it seems about deleting old blog composts? We also learned this week that Swedes are at least four percent less air bone than this time a year ago. A globally unusual retreat from the skies. It seems to be at least partially a consequence of what Swedes Coal Fleet. Come or flight. Shame guilt at the environmental consequences of air travel promoted by prominence weeds including environmental campaign greater. Tone book well. Maybe it's that. Swedes are unusually prescient in noticing. That flying is terrible because airports and planes a full of ghastly people. Who have no idea how to behave dressing teething infants and wearing stupid inflatable pillows attempting to cram everything they own into the overhead bins? Playing Games on their phones with the sound turned on and bringing enough food to supply an expedition to the South Pole aboard a forty. Forty five minute flight. Whatever here is molecules transport correspondent Gabriel Lee speaking from amid the tumble weed strewn runways of Stockholm on Mondays Globalist noblest? Swedes are known for being frequent flyers. They love to travel holiday for work and passenger numbers up until a couple of years ago where steadily rising throughout so I think really where airlines are seeing. The biggest hit is in these little domestic routes where it is reasonably viable to travel by train. If you look at the fact that some of the numbers quoted are that a single flight between Stockholm. Stockholm Gothenburg is equivalent to so many thousands of train journeys. It kind of makes sense. We learned that one of Thailand's political parties is not it turns insult a front organization for the furtive cabal of sinister string Polos which secretly manipulates human affairs for its own enrichment. Thailand's Constitutional Court. It cleared one of the country's biggest opposition parties future forward of accusations that it was seeking to overthrow Thailand's monarchy at the behest of the illuminate. -I the Eighteenth Century Barbieri. Drinking Club still feed in foil uttered circles as the hidden hand behind was economic upheavals faked moon landings and so forth. Both future forward have consistently denied any associations with the luminosity. But then they would. We learned that while there are obvious drawbacks to life in the all seeing surveillance state being built by the Chinese Communist Party China's high-tech panel to conduct its uses in the maintenance of saw to`real standards officials in Soochow in Hawaii province released pictures of seven Slovenly citizens who are observed going about about the business wearing pajamas the online shaming complete with the offenders names and I d card details was part of a crackdown on uncivilized behavior. Avia unless and we did work on this for some time. It's a counter espionage operation aimed at exposing sleeper cells and we learned to considerable surprise that rebranding a sports team does not have to be despite mountainous evidence to the contrary an embarrassing using undignified. Desecration a noble heritage and can indeed be pulled off with considerable panache. Let's hear it for the Baseball Club of Florence Kentucky. Currently members of the Frontier League previously known as Florence Freedom they have assumed as the new identity specifically southern term of endearment. Demint as of next season they are the Florence y'all's complete with a quaint nostalgic new logo in the kind of lovely swirling typeface which might wants of a dorm to Tailfin of a preposterous Buick. Florence begin their first season as the oils in May at home to the New Jersey jackals and we wish all the very best and we fat smashing the proverbial it out of the park for monocle. Twenty four on Andrew Listening to Michael's house views stay tuned. You're listening to Molecules House view with me. Andrew Muller retiring is not a word which has frequently been associated with John Paul goaty during his his half century career in fashion another word probably therefore needs to be found abdication perhaps for his announcement that he's runway show at the theatre Du Chatelaine. In in Paris of earlier. This week would be lost joining me now to reflect on Goethe's life and work Monica fashion editor Jamie waters and monocle. Twenty Four for Nando Augusta Sukkot both are of course clad from head to foot in goatee a mature. But that's nothing to do with this item. It's just Friday. Join me first of all. We would discussing jean-paul Goatee earlier. This week I it is an extraordinary life in career to try and sum up. But I'm going to ask you to do that anyway. I think one of the one of the major things that he has brought to the industry is a real sense of fun and a sense of humor and he's he's done everything with this kind of joyfulness that can sometimes be missing from the fashion industry. And I think to him. Fashion was a about a lot more than close it. was He kind of leave. Embraced it and in all its different forms. and He loved pop culture and he designed costumes and he you know he's just on his fashion freak. Show which is like this musical revue and he did or the costumes for that and he did. Madonna's costume very famously the conical Bra and it was this really unbridled like not to not po faced. Look at clothes and how they can check the body and sort of affect Jio attitude and I think I think that that sense of humor is probably his most one of his greatest contributions to the industry just Johny that the the sense of humor that he expressed and exuded was clearly very much him. That's just who we were. And I'll talk to Fernando shortly about some of his extracurricular activities not that were a consequence of that but did it ever especially when he was establishing himself tell against him did people in a fashion world. which as you correctly we say you're not struggling for people who take themselves seriously did? Did people think perhaps the lesser wate actually created because he dead give the impression that he was actually quite enjoying doing himself he certainly did court control Cathy at different times. I mean I think he had this kind of interesting background where he came from started in the fashioned establishment and he cut his teeth at Caught on and Shampoo so he kind of knew. That's where the real establishment and he does have these kind of reverence for French traditional sort of that thing of understanding the rules before we broke exactly and I think that that is Katie. Successes he can cut an amazing jacket and amazing suit but then he also twisted and so yes. I mean to go back to a question. He when he did a lot of these things he did. They shocked a lot of audiences I mean he was this was in the seventies eighties in the eighties. He put boys. He called one collection boy toys and he that was when he put manning skirts and there was some reviews that said it was disgusting. And if you think like Nah I mean he was so ahead of his time because now You know we talk a lot about gender fluidity in eighties. That was just absolutely registered. Some people and he he wasn't doing it to shock. I mean he was joining when he explained the collection. He said he was join different coaches. He looked to cute to sarongs various. It wasn't like just for the sake of it so I think yes I mean. Part of it was destroyed for for the not seeing boundaries between things are kind of saying papers having to leave in a box and look set them way But also pod was. I mean it wasn't it wasn't doing things just for the sake of it. I think it was kind of line of thought between different things and and analysis of different cultures and and but ended up being this kind of big pecan. MEEKS and it's yet to know really stands out and I think especially in the In the context fashion today as well He said if often say that kind of outspokenness and just unbridled kind of joy if another. How important walls that that exuberance that sense of fun to the Go-to your brand? Oh Law actually and and I mean of course. He was massively important in the fashion industry and perhaps one of the reasons again. I think he was quite right to question if the Fashion Industry Toto Riina bit last. Perhaps it's because you know he branched out to to popular culture. I mean the clinical Bra Madonna had close relationships with many pop stars which many of them were actually attending his His last cat walking Peres And of course he had the classic. TV Show Eurotrash. which I loved I saw as a young? How how did you see Eurotrash? Was it shown in Sao Paulo. It was actually there was a channel euro-channel of the best of European TV and I was very young at the time and I said is that Europe. Oh my God I need to go and leave. I mean it's not as camp and favelas. I thought he would be. It's still nice DuPrey ties. I don't feel like we should try and explain Eurotrash to people who didn't see it Fernando under because I remember watching it here in the UK on Channel Four. Because I I love have lived here long enough but it was presented if my if I recall roughtly by Anton it does call and Goto among others all reveling in this Somewhat lurid idea of continental culture and and the humor was quite risque. I I I would even dare to say that. Probably we wouldn't have eurotrash today because we're very careful so many things and Because of their language I'm sure a lot other people would complain Even selected a bit from Eurotrash. Here the one that I could show inherited and Show we have listened to it. Yes please shop. Will you be my little dougie. Yes made you. I would love to be your little Doggie good so get on your knees and keep quite. That was was a clip. The Fernando from jump Goatee as contribution to Eurotrash. You also wanted to play a clip of something a bit more recent and any to sell our magazines because it's quite interesting In the latest issue had the pleasure to meet Amanda Lear. You know they're cornick disco diva and it's funny cuisine. Poverty is mentioned in the interview because she told me he's one of the last best kind of French. Quarter here is still kind of working. At least when I spoke to her and she's fabulous and of course you had a very close relationship with here. She she even did a TV ad for one of his fragrances Just about a year ago again. Extremely camp she was carried but you kind of half naked sailors and and jump over taste is some is in something called the Zhen pod. You know those kind of Alexis whatever so instead of the Alexis. She had the zone poured in and he gives everything she wishes. Let's listen and so this recovery shift into shopping as a Pity Marsha Blackburn so. She's basically retired because she's been walking around doing some shopping so he I mean he he laid to say that you need do need to see the ads but then southern she has to have naked kids sailors carrying her around. We've jump Whittier giving you know all the wishes she needed. That's that's good puppeteer. That is quite a picture. You have planted the Fernando. I'm Jamie I I feel a little bit guilty about the fact that it kind of feels like we're doing poor blacks a bit. Cherie here but he is still very much with us. Do we have any idea what he's going to do next. He doesn't seem like the retirement type no and he. He said that he was to stay involved in industry in some way he. I think he's worth were so The the the jumbo brand is majority owned by the big luxury Spanish group behind. You know he's fragrances. Become like East like one. One of the powerhouses freeze brands. I think he was involved there in some capacity. And then he's also I mean I think he's GonNa be directing some sort of burlesque shows and things like that cabaret ratios which seems like right up his alley and you know. He's such a large in life personnel. He can conquer into any any sphere. Jamie waters and Fernando. It goes to shake. Oh thank you both joining us studies old for today's show Monaco's house view wells produced by Nando. STDM juice Christie Evans. Coming up in twenty hundred brand new dishes of Menu Mapra sippy. Monica House view is back at the same time. Tomorrow at Nine A._M.. London time I'm Andrew. Mullah thanks very much for listening.

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Wednesday 9 January

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

58:49 min | 2 years ago

Wednesday 9 January

"You're listening to the monocle daily. First broadcast on the ninth of January two thousand nineteen on monocle twenty four the monocle daily in association with UPS. Live from Madari house in London. This is the monocle daily. I'm Elson and a very warm. Welcome to today's program coming up the EU imposes targeted sanctions on Iran after accusations of state-sponsored murder on European soil. Also coming up, a bright smile liberal policies and a two year old son who steals the show together. Let us build a house stronger than the coming storms yet open to the world house that provides shelter to all need it and sanctuary to all who steep profile Gavin Newsom, California's new governor and a man with big expectations piled upon him. Plus we had to Florence the latest from our Manit pity warm. Oh, and we looked at the Asian newspapers to that's all ahead on the monocle daily life from London starting now. The very warm. Welcome to studio one the EU is to impose targeted sanctions on Iran following claims that members of the Iranian intelligence agency carried out or attempted to carry out assassination attacks on e you soil. The Dutch foreign minister has said there are what he describes as strong indications that Tehran was involved in the deaths of Dutch nationals in two thousand fifteen and two thousand seventeen the rain in authorities have dismissed the claims saying the accusations are intended to damage relations between Iran, and the e you will tell us more I'm joined by Sammy Hamdi, he's a risk analyst and editor in chief of the international interest current affairs website, welcome back to the studio. So good to have you just explain a little bit more, Phillip, what these claims are that were laid out by the Dutch foreign minister, I think first and foremost, we have to acknowledge that in Europe or lots of the opposition figures. Jittery a lot of them have phased that have been assassinated. Attempts even this year. There has been a member of the hours opposition who has is in an Arab area of Iran that they claim that they are colonized by the Iranians there is this liberation movement. Some of their activists across Europe have been assassinated or attempt to be assassinated some of them here under a God by the UK government and the like Iran the title of the sanctions become on the economy, the more difficult. The political situation becomes you. Remember, there were mass protests across Iran, the more Iran is becoming a little bit more jittery with regards to position figures in particular before there were the usual threats and the mic like any Middle Eastern government. However, recently, Iran, genuinely feels like the crunch that is coming as a result of these sanctions may actually result in political movement within Iran its-self who has is particularly difficult area in Iran, which is why they are the main activists who actually being attacked or targeted in this particular area. I think what's interesting is that these are targeted sanctions, these aren't widespread. Sanctions these aren't sanctions anything like. What we've seen from the US? It's many a slap on the wrist and something to say to the Iranians look like, please stop it not on our soil. There's a lot in there to unpick. But starting stop this not on our soil. What exactly is the European Union accusing agents of the Iranian authorities of doing within the European Union trying to kill fees activists who the trying to kill opposition figures in Iran who have links with a grassroots movements in Iran, that's linked to protests that linked to armed groups that are trying to fight the Iranian regime for a whole host of purposes. Whether it's to get rid of this limit Republic, whether it's liberation of of land, you remember Iran is made of all different ethnicities Baluchistan you see these posters even here in London free Baluchistan and the same with ours. So this is what the accusing Iran of stop trying to kill these people on us soil, the issues relate to the assassination of Dutch nationals in alma in two thousand fifteen and the Hague in two thousand seventeen the key issue. There is that these are not Iranian nationals. Who that the Dutch authorities are accusing of of being murdered by the Iranian authorities. These these. Dutch nationals here being targeted. But it's also like, for example, my situation, I'm a British born citizen born and raised time tunes in Algerian, by origin. I have links with algebra Antony Ziama involved in politics there. I discuss some politics. They see me as a tennis in Algerian. But when you're reporting on me, God forbid, something happens to me, you're referred to me as a British citizen. So these are Dutch nationals it, it's it's perfectly true. However, I think the EU has used these particular two examples, but when we asked why the the sanctions are coming now, given these incidents have taken place before or prior it is because Iran, even now is still going after people on European soil. It seems an unusual time. However, I mean, yes, the portrait that you've described of what is happening is that Iran feeling on the back foot because of sanctions imposed by the United States, or what have you are causing them problems at home? But. Since two thousand and fifteen in the nuclear proliferation, treaty. The European Union has stood up full the pre the the preservation of accord with tear on and in fact to the point to its detriment that it's come face to face with our position from the likes of Donald Trump who has profound mistrust of Iran and his reimpose sanctions. Why would it be in Iran's interest to pursue Dutch nationals at a time when the e u is on this side in so many ways, I think it's careful how we talk about. Whether he was on the side of the Iranians on of the EU has given words and rhetoric Macron has said we're trying to look for an alternative payment system in order to circumvent the sanctions, despite this even the biggest European companies on not convinced any mechanism that does come into place would only protect small and medium-sized businesses. The only reason the Iranians are playing along to the European Choon is because they have no alternative choice. The alternative is basically to say, you know, you we don't like the way you're talking to us. You got you may as well. Go on. In front of the sanctions on the US as well. I I think it's also important when we're saying why Iran is targeting people at this particular time, there is a very harsh cruel reality that takes place in our world today where assassinations of political opposition takes place hush. Oh, jeez. One case that was out there in the open, but the US has its rendition programme. So does the UK France does it across Africa all of these nations? It's not just a backward Middle East nation that does it even the most democratic nations in the world operate this. The only issue with the Iranians is that they did it quite publicly, and it came to light as long as people don't know about it. Then it's perfectly fine. So I I think we should put that on one with Gosse uranium's, particularly now come in the supreme leader of we nobody call him and Moshe. Delilah. I don't have to say in English. The supreme leader of the Iranians the hominy said that the the these US sanctions are unprecedented. And they have put unprecedented pressure on us. How many is in a fight now with president Rohani? There is this revolutionary guard that is unable that neither of them can control. There is real. Feud going on Iran now where everybody feels like we're in a difficult situation. We need to be the ones in charge domestically. The political situation is genuinely not as as as as many would like it not as Rohani would like it. There is significant pressure. Not only that in this significant pressure now Saudi Arabia, and the UAE are now committing funds to rebel movements in Iran, particularly the likes of ours and the like John Bolton now is talking about war with the Iranians as well. If you're going to fight, Iran. The best military tactic to do so is to encourage an independence movement in Baluchistan and independence movements. In was these two movements are being encouraged now wherever activist activists are in Europe. The activists are in California in Los Angeles Iran now feels like these activists could genuinely in the same way that the warned Saddam with Iraq. Where all the activists were here in London like Nordion Malik and hide elaborate as soon as Saddam was removed. They were shipped off from London straight to back that Iran knows that these are the activists who will be taken from Europe, they'll be talking to Iran to rule, Iran. Feels like look we can ride out the sanctions until twenty twenty and hoped Trump loses the election, but. India event that there is the sudden high pace channels of being setup to attack the Iranians in different languages on the like Iran feels that we can't take their we need to get rid of these people. I'm not justifying the intention is effectively to allow Iran to destablize itself from within essentially, it's it's to try to totally every people want to bring down Iran. We're not going to allow you to bring down the Iranians. What's very interesting about the sanctions that the EU have actually imposed on Iran is that it's a slap on the wrist for something so significant as trying to assassinate activists Lee, you say, it's it's up on the wrist. They are nonetheless sanctions imposed by the European Union. And there are ways and means in which you can express express to a country your displeasure to so publicly and so directly confront this issue is. Given the way that the likes to go round things. And quite a gentle way. It's it's actually quite a surprise key. It is. But it's also comes at a time where the EU is struggling within itself. Micron is struggling with his Jila. John with these yellow vest Marquel is about to step down. Donald Trump is causing them a headache by trying to promote the break-up of the European Union Europe finds itself on the on the wrong end of a lot of issues with the US with Syria. The Iranians Europe might be thinking, this is just a theory Europe might be thinking, you know, what maybe the Iranians aren't worth going out on the league and Olympic and sacrifice our relationship with the US maybe in this current time where we see our far right movement where we have Brexit and the like, maybe we need to warm up a little bit more to the US. I still think that these are just targeted sanctions. I think that perhaps they could have been harsher, but they're not which indicates that the EU wants to tell the Iranian stop trying to do this whole business, and they may even if you've seen it's on the military and intelligence industry is on the intelligence industry that sanctions have been imposed on. There is talk that the sanctions are actually being put on. Those who are scuppering Rohani. Who is the pro western pro opening it is to help Rohani unsure up his own position. The Iranians by making life difficult for his opponent, the arenas could be benefit in disguise for you know, semi Hamdi from the international interest. Thank you for joining us on monocle twenty four. This is the monocle daily life from studio on at Midori house in London the direction of travel on America's policy on immigration recently has been destructive and divisive. The wool the government shutdown an anti immigrant rhetoric so step forward, California. New governor Gavin Newsom sworn in at the beginning this week and proving that every publication is improved by gatecrashing toddler, his two year old son invaded the stage, and Mr. Newson ended up finishing his speech with a little boy in his own. Well, the rhetoric was Justice stirring, but in a positive way, those a promise that California will write America's future. So who is he one man who knows is Marc Edelman a media consultant, his splits his time between Washington DC, and California and Mark very warm. Welcome to the program, but you have to declare an interest. You're an acquaintance if not a friend of Mr. Newsom. Well, first of all good good afternoon. Good evening. Yes. I'm I am definitely somebody who is pro Gavin Newsom and somebody who's you know, has gone back many years with them. So there will certainly be a bias in. And I think what I have to share with you. I mean on the face of it when you look at this guy's fresh-faced great teeth. Great political Chom pretty two year old son seems like a perfect candidate for Californian. Governor certainly, you know, there's an old quote about you know, sort of as as California goes so goes the rest of the country, and I think Gavin and his his wife. Jen are kind of perfect examples of what that means. And what that looks like they embody sort of everything that I think the majority of Californians wanna stand behind, and and sort of get their arms around, and they certainly do paint the picture of this is the Golden State, and I guess what you would say California's golden couples should look like a golden speech as well. In many ways since the forest it, it did two things it it firmly placed. Donald Trump to to blame for so many problems at the United States is is going on and going through. And conversely Gavin Newsom 's offer of opening California's arms to people who may feel disenfranchised was the absolute antidote to what's been coming from the White House. That's right. I think if you look at California, and it it's interesting because living here and also spending a lot of my time in Washington. It is so much the antithesis to what's going on in the federal government with our shutdown. That's happening right now in many parts of the country as well. If you and I urge all your listeners to really if they can go on YouTube, and and find the speech that he gave because it was not only a direct rebuke of President Trump and the policies that have been coming out of the Trump administration over the last two years, but it was so much about the things that you hear over and over that Americans care about and whether that is universal healthcare whether that is mental health and criminal Justice reform, whether that's fair pay it really hit upon so many of the ideas that you're not hearing really in in any sort of railway coming from the White House. This is one of those moments. I think in lots of people have been waiting for. But how much is California going to welcome this manning? He has big shoes to fill in the LA times is written about the enormous job that Gavin Newsome has absolutely. I mean, look, I think California by you know, I'd see the numbers change every day. But it's the fourth or fifth largest economy in the world. And there are a lot of people here who, you know, need need help from the states and need help from the federal government what Gavin provides which is a very unique. And I and I have to say having spent a lot of time around him. I and I've spent around I've been around a lot of politicians. I have never come across some more intellectually curious or somebody who has really thought about everything at such a deep and intense level than Gavin Newsom. And this is a very large. Statement I'm gonna make. But I really believe that Gavin of all the people that are in office today is probably in the best prime position to start thinking about what the economy is gonna look like going forward into the twenty twenties. What that's going to look like for automation and jobs what that's going to look like for the environment with climate change. And and what that's going to look like for you know, how everyday Americans sort of welcome and absorb all these changes would Gan. And I think is also very good at he he really being in a largely ceremonial job is is he has said it many interviews over the last eight years as Lieutenant governor. He really was able to embed himself in Silicon Valley with technical entrepreneurs as well as going into places like central California, which is an agricultural zone, where you've got a lot of people that are not taking part in sort of all the innovation and changes that you know, when you think of what's happening in California, certainly in debate area, and certainly in Los Angeles. They're not partaking in all of that. In. What I I think Gavin has been able to do is really think about what these changes mean for sort of the entire California state, and how we are going to sort of needs to start reconciling with all these great transformations that are happening. But what does that mean to people who don't have the education background who aren't trained who are not able to make a living wage every day. And if you if you pay attention to gab and going forward, you're going to find I think somebody who really has studied exactly what these challenges look like. And I think you'll find we'll have some interesting ways to sort of combat them with solutions. This struck me from from reading about what California's needs are things. So I read somewhere that someone had California could use some serious rethinking from unstable tax bases. Bad management of natural resources. Dia housing shortages. I mean, you speak of a man who was profound intellectual rigor, but can he stopped to address those problems quickly and effectively. I think so. And I think the best lesson we can learn from that was his time as an executive being mayor of San Francisco where you know, in that short period of time six years, I believe it was mayor, you know, he was able to make, you know, universal healthcare accessible to everybody in the city of San Francisco. My gosh, I always joke. It's it's a legal not some mall ch- in San Francisco doing things like banning plastic bags, and you know, it's it's important to point out that he was the guy I think that you can sort of say set the the American paradigm shift on gay marriage. And so I think Yavan is very much a doer. I think he's somebody who, you know, as you mentioned is very thoughtful, and intellectual, but even just in the last two days since he's been inaugurated is out there trying to actually be everywhere and do everything, and I think we need that. I think that's what. We want from our public servants. And I think certainly he's in a position to continue. You know, it's a big state you live in other parts of this country. I believe California from top to bottom is nine hundred fifty miles approximately. I mean, you can cross fifteen sixteen states in other parts of the country. He's got a big state. He's got commandeer, and he's sort of. I think somebody who will be very good at getting to all of the counties and all the municipalities that are not the big cities like San San Francisco, San Diego in LA. Joining us on Monaco, twenty four. You're listening to the monocle daily up next Taiwan faces off against China. Once again, stay with us. UBS has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries. Hundred of the shop is mine's on freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. No one knows who find out how we could help me. Contact us at UBS dot com. If you've just joined us, a very warm, welcome to monocle twenty four I'm Elson, and you're listening to the monocle daily in a little while we had to Florence to him from Jamie washes, Monaco's fashion Edison, who's at pity wamu. But first Taiwan is to hold lots scale military drills later this year in an attempt to stave off any future threat from China. The Taiwanese military said the exercises will incorporate new tactics to defend against possible invasion by the Chinese China claims sovereignty over the self-governing island, which spit from the mainland during the civil war in nineteen forty nine. We'll carry Braun is professor of Chinese studies and director of the Lao institute at King's College in London. He's also the author of China's world, and he joins me on the line. Now. Welcome back to monocle, twentyfold Kerry. Just explain a bit more about these drills will entail. Well, the stand drills. I mean Taiwan has a pretty Multan military. A lot of equipment is supplied the United States, and that's being true for you know, kind of because of the Taiwan relations at nineteen Seventy-nine that commits America at to having any involvement in Taiwan's defense. So it hasn't done such large exercises in recent years. But the at the moment there are a lot of tensions, I suppose. This is the symbol that it is willing to defend yourself. If it keeps on being a provoked, and the maybe even a kind of physically attacked threatened by China. So I think that's the reason why the holding these taking the moment, and the kind of probably will say expecting to have some solidarity and support from Americans because all that you say that Taiwan very recently has come under threat from China. What have been these? Nude threats that have led them to to make this announcement. So in a New Year's address Jingping, the president of China made some comments about the need to accelerate a reunification I in the past he has said to a three years ago. You can't keep on pushing the unification on hold keep on being about, you know, something that might happen in the future. And it really prompted strong response from the time these president saying when she basically said the nineteen ninety two consensus. So this is a kind of idea of there being one chine renite beside being kind of asserting independence Taiwan notice that he independence. She said that that was no longer policy in she felt that Taiwan no longer needs to stand to the nine thousand nine hundred consensus such a symbolic thing. But it's quite important Simmons something that China run. The thing that's been demanding. So it's really the kind of tensions between both sides. It is very dangerous face of the because the minute that loan sidestep. Out of line. You risk a series of events could follow the could involve much much more than Taiwan and China. Yes. Taiwan is on the absolute front of will be cold shiny house has been getting increasing economic pressure, particularly since the election of the mole pro independence Democratic Progressive Party on dislike up years ago. If all end there were present my enjoy she met Xi Jinping, the president of China in Singapore in two thousand fifteen things looking at Wilma. But now there's been a real deterioration. Pas of that is because of the pressure in Beijing from the Trump issues north of the problems with the United States. So Xi Jinping is talking to a domestic audience where he's basically showing he's strong. He's pushing back against Taiwan. But Taiwanese also dating with not great economy. The moment if it was his international space is freezing up. And so there are real tensions. And the issue, I suppose is that China where to act intemperately and try and do anything on Taiwan would be really costing itself into the total unknown because you'd have. An enormous international kickback, but also you have twenty three million people in Taiwan who simply don't save themselves as poverty United reunified country, particularly under COMEX raging Taiwan do at the moment other than make these in do these military exercises in NS NSS independence when on either side of Taipei, you have to halt headed strong minded leaders in the shape of Donald Trump in the US and Xi Jinping in China who will go to the ends of the earth to publicly exert that power in the middle. Taiwan gets ripped pieces. Sir tying when the party had not a great result in the local elections of the end of last year, and she's resigned. His champion of Papa she's full president. She comes up for reelection or attempt to reelection two years time the issue really is. She is not probably keen on getting too close to Americana Trump because they didn't want to be played as a fallen in the battle between American the US Trump has obviously a bigger consideration about how to deal with China being, you know, having Taiwan as useful point in that guy. I mean that would be something that wouldn't really suit Taiwan on the other hand they want to buy too much with China's hippies trading pumps like seventy percent. Seventy five percent nitrate is with China. What are they doing? So they're gonna policy cool to go south policy of trying to find other partners trying to reach out to the international community. And basically making sure that their alliance is a strong enough. The people know that wouldn't be acceptable for a flag democracy to be attacked by known democracy. So they're just trying to help that. Line at the moment. Kenny ban from King's College in author of China's world, thank you very much for joining us on monocle twenty fool. You're listening to the monocle daily in a moment we had to Florence the latest on the pity woman's but trade show, but I with time at twenty three twenty five in Rome twenty to twenty five here in London. His a summary of the latest world news headlines. The US President Donald Trump says the refusal of funding for Buddha will with Mexico is a growing humanitarian and security crisis. But in a recent televised address, Mr. Trump didn't declared a national emergency that would have bypassed congress to fund the will he reportedly walked out of a meeting with Democrats held to try to resolve the standoff, the UK Prime Minister Theresa May's losing space to maneuver politically. After the British house of parliament voted. She must set out a plan B, the Brexit should check his plan. B voted down at a crucial contest in the house next week. If Mrs Maes plan, eighth fails, she'll have just three days to silt out another option and a former minister in Israel has admitted spying for Iran, Ghana and Segev who is an energy minister in the nineteen nineties. This to be jailed for eleven years. Israeli Justice ministry says he reached a plea bug enough to confessing to severe espionage passing information to an enemy country. You're listening to the multiple daily. You're listening to the monocle daily with me Emma, Nelson, and let's head to the spectacular city of Florence pity warm. Oh, the Florentine menswear trade show is in full swing who's twelve hundred brands being showcased where we needed someone to do the heavy lifting for us, a Monaco's fashioned Edison. Jamie waters is the men taking on the task in between mouthfuls of spaghetti, Jamie. How is life in Florence tonight? Yes. It's it's pretty good ever really can play. We've just been out having executive that having spaghetti and sit of Nagorno knees. And it's you know, it's a it's a beautiful city to Bain, although very chilly at the moment these freezing. But inbetween taking a welcome break from all the eating and drinking at there's a small matter of PT womb. Oh, how is that Bain today yet it's been really good on its very busy this season. Awesome. Winter is is a is. It's a it is busier than the the psalmist season is just a kind of big industry. But to that we we were at one of the big drum way shows tonight. And so what he does really. Well, I mean, the the main event is the Fortezza the bus on. That's where you know days twelve hundred brands have stance and everything, but then they also host these special sort of rock one off runway events runway choice today. There's only one to feature designers who stays these kind of spectacular shows. I one of those tonight, and the designer was why projects which is a prison liable. It's the credits is a Belgian guy code Glenn mountains. And it's a very very respected brand. That's very cool at the moment. And what's so good about PC? The bees runway intensive design is is that they have they have time to for these my shirts time, the paper to off the paper to kind of absorb the shows talk about them off to it's it's really inexperienced. What happens in Paris fashion? Waco milan. Is this such a tight schedule that people are just running between shows? So if you're a brand you put a lot of money into a show, and then it's on social media on Instagram. Whatever people talking about it for ten minutes and Debrecen to the next Sean it's all wiped out. And that's the problem that brands have to contend with a PC all the focus is on not people have time. So there's a really nice feeling about it. So at the white project show tonight, it was held in in the cloistered courtyard of the Santa Maria novella, which is this incredible sort of church from the fourteen hundreds in the center of the city set was in this core. Yards. That was that was Nord lot. He was very dot and people had torches, and we were sitting sort of sitting on these long benches on around the courtyard sets a very spectacular setting that really makes the most of being in Florence. It was a men's and women's shore. And it sort of started with these quite Yeary, quiet music and the models were kind of. Clopping down down, the, you know, the stones of this courtyard in the guys instead of black boots in the the goes had gold hails on various units spot footwear. And it was it was a very interesting shore. And it kind of felt like an occasion. And I think that's one of the things that PC really does. Well, it's an interesting idea to actually give you time to see what's on show. How does that actually change the way that you see the fashion? Do you actually spend more time thinking about ten appreciating it more? Or is it still that whole thing about having to give an immediate reaction before you move onto the next thing. I think you do appreciate it more. You're in kind of different mindset. I think even we'll keen into the shore United said it was it was Pimm shar. And but only actually started at seven so for an our people we walked through the centurion Avella and paper would just just wondering around the church and shining torches around and looking at the, you know, the incredible data house on the sailing and. You'll in a different head spikes. Because you do have a bit more time dot just you know, that wouldn't happen at a normal fashion. White paper, you don't have an hour. You would miss the next show. So I think that is the sense of curiosity that you have on and then all equally after the show, you know, people are going to drink some things like that. But that is not a runway show straight afterwards. So we were debating the show talking about it with different people. A was kind of gathered outside days. There's a different failing around the. Which makes it an incredible platform today's design as well because they do have that getting all this attention on them. And they just on that note. There's another one tomorrow, not the second round my showed, which is it's a brand new label and the designers could out outta Maria Camilo on Hayes had an amazing a really good sort of prestigious career previously is been designer Zana Valentino to Roussy Baluchi, or these amazing European houses some break cited Sabe what he's gonna bring with these folks short. But yet, it's I think it's just an amazing platform for the signs, and it's really nice for us as well that we kind of have time to absorb what they're doing saying stuff up close. Do you see how the fashion system really really works? Given the fact that you do have that time, and you can see the perfection and the other things that make putting on enormous show, really real. Yeah. Well, I mean, I think there's two things I think with the runway shows it's more about it's more about the u saying the closing movement. It's against the music. It's kind of the whole it's more of an emotional thing. And I think it's about the host spectacle. I think in terms of like feeling the close insane the data. That's where the the actual trade show is so good on. And that's why I think PC worked so well for men's by because men's by really ease about the details, generally, I knew see how it all works. And kind of you know, it's a very stressful industry. And if a Boston is in the wrong pilot seems trivial bit trivial, but if a design is just not quite right. You know, this is the chance to show it tool the buys, this is dead shot on a lot of money go, you know, the spending a lot of money on these. So you know, there's a lot of pressure for them. And you kind of us you say the workings up-close, Jamie. What is on the line from Florence? Thank you for joining us on monocle twenty four. A little while we'll go through the Asian newspapers. But I it's time for toll stories. Our weekly audio tour of suburban urban landmark this week. We had to Wellington in New Zealand when nestled into the side of a hill and on the quiet street, you can pry find premier house is the official residence of the country's prime minister his Monaco's resident Kiwi David Stevens with MU. Well, Trump sleep soundly in the White House and South Korea's Moore. And John hangs his head at the Blue House to send Dern raises the first baby of museum in the residence that was once nine as the mid. Construction of the category. One here to building dates back to the infancy of the New Zealand colony built in Wellington and eighteen forty three. It was originally intended for the city's first mayor George hunter. But when the capital city was picked up and shut down south from Oakland. Eighteen sixty five to it's now, comfortable harm amongst the hills of the Wellington harbour, the building became New Zealand's official residence step aside ten Downing Street the Kiwis have to sixty Tina cordy road. So the street adjacent might not be as snappy, but the newly minted residents was sitting Leah buzz with peanuts. And the Knicks seventy years a total of nine premiers four prime ministers called at home and aside from simply moving in the favorite pillows plants and pooches many of the occupants sit about renovating the property to make their own. Gordon cuts the country's twenty PM rebuilt, the properties conservatory and even added an enclosed verandah in nineteen twenty six, but by this point, the place had fallen into disrepair and it required. More than a bit of window-dressing to survive. By nineteen fifty-five prime minister, Michael Joseph savage, who was the properties Knicks potential. Tina more than hit his hands full rebuilding the country's economy during the great depression and decided to rebuild at two sixty kin equating road wasn't with adding to his job sheet. He declined the offer to take up residence. Helps also not vote is that even he was giving up some luxury during the economic Dan's in and the country was without an official residence. The address was handed over to the health kit. Sick and transforms into a children's dental clinic where it became known by every school could who faced a meth fulfilling for the its walls by the slightly exaggerated. Monica the murder house. One thousand nine hundred and debate over the future of the property had come to a hit, the then minister of internal affairs. Michael Bessette declared the house was to be restored to its former glory to Mark the one hundred fiftieth anniversary of Wellington becoming the nation's capital. In nineteen ninety the first p move back into the freshly refurbished residents since the in almost every prime minister has set up shop in the phone than valley Cortas, barring the slighted Bill English due to a New Zealand law prohibiting Wellington-based impis claiming player combination in the capital while John Cain. Helen Clack used up more as a hotel than a home museums newest leader to send Arden has moved proper even posting social media updates from the catch with pedals Zealand's, fist cat who sadly died after only a month in office. And some of the Granger of the Kremlin will the security of the White House. UCLA premium house seems to sum up the country quite well. A quiet little house in a quiet corner of the capital with dog walkers returning from a stroll around the Wellington botanic gardens. Mike catch the prime minister putting out rubbish bins perhaps collecting the mail, please just hard. It's not another boat. David stevens. Aaron you can hear more city stories on the up and it's on Thursday at nine thousand nine hundred London time, you're listening to the monocle daily. We had not Thailand were a Saudi teenager who locked herself in a hotel room at the airport to avoid being deported back to her family has been referred by the UN to Australia to seek refuge. Ralph Muhammed Al Coon claimed her family might kill her and left them behind in Kuwait to travel to Thailand with the ultimate aim of then flying onto a stray stranger to seek refugee statements. What is what is a huge number of press coverage for herself. She's perhaps inadvertently shone the spotlight on Thailand's less than satisfactory asylum process. What Elliot monocle Danube h heard from the southeast Asian affairs specialists Carlo Banura and the journalists marriage digestive to just digest ski to learn more. He began by asking if this was just a bit of bad luck for Thailand the tires. Authorities most likely processed her in the way that they would process anybody that system itself might be overly harsh and in this case, and it's not only this case. But also, it's a parallel case of a I think it's a footballer from. Bahrain who was detained in Bangkok on his I think leaving Bahrain. And there was a a INTERPOL warning on him. And he was the tame by thirties there, the fact that they're not checking who these people are or what the complications in their cases might be. And certainly in this case where they worked with its it appears that they worked with the Saudi embassy to send them back to send this woman back to Kuwait. These are all these are all problems in her case, though, unlike in both of the cases, actually, there's been a very rapid mobilization of social media, and that's been that has been a deciding factor here. This is a military government, which is not accountable to anybody at this moment, they should have. No, they would have no qualms about deporting somebody you're sending them right back. And so these are obviously exceptional cases. This is just all due to the international attention, nor does it fit in with the wider disapproval of of Saudi Chris Saudi Crown prince, Mohammad bin Salman is record an and sort of the negative attention that they have had recently. I think it's bit of both. I mean, I saw a one wonderful quit. But suggested that Saudi would have been more accepting if Thailand had not confiscated the girl's passport, but had confiscated mobile phone because that was what enabled really gave her access to the outside world. That's created the Twitter storm that really is what has allowed her to stay where she is and possibly get to Australia, which is where she was planning to go, and which she apparently had a visa for in the passport that was confiscated. So there's all that going on. But I think as you say the the wider aspect of this is that Saudi Arabia is not enjoying a good global image of the moment. And there's the kashogi Koji case. There is the war in Yemen. There's all sorts of other things that have really. Tarnished the image of the crown prince when he first came to where when he first came to power when it was he was thought of being maybe a bit more enlightened going to bring Saudi into the modern age, and really it's been almost backwards since then, and I think in the international context that's been a huge help to the goal. Who is now immune? I it looks as though she certainly at the moment protected, and as though she'll be allowed to go to Australia. Carlo amount point, do you think Australia or anywhere else where this young woman could have applied for asylum tried to have much choice now in taking our in before they know the whole story because of this sorta social media storm, I think this stage after we've had the initial bought up by the Thai authorities everybody is playing it safe. So today, I saw that the Australian government is saying that this case is no different than any other. It'll be processed by UNHCR. And that once they do their report, then the Australian government will process the case normally there is the slight question of diplomacy here. I think Australia is very keen not to necessarily put pressure on the government about this case. The government is keen not to make any moves. That would interrupt the UNHCR's moves here to make sure that they don't invite any further criticism, and then the Saudi it would be very interesting to see what happens the Saudi tie relations after. Both of these cases are process because obviously this won't disrupt the relationship, but certainly in the region the region itself is Southeast Asia's kind of recalibrating its relations with Saudi Arabia and again this bad publicity. And the fact that Thailand seems to be the conduit for a number of these I was about to distance. But in this case is not a disadvantage just individuals who want to get out of the region. This could become a bigger issue. If tile and more and more individuals go through Thailand to do this. That was married to Jesse. That's okay. It's Daniel bait on Midori house on monocle twenty four Elliott today. The newspapers a next. UBS global financial services firm with over a hundred and fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of people. We bring fresh thinking in perspective to our work, and we know that it takes marriage of intelligence and haunt to create lasting value for Clinton's. It's about having the rights ideas, of course. But also about having one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivaled network of global experts. That's why it s we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. June in weekly to the bulletin with UBS for all the latest insights and opinions from UBS and experts from around the world. Time is twenty three forty three in Berlin twenty two forty-three here in London. Let's have a look at what's making the front pages in Asia, while I'm delighted to say that Bruno Gus says is ABC world services digital editor for Asia. Well, he's done all the hard work for us. And he's going to look at all the papers and has decided what we will need to know. Welcome back for now. Okay. So you have decided to burn a, what's what's the big stuff happening? Our top story. Here would be because it has implications in other areas as well. And its further development into all the things that we are seeing happening right now. It's a piece by the South China Morning post in which the university of California Davis has issued a warning to Sudanese of some of its students for them not to use what's up or we chat while in China. And also to the vice goes a bit further not sign anything don't give away their passport. And also avoid discussing politics through social media. That's due to fear of a backlash improbably arbitrary detention while in China, and some are speculating that this could have been also a directive provided by the State Department of the US given that there have been some. People believed to be retaliate retaliatory detentions taking party the by the taking place in China by the Chinese government. After the who I weigh executive main Mon Jew was detained last December in Canada and deported to the US. Enormous statement to make don't use what's up when you're in trying not least because it it puts it it. It doesn't make Facebook look too, great Facebook know, the owners of of what's up, but also in suggests that perhaps there are ways and means that to the security of what was that may be compromised by bright mind, but it it's the way now that a political row that is taking place with re I'm the trade route that's happening between the United States and China is now filtering down to everyday life. That's pretty much. What it is. It's it's I mean, the warning goes further and says that it believes that some of these messaging apps could be could be used in in in espionage charges as just happened with a US citizen who was detained in Russia and his use of what's up and the messages that he exchanged there were cited in the espionage charges used against him. And there is also the risk that following the detention at highway executive in Canada on the instruction of the United States. If you are a US national now visiting China as his happen to two Canadians. You will not completely immune from detention, full whatever reason given the fact that people are prepared to arrest. Other people simply on the grounds of. Of where they come from. That's precisely it. Yes. And and the will the several concerns also about China, China's understanding that a Chinese citizen could extend to being somebody of Chinese origin, but born elsewhere or even the in the US that they would be entitled to detain that person as well as has happened in the past. Let's move on to the next story. We cannot continue like this. Jacoby Andre Carter's traffic. Well, Jakarta's traffic as that of many Asian capitals is notorious for being chaotic and for retaining people for hours in the traffic. But there's a recent study showing that that's also hitting Indonesia in its pockets. It's costing annually over four point six billion in losses due to the traffic jams, and what's president Joko Jayco? We don't do. Is saying is that that has also to do with the fact that there is no communication between the many modes of public transport in greater Jakarta, and tell us a little bit more about, you know, the the what can be done about this. But you get cities capital cities which suffer from terrible traffic problems. But where is the infrastructural where is the leadership that could come in terms of you know, sorting this problem out the fact that when you have the president saying that the traffic in his capitol is pretty bad. I mean, that means that something needs to be done truly. Well, he wants he wants the IMP implementation of of of public transport in a public planning plan to be to be implemented and also for the managements of these different public transportation outlets to to have a common management right now. Each one of these have a different. Different organizations. So they don't talk between themselves, and that doesn't help much and that leads to situations where we currently have. I mean, I walked through the streets of Jakarta, but it's very complicated to spend hours walking there. Because all of a sudden the pavement disappears. And when I told people that I had walked from one distance to another people just were in complete this believe, nobody does it. He I mean, you can all of a sudden the sidewalk where you're stepping on vanish shoes. There's all. And then you're in the middle of the traffic just like that. Wonderful. Thank you very much pre positive that Jack. Kennedy dodo is right. Very nice has has experienced the absence of the pavement. And right. Let's look at an article from the air awardee concern mounts for ADP's. Refugees, independent displaced persons says she displays people in Northern Rock kind is only blocks aid shipments. We are back again to wreck Hines raccoon state and people vulnerable vulnerable people not being looked after. Yes. This is yet another crisis in Rokon state other than that of the row hinges, which are meant to be returned to to me Amar for quite a while. But those no specific date for that. But that's a different story. This one is up to four thousand people have been this place due to the conflict between the so-called the Arakan army, which is a guerilla group and the Amar security forces. So it's and that has resulted in over four thousand five hundred people becoming this place internally within me Amar, and that is particularly concerning because there are other local ethnic military groups and different parts of. The country. There are there are different ethnic strifes within me, Omar there have been promises to incorporate these ethnic military groups into the country's military. But so far so far that hasn't been fulfilled yet. And there is no end in sight for this current crisis as well. I DP sense internationally displaced person. Of course, it means internally displaced persons, one element in this article that struck me as it says, it talks about the UN's claim that it's already offered offered humanitarian assistance may two men mar. But local groups say that they haven't seen any international organizations. There's no NGOs apart from the international community to the Red Cross committee of the Red Cross. I'm getting acronyms all over the place today, but the emergency fruit referred relief is being looked after by local organizations. What does that say about the amount of trust that can be placed in these organizations to bring aid to people? Well, those that and and I think there's a mutual distrust as well because I think there's a sense that meal. Government cannot be trusted by day. Don't have fully full trust in the government either. Okay. And finally, we will worry about the health of our own family. But if you're in the Philippines, three, no. Two thirds of you a worrying about Rodriguez detaches. Well, yes, there have been several rumors about his health. He apparently has chronic back pains and his his appearances a somewhat awkward. He has a right now he has been known to have a somewhat greyish appearance on his skin. Nobody knows for sure. Why that is he there were rumors that he had cancer and the and there, but then he dismissed those rumors, but sixty six percent, a majority of Filipinos are worried about president Rodrigo Duterte is health. He has seventy three years old age. So you know, it it is concerning. Specially if it is the case that he's not actually fully disclosing, what is it that he has if. He does have something more serious, which the constitution of the country stipulates that when it is something of of the poses a serious health issue. He should disclose it. Okay. Brin Augusta's from the BBC World Service. Thank you very much. Indeed joining us on the monocle daily. Finally, staple of every angst ridden students bedroom walls. But now the scream by Edvard munch or rather one of the lift at the lithographs of the work is on its way to the British Museum in London it'll form part of a wider exhibition which explores the artists complex often conflicting emotions, but as what is being a brilliant shown papers at the art world rather stylish way of snubbing. It's news at Brexit will phone rebel is a cultural historian and joins me. Now. Welcome back to medical twenty four many of us know, the image. Could you explain the explain the meaning of the angst, the the anguished expression? Please. I think we can devise our meaning between behind the screen. You only have to look at it to have an instant emotional reaction to it. And I think when we're looking at there, it's it's fascinating that we have in our cultural consciousness almost automatically connected to Brexit before even appeared. Why is that? I mean, the first time I I realized that it was on its way to the United Kingdom. Am I immediately wondered whether that was the because the the screams expression is one that's being adopted by many British people at the moment. I think I think I'd have to agree with you. I think it's fascinating. You know, this exhibition is one of the first that we've had in a very long time. And it's being placed in Nova next. I think is it's full title, and the squeamish south is going in the exile, tea and separation pop of the exhibition and the coup to mathematically that's gonna make anyone who walks in think of Brexit because it's full front of online on. I think is a very interesting this choice on the curator's Portland Bush meetings pot to to really link this hugely well-known off work to what's happening to us today. Do you think the city's light London trying to achieve you meant to know do the curated deliberately placing it in the separation part of the exhibition? Indeed, she said she's closer to say that much was really cosmopolitan European figure, and I think in this day and age that's an important message to convey, you can just hear the message clanging is his hits the floor in anybody who sued the fireworks. So new years eve, we'll have hit notice at the Joe droped as London's large ferris wheel was transformed into the Twenty-eight stars of the European Union. We'll city econ has has made it very clear that as far as he is concerned London is going to remain open. And he is a very strong campaigner for people vote on the second to make sure that we really want to commit to what the government is saying we have no choice in. And I think this is this is something that a lot of Neo London is leading in. I'm I was London for ten years. I now live outside live on the coast, and I see the push and pull between people's different ideas of what Brexit means to us. Very clearly, you know, we have we have lost this idea that this is something that has become a word. He's very focused on this idea that Brexit is a division. It is one part of the country London against everything else. And we forget that in many parts of the country. Like Kent the vote was a fifty fifty split. Blitz. You know, this is something that that is still we still have not come together as a country onto back any actual choice. Oh, what we're going to do here. And how wold is representing the fascinating. Indeed. I mean, one wonders what what the art world can indeed do to try to make sense of what is going on. I mean, it would make up sedately perfect sense. As an angst ridden region. Portrait would be the solution. I think monks monks. The scream really has always spoken to people who are struggling it. It doesn't 1893 when it was first created am I on display and doing it still today? It's never law. The very emotional human connection to how we feel when all lives both internal and external are in turmoil. You know, he's ninety three inning in the UK history. When when the screen was done with actually the first time, the labor port became the labor party was formed led by here hardy in we we all always out moments of art and politics reflecting the turmoil around us people seeking to express that in a workings and there in the cells, and I can only see that the BMI is really pushing that forward today with an enormous small face phone reduce much. Join. Fool, and that's all we have time for today's edition of the monocle daily. Thanks to our producers, Daniel Bateson, Tom poll. Researchers Daphne Carney's and mainly Evans. An Australian manager Christie Evans, the globe lists is here in eight us time with Teich and rights. You your host daily returns at the same time tomorrow, if he can join me for that if you can for now, though from me, MLC's goodbye, thank you very much. Bill listening.

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Thursday 27 September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:48 min | 2 years ago

Thursday 27 September

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast only twenty. Seventh of September twenty eighteen on monocle twenty four. Live from the Dory house in London. This is the briefing on monocle twenty four. I'm Ben Ryland coming up the US supreme court. Nominee bread covenant will face intense scrutiny on Capitol Hill later today, as a sense of crisis grips the GOP. We're looking for a fair process where I can be heard and defend the my integrity, my lifelong record. We'll have the latest also ahead. We'll look ahead to this weekend's controversial referendum in Macedonia, and examine Argentina's severe economic woes. Plus does sex still sell will consider what the designer Tom Ford had to say in the latest issue of monocle magazine, and we'll ask whether Venice's authorities are going too far in their issued of the city's more unruly tourists old out ahead on the briefing with me, Ben Ryland. A woman who has accused supreme court nominee, Brad Kavanagh of sexual misconduct since the assault drastically altered her life professor, Christine, Blasi Ford and Judge Kevin o. are expected to testify at a Senate panel hearing on Capitol Hill later today. Jacob parakeet. Lewis is deputy head of the US and America's program at the think tank Chatham house. He joins me now on the line Jacob, they're announce three allegations of misconduct against Judge Kevin, oh, it safe to assume I would expect that if this were your average job interview, he's chances would be slim to none. How do you assess the current situation? It's very fluid because at the moment the Republicans have a majority on the judiciary panel which is what recommends Cavanaugh forward to vote from the full Senate. If one of them decides not vote for Cavanaugh because it's a very evenly split panel, they can still advance his nomination to the full Senate even without. Out a recommendation at which point the question is whether all fifty-one Republican senators would vote to confirm. There's not a lot of margin for error there. If there's a tie a fifty fifty split, the vice president can come in and would almost certainly vote to confirm, but they can only afford to defections assuming the democrat all hold the line. So there's, there's a lot of question today about how appears how Christine Blasi Ford's testimony is received by the panel by the audience by the president by everyone watching which is to say, quite a lot of people and how successful Cavanaugh is at defending his own reputation and defending his own actions. I think it's fair to say there's a lot of nervousness amongst the Republican supporters of Kavanagh's nomination. Well, let's look at that a little more closely than because especially when you look at the general analysis, the surrounding this in the US press over the past few days. Few weeks. It feels as though it's it's very political and very legal in its in its wording, but there is a show business aspect tool of this what you've just touched upon there. And I think that was in full display at Donald Trump's press conference in New York yesterday, it was certainly one of the more extraordinary displays by the already erotic president. He, he said that the allegations against Cavanaugh where the work of some very evil Democrats, that's how he put it now, eve. Indeed, there is a backlash brewing against the GOP because of all of this, which you know a lot of people in the potty certainly have been quietly suggesting that that's Donald Trump's woods yesterday, surely doing nothing to dampen it. Just a real problem for the Republicans because they're, they're caught between a rock and hard place. There's a sense in which there's a very easy maneuver for them. You could tell Cavanaugh that he won't be confirmed, ask him to withdraw his nomination. There are dozens of other jurists who would be qualified for the supreme court who have the same sort of jurisdictional and. Ideological disposition as Cavanaugh who would almost certainly pass the Senate. Even if not before the election, they're still lame duck session, which will be the current Senate. And of course, there's every chance that even if the Democrats do well broadly November because of the apportionment of Senate seats, it may even be a more Republican Senate. So in a way, there's no particular urgency about cavenaugh. If the point is having a right wing Justice on the supreme court, there still relatively safe. The problem as you observe is optics. A lot of the support for Donald Trump from people who evangelical type of people who normally wouldn't sort of have much to do with someone of Trump's general background and lifestyle is to do with his right wing appointments to the federal judiciary and backing away from Cavanaugh I think will be seen. We take as a signal by a crucial portion of those voters that he's not actually committed to the project of turning the federal judiciary. To the right. So it's it's nearly impossible for them to sort of thread the needle because of course, now this is mobilizing democratic voters, especially though not exclusively women and the more they push forward with it and the more danger there in on that front. So it really is a very, very narrow pathway for them. Well, a lot of talk about the backlash to will of this and the and the potential Blue Wave at the midterm elections just a few weeks away. But look Trump was also speaking yesterday during that that conference about the allegations from his own perspective, he acknowledged that he too had been accused of assault or misconduct which he, of course, denies. He said the what's happening to cover. No had happened to him, and that's why he sees it differently to people simply watching it all at hun. So one suspects that despite the metoo movement and then the current climate that we are in, they probably are lot of people sitting at home who identify with what Mr. Trump was saying, rightly or wrongly, and that maybe this backlash isn't as. Veer as a lot of people who sympathizing with the Democrats are suspecting. What's your view on? All of that is is Trump may be betting that that the the suspicions of the backlash, perhaps a little bit of a blown. I don't know about that. I think I think Trump is already entirely committed to this, his whole public persona. His whole attitude during the campaign in an office has been never backed down, never apologize. So he can't very well step back at this point and say, you know, actually does women had a point. I did some bad things and I'm sorry that would be completely inconsistent with everything we've seen from him so far and wouldn't really at this stage, get him much credit. I think he's he's gone so far down the line of just sticking to the hardline, denial. No, no, they're all fake. They're all lying there all paid, which is a truly absurd sort of accusation to throw around that. He doesn't really have a choice. He's kind of path dependent. At this point. We haven't really had a chance to see how how much the backlash is going to play out. Because there hasn't really been an election. We've seen a few special elections where it particularly in the case of the Alabama standard election, which should have been an incredibly easy win for the Republicans and because their nominee was accused of sexual misconduct of the democrat won instead. So there's some evidence suggests that in fact, the backlash could be really significant and could throw races that might otherwise have gone one way the other Jacob curricula. Thank you very much for joining us. It's short to be an explosive day in the news across the United States today. We'll keep an eye on that here on one hundred twenty four. In the meantime, here's what else we is making news today. Of ABC has resigned. Following allegations of political interference at Austrailia. Public broadcaster, just unknown had been accused of calling for journalists to be fine because they're reporting was disliked by the Australian government speaking to the ABC's seven thirty program Milne said he decided to step aside to spare the broadcast from further controversy, and it's clearly not a good thing for everybody to be trying to do their job with this kind of fast on going on. So I wanted to provide I release valve other news Japan's biggest warship. The cargo helicopter carrier has joined the UK's HMS Argyle in naval drills. In the Indian Ocean, the exercises took place as the frigate headed towards the contested South China Sea. Japan's maritime forces says that it was an opportunity for the two navies to train more closely. And today's edition of the monocle minute reports that Tokyo is undergoing a department store, Rene zones. Taco Chamaoli co has opened a lavish. WJR annex in the city's Nihonbashi district, we plan is to attract young people to an area that's known for its older demographic. Those are some of the stories we're following today on monocle twenty four. It's nine minutes past twelve here in London. We'll get the latest business news now with you and parts at Bloomberg look, you. An Argentine has won a promise of extra and faster cash from the IMF Attila's mole Ben. It's a big bailout, and it's about to get big. In fact, it's the biggest bailouts in history. Fifty billion dollars was announced back in June, and they've said today that the increase to fifty seven billion dollars and the money will come quick more that cash delivered up from now. Argentina's already received fifteen billion dollars from the immature and president. Macaroni is new. Central Bank chief are going to have to tighten policy. They said they'll accelerates budget savings and they're gonna freeze the supply of money to an economy which is suffering from inflation that can ensure and get that inflation down. They've already, they've already had to raise interest rates to sixty percent in August the highest in the world, and they've been spending very heavily to defend the peso running down reserves by fourteen billion dollars. Just in the three months to June, the peso was twenty to the dollar at the beginning of the year is now at thirty eight to the dollar. That's pretty painful. If you've got your savings in the peso and you need to change it to foreign currency to buy imports. And of course, for companies who may have borrowed in dollars or other foreign currencies, that means every payments will have double just over the course of the last nine months. Well, you and of course, all of this has a political backstory to it. How high the stakes will president mockery mockeries up for reelection next year, and he risks having to campaign amid shrinking economy. Something that no politician. Of course, once he sought sir, I'm IMF help. Even though the fund is politically toxic 'Argentina after the collapse, of course of the loan program in two thousand and one led to default and a deep deep recession, memories of that painful recession very prominent in many people's minds in Argentina stakes high also for the IMF is an opportunity for them to rebuild their country reputation in the country where it's assoc-. With poverty and unemployment. The microbes are already, yeah, promised budget cuts next year. That's not something you want to be promising going into an election here. Likely be contesting that election against a left wing populists are the people who run the country for more than a decade after that collapsed in two thousand and one. So lots to watch in Argentine inch. Interesting to watch the political situation, but more cash from the international community for Argentina to be continued. It seems you on Bloomberg. Thank you very much for joining us on the briefing. Twelve minutes past the hour here on the briefing, the latest issue of monocle magazine features a fascinating interview with Tom Ford, the world renowned designer and filmmaker needs literally introduction, and he had some very interesting things to say about selling six in the current climate while I'm joined now in the studio by Monaco's editor, Andrew tuck, Andrew in one way or another. It seems as though old-fashioned is about selling sex, but Tom Ford has been known to take a little bit more literally tell us a little bit of the back story of what Tom Ford might be known for well of us. This is an amazing interview done by Jamie waters whose fashioning who, unfortunately is on the road stay. Now, Tom Ford of the made his name Gucci where he. A good generation goad. Now got an image of this kind of glossy global, super successful person. Encapsulated in the collections he made it was high sheen fabrics. It was a shiny shoe. It was a gold belt. He he perfectly caught the times and he left Gucci the his peak. He was doing amazing work, but he went off to be independent and he's now grown this vast and very successful independent fashion company where he has actually pushed my nothing towards a more refined way of dressing. So there's still kind of an emphasis on a good suit, a great piece of Iowa. He has an only gone down the kind of athlete route. Other brands have done. So he's he's gonna start to his guns in many instances, but he's a clever maverick, an independent player across the fashion scene. And as you say in his adv. Ties ING like most brands in the past. He has been confident to use sex to sell the clothes and the kind of lifestyle that he mentions the goes with a, I can imagine Jamie's little Jake's blushing when he was doing this interview in the interview fold Rickles contain from some years ago that I'm sure many of us would remember as well. It involved a man and a woman in handcuffs and a crocodile with. And it also reminded me the series from two thousand and seven depicting a Tom Ford fragrance that was wedged between a woman's bed breasts. And in between legs, he says that back then he didn't even think about things like that. But now he does easy religious saying that he's got a little older or is it was a little bit more complexity speaking about how culture around in his changed as well. What his touching on a couple of really interesting things have because first of all, he does say that he would think about now, but he does also say, which I think is really interesting and Braves, say, actually, Juno, I might make sure that everyone was comfortable with. The idea, but I think I'm still comfortable with that notion of sex and fashion, and I would probably still do similar campaigns now. So he's not saying I'm running away from this. You know, we, we con have a sexualize fashion industry fall from his. You're saying, let's all make sure that we understand the game. Everybody is invested. Everyone feels comfortable with their roles Knepper if you ask nicely and everyone is is up for it. Then sex still has a part to play in fashion. Now was interesting is just a recent weeks fashion pages. We've run stories on, for example, whatever happened to the high heel. Now, while you may see on the front of your tabloid papers, Meghan Markle always stiletto. Actually, the majority of women are wearing flat shoes trainers pumps they they have pulled away from the high hill, and that's having a big impact on some of the the brands which sell high hill. So you're seeing. Decline in sales, and this is all part of a moment. I think where women men fashion have found themselves questioning and what our identity is and how we should behave in public. And there's definitely been a pull back to a less sexier image fashion. UCI in the the runway shows have taken place in recent weeks a bit more androgynous dressing for kind of come for Boehlke, close hiding, the silhouette, rather than always putting on display less cleavage less leg. And that is a moment the we're going to go through Tom. Ford has a really interesting perspective because he's been through these ups and downs, and I think he's just saying, hold on. Let's wait to see what happens in two or three years time as fashion begins to reflect, hopefully what will happen in two years time with kind of begun so out some of these issues. And we've got a bit more confident about playfulness and sexuality and the they will come back because in the end, we like having sex and we'd like close just finally on this Andrew, very true fashion has always relied on the provocateur in one way or another. We had seen the run back in the seventies posing nude for his own label. Calvin Klein bringing the the, the tiny white briefs above the genes waistline where is the provoker in today's fashion? Do we need a little bit more rebelliousness injected into? It'll. Well, I again, I think some of the fashion houses they want their cake and eat it. They've had the likes of Alexander McQueen have had a John Galliano who who are provocateurs, but you one who, unfortunately committed suicide and one who got caught up in an anti-semitic which has nearly destroyed his Co. that he's made a something of an apology on a comeback. But I think they they, they won't rebelliousness, but they won't make sure is commercial. Again, coming back to Tom Ford. He certainly not going to say anything to ridiculous, but he has got independence because he owns his own company and that's allowed him to come out here. And he's not kind of dismissing these ideas if far from it, he's saying, this is a moment questionnaire, but let's not give up on the idea that in the end, people kind of want to look hot in their clothes, and that will come back even if for the moment, people want to feel a bit more safe androgynous and kind of know on the market as it were that will. Eban flow. As we feel confident about the social mores around us. Monaco's editor, Andrew, tuck. Thanks for coming in on the briefing today. You can read more of that interview with Tom Ford. In the current edition of monocle magazine. It is of course by Jamie waters, Monaco's fashion editor. You're listening to the briefing. It's eighteen minutes past the hour here on monocle twenty four. The naming dispute between Macedonia and Greece could finally be over. But as Monaco's news editor Peter, I explains the final hurdle a referendum. This weekend. Only issue could send the whole process back to the start. This week, it is hoped that the biggest and longest running semantic argument in European politics will come to a happy if not far overdue conclusion. Over the last twenty seven years Greece and the Republic of Macedonia have been locked in a geo, political, jostling, match over the name. The Balkan state decided to give it self when it first became a country in nineteen Ninety-one, chest. Dumb slob SUV, Erin. He's so most doing oneal. Greece is since the state immediately to its north cannot carry the same name as its own Macedonia at geographical region just over the border which divides the too often seemingly interminable period of squabbling. It began to feel as though there'd been end to the dispute, but lost summer Greek Prime minister, Alexis Cipruss and his Macedonian counterpart. Zoran Zion have devised a plan to settle things once and for all the solution, it turned out was laughably simple, drop a five letter adjective into Macedonia's official title, no more. Would it be the Republic of Macedonia? It would become the Republic of north Macedonia, then on the Mon machine. Man. Again, we are not gathered here today to mourn the defeats of the past. We are taking a historic step so that from now on will only be winners this. So what's in a name anyway? Well, in the Balkans the answer is rather lot arguments. They've. National identity and disputes over territory have occurred with surprising frequency since the nineteen ninety s and within these disputes. Symbolic acts often loom very large in two thousand and one when fighting broke out between Albanians and Macedonians along the cost of and border. The Macedonians were able to quell the violence with measures, such as making out Bainian the second official language of the country and permitting the flying of its national flag. A successful renaming now would yield two significant political prizes for Macedonia. One being an immediate admission into NATO and further down the line of potential membership if the EU both of which Greece has vetoed previously. But now Zeph has to get the decision through a referendum this weekend and not everybody's happy with you. Never. A more blooms will. This week, rallies were staged in Macedonia's capital Skopje protesting. The new name is being too beholden to the Greeks. And meanwhile, the main opposition party has declared in acts of treason and threatened to boycott it altogether. The hope is that if enough citizens follow suit, then turn out will be less than fifty percent. Thus rendering the result void and the whole excise a colossal waste of time. If the referendum fails it will likely mean the end zehr's leadership Macedonia will become less stable place that is more susceptible to influence from the Kremlin which has formed for meddling in the domestic affairs of his neighbors. Most depressingly of all it will be barred once again by Greece from entering NATO and becoming the European Union's newest member. Monocle twenty four on pizza. L. thanks to Peter for that report there. You're listening to the briefing. And twenty two minutes past twelve here in London. It's time to flick through the European newspapers. Now I'm joined on the line from Zurich by Monaco's contributing editor, Jessica bridge, Jessica, thanks for jumping on a status off with the New York Times. No prizes for guessing what's all live the front pages, either. Yeah, it's not so surprising, but the cover or the front page photo. Super interesting. It's a page from nominee Kavanagh's calendar. One thousand nine hundred eighty two when he was in prep school, and he says, he's going to use this in his defense against his accuser, Christine Blasi Ford in the hearings take place today. It's kind of a bizarre peek into the memorabilia of someone's teen years with beach week spread across one week in details about workouts and things like that. Yeah, I was having a bit of a read of this a little bit earlier into it seems as though if he's going to plan on using it as a as a defence, it might not completely go to plan given what the New York Times has pointed out is this some some of underlying details that might not really exactly what he's looking for a better take us to elsewhere in the papers. What else have you spotted today? So also on the front page of the US addition is an article which is hungry. Children a warning sign in leaner times, which is a little bit like hunger games UK making the point that school that a school district in the UK has seen an uptick in Hungary kids. And typically that's something that people see when there's changes to larger economic issues. And in this case, the point is made that welfare benefits and spending cuts under us. Territory have are creating are really a crisis for the working poor. And that's actually reducing a trend in the UK which was a reduction in childhood poverty. Well, let's flick over to. Some of the other news hype is you've been looking through today in the Straits Times a clever headline. He crazy rich, Asian country. Tell us what's happening in Singapore that actually isn't the headline, but that's kind of the subtext of what's going on. So Singapore tax collection rose by six point, eight percent in two thousand seventeen to fifty point two billion. And that rises the result of GDP gains in increases in stamp duty from property sales, but the property market in Singapore's quite hot. But there's cooling measures in place right now. And that's to be resulting in kind of a cooling and they Konami right now in Singapore in q. three, and also the US China. Trade war is creating disruption in supply chains, and Jessica just before we wrap up just enough time to take us back to where you what's happening in the Swiss press. So this is a big deal in the Swiss press which is that the Nazi and all rod voted yesterday to block the bundy's routes, proposed loosening of weapons, export rules. After a lot of emotional debate. The Bundesrat had one. To allow exports to countries fighting civil wars. If it could be determined that the weapons were not used in conflict, but the Nazi now rod came back and said across parties. No, we're not into that idea. We can't do this as Swiss does goes directly in the face of our identity as a humanitarian nation as a neutral power Monaco's Jessica bridge at Zurich. Pierrot, Jessica. Thanks for joining us here on the briefing. And twenty five minutes past twelve. It is time to venture off to Venice. They're all some questions as to whether Venice has gone too far in its attempts to clampdown on unruly behavior by tourists. While I'm joined in the studio by Monaco's culture editor and proud telliano Kiara romola Kiara tell us what is the latest attempt? It seems to be the story that Neta ends. Yes. I said there are now at to try and regulate the consumption and sale of alcohol, pasta seven PM in Venice. And this comes at the same time. When other measures about behavioral public spaces is being discussed as well such as fines being proposed for people sitting down steps and an infant of monuments, for example, or on the side of Piazza's. In in Venice, we have had other instances in Italy where the consumption of alcohol has been cubs over the period of nighttime, and also the consumption. Off. You can imagine it pizza for cop show in Florence as well, and whether this is taking the approach to tourism to to fall and whether it kind of strays away from from tourism and actually influences the way that Laker residents live in the city as well. It's a, it's an interesting method to go about maybe trying to improve what they term the unruly tourists, but how much of a problem do you think it is full of a nation's how? How deep is the discontent running amongst people who who do leave in the city? The very problem is that the number of people who live in the city is decreasing. Sorry, shop they we have now about fifty, five thousand people living in Venice. That's a third of what was the case fifty years ago. So population is depleting. And so more so than the behavior of these people, which is obviously a problem when tourism is in respect for the place that it visits this also an issue of the quantity, the sheer number of people and not so much about those. Stay for a few days. But the problem is VIN Venice has been experiencing, particularly is that many of these visitors decamp for the day coming in from us cruise ships that both in in the lagoon and then and then go away after the one day. So the contribution they make to the local economy is very low. And I think the issue is not you shouldn't cub rightful like residents to the few that have remained, but the rights of the residents that need to be maintained, especially are the rights to access services. And I guess that includes not only public services but also private services such as shops such as retail outlets such as workshops. For example, venison has the tradition of having an incredible autism tradition and of of Crofts and making and much of that is being eaten up by low-quality shops. For example, same situation went hospitality rather than curbing the amount of beds that you trying to off. The tourists triumph, cub the amount of apartments to being used and kind of left empty for much time, then used by tourists and pushing away. People who can't afford buying housing Venice, any more coming from Australia. I know what can happen when a city styles to get rid of a reputation for being a nanny state, shall we call the dot and Sydney is has been battling with that for a little while. Now, since the lockout laws were introduced and there are certainly a lot more straightforward than a lot of the rules that we see coming out of Venice at the moment. But look, I don't think anyone is questioning that there is a situation in venison, something needs to be done, but do you think there is a risk of Venice, attracting a bit of a reputation for being just a too difficult and then perhaps it will start to experience a drop in tourism, which given the state of the economy in Italy right now might not be such a good thing. Even if there's not much danger of not enough tourists in Venice, just yet it can be a tap that can be suddenly switched off Conan. Yes. As. Especially if you consider the the industry. And I guess the economy in Venice is pretty much solely reliance on tourism right now. So if that was to drop, then the situation very different. Well, I went to, I think we're risk Venice running out of tourists anytime soon. I know that for example, measures such as introducing barriers to arrive into Marco have been tried and have been, I guess, rejected and and pulled back because they just didn't work. These kind of approaches, which I kind of know the root of the problem. I don't think are going to slow an awful lot. You need to look at the root of the problem. I rather than kind of patching it up with bans on behavior, which is really common sense most of the time and not a certainly the current flow of news not such a good look. Venice's PR PR karate Amelia for joining us today. That's it. For today's edition of the briefing was produced by Reese James and researched by your lean. Gone and Martha Librium studio manager was George mcdonagh. The briefing is back at the very same time. Tamar do join us, then. And joined Daniel Bauge today's edition of Madari house that he's live at eighteen hundred in London. Thirteen hundred. If you're listening in New York City, I'm Ben Ryland. Thanks for joining us by Fennell.

Venice Macedonia United States Blasi Ford London Donald Trump Cavanaugh Senate monocle magazine Greece Jamie waters Christine Blasi Ford editor Brad Kavanagh president Ben Ryland UK Tom Ford Argentina Austrailia
Print media during coronavirus

Monocle 24: The Stack

29:51 min | 9 months ago

Print media during coronavirus

"Is we can the stack. We speak with Mighty Garcia about some precious lessons for the print industry at this time. Plus we discuss Christie's stunning print title. Monaco's fashion editor wonders about how fashion magazines who fair during the covert one thousand nine outbreak and finally the photography title source celebrates a hundred issues? Stay tuned for this week's edition of the stack from the housing loan and this is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis. And I am fairly. You shared a very busy show today coming up. We'll have Jane Burton from Christie's plus our very own Jamie waters on fashion magazines and covert nineteen. Plus we welcome back Richard West from source magazine but we start the show on a friendly note with the Stack Regular and legendary newspaper design. There might have got my tells me what he's been doing. During the outbreak and a few tips for the printing industry. During this time like everybody else it takes a lot of adjusting. I mean he man who sometimes do two countries you. One day I will do lunch Vienna and then maybe have dinner with you in London or with Tyler. You know and here yesterday. It was a landmark day for me for the first time in decades. I have been twenty four days in one place. This had not happened for thirty seven years. I am never twenty three days in one place and so that takes a lot of adjustments at the same time you make the best of it so ice structure my day. I usually go for a run in the morning then I come back. I do German lessons trying to learn German and so I do my German lessons then. I teach my class Mike Columbia University class. I teach from here you know with the backdrop of the beach there and then I do office hours with the students. Individual students per fifteen twenty minutes on zoom then. Last week I was sitting in my balcony was happy. Hour was sunset over the Gulf of Mexico. Which is so beautiful and I said you know. I am not a health worker. I cannot be out there. I am not a fireman. I'm not an emergency kind of worker. How can I help in a crisis like this and I said all I can do is to go on zoom and continue the learning that we all need to getting bald with so I created what I call the zoom quarantine chats and? They are little thirty five minute episodes open to anybody in the world. Who would like to join a usually do them twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays at nine thirty in the morning eastern standard time and I promote them a lot and the idea is to have a conversation. You know creativity in the time of the corona virus. That was my first episode in the next episode. I'm going to talk about. How do you write and edit and design for mobile devices specifically? That would be something that we will continue for several episodes from time to time. I will take my Columbia University lectures which I think are global maybe on typography or maybe on the use of video on mobile and present version of this zoom then we have a Qa but he was wonderful for me to see the first episode. People coming from Australia from New Zealand people who are up in the middle of the night to attend this was quite nice and and people can participate. They can even show their work. I'm trying to highlight the good work creative work that has been done about. The Corona virus from designers editors journalists. We're working from home collaborating without being in the newsroom. So I am trying to keep myself busy and I am trying to make sure that people continue to learn. I know that we're all doing other things cleaning our closets becoming reacquainted with things that we had not seen for a long time in our own homes but I think that at least for thirty minutes every day we have to think of our craft. How can I be better when I come out of this? You know at the same time. You re- rediscover yourself personally. I'm at percival. Never paid attention to birds for example but because there's so lonely at the speech the only creatures that I see when I go running these birds. I'm beginning to realize how how many varieties of birds we have here. I hear them chatting with each other. I hear them singing. I will never ignore birds again and for many people. These discoveries are real weird discovering. I'm also this current that I had not even been in my beach. Plays for almost two years. Why because I'm too busy. You're no so maybe I will make an appointment to come back here more often so I think this is also a time not only for professional rediscovery but personal rediscovery. Hit the reset button. And see what you find your to Fernando. Listen this is a very good point. Actually I do birds but hearing. Soho is just mainly pigeons and seagulls. But that's okay. I was wondering if our listeners would be interested to join one of your chats. Would they find information on your websites? Margaret see the calm or in the website. I always I do a different invitation for security reasons every week and so I posted in Lincoln of my accounting lighten twitter facebook and my website is the best place. Mario Garcia media DOT COM GARCIA MEDIA DOT COM. Anybody who would like more information simply. Write me an email. Mario at Garcia Media Dot Com. And I will be happy to send you the invitations to you more about it. I think that this is one way for us to continue the dialogue the weekend. Not have impression right now. There is no substitute for that by the way absolutely finally just went. Ask what's been your media diet like because he I mean you've mentioned before that there's a lot of media groups doing a great job with the coverage of cove in one thousand nine. Do you have. Do you have a time that you have to watch the news because I guess like for example? I don't watch the news in the evening because it's trust me out a little bit these days but at a what. What's been your news routine at the beginning of this. I was Tuning in to television news quite often and I would have CNN on for long periods. Of Time then I decided that this was not good for me because in a normal day I would not be doing this however I believe that briefings have become more important than ever so obviously I look at the briefing from the Times The Guardian. Lp's of Madrid. Atlanta's of Zayas are get a different vision. I visit with the Hindustan Times of India. They are one of my clients on our project is in the middle. So I'm watching how they are applying all of this due to the real thing and then in terms of media obviously a look at Monaco because Monaco always takes me away from the corona virus per se. Kind of story and you still include in your in your briefings stories. That in a sense give you hope not because their stories about hope they use zero in on locations and so on and what. I get that I could see this someday. I'm GONNA be there again. There was Margaret there for more information on. Mario Zoom talks go to Gaza media DOT COM. Our next I discovered almost accidentally when I saw it on the desk of Monaco's design editor Nolan Giles. It's Christie's magazine. A beautiful piece of print published by Connick British Auction House. Their latest issue is a Tokyo special on the covert collector. He can he say I had the pleasure to speak. Jane Burton Christie's Global Content Director. It is something that we publish for our clients and it goes out around sixteen thousand people in all corners of the globe and it really is at present to them to introduce them to some of the wonderful things that we have coming up in our auctions at Christie's but it really focuses on the wider themes in art and culture that might be of interest to them but where your job is fast. Because you're not only helping out with the content for the magazine but also other things that Chris. The films the social media so tell us a bit more about your role so. I'm yes global content director which really covers of the print magazine but also all of our social media and aditorial content which includes some feature stories and videos. I was look after we chat the Chinese Social Media Channel and I have teams around the world in Hong Kong Shanghai New York and London who are professional journalists. One thing Christie's did when I came along with the team. Private six years ago we all came from a wide media world and brought her skills to Christie's and really it's very narrative it's it's very journalistic and we're having a lot of fun here and one thing that's quite helpful. I guess being Christ is you have experts. You have a great wine expert. That can write a nice calling about the topic. Do you know what I mean because I mean that's what you guys do. Yeah I mean what are the pleasures for me having come from tastes which was not going before that from the Telegraph whereas the journalist is that Christie's every day something comes through the doors in one of our global auction houses that I've never seen it might? It's been in somebody's collection for twenty years and it's museum quality. It could be an incredible painting. It could be a meteorite. It could be a spitfire. We've even done films on these things and it just all manner of stuff that is always top-quality beautiful fascinating and there are plenty of stories to tell. I mean some of my favorites kind of discoveries. Where an expert from Christie's has gone to make evaluation in the client's home and found one great one of years ago. They found an umbrella stand which was in a European House. The woman had umbrellas in it. It turned out to be a Ming Dynasty Dragon Jal and we managed to follow that whole story because these just very calm and he said I've got something really exciting to tell you and came with his photographs of this thing and we follow the whole process of from the valuation to you know checking ensuring it really was what they thought it was which is an exciting things have witnessed to the final sale in Hong Kong where it went for twenty million dollars and the client on the phone just amazed that she got that price for her umbrella system. It's a wonderful world. This two hundred and fifty years of Christie's history two hundred fifty two and I think to delve into from the jewels. Mary twit being sold right up to the latest contemporary artists. Things coming straight out of studios and then go to market some amazing stories. Jane and I must ask newspaper. I'm asking this to all star. Cast the colonel result break was such a think it's affecting so many industries around the world. I was wondering how did it affect Christie's and how the magazine is a great read for those who are at home you know especially during this crisis in the world. Yeah I think obviously it's come very quickly upon us and we've had to be very nimble and flexible in how we think about certainly from my perspective creating editorial content in this new climates. In these new circumstances. You can see me here in a guest bedroom. Not In my office of working remotely of the moment but we are. We all doing says successfully in terms of already in our storytelling was online and social. Media is very much a part of it and what we found is that there's a whole audience out. There just wants a distraction from the rather new cycle of this moment and art can be uplifting and life affirming and a reminder certainly when we look back at the history of sold through Christie's and through museums on display that things continue and creativity continues even grim time so we have actually quite a lot of our print. Magazine storytelling online. That would be lovely articles. That have been commissioned for the magazine. Some of those are going online for now while we pause distribution we will be receiving magazine distribution a little bit later in the summer. What's our sales resume because we follow that calendar that rhythm of the auctions but I must say the artists therapy program. That we're rolling out is being you know people are enjoying it. We'd such a few created challenges where we're did a whole story about artists views from their window. That's curious strong theme in art where artists have from Martinez to Bonora. Whoever have been looking into and painted the views collided a whole story about those with lots of visuals and then we through the challenge out through our social media to ask our audiences to show what they're seeing from the windy right now or which they could see that we had really great response and we were of through obviously instagram. Able to share those views back with rather receptive wouldn't moment because everybody's fitting little traps just as we have and everybody feels at the same time that they are trapped. I feel that they want more connections as well even with the brands. They love or the people they trust. So I'm sure you're getting a lot of feedback from your customers from the people that just enjoy Christie's yes what's really interesting. Is that year compared to this point? Last year are open rates for all our email editorial content views of stories on the website. Our instagram figures up quite significantly. And there's a lot more engagement interaction. So you're right. I think at times of crisis like these when the physical experience of going to an exhibition or one of our sales is not available. People are turning to digital formats. We're actually creating what we're calling viewing rooms which are digitally displaying. What we can show that we have for sale but that isn't in a physical space we using the platform shorthand which is a lovely immersive and fluid piece of software that you can plug into the website so we really gorgeous digital moves over art works in high resolution images really show you the detail on these wonderful things that we have to shop does a fantastic idea and I just want to come back to the magazine. I've seen the April issue which was kind of a Tokyo special a brilliant piece of work. I wonder if you can tell me a little bit more about some of the content in that issue and also. What does it mean that the prince tired for your customers? I think you mentioned sixteen thousand of them received the magazine something like that. I think someone quite special it is. It's a very unique really. That isn't a new stunt product and it is quite a very specific audience. Some of the top collectors in the world receive this along with important museum directors or advisors of this group of Global International Art Collectors. That was Jane. Burton Christie's global content director for something that I've been thinking since Cova nineteen began. How Fashion Magazine Welfare? During this time what will be the challenges in covering fashion. My colleague in Monaco's fashioned attitude. Jamie waters have all the answers. Plus your magazines have struggled in recent years with Trying to like a lot of different magazines. But they've struggled with online that struggle we Big Brands slashing budgets. And things like that so they will already. Inner like quite turbulent periods of quite a lot of fashion magazines while obesity now with the pandemic he says you know really thrown things. I think the one of the major issues for these magazines Road they serve at the moment because can generally fashion magazines selling a fantasy and escape and selling a bright beautiful way of living a lifestyle. Beautiful Clothes Kind of encompassing. Whoa D- these. Obviously it's generalizing it and it does Defer between different typhoons but like a lot of the selling escapism. So now you you'll face this problem is what do people want from you at the time and and I think some Obviously this consent. You don't WanNa same tone death. You don't WanNa feel like your just continuing to showcase beautiful things and almost like turning a blind eye to all the kind of treatment that's going on everywhere but then there's also this other thing where it's like paper want some kind of escape at the moment right. So that's why they turning to set. I think kind of the crux of the problem is how to how to kind of strike that balance before we talk about what you're doing at Monaco being professional. Let's talk about some examples of some of the cougars that we've seen so far official magazines published during the outbreak. What have you kind of spotted? I think I see the thing. That's quite interesting is a lot of the bigger titles as big as he might take a chunk. Todd who's that don't come out quite as often on their issues that hitting newsstands. At the moment moist a lot of them were went to print before the pet demi broken up so to begin with west seeing these kind of strange thing where these images the front comes through like that from another time on it and we'd kind of thing of being frozen in time and they couldn't wait Obviously that's quits moved on so. I'm pretty spoiled. They have ran on the cover. For instance the J. Q. Had Daniel Craig and I have the magazines have said you know by the way we didn't go to print the diesel happened before. But I think that is quite interesting. To just keep your real sense of how quickly we've moved on In terms of titles that have gone to print off the Potomac has started an account of engaging with the Italian edition of Vanity Fair which is wait closer than more more flexible. They've had some really interesting Covers on they featured medical workers on in in that kind of white coats on. They've also done one of the Italian flag It should be a time five with a crock. Running through the middle I think I think bose interesting. One of the most striking ones we've seen which is Kinda made a lot of headlines is the latest issue of Vogue Italy which is watched Which is really kind of powerful. You know symbolic kind of cover on on. That actually was done. That was changed. Really Light That had an original plans and everything just before they went to print acting. That was a couple of weeks ago. Changed at the last minute. As the kind of pandemic really escalated. I think that's that's really powerful and I vote each of these really interesting because they have this history engaging with political issues with broader societal issues. Frank Cassani the longtime editor. She confronted issues about race about beauty. Standards Surgery you know. She was never shy of confronting those kind of topics on the current editor. Emmanuelli Nettie has said in his in his Kabul lessons for the race issue. He says something which I think is worth quoting. He says somebody who say that the red zone debts avoid is to entertain to offer a few hours of devotion to those who lake through its pages. I didn't know about that. And then he kind of goes sold as things in basically says that he thinks it's role is also to engage with what's going on around it and it would be it doesn't use what ignorant but you know we'd be ignorance kind of ten a blind eye to all of that and I think it really the engagement It also really works Savoy each. They'd because they have that history. You know evening January. That was a really interesting issue edition which I love which was completely illustrated and that was kind of a different kind of political message. They were sending Bicske like we want to address the stability issues on producer. Really lower waste low carbon footprints edition so to colognes for show. I think they have this long history of engaging that I think that makes probably the most recent Kaba even more powerful bearing that mind absolutely a gym of course symbol so very curious. I mean how our when I say our Monaco's coverage of fashion will change in. How are you having to adapt your job? Because you know 'cause I wonder you know. Is it going to still the same? I mean we'll still buy clothes from their home or something like that. Tell us about your experience. Yes life is issue which is on. May issue on that went to print a few weeks ago and it was basically way changed quite a few things in the late up because suddenly stories didn't feel relevant anymore and I think that's heightened in some instances in fashion because it's that idea of focusing on beautiful things quite often and it's like what what are they saying about the times we're living in so we actually Held one of the features that we had because it just it was. A profile of a brandon suddenly didn't feel like it just felt out of place to talk about at the moment but Ali story which we ran with the late. Fashion Story is about body which is such a profile of these American brand. And I think it works because it's a story that says a lot about if Utah the few chow American manufacturing to break forward-looking brand. It's a brand basically that it's young founder. Emily Adams bodey employs a lot of young people to what in house a lot of crossman so I think that it was saying something about the future of the industry which makes it feel a bit more. Although it wasn't directly it wasn't a wreck made about the pandemic will the Redid ad-lib who asides and I think it was because it was a boorda comment on the on the future of the industry. That was Jamie Walters. Darren Jamie's fashion pages. Make sure to buy the new issue of Monaco out. Now you can always subscribe or Monaco dot com slash subscribe. Let's go to Belfast. Now I welcome back on the Stack Richard West editor of photography title source which has just published. It's a hundred issue. What a great number every should have a theme for this one it scripted reality a very relevant topic for our time's Richard tells me more. We started off with looking at some from Thatcher Archive and in photography that especially in the eighties and nineties. There was a little discussion of staged photography. But it's not exactly what this is. It's more about the political realm anything to do with the setting up of pictures but it isn't necessarily being done by the DACA Sarah restricted reality. Which is what people use to talk about sort of reality. Tv IS GONNA capture that that mixture of it could be it could be reality. Tv could be documentary. But it's also someone's kind of arranging stuff. I mean a classic example. That new over that in your magazine of a great interview with Stephan Russo politicians these days. I mean they in the US in UK everywhere. You go you know. Somebody has to eat like food in public over there classics examples here in British politics. It can even be bad for you. Especially if it's a Bacon Sandwich yes yes it was interesting. I spoke to both the press officer. Who'd worked for government department and Stephan both brought up the famous Bacon Sandwich scenario which has become an actually a year ago. I interviewed a picture editor. In in France resources. Somebody else interviewed and the Bacon Sandwich was even a reference point for them. So I think that's become a by word for the tragic photographic opportunity gone wrong and in the world of photography. What do people think? Or if he even if you have a personal opinion of this kind of this management of politics because some people might say always kind of dishonest but at the same time. It's my bring someone closer to this politicians as well. Well it's interesting. I think that the PR itself Pr. Something we've covered in the magazine as well. It's it's one of those things that if you're worried about it you're likely to think that it's more important than it is. But if you're not worried about it then you're likely to be disappointed by the amount of manipulation area so for the press officers point of view. They think we have no power. We CAN'T DO ANYTHING. We're trying to tell journalists well-to-do but nobody listens to us and from the picture editors point of view or from the photographers point of view. They can't help those saying how much everybody's trying to direct them at instruct them and limit what they're doing so everybody's everybody's sort of feels a bit frustrated by the attempt to manipulate but it's kind of ongoing war routed kind of changing the topic slightly. I mean I'm asking all the guests. You know how this current outbreak worldwide is affecting you personally and perhaps the world photography's or because now we need photographers to over. What's happening outside which I can see even from the my my window which is usually quite busy. We live in quite a busy street. It's empty it's eerie. But we need pictures of that as well in a way. Yes yes a lot. It's it's affecting it in lots of way. I think it's it's a terrible problem for photographers. Who are trying to get out and work in calm but like lots of other people. Lots of people are trying to find ways of doing projects which they could do in very limited means People are looking for more and more images to Cheyrou the seriousness of the situation. But it's difficult West openings in the magazine so I think this is such a time for people to look at things that they look back. Catalogues looking online archives. There is a whole world of stuff that you can still discuss photography. I mean we're becoming aware how much they the world is now online and the amount of resources that we in fact we just offered a an online digital photographic archive review. So we'll be reviewing online archives and the first one we're GONNA do the American Center for Disease Control and until I until my review of told me about this. I didn't realize there's a whole there's a whole well two pitches already that to show you this stuff. So it's a desperate situation for lots of people but I think it's letting people realize how they come across material especially because you know our job. Is You know journalists or photographers still very much. Essential in a way as well. We know even for people at home that they want some some sort of comfort or some some extra reading or to find out what's happening in the world. Yes I sent a review. I'm being sending books out to reviews in the usual way and people are still sending sending stuff in the post and I also review review broken. She said please don't send me a digital copy. Anita I need paper copywriter. Because I'm spending too much time looking at screens and other people have been saying you know. We need books and we need magazines more than ever. I sort of feel we still have a role in this talking about the analog. I hope you don't mind telling the story. Apparently you interviewed someone in the State and you send the recorder to the press. I found that that was very sweet. Can you tell us a bit more? Well this is just a technical question. I am sure you have the same experience you interview Somebody Online. And now everybody is using zoom and skype to communicate with one another and it's unbearably full of glitches and turf. You're trying to interview somebody that takes some time. I thought it's really just going to be a bit uncomfortable lessons. Or if you've got to do it for forty minutes so I I sent her record in the post to the guy I was talking to but then of course you have to send it back two minutes. It's called missing at least so far. Hopefully in the next couple of weeks he was Richard West air from source magazine issue. Hundred is out now. That's it for this week's show my thanks to our editor our whole if you have any comments. Aquarius feel free to write to me financial at F. B. At MONACO DOT COM remember. We're back next Saturday at the same time. And of course you can always listen to it again. At MONACO DOT COM or subscribe to the show on Apple podcast spotify and soundcloud. And don't forget if you're stuck indoors at the moment that Monica can come to you in print who have some new subscription offers which can also unlock at the website. But before we go a little song for you we have some nice messages. Well here is do a leaper with break my heart. You've been listening to the stack. I'm feel to share until next time. It's goodbye from me. No no another was the adversary another.

Jane Burton Christie editor Monaco Christie Richard West Monaco Global Content Director Jamie waters Jane Tokyo source magazine London Mexico Jane Burton Stephan Russo Mighty Garcia Mario Garcia Mike Columbia University CNN
Monday 8 June

Monocle 24: Midori House

24:17 min | 7 months ago

Monday 8 June

"Aw after weekend of protests in cities around the world will assess how institutions and governments are responding to the demonstrators demands. Brazil's government is accused of censorship. How's it removes the numbers of Corona Virus Infections and deaths from public view, and we'll take the long view on the effect of a global crisis on what we say about ourselves in what we decide to wear. Monaco's editors tackle those topics today the late edition on monocle twenty four. Hello and a very warm welcome to you to the late edition. Hero Monaco Twenty Four. I'm Thomas Lewis here in Toronto I'm joined today from London to college, there is across the beginning of another busy news week. No Diets Monaco's editor Andrew Tuck and monocle twenty four culture correspondent. Financial Augusto Pacheco Hundred Fernando. Thank you both very much for joining us on the show today Andrew beyond the beginning of another week. How was the weekend flea in London Personally or ride, even if the. Weather has changed here so it's been a bit gray and steely up in the sky, which I think impact mood straightway after the weather, but it's been a big news weekend in this city in every city demonstrations, the tension between abiding by the demands of Krona virus. Central Government says you do, and then the need and desire to. Go out in the streets in for people to shout something they. An equal danger. and onto has been a fairly tense weekend in places like Toronto to how things unfolded from your vantage point there in London as well. Well as Andrew, saying. Here close to where I live. There's been a lot of protests as well here in London I mean. Of course there's been some problems in there, but if most mostly they've been, you know very peaceful protesters and a personal site. Even though it was raining finally, we managed to see the parents of my partners while they were shooting. Because they're elderly, so it's quite nice now. We're allowed to speak from the garden, but then it was raining so much so It was a bit hard ahead to wear a nice Nice. To say hello to this, you haven't seen for several minutes and under Fernando. Andre thank you both very Betcha for being here on the program today. Well, let's begin today. Show with those protests that took place in dozens of cities across the United States and around the world this past weekend. Some signs from one of three large largely peaceful demonstrations took place here in Toronto this past weekend, while in the UK, to thousands of people demonstrated in several cities that one of those protesting was the writer and broadcaster yes-men Abdulmajid. She explained her voice a little hoarse after the weekend's protests white, one of the demonstrators central calls that is to fund police forces as a way of holding them to greater account was particularly complicated issue in the UK. It's much more difficult here in the UK for example to say. The police broadly because it means something very different, because the funding systems very different industry for example, just having a conversation with my colleagues in Estrella, the police are incredibly highly trusted industry Australia, which is not the same as in the US I think it's that one of the most trusted institutions in the country and the defunding isn't necessarily something that's going to be politically tenable or even going to make the difference that people wanted to the whether or not. Not Things change depends on how well activists in every context can say. These are the specific policy objectives that we design that we think are important and trying to make sure that the focus is just on what's happening in the US but is contextualised the writer and broadcaster yes-men Abdelmajid, speaking to us on today's edition of the globalist here on monocle twenty four Andrew in London. Yes, NHS right, isn't she? The perhaps one of the extraordinary things about the. The scale of the demonstrations we've seen this past weekend is that they've become rooted in the particular set of context of the country or the city? In which there's demonstrations are taking place even if they were spurred by the same case dot as the response in the US to the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, here in Toronto, for example, the death of a young Black Woman Regis Cushion Ski Parque on the twenty seventh of May to WHO's apartment the. The police have been called. She then subsequently fell to her death from the balcony of her apartment. While those police officers were at the scene. That is the case that has sparked protests here under investigation is underway into what took place there so while there is a broader perhaps universal set of systematic injustices that are being demonstrated against in many parts of the world, many of them are rooted in specific cases of that sense of injustice to on Bay. Thomas's is one of the most complicated and difficult topics to speak on first of all. We have to remember that the relationship with the police force varies according to issue and time so when you see terrorist attacks here in the city for example and police, rushing in to tackle Taras to save the members of the public who are being confronted, then you see a very high level of support for the police and the police garlanded by a wide variety of people is is heroes and is great. People and something happens in your home. You still call the police. You still rely on them. Them to come to your aid, but the complicated thing is is a broader thing, I think here in the UK, and of course there are many examples. I'm sure where people will tell me I'm wrong. It's actually a very specific incident, but I think it's more complicated is even for example with the number of arrests during the period of the lockdown. Many people said that if you're black, you're more likely to find yourself fined for breaking the lockdown. The new you were. If you somebody who is white. And I think this is the traditional version. Racism is the thing which is more complicated to root out a more complicated confront even when you have. Black police officers. When even when you have a better community, engagement is very hard to completely eradicate an I think. Whatever people feel of the more complicated issues evolved here I think this is just one of those moments when it's forcing the police forces to explain what they do and come forward a little bit more and engage more I. Don't know if defunding will ever happen because I. don't see any political party finding it. A good cause to get behind. The accountability is always important and see if they can hold police forces to accountable. That's that's never a bad thing and I think. Even many leading police officers would say that's a necessary thing if you want to have community trust. And Fernando that's the key points that andromeda thighs, and to the one big questions in any protests is. The authorities the institutions which are being demonstrated against. Are they listening off? Then bring about the change being asked of them. We've seen over the weekend Minneapolis City Council for example it voted despondent. It's police force and institution news system for Public Safety. New York City's mayor. Bill de Blasio, he announced over the weekend to that he would cut six billion US dollars from the budget of New York City's police force, which is the largest force in the US you know, what's your sense of how is seeing? The demonstrations calls on that actions filtering into the way the institutions that are protesting against how they're responding to it. Well I think so far. The big changes are coming from the United States with the examples you've mentioned, but even here in the UK we had. An example here in the city of Bristol when you know protesters, they torn down a statue of a slave owner. And and they throw it away in the city's river. There was quite a remarkable, but the police in Bristol. They decided not to intervene. Of course. There's a lot of criticism as well against that including from the from the government here in UK Boris. Johnson said he was criminal act, but I wonder perhaps if the police embrace to kind of read the room and said you know what is better for us to not intervene. Data because perhaps it will be not be worth it and even the mayor of the city Marvin, reese et Cetera. There was no sense of loss for dismiss over statue I know. People don't need. To open a precedent. To remove all the statues of people. You don't agree, but I think they're one was very fairly. Different is still name. That in many streets of brisk to have his name including a statue in one of the most central parts of the city but I think the police in Bristol did the right choice at least in my opinion. While, we will be monitoring the the many threads that have been turned up by demonstrations in cities around the world in the days to come here on a monocle twenty four, but let's move now here on the late edition to Brazil where the country's government led by President John Bosco narrow has been accused of censorship after it removed months of public data on the corona virus outbreak in the country as the rate of new infections continues to rise that listen to Elliott is Monica. Correspondent in Brazil. Here's some the report. She sent us a little earlier today on the moves by the government that. The daily coronavirus death toll this past week in Brazil has regularly surpassed two thousand. But, what a sparked further outrage in the country over the weekend is the new way in which these official figures ought to be presented to the public. Brazil's Health Ministry took down a website showing the evolution of the epidemic over time, the ministry also has stopped reporting total tally of confirmed cases which shop past, six, hundred, forty, five thousand. More than anywhere outside the United, states. Critic sabe aims to downplay the severity of the outbreak as the country are just closer and closer to its peak. The experts say is still several weeks away. President, Bolsonaro, in his acting health minister didn't give a clear reason for taking down the covert site which had been a key public Brazil's for tracking the pandemic. The cumulative data the president tweeted does not reflect the moment that the country is in. And that moment is one where more and more businesses reopening lockdown to being lifted. Six prominent cities including some Paulo virus hotspot et Cetera this coming week. Here in Rio Basel already serving co Biz this weekend in dramatic return to normal. And all when NOT IN AMERICA'S BIGGEST ECONOMY! Is Potentially entering the worst period of the health crisis. That was Lucinda yet Monica's correspondent in Brazil reporting for us from Janiro Fernando you also monitor Brazil for us here on Monaco Twenty Four. What's your reaction to the news by the government in Brazil that outlined by Lucinda? Well Tomas I find it worrying this morning. when I went to the covert nineteen official website from the Brazilian government and Lucinda was right that you can't see how many deaths Brazil heading totals, so they're showing the numbers from the previous day and even so. They're they're reasons for us to suspect that the government might be feeling the numbers for example for the Sunday numbers. At first, they said it was a thousand, three hundred eighty two deaths, and just a few hours later they changed to five hundred, twenty, five without explaining why they decided to change that, so it is worrying I do believe the Brazil still have a very strong press and people will know the numbers. If they watch. The news shows on television. If they read on the paper I'm sure those numbers will still be available, but it's just. It's just so random and a terrible thing to do not have those numbers officially available on the government website so I do see this act from Boston ours government. Very worried actually about that. And Fernando just stay with you briefly when you talk about the robustness of the press in Brazil, are you seeing them swinging into action? If you like in terms of getting hold of the the actual numbers, numbers that people can trust if there is some suspicion now over what the government is is revealing to the public on the scale of the virus outbreak there well. But again I think you can compare Brazil the United States. Who have a very? Important presence of the press to tell what the government's doing right and wrong, but the thing is Brazil is a big country and I wonder. If many Brazilians would even have excess to buy broadsheet on the newsstand, or or to even frankly to watch the news show on TV. So that's why it worries me that the government's message you know it's not like easily available for this type of people Brazil. Not everyone lives in a big city centre with access to information, and that's what worries me in that sense, but yes, we do have a very strong press all our newspapers, I think some of them are doing press coverage of Covid nineteen bullets some Paulo a the news networks as well. On that sense, it's good, but you know we need frankly more than that. Was Interesting is yesterday I had. A drink. The friend who is from Brazil from Rio de Janeiro? And I was asking you about Boston. Are and he had very few on both narrow to Fernando, but here's what he said. He said when I speak to my family. Many of them still support Bolsonaro and what they say is yet. Maybe a thousand people are dying a day, but thousand people were dying a day in the UK and the population of Brazil is over two hundred million, so if you had up. France. Italy and the UK altogether. You have roughly the right population numbers, and even when you look at the big numbers are said to been region Brazil. Maybe they'd been fiddled, but supposedly thirty five thousand people dead so far still hasn't even caught up with the K. figgers yet, so he said, first of all people were actually. Numbers are that bad when we look at Europe and the other interesting thing he was saying. There's nobody furloughing staff for example in Brazil, because thirty percent of Brazilians don't even have a bank account still so getting money to very poor people is very very difficult, and there isn't the money to do it, so people have to go back to work. Can How'd you make? People feel comfortable about doing that when you're pumping out these number, so he wasn't a supporter of Bosnia tour all, but he just wanted to present. The is a little bit more complex than maybe we have been reporting on it and sometimes here in the West. And I wanted to then Andrea in that vein when you look at the government's for example that we have discussed here on the program on several occasions during the outbreak. We've come back to the idea that governments you have been most transparent who have got the information to their people quickly and been you know straight up if you like kind of with populations that those governments that seemed to have had the best handle I'm on the outbreaks in that territory, what t make therefore the decision of the the Brazilian government to take down this retrospective archive if he like of the numbers of the outbreak as it's evolved there so far. Does that suggest that there is maybe admission that? The worst is yet to come in Brazil from the government there. Are I'm sure the numbers are bad. That's why they're doing it, but it's just in context when you have hundred million people living in your country, many in poverty is a much more difficult situation to manage, and you're right the countries that kind of said. We don't believe this is really a danger. And was slow to at those of. Kind of being punished in a way for that decision and the countries, which were small and wealthy and fast and quick have benefited so a wealthy nation like New Zealand have a huge number of people who buy into the same idea as even the same in Finland or in in Denmark. Move Swiftly, and you're successful big countries where you have a leader who's questioning the very veracity of? Even needing to take action then. Blunt you're screwed. For me. It's just won't find. A note is quite interesting actually about the support of Sonar, even who he or she is is changing as well when he was elected, I mean he got load of votes from you know southeast south of Brazil Very. Wealthy areas of the country, but now as Andrew Rightly said lot of Brazilians they live in poverty. They don't have bank accounts. They have to work. They have to bring the money. And the government did offer a small son of six hundred is so in the latest polling by the newspaper, saying that he's he actually even though his popularity is going down overall, he's he's finding like a new type of voter. The one they live in small towns the once there are perhaps the poorest in society, so there's been a change in the type of people voted for Boston are that's a very interesting one. That would certainly be looking out when there's a new election coming out. Where we will be monitoring the situation in Brazil, and elsewhere in the weeks to come here on monocle twenty four, but finally here on the late addition we're going to turn to our fashion. Editor Jamie waters who spoken to us on several occasions, Jeremy outbreak about the roles fashion houses have played during it, but on today's edition of the globalist. He explained to us that by looking back at past moments of global crisis that we might glimpse how the pandemic may impact how we see ourselves and therefore informed the choices we make when we choose what to wear. Here's some of what Jamie how to say a little earlier. If you look historically at the things that people have worn often moments of crisis, so if you look at like deals, you look which came out of World War Two, and that just a completely different way of for women to dress tiny waist and big skirts, or if you look at the flapper era, which came after the first World War, which was this great period of of exuberance and and sort of funding dilemma, there is the sense of people want to have fun. Fun with what they wear in kind of express the individuality, Jamie waters monocle fashion editor, speaking to us a little earlier today I'm true, it can be CRA when you're in the moment as opposed to see how these things become tangible, the effects they have. What's your sense of what the effect might be in the choices we make in how we present ourselves. Is there potentially quite a profound change coming? Do you think well I think there's going to be profound change. A lot of people are not going to have a job and not going to have any money, and so the idea of flaunting your wealth at this time. He's going to be very very complicated, so I think you're going to fall back on products. Made and durable and a fun, but not in a way that seems to be making other people envious of you. There's going to be a more democratic feel to design in all senses going forwards, and maybe a little bit, pared back and and free of logos, and all those kind of like big displays of. Comes with certain brands, but then after that Jamie's right, there's there's there's a period of. Of of readjustment of of of getting used to what's happened to us, and then people are going to want to kick off because. Even, if you've got no money, you can do this forever. And in a way. We feeling that an asset is already the people can do lockdown for certain amount of time, and then suddenly something happens, and you see people wanting to express themselves in all sorts of ways. And that is what's what's GonNa? What's going to happen? It's interesting, even just the last few days in London. We're in kind of semi lockdown period, but you know the city is changing very fast even without any adjustments by government policy, and just as I see people on the streets, people are beginning to make more of an effort about how they look i. mean everybody whether that's. You see a few more people in a jacket. There's a little less athletic. There's a little bit more kind of display of color. There's a few more pressures. Gone and I think people are going on dates as well because come evening, you see people a kind of hot. Emotion where they I'm sure that game for zoom date, so I got a feeling that. Will have to decide what is going to be really the vibe of this summer at the end of it, not as we go into it, because that's what people will have adjusted and settled into the feeling that job their situation. I'm do I was stretched by a piece by The Washington Post's fashion editor Robin van last week, in which she wrote about the protests that were unfolding last week in the United States, he wrote pretty beautifully about the potency of the clothes worn by demonstrators in the US, the protesters are dressed as they unique selves, and that's part of their power. That was the headline of her piece. De Think, there's a change coming in in what I closed choices say about just as Andrew said that, both in the very near term also long term as well. Well, first of all I have to say rubbing. Such an excellent fashion writer at the Washington Post. And I do I do agree with what Jamie said that after crisis, historically people move you know two things that are very colorful fun, perhaps not immediate. You can't flaunt it. A finger have to have some kind of some sort of things ability at least in the period straight after a pandemic. I predict and I hope I'm right. In the world who have incredible creative decade ahead and I think there will show itself includes as well. As an admire A. Fashion in general, I am very happy about that. Because to be fair, even at the beginning of this I was not very into athletic in a way I think I kept. Trying to dress well, even when it went when I was at home, my partner not so much I have to say, but you know it's. That's hope things are in this. The other finely dressed Fernando Augusta check. Oh, I'm Andrea tag? Thank you both very much for being with us on the program today. That is all afraid to say. We have time for for the late edition today our studio managers in London Steph Chungu and some -Ympia big thanks to them as ever the late edition returns at the same time tomorrow for more news analysis, and much more to do. Stay with US here at Monaco Twenty Four. I'm Thomas Lewis here in Toronto. Thank you very much for listening. See Tomorrow.

Brazil government United States London UK Andrew Tuck Toronto Thomas Lewis Fernando Augusta Jamie waters editor Boston Central Government Brazilian government Monaco Hundred Fernando writer De Think Monaco Twenty Four Lucinda
Tuesday 26 May

Monocle 24: The Briefing

33:10 min | 8 months ago

Tuesday 26 May

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the twenty. Sixth of May Two Thousand and Twenty on Monaco Twenty Four. The briefing is brought to you in association with Allience as part of the programs partnership with Alliance. We bring you stories that demonstrate commitment to securing people's lives off the role for one hundred thirty years all around the globe. Alleanza has been working hard to do just that to give courage to its customers for what's ahead because `alliance knows how important it is to have a fan partner your side who provides solid and sustainable solutions. Leon strives to do it right. We passion every day. Stay tuned to the briefing dear. Exactly how allience does it an allowance for life. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you. Live from studio here Madari House in London. I'm Andrew Miller coming up. The latest on Libya's civil and proxy war The protagonists deploying covid nineteen as a smokescreen. Also ahead regrets one thousand eight hundred as I said. I think reasonable people may well disagree about how I thought about what to do in these circumstances but I think what I did was actually reasonable in these. In these circumstances he speaks Dominic Cummings senior adviser to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson attempts to put his lockdown wandering behind him will the rest of the country let him plus And Jamie waters. We'll have the latest on the UK government's guidelines for reopening retailers and. Then science doesn't really give the sorts of existential answers that religion does right the. Why am I here where we going you know? Why did I become sick? In that sense nature and naturalness are starting to substitute for God and holiness. We'll hear from the author Alan Lovitz about his new book. The natural all that coming up right here on the briefing on monocle. Twenty four and welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me and Ramallah. It may often seem as if the covid nineteen pandemic has brought all normal news to a standstill. It has not even perhaps especially in the places where the locals might not be entirely ungrateful if it did fighting in Libya which has been going on now for nearly a decade since the overthrow of dictator. Moammar Gaddafi in two thousand and eleven has recently escalated and grown more complex as Libya appears to be more and more hosting a proxy war involving several regional players perhaps most notably Turkey whose military commitment is growing less and less deniable joined with more on this by Mary Fitzgerald Research Focusing on Libya. Mary first of all. Let's start with the internationally recognized government based in Tripoli which Turkey does appear to be trying to shore up doesn't actually do any governing well. The term governing in Libya is extremely relative The so-called government of National Accord which came out of a U N mediated dialogue process has struggled to exert its sem its authority Inside Libya amid the Patchwork of armed groups operating in the capital and AAA and elsewhere in the country. So it really has been a very very weak authority and one that. Holly FA after the military commander who launched an offensive to oust the government of National Court from AAA just over a year ago. He a thought that he was exposed. It was wonderful it was Tripoli was ripe for the picking and Year later with thousands dead hundreds of thousands displaced. It's actually after who is on the back foot in recent weeks. So who are the proxy players now? Allying themselves behind those two principal factions. Well for a number of years there have been a a range of external actors backing different factions in Libya. Half has enjoyed the support for about six six years now off the United Arab Emirates and Egypt in particular Saudi Arabia to a lesser degree on the side of the government of National Accord over the last year. Turkey has waiting considerably to support that government. Turkey claims that it's an acting Above board that it's merely supporting a UN recognized a government But it's the Turkish intervention military intervention on the part of the that has tipped the scales in recent weeks in favor of the government in in Tripoli Turkish intervention in the form of air defense systems at drone strikes and also the funneling of Syrian mercenaries on the ground via Turkey to to fight in the anti after camp that line by Turkey that they are acting in support of the internationally recognized. Legitimate Government of Libya is true enough on the face of it. But is that the extent off? Turkey's motivations are the really acting out of pure hearted internationalist altruism here now. This is Turkey's intervention is In many respects very opportunistic here First of all it's bound and protecting the investments that Turkey had made in Libya Post two thousand eleven but also the investments that had made during the Gadhafi era. A lot of construction contracts that had had at wanted to continue but also long-term Turkey sees and admits. This quite openly are. Dhillon has been quite frank about this. It sees Libya as an opportunity right now. In terms of expanding its influence elsewhere in the Mediterranean and giving it more as a as a regional player. Of course that puts it up against 'em it's Regional rivals particularly Egypt and and the UA who has more recently aligned with Greece. Athens is unhappy with some of the agreements. That Ankara has Inked with with Tripoli over the last year in terms of territorial claims in the Mediterranean the other actor very important Right now and Certainly raising a lot of eyebrows in Libya is Moscow. Moscow has even though it insists that it does not support any one particular faction in Libya it has been leaning more towards a after in in recent months and in recent days following the retreats of after US forces from the hinterland of Tripoli where they had been fighting and Libyans were quite taken aback to see images of Russian fighters. Essentially mercenaries reportedly part of the so-called Wagner group retreating withdrawing from Tripoli's hinterland and being flown out to the town south of Tripoli according to the mayor of that town. The town's name has. Benny will lead that. Were fifteen hundred. Russian mercenaries flown out of of the town because simply after was on the on the back foot along with his Russian fighters just finally and briefly than one of course of the key catalysts of the chaos that we've seen in Libya for near enough to a decade. Was that early. Intervention by NATO during the fall of Gadhafi has the Western world now completely just given up on Libya no in fact. Europe is quite divided on Libya. Obviously Libya is on Europe says southern rim it's a key country in terms of the migration issue security etc but Europe has been divided. Why because one key member state France has not Has Basically resisted a joint European line. Franche Franz has been a very sympathetic towards after it has supported after an military at at different points it has pushed back on a European level against a sensor of after for starting this war over a year ago. So there's disunity in Europe which differently being sections realize that they have tried to 'em to exploit and this is something that others Find a particularly unfortunate given that Europe stands to be affected by instability in Libya more than say as states like the United Arab Emirates which are further away. Get fueling the conflict Mary Fitzgerald. Thank you for joining us. You're listening to the briefing monocle. Twenty four monocle free to subscribe daily email. Newsletters the on minute and we can addition to live a headlines and a swathe of recommendations from our editors correspondence and bureau. You can also browse a menu of Radio Highlights and Monaco films while the focus is on knees and comment during the week are we can newsletters. Us deliver great columns from Angie talk on Saturdays and Tyler Bra. Sunday's cultural hides media diets and far-off newspapers recipes to cook at home snapping interviews and some reminders on how to behave in public for Miss Etiquette and his Feline Sidekick Mr tiddly. It's fun take a weekend. Living HEAD TO MONACO DOT COM FORWARD SLASH. Minute to be part of the conversation. We'd love to have you. You are listening to the briefing with me. Andrew Muller given the last five years or so of British politics at nowadays take something pretty special to get British people asking such rhetorical questions as water. My watching what fresh hell is this and what are the practicalities of emigrating somewhere relatively stable and sensible like for example Lebanon? Where at least the sun comes out that threshold was cleared comfortably yesterday. By the bizarre press conference conducted in the garden of ten Downing Street by Prime Ministerial Advisor. Dominic Cummings well joining me now to review his performance is lance price. Who spent an amount of time at number ten himself as Prime Minister? Tony Bliss Director of Communications Lens. We talked yesterday about how dominant Cummings might have been considering approaching this. We now know how he did. As far as you were able to understand that what what was he strategy. What was he going out there planning to do? I think he was planning to appeal to what he thought was they have to the British people and he. He's this person who claims to be really in touch with the core of the British mentality. If you liked the nets why the brexit campaign so successful and that's why he thought a successful general election campaign for Boris Johnson. He thought the bat same appealing to that. Same sense of fair play. Whatever you want to call it would mean the people would listen to him as a father and say Oh yes well. Okay maybe We wouldn't have done what he did. We could understand why he did it. And that really didn't work at all. I think that the response has been to a bacteria. Extraordinary press conference has shown that he's the one that's out of touch with public opinion We will come to respond shortly. Which as as you say appears to clean other than what he would have wanted. But in terms of his actual performance he was near enough to offer. Now a later than the advertise. Time which you have to think must have been deliberate He was wearing an actual shirt with a color which is unusual for him was any or all of that part of some grand scheme or was he just running light and decided to smart himself up the cameras. Well I think all these things are thought through and it's will it would be unusual for somebody that Dominic Cummings to allow that to happen by accident. So yes he had spartan himself opportunity compulsively got away with doing it in his usual. Being the and a scruffy t shirt and tracksuit trousers and the reason for the delay. I've I've no idea but it certainly did him no favours at all because it still spoke to that idea of arrogance of you. Lock invites on me. I'm I'm more important than you'll you'll shedules. All all and keeping to a deadline that I set myself a lot of what he said was a recounting of his peregrinations under lockdown. In in absolutely merciless detail. I think that the jury remains out on whether that was transparency or obfuscation but it strikes me that the thing people have lit upon. Was this Bazaar John. About having undertaken a brief road trip with his family in the car on public roads to test whether or not he could actually see now given that he's supposed to be a master the dock outs of communication that he's had some time to come up with something. Why does he try and advance? Allying gamely being spun by ministers almost as we speak that is really not much of a step up from the dog ate my homework. Yeah I mean that was the most extraordinary points in the whole news conference for me at that. He would honestly think that people would buy the idea that if you're not sure whether your eyesight is up to scratch you put your son and your wife in the car and go for a drive to test it and Michael. Who's a very good friend? Dominic come in search in many ways abroad on come in and introduced him to Taurus. Johnson was on the radio television this morning. Trying to keep straight face saying that yes he would do the same thing I mean. This is so build a the Ken of a of and vote that I think he opened himself up to to ridicule. And the reason I find that hard to comprehend is the www.amac.us basically a smart guy. He must have looked to what he was planning to say. And and would you would have thought he would. He would have thought well. How's this going to go down? And at which suggests that either is under enormous pressure or friendly's lost only subject then of how it is going down as a scientific results and not necessarily yet in. But you don't need to look far to find what I think it's fair to say. He's an amount of skepticism being expressed by the British public. But what's potentially more interesting. Is that strikes me is that we've had one actual ministerial resignation. in protest over this not a massively senior minister this junior minister. Douglas Ross from the Scottish office whom I suspect few British voters would have heard until today. But there's a lot or fact gathering amount of noise from the Tory backbenches. How close are we to this? Actually getting out of hand to the extent that Boris Johnson has to sack him anyway. Yeah I mean the resignation of Douglas. Ross wall significant because nobody else had quit from from the government and not gave those who still have doubts about whether he should be an office within the Conservative Party conservative. Mp's licensed to carry on piling on the pressure and they are still piling on the pressure. And so I think Kim the the by by Johnson government with those bizarrely coordinated rather embarrassingly coordinated tweets. Going out from cabinet ministers yesterday in supportive. Dominic Cummings almost in executive sight words. So clearly not exactly coming from from the heart and the idea that that was going to draw a line under it and take the pressure off certainly hasn't happened yet. There's a meeting of the nine hundred and Twenty-two Committee which is all the backbench Tory. Mp's later this week virtual beating Zuma blitz and most of them and in theory if they were to come out strongly and say he should go that dominic coming should go. The prime minister would find it very very hard to resist that but then he's resisted everything else and I wouldn't actually say spill the bounds of possibility that they could even all the in twenty two committee. Which Tory party politics is pretty? I've heard of lands price. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty four as part of the programs partnership with Liens. We are bringing you. Stories that demonstrate alliances commitment to securing people's lives afterwards. Pylons has been working hard to do just that to give courage to its customers for what's ahead because allience knows how important it is to have a fair Paul at your side stay tuned to the briefing to hear exactly out allience. Does it and aliens for life. You're listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty four as more and more of the world emerges tentatively from lockdown the question facing any business which deals in person with customers is how far on the side of caution shoot one. Some strictures make an amount of obvious sense stepping up cleaning of services using contactless payments where possible regulating foot traffic in and out of stores and so on other see may be like overkill including here in the UK and officials suggestion that charity and or clothes shops leave all donated or returned clothes for seventy two hours before handling them on joined with more on this by molecules fashion editor. Jamie waters and from Monaco Zurich Bureau by our editor in chief. Todd burleigh Jamie I of all. Let's look at the broader retail picture. Do we have any sense yet? Of How keen or otherwise people actually are to return to non-essential shopping. Well I think I mean we can take a lot of cues from what's happening in other Western countries and in particular if we look at France or parts of the West Texas where they've reopened. Basically there are a lot of. Shoppers are to get back into stores. And I think what we're saying. Those cases lower foot traffic bought higher conversion rates. So there's there's a lot of people who have pent up demand they POPs haven't adopted to online shopping these time and they really want to go. Try Things on by some nice things but this crates all these complications. Because it's you know. The question now is whether these retailers are able to create the Nice enough enjoyable enough shock environments for people to actually spend money and buy things. Well toilets look at these. Uk government guidelines. Is there an argument? Do you think any argument that portion from where we are now. He's at least a good place to stop from. I think hyper caution. No I think it's a bad place to start from and I think if you look at the narrative that we we see You know in in so many elements of of the the media in the UK and it's built from a place of fear and it's very interesting few look at it's interesting. How Jamie was sort of raising the issue of France or looking at the southwest of the. Us thing we look at many other countries. You don't see this constant you know I would say sort of discussion at a leader. Writers know where they're always raised in this question of SAFE SAFE SAFE. I think the UK is painted itself into a bit of a strange corner right now. Where they're I think. Creating sort of undue sense of panic about Just returned to work the whole discussion about schools et Cetera. So I think it's it's unique in that sense I think also we benchmark. I don't know who drew up these these guidelines because they have nothing to do with what we're seeing in some other countries which are now almost a month ahead Andrew word. I very very different place and so I think you going back to the first question. It's it's very heavy handed and I think crates. Navarre people aren't going to want to spend just to follow that up tyler. What are we learning from those reopening countries about how much reassurance you need to be able to project to staff and two customers? I think we if we just look at live examples here. You know what we've been seeing just living on the streets of Zurich right now and this is the really. I think curious. Bet You've got the government saying on one side that the retailers must abide or they're going to. They're going to be fine. They could go to jail up to two. Here's but what we see you let people out and you let them out and about in society and maybe the first thirty minutes when you released the first half day. Maybe you're tiptoeing around but I think as we've been saying throughout this whole thing we also go back to two habits both good and bad as as humankind. That's just what we do. And so I think what we've noticed you know already. There's a collapsing of social distancing. In Switzerland is two meters though. There is today little bit of late breaking news. We'll see what happens. We'll probably talk about a tomorrow. Andrew which is they're looking at collapsing. That a lot of discussion right now that do go down to two one. Meter certainly outside. They're talking about also now already football games Where you will have spectator so a lot of very very interesting discussions. This is very far away from Where we are in a out of London end and the UK. But I think what we've certainly seen at first hand People are drawn a bit closer together and I don't think you can hang on the retailer that suddenly you're going to get fined if if of course customers are coming store. They're spending money and then you're also telling them off at the same time Johnny if we look again at the global picture are we getting sense yet of where the retailers regarding the current situation as a thing for which they have to make temporary adjustments both in their thinking and in the you know the the physical manifestations of their stores or has the idea that shopping has somehow changed forever. Taken root I think I think I mean. I think they're waiting to see how it unfolds but I think it will be a short term measure. I think the more minutes about how do you abide by Health Regulations whilst creating an enjoyable shopping experience which oversees these big challenge? I think the regulations will continue to as as we go on because I think ultimately bricks and mortar stores. The appeal of them is creating experienced dot that easing joy. Easy exciting. That is different from what customers get. If you're sitting on your laptop and you know if consumers will open that kind of being with these rules and you can't touch anything and you know in some instances brands retailers on opening fitting brooms under that's part of the UK suggested regulations. He's not have fishing rooms. You'd I mean is removing one of the major Appealing things about going with these shop. Is You WANNA try on? You WanNa touch things so I think I think that. Have to be temporary in you know. They have to relax otherwise otherwise. It's kind of stripping physical retailers of their biggest selling point's well further on that tyler retailers obviously ferociously competitive arena and retailers will be competing for those customers which are returning. What's your sense of what's going to work? What's going to give people an age in getting people into their shops ahead of their competitors. I think part of it is probably just being a little bit pragmatic and and really. This doesn't mean sort of pushing it and no one wants to end up in a UK jail or prison for two years. But I think you being able to say let's take this early days As close to the edges possible And and still I think also just recognizing that people are responsible. I think you have to and this is. This is a broader issue. Can't just be down to retailers. But I think there there is this that have to be able to to trust the individual. I think that is the different narrative that we've seen either as we've been talking about this for the last two plus months There are some countries Which certainly treat people like adults? But there's there's a certain sort of infantilism action Of all of this and again it comes back. I think the document Andrew is thirty six pages in the UK We were talking about the return to the workplace document which I think is thirty two pages in the UK versus the Swiss version which is two point five and again. It just comes down to you. What what is the epidemiologists? Of course the heads of public health services. It comes down to the same thing. It is pretty much. Just keep your hands clean And you do keep your distance but most importantly if you're not feeling well stay home and that's what this still gets still down to toddler burleigh and Jamie authors. Thank you both very much for joining us. That was Monica editor-in-chief toddler burleigh fashion editor. Jamie waters you're listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty four finally on today's briefing in the last few decades especially does seem that nature has for many people replaced religion in his new book natural. Author Alan Lavrinovich. Our faith in nature's goodness has led to harmful fads unjust laws and flawed science for him. The word natural doesn't necessarily mean. Good Ellen believes that we can love nature. Without necessarily worshiping Allen spoke earlier to Molecules Fernando Augusta Pacheco for me as a scholar of religion. You know someone who studies religion. What I see is that the authority of religion in certain ways is shrinking. So people don't go to their priests to their rabbis if they want to find out what to eat or if they want to find out how to treat the planet or if they want to heal themselves and and so they're turning away from religion looking to secular scientific things but at the same time. Science doesn't really give the sorts of existential answers that religion does right the. Why am I here where we going you know? Why did I become sick? In that sense nature naturalness are starting to substitute for God and Holiness. People are looking to nature as the kind of perfect original system that if we obey will be healthy and happy and if we disobey will be unhappy and unhealthy and is incredible. How widespread is that? You know because you know I've seen my friends and social media especially during the spend democ everybody's saying hold the animals are back see. We are the virus nor the animals. Do you know what I mean. It feels quite dramatic which has rightly said it's like a religion yes sympathizer to that. Look you know. Human beings have extraordinary technology right. Now that has allowed us on a global scale to alter the planet in some ways for the good in some ways for the back and I understand when people see you know species going extinct in oceans being polluted. I am very very understanding of wanting to blame humanity and change our ways. The problem I think is when we like you said reduce it to a sort of simple were bad. Nature is good really that the systems are complicated. And there's ways of being unnatural of using technology altering the world. That aren't irresponsible. That are that care for the natural world so if I want people to take away something from this book from my ideas. It's the weekend Love Nature Without Worshiping. It we can care for Nature Without worshiping it right. It's like we care for a child or a friend or a spouse right we sometimes wanNA change them Sometimes we change ourselves for them but we understand that the relationship is complicated that no one in. It is perfect for the bulk. You visited many places. For example you've been to the Peruvian rainforest. Correct me from wrong. But that's a lot of people especially in the West is said. Oh you know what's the best way to give a childbirth but actually when you look at certain communities perhaps does not what they want anymore in a way that's a classic example right absolutely. This is sort of a grass is greener on the other side kind of thing but it's easy once you're privileged and you have electricity and access to even basic things like salt is a really good example. You know what meeting with the Mata Ganga one of the things they told me was they were welcoming more tourists and I said why is that we want money and I. So what for is it a by things like salt and you start to realize these are things you you take for granted right and so it's easy to romanticize living in a state of nature when you don't live in that state when you have books medicine and electricity and so. I was really struck by the way in. Which would I value is dependent on what I take for. Granted tells about some other parts of the book. There's also a natural bodybuilding competition in order to understand a relationship with nature naturalness. I really felt like I had to look at it all kinds of areas not just the environment or medicine or birth. Where you see that word come up and one of the places you see it a lot of sports right so there's people are saying well. You should only be a natural athlete right. You shouldn't take drugs. Shouldn't have natural talents. Okay I'm going to go to this. Natural Bodybuilding Competition and of course bodybuilders look incredibly unnatural right have enormous muscles batons artificial spray. Tans. They're selling all these weird vitamin supplements of the door. And I was thinking to myself. What was the what? Is it in sports when we say we want natural talent? We want natural athletes. What does that actually mean since sports are the epitome of unnaturalness right? You're practicing every day eight hours a day. These are you know in a sense freaks of nature right the very the most gifted and talented athletes. you know among us and so that really helped me understand that when we say natural might actually need something very very different like safe for example or drug free and. I think it's important to be able to be clear about what we mean instead of just taking everything value and lumping it together and calling it natural. Whoa including with food or fingers so much misunderstanding. I think people they almost feel superior they have. I Dunno inorganic tomato or something like that Dino compared to the others also kind of Metros or in a way it does become quite confusing language. I sure I mean food is a really good example again. This goes back to the idea of religion right when nature is God and naturalness purity than when you buy natural tomato. It's not just good for your health. It's good for the planet. It's good for your community right. It's what was commanded by God and what God commands is good in every possible way and what I think we need to do as we approach. The problems of the future is to realize that. What's best for our health or what tastes best might not be? What's best for the planet? It might be better. For example to freeze vegetables truck them from far away rather than buying them from your local farmers market for the environment but it might taste better to buy them at your local farmers market. And you might enjoy that experience. There's nothing wrong with that. I get a farmer's markets. All the time again I loved them but I don't wash it and I think that's the key difference you elegantly said that you're you're judging you know those people he. It's quite understandable during a pandemic. You know they feign humans are the virus or they have this type of relationship with nature. But what would be your tip than you know to improve our relationship with nature. What's something that you can say that we can learn from your book for example one of the things? I think that's really important is that we don't have to hold ourselves to a high standard of shirty. When it comes to the natural world so even take something visited Yellowstone National Park when the most famous original National Park really beautiful place and it's famous in part because it preserves the sort of pure ecosystem untouched by human beings right but at the same time people got rid of the native Americans that were living there as part of this purification of nature. And so I think that we need to realize that humans can interact with nature and be a part of nature even with technology. Right there are roads that go through yellowstone park. There are handicapped access points that US meet a modern medals wheelchairs to allow people to access the park all of that's very technological and that doesn't make it worse so what we need to realize as a straight line by H G wells which is that human beings are unnatural animals he says and I think that really neatly captures the paradox of our relationship to animality but also are our distance from it. And that's something. I'd like to see people embrace a little bit more. That was Allen Lavrinovich speaking to Fernando Augusta Pacheco Book. Natural is out now. And that's all for today's edition of the briefing. It was produced by reese. James Healing Goffin page Reynolds. The research with Charlie Film Court Studio Manager Today was Christie Evans. The briefing tons the same time tomorrow. That's midday London. Andrew Luck Goodbye and thank you for listening.

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