17 Burst results for "Jamie Mezzo"

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:39 min | 3 months ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Our listeners a friend of the show Jamie mezzo he senior fellow Atlantic council former director on the US National Security Council the state department and on the Senate foreign relations committee we've talked with him about his book hacking Darwin genetic engineering and the future of humanity he joins us once again on the phone in New York and I gotta say opening up Pandora's box again Jamie with some writings that you've done about we're this virus the coronavirus originated from and we talk we take everybody back to the Wuhan lab and it you know and an accident to to talk to us about kind of where you're coming from right now sure so Carol didn't really happy to be back with you and before I tell you my my story of where I think you did this and having most likely began I want to say that I'm a progressive I really believe that we need to work together to make the world a better place we can't do it by game we can't do it by not seeing things that are right in front of our eyes and I believe that you as you know an alluded to that the most likely so as source they'll most likely origin this outbreak was from one of the two virology institute in Wuhan and and try and win this outbreak began in the beginning of this year I was really concerned we've seen these kind about about great happening in China but they usually happen in the south in the tropical provinces of new non and Congo and this was not in the south and this was a part of the country where the bass were largely hibernating at that time and it has a very well developed parts of of China and the one thing they we do have in Wuhan is the only level for the Rolla G. institute in all of China that happened to be studying extremely dangerous bat coronaviruses that we know had a very body security record so that is evidence number one and then number two is when there was the first evidence of this outbreak it would massively suppressed the evidence was destroyed that scientists were banned from speaking and that's really concerning if if they're with China wanted to get to the bottom of this story they would have been inviting people in they wouldn't have been blocking the World Health Organization investigators for weeks denying them and then he says there's a bigger story here and I think that we need to really get to the bottom of it and that doesn't mean that only China is to blame we've had a massive in fundamental failure here in the United States and that's why yeah which I think is a lot of folks in a sixty minutes has done some great reporting about a scientist has been very involved and has you know been at the Wuhan lab I mean we've had outside researchers involved in it right and even you know funding from other sources outside of China so there's been a lot of international you know exposure there are few well so like we're was the break down so there has been international exposure and is billable order virology institute the Wuhan institute of virology was built with huge support from the French government and the Pasteur institute yeah I mean I didn't think government funding I supported research that we've done in the in that lab and there were American researchers who had collaborated I'm into the breakdown is one is when it happens there wasn't any in a full accounting there well we this is exactly that kind of research that was kind of that kind of investigation that we need in order to get to the bottom of this and so why would China open up and say we want to get really get to the bottom of everything all that just kind of being China but we have so many people are dying around the world and for all we know there's another another pandemic what and so Jamie eight eight maybe asking the obvious question how much of our lack of understanding and maybe our ultimate inability to understand what really happened is going to be caught up in just pure politics because the rhetoric since January and obviously before right or around other issues has been escalating between the presidents of these two countries of these two superpowers so how much of this not to be too cynical are almost nihilistic a fatalistic about it is sort of a loss because like we're never going to get we're really never going to get to the bottom of this yeah it may be and that's why I started by saying I am a progressive I am massively critical of the job if the trump administration did here I am in the response and preparedness and response that's why we have over a hundred thousand dead here and in high wind they have seven deaths from clover this is our failure and so we need to I'm I'm all for pointing fingers pointing fingers thoughtfully and honestly and responsibly and if we point a finger at China as we should we also need to point a finger at ourselves as we showed in the reason why this isn't about me kind of had become about politics but this is who knows whether this is the worst pandemic that we're going to face this year let alone this century and so the plane crashes you want to know why that plane crashed not for that plane but because there are more planes that are is that right and I did I don't think we should we shouldn't accept from the United States government the obfuscation and basically the lying that happened to try to cover up our failures and we should we should hold apply that exact same standard to China well I think and you know we'll continue this conversation we're gonna do some news you know Jimmy come back but I do wonder to that there were a lot of folks I feel like in the business communities you know corporate communities financial communities with offices around the world that we're seeing things and I and in some ways wonder even in the media do you know did we all kind of miss things and not jump on it as soon as we needed to at least stay with it so that their information came to light a lot more quickly we're going to continue talking with Jimmy metal senior fellow at.

Jamie mezzo director US National Security Council senior fellow Atlantic council Senate
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

15:54 min | 5 months ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Amanpour

"Unwelcomed Amanpour. Here's what's coming up today. I'm instructing my administration to halt funding of the World Health Organization. We regret the decision of the president of the United States to order. Hold in funding global outrage at America's move to pull the plug on the World Health Organization in the midst of a pandemic. I explore the dangers with who adviser Jamie Mezzo then and now from leadership to U S China Relations Historian and author Margaret. Macmillan.

World Health Organization Jamie Mezzo China Relations Historian Unwelcomed Amanpour Macmillan United States president Margaret America
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

09:24 min | 6 months ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Was a gain of seven percent I'm Charlie politics and that is a Bloomberg business slash Charlie thank you so much this is Bloomberg business week on this Monday cal master along with Jason Kelly back with us is Jamie mezzo he senior fellow Atlantic S. account of a council at the Atlantic council excuse me a former director on the US National Security Council the state department and also on the Senate foreign relations committee his book I believe out today in paperback is hacking Darwin genetic engineering and the future of humanity he joins us on the phone in New York he Jamie nice to have you on people will read it and there's like a third practically giving it away on the evil today and tomorrow three dollars or something so if you're sitting at home and you want to learn about the genetics revolution I hope you read well and I do feel like it's relevant to everything that were going on with the virus you know you you had sent out some messages over the weekend taking a look at all the doctors who are working you know endlessly to deal with that so many cases of coping nineteen he talked about a high in the future that could you know potentially help us talk to us a little bit about that yes so this is crazy experience that we're having now is that all these trends that we thought would play out over ten twenty years or happening now because we're in this crisis so you and I were both in case we're we're always here in New York and we the number of cases is overwhelming our health care system and not only that our health care providers are in themselves being infected so we're we're relatively quickly going to come to a point we have more patience and not enough doctors and so we're going to have to ship so that the at least the first point of care is going to have to be artificial intelligence so that if you have a symptom you hate you go online and you have an artificial intelligence agents basically have a program and everybody will have a home to get to the thermometer and Gail and that blood pressure cuff and a few other simple things and you'll put in your symptoms and you'll put in your readings from home and then you'll get the differential diagnosis and if it's just here's some things you should just stay home and and half chicken soup and liquids and rest they I will tell you that if you need to be escalated then a I will refer you to a telemedicine general consul and then perhaps to a specialist telemedicine consul and only then to humans so this whole thing now where you feel symptoms and go to the doctor it's great for normal times but it's probably not gonna be possible in crisis times like this and so I guess one of the questions Jamie is what of crisis time will become normal in normal time it's such a great question and people lot of people have this feeling that what we're experiencing now is kind of like a snowstorm that gets a big storm we sit home the plows come out plows did they get rid of the snow the sun comes out everything else and then we just go back to our lives right old lives that we've had are never coming back in so many big ways and so this shift to virtualisation that we're all experiencing it's going to happen is going to going to continue not just in health care but everything else in our companies are taking a beating they're not going to bring all the employees back in expensive real estate across the economy they were going to see big big changes that are going to change the way we live and the way we work and certainly the way we experience healthcare yeah I mean we you know we had so many conversations about what will be lasting it's interesting because here we have gone through this phase yeah we certainly have it in our offices you know these open environments for all teams can walk into one another you know conversations across different parts of the business and that is seen as an advantage but we are finding to some extent that we can do a fair amount of that your virtual world right absolutely and on top of that we're not going to go back to it anything that even steals normal until there's a vaccine and I know we're hearing this this twelve months as a as a possibility but that's the ultimate dream scenario that everything going right and an order of magnitude better performance than we've ever had in in the history of health care so it could be that it's eighteen months two years until we're able to be in those same kinds of physical environments I was doing a Denver radio interview the other day and I told them that I didn't think it was very likely there is going to be a full stadium NFL football game anywhere in this country until twenty twenty two and these guys they were planning on going going to opening day later this year and it's it's it's really this is a really big change it's so hard to fathom where were Hey Sir Jamie when you hear the president or other officials or even business folks start to talk about re opening the economy you say what not even close well it depends on what we need we can't have we can't be totally hunkered down like we are now or ever on the we're not gonna be able to just say everybody goes back because again until there's a vaccine if we all go back to normal on it we're going to have the same kind of of explosion what we're talking about is is this exponential growth so I do I do that how will it work maybe some people will go back maybe we'll have some groups of kids who will go in small numbers the schools maybe Monday Wednesday Friday group in a Tuesday Thursday Saturday group and and businesses will have to work that way and somebody in the government very tragically is going to be doing a calculation about how much we open the economy verses the number of people who at least until there's better treatments and a and a vaccine are going to die and that's I mean that that's the yeah I'm sure you had cats on skiing on your on your your program but that kind of calculation the government does it all the time when they say what what should the speed limit be increased the speed limit people go faster but you'll have more fatalities right now the latest calculus that we're going to tragically have to do you know Jamie I what I wanted to pose a question to you that that came to me earlier we're talking to our colleague Andy brown who runs our new economy program a new economy forum that happened last year over in Beijing just outside of Beijing you are a China expert and you're an expert on many things as we have laid out but you know so much about China and specifically the relationship between the US and China and I do think that this has thrown that throw that relationship which already was to say the least complicated over the trade war into a whole other category what do you make of it right now especially at a time when man and I know I'm being a little Pollyanna ship at this but if those two superpowers could get together I do feel like we could make some progress on this right yes well the good news is in the on the scientific level our scientists are actually working pretty closely together and that's because if I was on a big and have that big global call over the weekend we had scientists from China scientists from Italy and scientists from the United States and also so that that is happening but in terms of big power politics I mean this is really really dangerous I mean first there was all the name calling and I think that it's just undoubtedly true that China's massive failure at the beginning of this year helped exacerbate this this problem in a very very big way we're all suffering as a result but the total failure of the trump administration to prepare even when we have the warning signs out of China in January and U. S. intelligence was raising the alarm that the reason why so many people are dying here in New York and elsewhere is not just because of China it's also because of the total failure of the U. S. response that's the starting point but we have to work together to get there from here I was just hearing and you know what I was waiting for it to come on about him cook having supplies made and apple having Mike made that are going to save people's lives here where are those supplies being made you didn't mention in your apartment I would bet anything they're not being made here in the United States are being made in China that has figured out a better way than we have to address this problem if we don't learn from China in spite of all of the problems that we have in our relationship we're going to harm ourselves so I totally agree with you Jason we have to find a way to to collaborate well I think you know tiny in particular Jamie they have had to deal with other health issues before right I mean you know this is a society a country that has dealt with some of things whether we go back to sars and some other you know.

Charlie Jason Kelly Jamie mezzo Atlantic council director US National Security Council Bloomberg senior fellow
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

07:47 min | 6 months ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Official and author of the book hacking Darwin genetic engineering and the future of humanity Jamie welcome the KDKA radio thank you very much happy to be here Brigitte you taking some time for us thank you very much for it I'm sure you've been monitoring the president and his news conferences as he's been having them with the White House coronavirus task force we've been talking a lot about how it's at least it seems to me as though there was a clear tone change that started a couple of days ago when the data was presented to him and it was clearly evident today and the White House briefing room I wanted to get your thoughts about that yeah it's clearer is that there's been a shift in president trump's tone from the beginning when he was getting intelligence service reports about the severity of this of this crisis and at the same time was just outright lying to the American people to plane down this is this terrible pandemic which has cost the lives of local supplies to tens of thousands of Americans if not more and finally when it is you know it would be impossible for anyone to deny what's happening and it is growing it's great that he's finally getting getting serious but when dead tens of thousands or more of Americans will be on necessarily dead because of this disastrous behavior on on by the president ma'am Hey I can just think about well how different things would be if the information that was made to the public at least three weeks ago about the severity of this and the math in the models was something that was fully embraced by the president how different things would be at this point yeah well you just have to look at other countries I mean look at career I look even China lots of other other countries had the same information as we did but China they face they were first and then they really messed up but we had a month six weeks to plan and in that time nothing was done and the president of the United States who should have been the one leading the charge was holding the charge I mean there are lots of conspiracy theorists who say who believe to this day that FDR knew about about the Pearl Harbor attack before they happen I mean this is that times a thousand then they do either you have to look at what's happening in the United States aired to China compared to every other country we are now the biggest hug known for this virus and this disease in the world and it is a monumental it's one of the great failures in the history of the United States government the it's it's a bit hard for me to get my mind around the idea that somehow this is advantageous the trump in and in some way in order to have this go forward this would make a comparison back to an FDR and what happened at Pearl Harbor it would seem to me at least that when it comes to trump in the way that he has been looking at things that he just sees everything as a personal attack somehow that the media is out to get him if they can get him one way they'll get another and so the media was building this up into something that it wasn't and I could just like in a back to maybe the a ball a concern and there was a lot of concern to the media was expressing at the time regarding that and what it could mean if they came here that somehow we get caught up into that and it's just an issue of him being flat footed and misdirected more than some type of a orchestrated plan to not be on top of it and then bring the wrath yeah this disease on us you know I I completely agree with that I mean I we were it would be even as terrible as this is it would be even worse if it was some kind of evil plan to kill American people I definitely don't I don't think that and certainly at the R. me he didn't want Pearl Harbor dead kids it to happen but I and I in it could lose then Alice's could very well be what you're saying and you mentioned the bola and one of the reasons why Ebola didn't come here is because the United States was so proactive we sent teams to Africa that helped contain bad that buyers we were part of the solution we didn't say our we're closing our borders were not gonna help we're not going to be part of the solution because we know that viruses are transnational viruses don't know borders and so when trump thing are we're just gonna look we've got this under control even though it does not having adequate testing was one of the monumental screw ups in American history and then we're just gonna close the borders if like people in in medieval Europe and who built these walls to keep out invaders and then there was the black plague and then played with the inside and that's what happened we had no testing we didn't know what was here we already had community spread we cut we shut down our borders it was like locking the door after the burglars were already in the house it won't one of the things that was interesting me too regarding the whole closing the borders was that granted Chinese nationals were limited in their access to come in but every American who wanted to was free to come back in without any aspect of quarantine just advisement to quarantine themselves and even from Europe there was no real locked down on those that were coming back so granted the Europeans were able to come in or the Chinese nationals weren't able to come in but every American that went there they contracted the disease and came back nothing was done about those individuals at all you know it's really tragic the United States we invented the entire field of public health people around the world who are the leaders in responding to this crisis well the people in China in Korea and Taiwan and Singapore they train here we have the best experts the best universities in the world and then we have accuracy to this point and we've had years of politicians complaining the government is the enemy and people started to believe that our civic culture has has has broken down and this thing that could have been manageable what we're experiencing is a health crisis but at its core it's a political question to the political crisis in China where it could have been suppressed in the very very beginning in China really screwed up in the whole world and hundreds of thousands of people are going to die because of China's screw up it was a political process here for some of the reasons that you articulate them couldn't take it seriously because our government was so divided because we had a president who took every everything as a personal insult and attack on him rather than as a danger to the American people and that's our starting point but now we need this is where we are we need to come together because we're one country we're one people we're one humanity humanity and in this country Donald Trump is the only president who we have so we have to pray for him we have to help him because the if it's not perfect this is the president that we have Jamie mezzo is with his World Health Organization expert former National Security Council official and author of hacking Darwin genetic engineering and the future of humanity do me a favor Jamie hold on right there we'll pause here for a couple of moments sketch of the latest news headlines and come back and you know Katie K. ready.

Jamie Brigitte president Official
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:02 min | 7 months ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And the future of humanity Jamie mezzo thank you Jim my pleasure we'll have to have him back policy under full seven thirty one as we head back outside John Morrissey one of the biggest back up right now your heaviest wall from downtown all the way out of favour at the stall that turned into a crash somebody not paying attention and hit the stalled toward front about about five miles an hour but enough to bring out the police to block the center lane so he's bound I. seventy is really about from downtown all the way up to the chamber's are you drive what was billed as always been heavy for tower in the downtown all morning long drive downtown pretty heavy sell below twenty five really loaded up with traffic but I'm not seeing the total do accidents so that's the good news but the traffic flow is so heavy this morning but it really doesn't matter you're getting slow and all the usual spot that includes two seventy in both directions stop but I drew the G. twenty five coming out of your area starting at I love all your doorbell drug getting on the I. seventy because the back up on I. seventy pretty every drop of the website did jump to that drive out to the west side of doubt on what about the I. seventy six heavy all the way through commerce city and then west of I twenty five outward what for traffic on that was spelled C. for seventy drive heavy around two eighty five and all your east of route you have battle that saw they had the other drivers is forty that's double trouble on your drive this report is what's what napa auto parts napa auto parts believes every driver deserve quality parts that's why you could do it yourself in the napa auto parts store or have it done for you the napa auto care center either way that's that but no now next update ten minutes on gateway eight fifty eight ninety four one FM you're listening to Colorado's morning news nine it's login and Louis Rick Lewis and Kathy Lee ko eh the voice of Colorado it is Colorado's morning news April Marty with this morning twenty five right now highs today we anticipate in the mid fifties our top story on Colorado's morning news there are no confirmed cases of corona virus in our state but two people in the metro are under self quarantine one works of the.

Jamie mezzo Jim John Morrissey Colorado Louis Rick Lewis Kathy Lee April Marty napa
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Curious with Josh Peck

Curious with Josh Peck

12:57 min | 8 months ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Curious with Josh Peck

"Oil dripping chipotle Burrito and you know whatever. GMO corn or the glyphosate hyphenated. Whatever else like I can't put that out of my head when I'm eating it and I'm like Oh shit I'm damaging my body flick? The next one thousand nine days and so for me. It's like that knowledge has kind of crippled crippled me from being able to enjoy some of those foods but knowing how good the good foods are for me again like forgotten like I at a bell. Campus the other night right and they've got like tallow fries cooked in Lard. And you know grass-fed grass finished Ridi- with like this wonderful of the he was like a blue cheese. She's butter or something like that. So I mean like you can still enjoy life. Need some really good food. It's interesting first of all. I don't know why simple because I'm not even a fan and just the the bus I don't know if they're shits GMO or they're not worried about this podcast. They should be to never going to be a sponsor but like you know first of all I'm interested in when you mentioned the GMO corn. I had a guy on the pod named Jamie Mezzo who's futurists and really brilliant guy. And he was like the and he was on Rogan talking about this. He's like this whole idea of. GMO is ridiculous. He's like every scientists worth their weight in salt has said that. GMO is safe if he's a and by the way the idea that you're avoiding things that are that are in quotes. GMO is ridiculous. He's like everything on earth is genetically modified because as the corn crop. Five hundred years ago was a few kernels on a we'd like we've genetically enhanced everything and that's just the evolution solution of agriculture. It's semantics though because selective breeding is genetic modification. But that's also just farming like that slow slow process not the bullet train to making you know the giants whatever purple tomato that glows in the dark. Because you've used crisper type of technology to genetically modify defy that Cedar that plant but like selective breeding of tomatoes over a long period of times that naturally occurs. Read the same as with the human being we could say like an and this. This is all based on EPA genetics of human beings like we could develop robust strong muscular baby for generations from now. If we start taking mom Um and dad and the other weightlifting eating organ meats and colostrum and living this super active lifestyle in which they're loading their bodies with weights each day. I mean eventually you've got got little vikings a few generations down the line. Those kids like little Hercules. Yeah yeah seeing kids like. There's this German kid you can find pictures of online. He has has the mile STATIN knockout gene knockout mile. Staten that that gene is responsible for regulating muscle growth. And so it's kind of sad because like we get these ripped kids but they die early right. It's kind of like a formal gigantism almost worth it or milestone knockout bowl mazda knockout dog like there's a mouse knockout knockout rat. So Google lease so recall. If I've got ripped but I had to diet. Fifty could have a good life. Maybe where they yeah. Yeah interrupt queued up the gun show on your tombstone. Some of the worst The the idea then is that that would be a more natural method of genetic attic modification through selective breeding over over a generational time line. We could take a a human embryo as they've done for example in China and use crisper expert technology to genetically modify. It and with a fallback was for that in China but the children are more susceptible to something. I don't recall if it was teasing I just cried at least twice the amount of the other babies. Not they they were actually genetically susceptible to something. I don't recall if it was aids or it resulted in some kind of a downstream blowback. That they didn't expect when they genetically modified via crisper technology. Chris please. CRISPER is a type of technology where you can go in and basically cut out certain genes so you can keep certain proteins from being expressed. It's almost almost a way of very selectively modifying genetic expression unfortunately it's kind of like the butterfly effect. Where like you don't know for sure if you modify one gene? What that's going to do to downstream patterns even bad genes have come back to the tomato and a little bit? But even bad genes jeans have protective effects like sickle cell. Anemia right folks who have sickle cell. Anemia who say live in Africa are protected against malaria area. You take those same people and you put them into a context that does not have mosquitoes like the living. Whatever Montana or something like dat sickle cell? Anemia does make him suck wind. When they're trying to you know go on a hike right so that gene doesn't serve them well but at a time it was beneficial There's there's another example. I'm I'm blanking on the name of it. It's it's like A. It's like a lactose intolerance gene or something like that that that is protective against some of the proteins and milk but the the the sickle cell sickle cell. Anemia is a good example like that. Gene is protective against malaria. Right right so some of these bad genes if you knock him out. You don't know downstream. There might be some other things that are caused Diabetes is another interesting. There's this theory that diabetes easy volved as a protective mechanism during some kind of an ice age or a period of time in which humans were exposed to very cold environments. Because if you're in a chemistry class and increase the amount of particles in a liquid then increases the freezing temperature of that liquid so so if a human body has more sugar in the bloodstream the blood would be less likely to freeze and very cold conditions. So maybe there's a diabetic gene that developed as a response to humans being in very cold environments that nowadays doesn't serve US quite as much Wow Yeah and some of this stuff is not genetic some of it is. This is basically developed due to environmental factors like for example If if you look at like hypertension in the in the deep south for example and you look at at the African American heritage that is pretty prevalent in the south. Well if you're in a very we like warm. Sodium poor environment right eating a lot of citrus fruits and fibers such as they might do in the indigenous diet of Cameroon West Africa. And and then you put that person into an environment where they no longer need those robust sodium conservation mechanisms that they had in the very very hot environment that that was low sodium. And they're instead in like high sodium while house kings chicken southeast junk food the Holy Trinity of delicious pushes for hypertension is going to mattis because they would hold onto that sodium far more readily based on mechanisms that developed from an environmental standpoint and for where that person came from. So we know with humans genetic modification is kind of playing with fire right and there's some downstream issues that might occur with breath fruits and vegetables. We know that there's some change in the microbiome upon consumption of genetically modified fruit or vegetable. It's doing something and in some cases aces some of it has been shown to increase gut permeability almost like the like the leaky gut. Type of scenario that you'd get in response to to glyphosate or inflammatory foods foods or stress like a lot of people have poor digestion. Due to this fact that the gut can become more permeable in response to certain factors and genetically modified organisms can cause that whether or not that's GONNA result in serious issues. I don't know but I'm playing it safe like if I have the option between non GMO corn corn and GMO corn. I'm just going to choose non. Gmo Corn You know many beats and Papayas and foods like that the very difficult to find non GMO these these days. Many of them are are genetically modified not selectively bred but actually genetically modified to be like resistant to herbicides pesticides. Or you know have some other kind of modification -cation and the data that I've seen in the effect of the human gut gives me pause and makes me question whether I should consume it. It's kind of like kind of like sucralose. sucralose right. Like sucralose has been shown to impact the Gut microbiome and even though there. There's not bodies in the streets. There's people coming down with like bleeding intestines or full and seal EAC disease or something like that from consumption of sucralose when I see that impacts the microbiome specifically by decreasing creasing the amount of favourable bacteria in the gut. Well if I can choose between sucrose gum in his isla tall gum choose the xylitol gum or gum flavored with monk fruits or Stevia rather than sucralose so in some of these cases it's like why choose the GMO food when there are other options. And there's some evidence evidence that might cause harm. I just don't Wanna I don't WanNA play with fire. I've been a fan of yours for many years. Listening you on Rogaine and then falling in love with your podcast and I know you to be like the real deal and we you talk about that Dr. We're going to have dinner with them. Friday I can't wait. And and how brilliant he is and then it seems to so in social media culture especially. There's been this. Wave of charlatans and people projecting checking themselves to be every. I can't tell you how many girls I've fallen. It's more like I healed my gut like I healed myself and now I can heal you you and I'm like I had bigger issues. Darlan does it. How do you discern who the charlatans are and does do they just piss you off this whole like people that are picking up health and wellness as like a hobby and you know projecting themselves to be authorities is the same instagram girl showing her but next to a kitten on the beach shepherd healed her? There's always some kind of an inspirational message. Highly Inspirational message under the photo. It just it looks sweet and innocent. It's all bullshit. Yeah it is. Yeah this Harrison real by the way. This is a to pay put this on right before I walk in the door of your office I do. Have you fooled I like it. Yeah so what do you got going on in Baltimore have a gut. I'm wearing a like one of those courses right now to hold in the gut. So it's how is that. It's hard to maintain it's hard to equally. Yeah put an affiliate link in the show notes. I mean crime member makes them of course that money to day so it is so easy. Now you're right to paint a picture of you being an expert especially fitness. Because what do we associate with being an expert in fitness an ice body right and granted in this day and age especially with little better living through science right some some steroids. Some peptides. Some sort of you know any number of hormone replacement type of compounds or just a staggering amount of time spent in the gym right hours and hours longer than what. You're saying saying that folks can or should do on your instagram page. Like here's my twenty minute workout. And here's my three percent body fat and my gains Bro. Dad's paying your rent in reality. These folks are living in the gym. You know on testosterone and Dhea. In God knows what else An an a painting with a broad brusher there. There are some fitness influencers with Nice bodies who are natural and who have attained those through pretty pretty natural roll ancestoral methods of exercise. But that's the exception to the rule and when you're trying to identify whether or not someone is a Charleston for me me. It comes down to looking at what came before instagram. Were they actually working one on one with a large number of clients in a scenario area in which they were seeing many different body types move and looking at everything from functional movement screen to biomechanical analysis of you know hundreds and hundreds of joes and Janes coming through their personal training studio with our Jim or their physical therapist clinic before they started to just slap photos up on instagram of what is working for them without having experienced whether or not. This is even something appropriate for the general population and then are they educated right. You can get a personal training certification location right now online in a weekend via open book tests and say you're certified personal trainer right or you can go through training organization such as the National Strength Thank Conditioning Association an sea or the American College of Sports Medicine the the A CSM. There are few others but they require a college degree..

Anemia glyphosate China Gene Jamie Mezzo Ridi malaria instagram gigantism vikings Staten lactose intolerance Google Diabetes American College of Sports Med Rogan Africa Montana EPA
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Curious with Josh Peck

Curious with Josh Peck

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Curious with Josh Peck

"Welcome to curious with Josh Peck start the show. Welcome back to the curious podcast. My name is Josh Peck and I'm your host and your name is listener and that's what you do your lesson. Let's get right into Jamie. Mezzo <hes> brilliant guy. He's a futuristic geopolitical expert a writer. He's written a new book called Hacking Darwin. It's really good we talk all about genetic engineering and the future feature of humanity. He worked for good old uncle Joe Biden. Everyone's favourite vice president and I just love talking to him so everyone enjoy hey. Jamie Mezzo Humble Moose flavor walk is in the higher end flavor. I'm really excited. Exactly infringe makes me feel confident about it. I know right you speak French right to do. I know I heard Hey John Rogan. Okay Okay Yeah. I know that we were just talking about that. That was a great experience. I think it's been downloaded seven million times and all these people are finding me out of the woodwork that I would have never found me. I love it. He's the golden ticket right now. It's incredible. He's Johnny Carson Johnny Carson and Oprah Yeah Yeah. It's unbelievable in like like a beautiful five nine M._M._a.. Loving like he's such a great guy so interesting and just interested I think that's I was trying to think of like why hi Joe Rogan and not other people and I think it's the way he asks questions just like this are shocks attitude of just openness and he's asking questions the just regular people would want to ask people kind of get a little afraid to ask things especially if there are people who are talking about areas where where the guests are experts and I just think that he's he's he's just kind of open. It was great I love you're so right and he is surprisingly quite brilliant. <hes> 'cause I I only knew knew him as a comedian an actor but over the years to hear the pod and how intelligent he is in so many different realms but you're right I I think there's a lack of vanity with him so he's not afraid to ask and doesn't he doesn't feel the need to stick it up like he's happy to allow the interviewer the interviewee to kind of shine yeah which is great because he chose to so much confidence on his side man. He's not trying to prove anything he's just like really open and really curious and recognizing that there's a big crazy world out there and there's a so much stuff for us all to learn if we're open and communicative with each other and and on top of all that rich Jamie Goddess he rich you know Geez. You should all be rewarded for doing what we love boil boy. I mean I would love to know it. That's I've only heard about the studio but here it's quite the setup. It's really nice <hes> so Kevin your producer and I were talking just as I as I came in about the experience of being in that in that studio and it's really a guy space I mean there are ehlers. I went to the restroom before restarted and there's like a neon painting painting of a naked woman big some kind of bear hybrid ca merrick stuffed animal. There's a gym it was like a guy kind of place I you know I'm so happy to have you on the show and I've become more familiar with you over the last week or so researching a and and whatnot for the interview so let's start softball question nascent easy Scher. Are We fucked we are no I get the asset a lot <hes> but not so concisely and the thing is we are on the verge of the most wonderful incredible revolution. That's going to help us live longer longer. Healthier more robust lives cure all these in prevent all these terrible disease and we should be thrilled about that and there are some real dangers we could abused as these technologies in ways that could really screw us and the difference between the Great Story and the terrible story is us and that's what I'm doing with a lot of my life. Energy is saying saying well. How can we make sure that we're investing to increase the odds that the great story is the one that happens and the terrible story is one that doesn't happen is it you know I sometimes wondering the age of like trump and people going nuts about our political climate and what have you? I sometimes wonder under have people always been this way. Have we always had these debates where people in the sixteen hundreds going. It's all for sure actually every movie. It's like the end is nigh is the way they used to say it. In those old days. It's true it's part of our nature. I mean just going around the country in the world talking about the genetics revolution how it's going to change anything and let's say I'm speaking for an hour. I'll speak for fifty eight minutes and I'll say like here's here's the thing we're dying of. All these terrible diseases diseases cancers <hes> we just think it's normal when ninety year old person gets dimension loses their mind yet we've been we societally and have invested ninety years ears in that person's wisdom and love and ideas and so it oh that just goes away. That's just the way of things so screwing that let's fight back. Let's have our ninety year enrolled have ten more years of sentence and it's wonderful. It's exciting but then I'll say the last two minutes of my talk but there are some real dangers and these terrible things could happen like with every technology we need to be mindful and then it's exactly every everyone will say oh my God. The end is not worse crew right for the hills. It's funny I had <hes> Safi Recall. I know these old friend Yeah Great Guy Oh what a love and and he was kind of I in an effort to debunk conspiracy theorists who I can't stand and I was like soft. You're you're at the forefront of cancer research and I said is this ridiculous when these conspiracy e._p._a.. Say there is a cure. They're just hiding it from us because there's no money in a cure and he's like that's ridiculous any said a there's three hundred different types of cancer so it's going to be quite hard to ever in quotes. Come up with a cure and he's like you know we don't get a lot of credit for pretty much reading the world of infectious disease for the most part Yeah No. It's it's incredible what we've done ever this whole thing of like. We're going back to some great time in the passed I mean this is the great time we are living longer. Healthier lives these terrible diseases like we are all superheroes with these superpowers of Vare immunizations that we take for granted people say oh. I don't need I don't need to. I don't need to immunize my kids for measles. I who cares about music it's only killed hundreds of millions right and so we we take for granted all of this incredible progress that we've made. What do you think I mean? That's such a topic that that resonates with me. I have a seven month old kid regulations thanks and he's pretty cool and we've given them all the shots and done the thing and I just you know there's a part of me. That's I don't care what you do with your kid but it's negligent for you to have your kid near my kid if he's not vaccinated like I do here. If you don't vaccinate your kid your kid you are screwing your kid which I care about as a human and you're screwing me and my kid and society because you are depending on the heard protection that if everybody around you is immunized in your kid is the only non immunized kid. Your kid is safe because of of the numeric of her protection but once you get above like five percent of non immunized kids <hes> then everybody is at risk and I guarantee you like if there is measles. It's like killing millions of people or smallpox again. Killing millions hundreds of millions of people died from the Spanish flu all these people who are the anti vaccine. They're going to be lining up to get their kids vaccinated. No one wants their kids to die from a terrible terrible disease. It's just that they get something for nothing. So you know the Anti Vaccine Actually pissed me off. I do care right. I think so too that also for me you know when people in obviously there's there's the the topic of global warming is this waded subject and and yet it the people that are sort of anti climate change and all these things I always want to say well where does science and for you at antibiotics like it's so so true. It's so true yeah there's kind of this this contradiction in the genetics world where I do where I operate a lot and the climate change world because these same progressives and I count myself as a progressive when you have the argument about climate change and people say well climate the changes real. It's manmade and you say well. How do you know it's like are you a climate scientist and they'll say which is a very logical response well? I'm not a climate scientist but the united the nation's pulled together the top climate scientists in the world and more than ninety nine percent of them agree that climate change is real and that it's manmade and then you talk about genetically modified crops and you say you know genetically. We have every pretty much every living recipient of a Nobel Prize in science has signed a petition saying G._M._O.. Crops are safe for human consumption. Thurs been more than thirty years of studies all around the world. There's never been a single single study that shows that G._M._O.. Crops are unsafe for human consumption and so what I'll say to these other progressive like that seems like evidence and then they'll say you know this all. This science is rigged. It's biased. Monsanto has paid off every scientist on earth and so I'm a big believer river in in science and I that doesn't mean that scientists always perfect science has our own biases built into it but I think that we ought to try to to do to us just analytics to try to figure out what's better and what's worth analytics plus both values at.

scientist Josh Peck Joe Biden Joe Rogan Jamie Johnny Carson Jamie Mezzo writer John Rogan Monsanto Jamie Goddess vice president Nobel Prize cancer smallpox Kevin
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on The Chad Prather Show

The Chad Prather Show

11:54 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on The Chad Prather Show

"Hey, everybody. Welcome to another episode of the Chad brothers show. Good to be with everybody back here in studio. Twenty two always interesting. I love the days that we can have guests in here. We got a great one today going to introduce you to him in just a minute. Of course, sitting over there avidly on their phones in the peanut gallery, we got barn burner, Brandon and party foul. Steve. This is going to be a conversation. You guys don't need to joy into today because we're going to let the adult speak, okay? We're going to let the, the smart people. The, the people with it with a huge queue in e q engage in this conversation. Why are you looking? Where are you guys looking at me like that? You, you know, goodwill, you don't know anything. I don't know anything anyway. But then, but then, to my right, of course, I have the puppet master, Mark, who's, who's flying this starship here in the studio. And again, Ken DC, the Queen of the THEO paeans who she's actually the brains behind all of this. You guys doing. Okay today, we're going to have to get angry. I love how you guys always nod when we're on a podcast. Yes, it forget that, you know, some people don't watch the video I can actually do. Hey, if you're watching the video, and you happen to be on Facebook. I know hundreds of thousands of people watch this thing. Facebook do me a favor go to YouTube. Subscribe to our YouTube channel Chad pray through real simple hit the little notification. But after you subscribe, so that's that little bell at the top hit that thing. So it gives you a little ding, every time a new video comes up, you're going to get one Monday through Thursday. And sometimes with throw some surprise elements in as well. But check them out. We can count those Facebooks little bit hard to count as far as the analytics, but we'd like it on YouTube. And of course we're ever podcasts are offered. And you can certainly visit watch Chad dot com. Find me out on the road. We're head now we're going to be doing some shows in Texas going to be down in the Houston area and Stafford on June fourteenth going to be in San Antonio fifteenth of June. And then the sixteenth Father's Day over in Huntsville, Texas don't pick up hitchhikers in Huntsville, Texas, they probably prison break people. So and then got got a show on the twenty ninth of new braunfels. So we're gonna be hanging out. That's actually gonna live album. We're going to add some of our fun music that we do in that. So good watch Chad dot com. Check us out on the road. We're going to have a fun summer. I have on Skype a guy that you're gonna fall in love with a guy that I want you to get to know I don't want you. I want you to hear what the real open mind here. We're gonna have a fun discussion. I read his book over the weekend. And, and I've been perusing a lot of articles that I truly, I don't understand the articles. But I understand what this guy says when we're talking about genetic engineering, and you hear that word, and you're like what in the world is at me. We're gonna talk about that today. He's the author of the new book is very successful. It's going to be even more successful than everyone needs to read it called hacking Darwin. All from New York Jamie mezzo, Jamie. Thanks for being on the show, buddy. Hey, thanks chat. Great to be here. What has been the what has been the response when you write a book talking about genetic engineering, and the future of humanity? Now that's something we all have stock you. I like to think I mean, we're, we're all people what's failure response to to this book? Well, it's been great. And certainly, I've gotten a lot of attention is, you know, I was on the Joe Rogan show that interviews been downloaded about three million times. And I've reached all kinds of people and I'm thrilled about that. But for most people science is scary here word genetics. And people think, oh, I don't know if we're allowed to say, S H, whatever words on these ocean. I remember. I remember science in high school. I didn't like it. I was scared and the reason why I've written this book. The reason why I'm going around the country and doing shows like yours is what we're digest revolution. It's going to touch all of our lives in a really intimate way. And if everybody can't be part of the conversation, we're all going to be worse off for it. So the people who, who are reading my book are really loving it. And it's not just the NPR crowd. I mean, this these are I'm getting messages from people all around the country and all around the world who were saying things, like I never read a science book before. But I saw you wanna podcast. I thought I would take. A crack at it, and it was fun and interesting. And it was funny. And so that, that's the kind of stuff that I really appreciate one guy's got a message on Twitter yesterday that he had this book read. The first chapter was really excited. Put it down for a second and his dog came and ripped it to shreds. So we send we said that guy. A new copy. I love it because I read, I'm reading through the book and I told you this before we got started. I love that. You can take just a plethora of information and examination and research you make it humorous. Which I appreciate and you make it a real palatable easy pill to swallow and it's very conversational. It's very down to the core. I mean I, I love the part where we you've got a whole chapter and they're talking about, you know, doing away with sex, and how this could ultimately lead to that. You have to go the master Batori amend it, things like that. And I'm like I love it. I like this is fun. This is talking about the master in the first draft of the book the opening scene was need going to the master Vittore fertility clinic and my editor who's like amazing. She said, you know there are some readers. We're just gonna open the book and you're straight in the master Pretoria. Mm-hmm. And they're gonna like that some readers who aren't going to really like this. Why don't you put it back chapters? Get to know. I it's like. It's the full of like, why don't you start with, like a drink and some conversation. Yeah, let's Loubet. Let's lubricate no pun intended. Let's get everybody lubricated before before we get into that point of the thing. But I love it because it's real. And it's, it's a it's a you come at it from you're talking about genetic engineering of humans from very human standpoint. You know, a very fallible approach to it, and I like that, because it's, it's a humble approach, but let's talk about this thing because you've got a heck of a background. I mean you're a geopolitical expert you worked for national Security Council. What in the Clinton administration in administration? Yeah. And then you work with in, in the Joe Biden office. Right. So, so you got quite a resume. And then, you know, your technology futurist Asai novelist, you've got, you know, this, this book hacking Darwin, and you've authored a number of different things in the way we looked at it is, is, you know, you got Elon Musk that revolutionized is revolutionizing the transportation industry. You. Jeff Bezos whose revolutionized that consumer industry and you're kind of doing, you know, you're, you're doing the same kind of thing, the, the opportunity that's going to hit the market with designer DNA. So what does that mean? What does that look like sure? So let's go back a little bit. Everybody knows genetics that, that from the moment, we are a fertilized egg. Are I sell, we have a blueprint of who we are? And it's written in code, and that code is, is our DNA, and that's our genetic code and every cell in our body has this same blueprint. And that's how we become who we are. And that's really really important, and we've evolved based on this model for about four billion years, and where we are now is for the first time ever, we are at the beginning of having our species having the ability to read write and hack our genetic code, and that's going to change everything in just a deep and funding. The first thing that it's going to change. People are starting to experience. This is our healthcare. We're going to have healthcare based on their standing of who we are as individuals not just that we are humans. And so we'll get drugs that work just for us. And then it's going to change the information that we have a lot of people have done their mouth swabs. And sent them into companies like twenty three in me, and you get some interesting information. Accurate news, think are. Oh, sorry. How accurate do you think those are the DNA did accurate? And so there's some things that are more accurate than others. So, for example, you get information back on things like a carrier status. So there are a lot of, of diseases that are caused by just a single letter of DNA being off, and whether it's tastes act disease or sickle cell disease, or hunting, says he's about seven thousand of these that we that we know about or that we know about and can do something about. And so if you get information about carrier satis, that's really useful. You get information about your your ancestry. It's, it's kind of directional. It's not that accurate, but it's, it's directional. And then when you get stuff like, oh, you have long, twitch muscles, and you could be a marathon runner right now. That's baloney. But in the future in the not distant future, you're going to get some really actionable information. Like you have better than average chance of being incredible abstract. Mathematician or a really fast. Sprinter, I'm we're gonna have to think deeply about how. How we use that information. And we don't on one hand go crazy. On the other hand, we don't think that we're all genetically to determine because we're part generics. And we're part environment, and the, the mystery of life is in that mix I always love talking to guys like you because you're looking at genetic alterations and making yourself better. And you're already an ultra marathon and a try and a triathlete, which really pisses me off, Jamie. Like you're already a perfect specimen, and you're just making yourself better for science. It's so not true. As a matter of fact, I'm, I'm. Doing this interview from my apartment, my girlfriend. I can I can hear her milling about, and she could even come on and give you a list of reasons. Chuck. Chuck. So I had a conversation over the weekend with some folks who are, you know, they work with veterans. They work with a lot of folks with autism, and things like that. And we, we brought up the conversation of stem cell, research at and receiving like stem cell injections. This is what you're talking about is far beyond what we're talking about stem cells is connected. But we're talking about is, is much broader than stem cells. So as, as many of your listeners know, stem cells are the cells in our body that make more cells of the same type I everybody knows that, like your skin, for example, you're constantly shedding skin cells, and you're making new skin cells, and those stem cells are the cells that enable that, that to happen. And so there's a whole field of science of how do we do something called regenerative medicine. So if something is breaking down. How can we make sure that your body is better at producing that thing that you need? Yeah. And through this conversation, I'm going to ask you questions from my from my place of ign-. Terance but I think it's a place that a lot of people are going to ask those questions. So obviously, obviously, we're all ignorant. I mean we're talking about so big. It's so complicated that we're all kind of like the blind people touching the elephant. And so the only way we're going to get anywhere the only way we're going to learn anything is if we share the information that we have, and then some of that is scientific information, but some of it is just experiential. And that's why conversations like this are so important to be every single person in every one of your listeners has something really important to say in this in this conversation. And because I don't think anybody listening to this, if you if you said to them. Hey, there is a way that we can engineer your DNA so that at say, some onset of dementia or Alzheimer's or something like that they wouldn't be awfully tempted to say okay, what can we do about this is that everybody? Everybody would say. Thanks right now, there's a whole category of new treatments for cancer, for example, which are called T cell Therapy's and base. Basically the way it works is when you're younger, you're the cells in your body do a better job of fighting off cancers, but when you get older, your cells, just they don't your cancer fighting cells don't work as well. So what they're doing with people have certain types of cancer, they're taking their sells out with you usually through blood there. Then altering your own cells.

Chad dot YouTube Jamie mezzo Texas Facebook Huntsville Steve Mark Joe Rogan Ken DC Twitter NPR Joe Biden Jeff Bezos Pretoria Chuck
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KGO 810

"You know, I love the future. Although like in this job. It's probably always. So scared of it. I think I'm afraid of the future Meyer afraid of chose can. Grow. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. But I I believe that that I'm an optimist by nature, just because I think that when you have children, you know, my oh sang right is an as cynic as a skeptic with all the facts, but an optimist is a cynic with kids. Right. So when I had kids I kind of I I was all end for the future. Right. So I got to kind of be. Although I mean, there's some stuff out there like this next book that would give you pause. It's called hacking, Darwin the subtitle genetic engineering and the future of humanity Jimmy metals with us here Jamie incredible early praise for this. Let's give to the end we make it. We make it, but we're not going to make it with the genetics that we have we know ours is getting warmer. This planet is eventually going to weigh going to go away. I'm a human. I'm for humans. If we want to survive, we're going to have to learn how to be a little bit different. And we're going to use our science to be linear progression in the future. Doesn't seem like a logical way to go and space exploration and also itself atomic levels. It seems to me like a quantum level. You're it's a totally different world, you know, at a quantum level and a great distances. Dr you know, everybody from Darwin to to. I'm trying to think of why am I point blank the apple Newton? They're all wrong it real small distances a great distances. Einstein all these great hawking. They're all wrong. Well, there are many different perspectives that we have we need to recognize that we don't know everything. But we with the science that we have we are learning a lot more and our ability as humans to change the world around and within us is continuously growing. So we twenty years ago fifty years ago hundred years ago, we knew very little about the genetics about the secret code of life. And now, we are increasing the crossing cracking the code of life, and that means that all of life, including our own is going to be readable and writable and Hackel in the seventies. We thought there were like a hundred thousand genes and now we know there's like what about twenty twenty three thousand twenty three thousand right? Is that gonna continue to grow is is a volume of information of the things that we don't know is that a bell curve, and he gets to the point we know enough, and it's just going to drop off. No, no, there's so much that we don't know. But we know enough to start making changes. And that's the thing is that we will never perhaps have perfect knowledge or complete knowledge, but we have to make decisions before we reach those those levels and again bringing this back to the genetics revolution. Which is the focus of my of my book, we aren't going to be able to perfectly understand how the entire system of of the genome within the context of our complex biology for a very long time. But we will be able to make really significant decisions that will fundamentally transform our healthcare. And that's already happening. The way we make babies and the nature of the babies we make I'm going to get into the actual the kind of genetics. But the Greg bear wrote a book science fiction writer called Darwin's radio where he thought that it might be possible for these huge leaps in. Evolution would the advanced technology and science we have represent something like that. Where it could. I mean, we've had huge leaps in in our past. I mean, we have gone from single cell organisms to us in the relatively short period of just three point eight billion years. It was just kind of a long time. But when you think of it, it's it's a long it's a long journey. And so we could have we have had big jumps in relatively short. Periods of time. And now we have these technologies that are giving us the powers that we have previously attributed to the gods. You have the power to make and remake life, and those powers are going to become more and more significant very very quickly. How do you swayed the fierce that accompany that and that will impede that progress? So people have fears and some of those fears are legitimate, and they must be respected, and what we need to recognize is these technologies will allow us to do miraculous things every time of young child dies of some terrible genetic disease. That's a crime against human potential that every time. A ninety somebody might say that's also a natural part of evolution. And that would of you when you get in the way of that. Then you I mean, I know it sounds horrible. That person then should not be using medicine when they're sick. They should not be consuming foods from agriculture. They should be living in a cave and hunting and doing whatever we used to do. So we the history of our species is we've messed with nature. That's it that we can't pretend that we were part of nature. Right. We're right. We're we're part of nature for the people who think we shouldn't be playing God. Like we started playing. God we started messing with. There was an article today that humans are responsible. There's one million species on the verge of extinction because of what we're doing. If we didn't wanna play God, we should have made that decision a long time ago, we we're in. So if anybody who says, well, it's just let nature take its course. And let a little kid. I have some terrible preventable disease. That's highly immoral view. And but then every time in ninety year old person gets dementia. We say, well, that's just what happens. That's how biology works that. If we can change that biology give that person five more years of healthy life. What does that impact that person has a whole lifetime of relationships of nal? College of experience. How do we all benefit if they have five more years of sharing, and that's where and so there's a good side and bad side. And the question is not do he do it or not. It's how do we maximize the upside and minimize the harm does the upside always in extension of life? I mean is living longer always the ultimate goal or as living. You know, a more meaningful fulfilling life, I don't wanna live ninety five. If I looked like I should be in the grave. You understand what you're saying that the goal is to live healthier longer. And everybody always has the option to to stop living if you want, but I think that that the reason why people lose their spirit as they get older. In part is that we have a society that gives a message to older people that you aren't want. And we are warehousing our old people in these terrible old age homes. I spend a lot of time in India where old people are really respected. They're part of the family. They have a role, and there's a sense of meaning across the lifespan. Yes. If we're if we're living longer, we need to think about the meaning. And multiple chapters in our lives. I'm not trying to be cold here to all the older people that are listening, but old people are also very expensive. I mean, it's not just. That's a little. What I'm saying is like here out here we plan for retirement at what age I mean, there is expensive to live forty years after you wanna stop working. There's a there's not just a an environmental consequence to living longer. There's an economic consequence. So we have the sixty five year retirement age based on a different world. And that was certainly will not make sense and people will want to work longer people should work longer, and even people who leave the formal workforce, we have all these older people have so much knowledge and so much wisdom, and they're playing golf five days a week what a waste we should have all those people tutoring. Kids in are always in the forum in front of me too. What will she managing if you had to guess in in two hundred years, we'd be able to recognize human beings. They look like we do. Now, I think they'll look like us, but not entirely I mean, we are going to have a lot of of Manipur hundred awarding biology is right now, we can change we can change animals. We can make them different colors. We can do all of these these different things. And there's a lot of malleability in biology, and that's how we got this. I was mentioning from single cell organisms to us, and we are unlocking the secret code of all of biology, including our own, and we will be different and that will be part of our evolutionary but about stuff like Big Joe altering our body. So we can drink salt water. You know, something like that. You know what? I mean, we have we water crisis. Like is it those kinds of wings. We certainly those may well be options. And for example, our planet is going to get hotter. If we want to survive in this we're going in we're going to need to change a lot of things we may need to change the plans, so they can grow where we need them to grow. He may need to change we need to fight against pest. And we may need to ultimately change ourselves. And we will have the power to do it. And the question is not should we or should we not? It's how can we use our best values to make wise decisions about what we shouldn't shouldn't do Dorian gray the guy that lived forever yet. You know, they went up to the attic. And they see on those story. It's a it's a it's like a Mary Shelley kind of Frankenstein metaphor. Okay. This guy is given the power to live forever. But there's a painting and how would he really looks like upstairs in his attic. I can't remember the exact story. But I remember as a kid growing up, and and the nuns in Catholic school talking about that. The the idea again, I think the immune probably your by the way should mentioned you're going to be down at the ferry building tomorrow night at seven o'clock, again, we're talking to Jamie mezzo, author of hacking Darwin genetic engineering the future of humanity at the book passage in the ferry building. Tomorrow might come down. You see that? I really do want to hear you. But I would imagine it's going to be people in the audience that are afraid, and they're going to have questions, you know, about what this forebodes, you know, that the the future people are, you know, it's funny. You know, the checkerboard you put a penny always uses in the adult. Right. You know? And after a couple of rows, you're only in a dollar twenty eight or something. But then soon you have all the money in the world. Well, you have you have actually have like something like five twenty seven quadrille dollars. And and people don't notice it only have science and math. Can you can have exponential growth like that? Right. Until something gets in the way. Normally, you know, if it happens on a rate that we can all appreciate and see like regular humanity. Lucien we can we can decide. Okay. Well, so that time I guess what people worry about, you know, you know, quantum computer, which will be here and my great grandchildren's lives. Probably or maybe you're earlier. How do how do we know when it's going wrong before it's too late to fix it. And that's the issue. That's the core. Message of my book is that the genetics revolution is coming. It's coming much quicker than people understand or appreciate we now have a brief window now where we can have an inclusive conversation about how do we guide this? How do we bring our best values that we we've our values into the decisions that we're going to be making ten years from now twenty years from now there will be these processes already racing Ford. Now is the time that we have this opportunity, but people aren't focusing on these issues, and that's why I've written in this book because he's if you want to understand the genetics revolution what it means for you. What are the implications? What you need to do. Now. This book is I've written for the crisper thing from the punch. Chinese are already. I mean, there are societies that I mean, there are societies that don't have the the Americans ethos and ethics that will push ahead. Are you worried about that? Yeah. I have a whole chapter in the book on this. It's called the arms race of the human race. And so these technologies exist, you win the Nobel prize are willing to Nobel prize for developing, gene editing, tools like crisper, and you get an aide and your high school biology class for being able to apply them..

Jamie mezzo Nobel prize Meyer us Greg bear golf Jimmy metals Hackel Newton Mary Shelley writer Manipur Catholic school India Dorian Lucien twenty years eight billion years
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Why is it that other stuff sell so commercially? And this doesn't like why? Why that doesn't make any sense to me? Anyway. Whiskey Myers through that. Was you didn't find any Cody Jason your system? So he's that means that he's even more outlaw. He's so outlaw. He's not even iheartmedia system. To saying, okay, gene editing. I think the discussion we're going to have to have. Back in November of last year Chinese biophysicist John Kelly. He have no idea if I said that right stunned the world when he announced that he had used a controversial, gene editing technology called crisper crisper. You may have heard of they're using it now to they think the crisper might be what gives us the cure cancer. Sensually? What cancer is is. It's when your cells as you get older when your cells sort of die off or get messed up your mind, O'Connor, you go in and repair those cells, and as you get older, you have less country, they do poor job of repairing the cells, and sometimes they'll mutate when they reproduce, then, blah, blah, blah. And then you end up with a tumor will crisper is going in and kind of editing those jeans, and they think they have seen. They've seen a cure certain types of cancer. So it's kind of interesting, but it's got a wider application just that. So he genetically altered genes in the embryos of these two twins and gave them to to give them immunity to HIV. It didn't work, but it did some things to the the embryos. They were transferred to a woman who provided the eggs to create them into girls were born. This was considered highly experimental and experimental and at the goal by most scientists around the world because we're talking about experimenting on actual human beings. Now group of eighteen scientists from seven countries Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, and the US have called for a voluntary moratorium on all studies involving gene editing on human eggs, sperm or embryos, so-called germline cells. The scientists are asking not just individual researchers to agree to stop work on gene editing, human, Jim germline cells. But they're calling on secrete explicit laws and regulations while we have a conversation about this. Now, you know, our governments are probably working on this whatever's on TV and movies. They tend to have. Right. So they're probably experimenting with like human being hybrids. Well, we know that there are certain types of animal hybrids stuff, our government's probably experimenting with that scary stuff. And it's creepy stuff. But if you've ever seen the movie Gattaca, which is like a futuristic dystopia in future type movie, it was kind of old came out in the nineties. I think it's a future where rich people can afford to Jeanette at their babies. So they all do and then poor people can't so they don't and what happens is when you Jeanette it. People are basically perfect. So the poor people are doomed to a life of subservient servitude because they have lower IQ's, and they have less physical attributes mental attributes it's terrifying movie and the movie the whole premises a kid that's born in that lower class. So to speak wants to be an astronaut, but he can't because they won't let somebody from that lower class being astronaut because they theoretically don't have the qualifications. It's kind of a scary thing. Anyway, there's a new book out it's called hacking Darwin, and the author of the book is Jamie mezzo, and he's basically trying to bring up this question of whether or not this ethical. I wanna welcome to the program. KOA NewsRadio eight fifty AM, Jamie. Thanks for coming on. How are you bud? How are you? I'm good. You know, this is this is weird. It's like a whole new frontier because there's a lot of possibility here that I think probably makes people very excited. I mean, I see the future of how we would cure cancer probably being done at sort of this genetic level. But then the question becomes what are we doing? And what other effects are is this having on the human race. Yeah. I think that's exactly right. We are in the beginning of genetic revolution the exchange everything, and it's certainly mentally change our healthcare, but our genetic aren't just about our health. Our genetics are the blueprints of our lives. And so we're going to have the ability to manipulate other aspects of our lives that's going to create a lot of opportunity in possibility, but they're also real dangers. And then we need to be to be mindful of both. What are the dangers kind of go through like what like what these two little girls in China? They've been born right and their immune to HIV. I've also heard that they had other types of enhancements from they're not. That's why he was so unethical. I mean, I okay. We will be doing G, netted editing. Pre implanted embryos in the not just in future. And we'll do it to eliminate very significant disease risk. But what this this biophysicist in China was doing was he was making genetic edit designed to give them enhanced resistance to teach aid. But he didn't succeed because he didn't succeed because they the embryos when the girls were mosaic mean, they had they had different types of of sales. So right, and then same single mutation to this gene called CR five in some animals studies, the the animals with this medication had some enhanced cognitive abilities. So that's one possibility, but we don't really know whether these these little girls whether this mutation has helped them hurt them or done nothing. And and that's why would a very early stage. And we need to use this this science much more responsibly than than at least this Chinese scientists did. And I think the problem with this guy is that. This is this. We don't know what's happening in these are human beings. So it's not I mean, a lot of people have ethical problems with testing animals, but these are human beings, and we're simply turning them into a lifelong experiment. We are. And that's why you on one hand we need these technologies because you said it we have people were dying of these terrible diseases chances with people who are betting early onset, the millio, Alzheimer's and losing their mind. Hand healthy people. How wonderful what we must do it. It would be on ethical not to do it at the same time. There are real dangers of messing with you very complex systems that we don't fully understand. And we need to do it carefully and methodically and responsibly. And the reason why Britain the book is that we need to be informed enough. I'm able to have that conversation. And because we're going to have to make big decisions. Now that will have will have real consequences down the road. Gimme gimme the big cons of genetically engineering human beings. Like, let's just go through the list of pros and cons on this. Let's work through this the way people would do it. So gimme the the big cons genetic engineering. Because one messing with complex systems. They don't understand to equity issues if there are many benefits. What happens if some people have the ability to have kids with higher, I q other people who can't afford it or live or unfortunate living countries where it's not accessible, don't that's a that's a big deal. Diversity diversity as a way of having more interesting. Workplaces their schools diversity is the sole survival tragedy of our we didn't have diversity we'd still be singled till organisms, and and probably not even that we all make decisions that we think makes sense even eliminating certain disease risk. It could be that being tested carriers of certain genes actually protects us against something that could happen in the future. Really? Eliminate prevent you're all kinds of terrible diseases live longer healthier more robust lives on perhaps his future generation enhanced capabilities do certain things to invent things to live on this earth in climate change. It may become less biddable. We may have to leave this planet or some of us may wanna live in space in our yard genetics aren't set up for that. I'm so we may have to order to survive as a species, there's some there's some really huge. And that's why it's not a not a response. It's not responsible today. We could just do everything we can imagine with no limits and is not responsible to say. Well, this stuff is so scary. We can't do it at all. I think part of the problem is that we've already done gene, modification through our diet and environment. And I don't think I don't think this gets enough credence. You know, the the pollution in the air, the the the environment that we live in and the food and the diet that we eat the sedentary lifestyle that we've sort of developed as the industrial revolution has brought us. All this. Modern technology has altered our genes. I mean, we're eating heavily processed food. We're eating crap basically, and we're not moving, and that's altering our jeans. And if you talk about like cancer, for instance, which is one of the areas that a lot of this genetic modification they look at this as being maybe the panacea for that. Again. I'll go back to what I said when I was introducing you it's really a function of cellular activity, and it's a function of whether or not your cells are acting in a proper way, we also know that we can turn on and off those genes that repair ourselves through our diet through our activity levels and through what we kind of put in our environment. So I'm not sure that we. Actually need to go so far as to enhancing human beings. I'm not saying we shouldn't research this. But in a way, aren't we kind of playing God? Well, you know, if if God did such a perfect job. We wouldn't have these terrible diseases. The wouldn't have young kids dying before their ten years old. And certainly you are right that everybody if you care about your health your imagining to challenge you on that if God did such a perfect job. We wouldn't have these hold on. I just went through exactly part of the reason it's not God is not the reason why we have these diseases. It's it's our own decisions. It's our own choices. It's the it's the environment. We put ourselves in. It's not true. Because if you're born with a heritable genetic disease like sickle cell disease or tastes that has nothing to do with what your parents, eights or pollution, or whatever. It's just the networks, and there are lots of heritable genetic diseases that have athletes there's also a lot of evidence that shows that those heritable diseases that we call genetic are not so much genetic as they are the environment. Now, some of those diseases that you mentioned, yes, we can have hold on. Let me finish. Let me finish my point. You can have a genetic predisposition to it. But again through the decisions that you make throughout your life. Life. You can turn off. And on those genes, there's a lot of research that shows that. That's not really true. And there's different kinds of genetic diseases. So there are some that are really called min daily and disease which are single gene mutations off switch or an on vision. If you if you have this you have this there's if you have single, right, right? You can do with your with your lifestyle. I understand I understand that. I understand that. But I, but you blaming God for that is that's not God's fault. Human beings are imperfectly, of course. But I despise plan. Okay. That's given views, and that's one very legitimate. I won't argue with you on that. But what I will say you are right. There are some diseases that are partly genetic and partly environmental, and there's some diseases that are entirely environmental like when you get much exposure to radiation, and and and get cancer until I'm not talking about every disease. So the things that are percents genetic or almost hundred percent genetic whatever we need or the pollution where that doesn't really make a difference for the things widow. Then there's a lot of them. Whereas partly Connecticut, partly environmental, right? Doing everything that we can to avoid the so is anyone thinking that science is going to save them in the future..

cancer China HIV Jeanette Whiskey Myers Jamie mezzo Cody Jason John Kelly O'Connor KOA Alzheimer Connecticut Canada Britain US France New Zealand Italy
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hi, everyone. It's poppy Harlow on this week's episode boss files, CARA Swisher. Fearless tech journalist entrepreneur and founder of Recode she presses and she presses the biggest names in tech for answers. And a lot of the time. They hate that. But she still gets the big gets. So where did her unwavering confidence come from? I ask her plus though, she thinks we'd even be in this predicament today, if more of the big tech companies were founded and run by women, it's all on boss files. Subscribe on I tunes today. This CNN podcast is brought to you by American Express, my credit guide a free credit score. And report and other tools to help you take charge of your credit. Your credit score is greater than a number. It's your story. Hi, podcast listeners. It's been a week since the Muller report was released but its impact is far from over. I talk with Dimitri Simes the Russian American CEO of a Washington think-tank about what landed him in the four hundred page report. It's a really rare opportunity to talk to somebody who's actually named in that report with such knowledge of the Russia portfolio. Then the field of twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates is getting full an only expected to grow New Mexico's governor the democrat, Michelle Luhan Grisham joys to break down the current state of the party and the major issues facing her border state, and perhaps people across the country, and Harry has a fascinating and chilling conversation with Jamie mezzo about how DNA can be hacked for design a baby's enjoy the show. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. President Trump says that he will fight congressional subpoenas to have his officials testify on the hill as House Democrats pledged to carry the mantel of special counsel, Robert Muller's investigation politicians, and lawyers and investigators are still picking over this report. And today, we have the rare opportunity to speak with a man whose interactions with Donald Trump's presidential campaign Jemma spot in that to volume tome Dimitri Simes immigrated to the United States from the Soviet Union in the nineteen seventies. And he would go on to run the center for the national interest. It's a Washington think tank that specializes in Russian affairs in April twenty sixteen months before the election candidate, Donald Trump gave his first major foreign policy address at an event affiliated with signs think tank, according to the special counsel it was at that event that Russian Ambit. The SOGA kissing the ad met, Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and told him, quote, we like what your candidate is saying it's refreshing. It's just one of many interactions between signs and the Trump campaign. So to understand more. I'm joined now by Dimitri Simes who's joining me from Washington, welcome to the program. Thank you very much. So look, I mean, it's really interesting to have you to talk to tonight because as I've said, everybody's still poring over this. And we all want to know all the details. So here we have you tell me from your perspective. Just give me an overview short of the investigation itself. Well, this was a very humorous investigation. Clearly, quite deliberate. A lot of people involved who is manufactured sauce CT. I think that from what I understand several conduct people. In Washington alone were interviewed several dozen oil were subpoenaed to appear before the grand jury Newseum. You know, anyone else from the center of the national interest was one of them as the investigation concluded conversation who is special counsel people. And they were very nice saying king me, and my colleagues for our effort and said that they were Saudis that we had to go through this right and the hoped that if we see each other again, it will be under more pleasant circle. Stances tonight told them that while it was not my favorite form of entertainment. I understood that they were doing woodsy was supposed to do in their ear is sought. They were quite professional and responsible, right? So Dmitri, you have a great way with words and the great flourish. And you've given us a very interesting perspective. Were

Dimitri Simes President Trump special counsel Washington Robert Muller poppy Harlow CARA Swisher Christiane Amanpour CNN founder Jared Kushner American Express Soviet Union Michelle Luhan Grisham New Mexico Dmitri Russia Jamie mezzo
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on FUTURE STATE

FUTURE STATE

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on FUTURE STATE

"Seen? Yeah. So what would you how trying to approach all of this ten twenty thirty years from them? So as you know, dick, my one of my novels. Genesis code explores the issue of agenda arms race between the United States and China, but this all all put on a little bit of my science fiction hat, but not because we are predicting the future we are talking about signs, but it's not just science fiction because this is science is adoption are moving forward very rapidly. So I could easily imagine a country like China benign, necessarily, China to say I that we recognize that the treatment the lifetime care of people born with these what will be seen as preventable. Genetic disease is a cost society shouldn't bear therefore everybody who is going to have a child should have. Have there be prescreened and have their embryos prescreened if they're using IVF, or and this would be much more onerous to have noninvasive prenatal testing of people who are already pregnant, but I think that it's much easier, and it's much more comfortable for many people to say, we're going to prescreen pre implanted embryos, and that it is illegal to implant an embryo where there is a high likelihood that future child will suffer from terrible genetic practice, and and for you can't do it. Right. And I think that that from a cost benefit societal economic cost benefit analysis that I think would make a lot of sense it's very difficult because again people from the the disability community will say we'll hold on a second. Are you making a value judgment that one life is better than another in for people who already exist answer is? No. But I think that we're going to have to accept. That if a child is born with a terrible and deadly genetic disease that that child has been hotel Terry in government. I know you could see making the decision on the cost effective in the outcome of that would probably end up being roughly the same as in our society a bunch of individual parents making the same decision, but then it goes on from there. And so in Genesis code. I talked about what would a society do if they had a lot of information about these kids being born because we will be able to recognize who has a greater likelihood, for example, that doesn't mean a certain a greater likelihood of being a great sprinter or a great mathematician or a great, whatever. And so you could imagine a society kind of in some ways sorting what feel like they could be exceptional newborns into categories. So try this already doing this with their Olympic training. Exactly. So imagine the the Olympics. Training school model? But you know, that you have a bunch of kids who have potential to be great mathematicians and a bunch of great sprinters and a bunch who are great architects and artists with a great spatial sense. And you put all you put those kids into these equivalents of the Olympic sports schools, but for science and math, and engineering, and and all sorts of things, and then you have like a pyramidal structure. So the ones who do well move on. And so then fifteen years from now, you have people who were born with a genetic predisposition to be in great at something and they've been weeded out. So some people may have that predisposition and not do it. And then you have some champions who are both great and have the right opportunities. I mean Mozart had famously all of these exposures in the Habsburg court, but how many Mozart's are didn't? And how many Mozart's are even Beethoven's Beethoven was born in Germany, though, how many Mozart's bay. Tova bills are born in refugee camps, where they have no access to to anything because this is to our friend. Bill Clinton has often talked about that they're unstuck being born all the time to parents that are quite laurel yet show, though signs of brilliance and those unstuck are wasted. Because we can't find them. And that's why it's that people get so frightened of these genetic technologies. And there are reasons why people should be afraid in one of the reasons why say we should be excited and afraid that we need to have a conversation about how to maximize the good stuff and minimize the bad stuff. But one of the great things is we have all these people who are essentially thrown away. And if we could identify these people have potential to be great, I think at least it would make people a little more aware of the the human potential day. I don't think anybody has a problem with that kind of screening for sing what people's potential is. But I think what we're talking about is. A China or something like that in the future doing genetic engineering to make more of them. Yep. Now. So there's that there's there's certainly the make more with embryo selection. There's cloning there's the the, gene editing of embryos. There's a lot of things and then found the national security perspective, it gets more complicated because people will be afraid of this of this technology. And so there will be some jurisdictions, and maybe it will be here that will say, hey, this is a bridge too far in our lives is now in our societal concept. Can't do it. Right. It's illegal against embryo screening. So for the gene editing of cream planet embryos. Yes. For embryo screening. It's a gray area until that's happening more. But so you could imagine a society that opt out and say, we don't want to have anything to do with and another society that opt in the society that opt out how far will they be willing to go to protect. There gene pool from being quote, unquote, compromise by these genetically selected or enhance people from someplace else, and when you play that out though, lost will you need to tell a -tarian society that violates everybody's privacy in order to do it. So it's really complicated. So we're skipping way ahead into the future. Yeah. Probably twenty thirty forty years where I think of the current laws and ethical barriers eventually breakdown because some country does it some country gets involved in a heavy program to do genetic modification to create scientists to create engineers to create athletes and once one country does others will too. And so do we look back to come back to the question? We asked at the beginning of the show. Do we come back to sing? It was in the twenty twenties when humans took control of. Their own of Aleutian for the first time. Yeah. Absolutely. So that is what's happening. We've been around for three point eight billion years going from single cell organisms to us and our evolution has been driven by the Darwin principles of random mutation and natural selection. And now we are taking control in some ways of that wheel. So it will be guided mutation and guided selection and absolutely it's correct. As I write about in the book that competition within societies and between societies will drive option of this technology for you only need to look at South Korea where where they had to pass a law saying that cram schools need to close at ten pm because people were sending their ten eleven year old kids to cram schools until midnight. I have an acquaintance in South Korea. Who's got an eleven year old kid. He's got twelve tutors coming to his house per week nuts. And so if people say, well, you can you can select your embryos for higher I q and they will have potentially better edge. Educational and and and career outcomes he asked him how many people your social set would do it? And he didn't blinky said one hundred one hundred percent and then within societies. If if let's say China has this kind of genetic. Another thing. I learned from your book was it was at Japan or Korea already has four percent IVF will less Denmark has ten percent. I mean, it's moving relatively ten percent of the earth's. Yes. Finland the Stony. I mean, this is moving very very quickly. And there's there's still a case to be made for natural conception. We messed with complex systems are unintended consequences. It could be that new science will emerge that there's some danger of. I've hasn't yet emerged in. It's been certainly a long longtime. So yes, so I if is kind of the entry level activity that opens the door for all of these these other activities, so so many issues here and so much opportunity for people to misuse these issues politically for advantage, so many opportunities for people to ignore facts. Right. But also, even if you. Even if we could all agree on facts, we can all make different moral and ethical judgments, right? That's going to take a lot of dialogue a huge amount of dialing. But I always say is that the issues are new, but the values we will need to deploy to affectively evaluate them are in many cases, very old, but we need to have this conversation. We need to bring the best of our traditions together to say, how do we how do we deal with this because the danger there's certainly the danger of a an uncontrolled arms race. But right now, there's a real opportunity to bring a values component into this conversation. So this technology will advance no matter what we do. Even if we shut it down entirely in the United States. It will the the the cats out of the history of technology will hurry few technologies get supressed, but there are technologies whose adoption has been guided by a set of values in nuclear chemical bio, there are a lot. Of them. And so, but now we need to work toward establishing those kinds of norms that will lead to regulations and ultimately laws because this is life, and it should be regulated. And this is not something that just governments alone and government officials need to talk about religious leaders everybody. Everybody needs to talk about this. First of all, we need to understand the facts India, understand the technology. And then we need to understand the issues. I think hacking Darwin is for those listeners who wanna get into this topic is an incredible place to begin. So I I can highly recommend not just because my friend Jamie mezzo wrote it, but because this is the best book I have read on the topic and read a lot of them. That's great, Jamie. Thanks for talking about this. It's it is the issue of the future humans taking control of our own evolution thanks much. Thanks so much. Really, great pleasure. I hope you enjoyed that conversation. If you did please go to wherever you get your podcasts and rate us, so that others will get your recommendation, and if you see a list of other season one and season two shows though to future state podcast dot com. And also at that website. You'll see what we are reading the books of spring twenty nineteen that we think you'll like many of which were willing to talk about on the podcast, but they're more books there as well. One book you'll find air, the I hope you'll read is the fifth domain by rob Kentucky and me it's about cyber and how to get from cyber war to cyber piece it's written in while. I hope is clearing has lots of real stories and real people as well as some recipes for getting to sire these the fifth. Th domain can be preordained. Now. Traveler insurance for future state are made by sire travel. C R E Sira travel dot com for your personal travel as well as your business travel. Don't think you can do it as well. As the experts sire, we use them we trust them. They're the best in the business. Sire travel dot com. Future state is produced by Ethan though will be and Chris coating we'll be back with more in depth conversation next time on future state.

China United States South Korea Mozart dick Terry Bill Clinton Jamie mezzo Olympics Olympic sports schools Aleutian Finland Beethoven rob Kentucky blinky Ethan Habsburg court
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What you might call a seismic shift in geology a whole new way of thinking about how the Sierra Nevada. And even the continents were born one of the key thinkers in that revolution. Was a man named Eldridge. Moore's I had also my head. I was so excited at the end of that period. I could not stand. So we remember the man in the work that made him a legend tomorrow on morning edition. Kikuchi science. You can hear that segment at six six twenty two and again at eight twenty two every Monday morning here on KiKi weedy public radio. Coming up at eleven o'clock, former CNN journalists and managing editor foreign policy. Ravi on wall. He has his book. India connected how the smartphone is transforming the world's largest democracy. You'll meet him and also here from Jamie mezzo on hacking, Darwin genetic engineering and the future of humanity, Dr Moy gun and her guests technician every Sunday evening at eleven o'clock. That's here in public radio. A high surf warning is in effect until nine o'clock tomorrow night large dangerous waves rip currents along the beaches. Never turn your back on the ocean. So we say and then tomorrow, we'll have some lingering wetness some lingering precipitation possible in the morning and then mostly cloudy skies than giving way to sunshine. Temperatures will be in the fifties. And then Tuesday, We're looking at some nice sunshine to start out the week leading up to Christmas. It's KiKi weedy public radio in the time. Now is ten thirty. This.

Ravi Sierra Nevada Eldridge Kikuchi CNN Jamie mezzo India Moore Dr Moy managing editor technician
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

08:57 min | 1 year ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Amanpour

"Support for NPR comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans who were excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part. If rates go up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash Amanpour. Tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Xeni offers thousands of affordable. Eyewear styles starting at just six ninety five. No ridiculous markups. No hassles. Just quality affordable. I wear delivered right to you visits. Any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. And welcome to. Here's what's coming up. U S China relations, take a wild ride in a chaotic week. I asked the American sign -nology Jamie mezzo, did they get China all wrong from the very start. Then on defy from the streets. French president Macron abandoned his controversial fuel tax increases. But Paris still braces for another weekend environment grotesque and from wildfires to Cowboys actor playwright Zoe Kazan on her prolific career on stage and screen. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. And what a difference a week makes last weekend the financial world breathed a sigh of relief as the US and China agreed to nine hundred truce in that trade war, but confusion quickly arose about just what had been agreed and President Trump proclaimed himself at tariff, man, global stock markets have been predictably unpredictable and volatile. Add to that the United States has asked Canada to extradite a top executive from the Chinese telecom giant wall way, all this complicates sky high tensions between the two countries which in turn fuels investor concerns about global growth. So what exactly is at stake in this rivalry between two economic superpowers? And how did the United States get the rise of China? So very wrong from the get-go Jamie mezzo has studied these questions up close. Having worked in both the Clinton White House and in the Senate on foreign policy and join me from New York to discuss the current state of affairs, Jamie med welcome to the program happy to be. So let's talk about China. And of course, let's start by. Remembering that, this is the week that the former President Bush forty one was laid to rest, and that China was a fairly big and important part of his foreign policy experience, put it into context, the kind of China, the President Bush dealt with I as envoy then as President China at that time was very different animal from what it is today at that time China was emerging from many decades of turmoil. They weren't that far out of their experience of Maui and the and the great leap forward and the reforms under Deng, we're just beginning. And so the US and China had a pretty decent relationship at the end of the Cold War because the US and China had come together in opposite. Mission of the Soviet Union. And so at that time the goal for the United States was to integrate China into the global economy as quickly as possible, and certainly China under Deng recognized that that was what China needed as well. And so there was this great moment of opportunity at the end of the Cold War. When people leaders like President Bush and others in the west thought that the US and China could really work together in a great way to build greater, prosperity and peace and security for everybody. But as you know, because she on as China has become a more, economically powerful its ambitions have grown significantly. And that's led us into the situation. We're in today. It is extraordinarily two thing. Given today's politics and given Trump's politics on China that when Deng Xiaoping came to the United States wearing a cowboy hat going to NASA wearing an astronaut's helmet or whatever. It was it was the US which fueled the growth of China the economic giant, right? Yeah. The US felt that we were stakeholders in China's economic growth and to a certain extent that exists in some ways today, so bringing China into the modern world and helping the development of China both as a as a strong economy, but potentially as a future partner, and certainly as a market was seen as something that was was an inherent good at that time. And what did the west if I put it this way get a little wrong about what economic empowerment, and embracing capitalism would actually mean to China. I mean, did they think it would would open it up in ways that the Westwood recognize? Absolutely. There was this idea that as societies developed there was a certain per capita income level at that time. I think it was. Around six thousand dollars or a quivalent per person when middle class society started demanding their rights, and forcing the change of political system. So a lot of people thought that and people thought that if the US invest in that kind of growth, it was inevitable that China would need to open up and certainly the beginning of the information revolution. And the and the advent of the internet made people feel that even more strongly that people in China and around the world would have access to information. And that would be empowering people got wrong was one the ability of the Chinese government to manage the kind of economic growth while maintaining its centralized political control. And to was the that these technology systems, including the internet and information technology tools were in many ways, politically agnostic that in certain environments, they could feed openness but in other environments. They. Could be used to repress, or at least surveilled a society in some very significant ways. So again, George Bush is president was there during that awful night in in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine where people did rise up. They did want a little bit more of that openness that they thought came with capitalism and the state crackdown with a ferocity that that people hadn't expected that in a way was the turning point. Right. It was China putting the world on notice that we like your economic system. We don't like anything else about you tenement square. Excuse me, was it turning point for everybody for the Chinese. It was a turn away from this kind of creeping openness and for the west. There was a big choice at that time and. There was there were people of two minds. So the business community was very much for continued engagement with China the human rights community, as you know, was pushing for being tougher on human rights and for a while the business community prevailed and the US China relationship was primarily about business opportunities. But then later in the process of the business community started to sour on China because they recognized that there that they were being robbed in many ways of their intellectual property of being forced to to into partnerships with Chinese counterparts that were not behaving at least, according to the set of rules that western societies and and companies were used to. All right. So which brings us Faas forward to the present moment. President Donald Trump has put himself forth as the president who's going to deal with these very issues that you've just spoken about once. Unfurl whether it's what they believed to be economically ripped off or intellectually ripped off all of that kind of stuff. So here we all just give us a reason put it into context, why the stock markets all over the world to being plummeting over this last week having briefly risen and breathed a sigh of relief off the g twenty meeting between Shizhong pain and Donald Trump. Yeah.

China United States President Donald Trump President Bush President China president Deng Xiaoping Christiane Amanpour Jamie mezzo Quicken Loans NPR America Xeni Xeni dot Zoe Kazan Soviet Union London
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Warning at all about the so-called Woolsey fire. Jim Roope reports say county fire chief dare lost took exception to the charge of lack of notice we gave evacuation orders only three media and other means he could including firefighters in sheriffs and law enforcement going door to door says he's aware that some people simply did not comply with the orders. He says to that relying on cellphones doesn't always work because cell towers, go down quickly. He says they received a number of nine one one calls asking for help because people were trapped if you live in these areas, you see a fire evacuate only do not wait for any backwards. Or he says people trying to get out at the last minute hampers efforts of fire crews trying to get in in Thousand Oaks, I'm Jim really Washington Post reports President Trump is telling advisors. He's decided to fire homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen departure luckily to occur in the coming weeks. Possibly sooner according to five current and former White House officials Mr. Trump reportedly told as over the weekend he wants wrote as soon as possible president has complained for months about what he says is Nielsen's lackluster performance. On immigration enforcement other signs that North Korea could be moving forward with its ballistic missile programme, new report from the center for strategic and international. Studies says it has identified thirteen sites where Kim Jong UN has not disclosed missile related activity this despite President Trump's recent claim John Yang poses no threat to missiles have stopped the rockets have stopped former NFC official Jamie mezzo says Kim Jong UN is having the last laugh the North Koreans absolutely hoodwinked, President Trump. It was clear from the beginning that the North Koreans were not agreeing to give up their nuclear and missile programs. I'm John Lawrence reported Zona democrat Kirsten cinema declared victory in her race against Republican Martha mcsally Monday evening..

President Trump Kim Jong UN president Jim Roope Kirsten Nielsen Woolsey North Korea Thousand Oaks Martha mcsally Nielsen Washington Post Kirsten cinema John Lawrence secretary John Yang White House Jamie mezzo NFC
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Amazon Alexa, opened the Kosovo skill residents. Complain Nelson on the bubble. I'm Elliot Francis. Fire officials in southern California or pushing back on the charge that some residents were warned early enough or didn't get any warning at all about the so-called Woolsey fire. Jim Roope reports county fire chief Daryl beat took exception. To the charge of lack of notice we gave me declarations orders only three media and other means including firefighters sheriffs and law enforcement going door to door. He says he's aware that some people simply did not comply with the orders. He says to that relying on cellphones doesn't always work because cell towers, go down quickly any says they received a number of nine one one calls asking for help because people were tracked if you live in these areas, you see a fire evacuate only do not wait for many decades on he says people trying to get out at the last minute hampers efforts of fire crews trying to get in if oaks, I'm Jim really Washington Post reports President Trump is telling advisors. He's decided to fire homeland security secretary Kirsten Neilsen departure likely to occur in the coming weeks. Possibly sooner according to five current and former White House officials Mr. Trump reportedly told as over the weekend. He wants wrote a soon as possible president has complained for months about what he says is Nielsen's lackluster performance on immigration enforcement. Are there were signs that North Korea could be moving forward with its ballistic missile programs. A new report from the center for strategic and international. Studies says it has identified thirteen sites were Kim Jong UN has not disclosed missile related activity this despite President Trump's recent claim Pyongyang poses. No threat to missiles have stopped the rockets have stopped former NFC official Jamie mezzo says Kim Jong UN is having the last laugh the North Koreans absolutely hoodwinked, President Trump. It was clear from the beginning that the North Koreans were not agreeing to give up their nuclear and missile programs. John Lawrence reported in Arizona democrat Kirsten cinema declared victory in her race against Republican Martha mcsally Monday.

President Trump Jim Roope Elliot Francis Kim Jong UN president Amazon Kosovo Kirsten Neilsen North Korea Nelson Kirsten cinema Pyongyang Martha mcsally California Woolsey Washington Post NFC Daryl
"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Quest Means Business

Quest Means Business

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"jamie mezzo" Discussed on Quest Means Business

"They don't really mention Brexit much tool. They they, they named season -ality price, competitiveness, cost of new shops, all sorts of things that profit drop. They only blame Brexit for the outlet which they say. In pot Brexit makes it slightly on Sutton. If you look at the way in which Brexit is coming together, you've been doing some reporting on this, the difficulties that the UK faces are now becoming extremely clamp. Extremely clear. It's now panic stations. People have made contingency plans. Investment has dropped off a cliff and one of the big issues, Richard particularly businesses trading with Europe is what will happen in new deal Brexit's and actually, I got chance to had to report and get my nose stuck into some excise duty films to have a look. Glide into in Phoenix day, pause carrying cargo from all corners of the globe, full million containers each year filled with food stuff. Some fun at Scher cars and consumer electronics. Three courses coming from beyond Europe, what's this? Whereas it come from wooden flooring and comes from China, George Baker customs break in modern goods like this, a batch of animal feed additive through the port. We go to big responsibility to keep the ports and the airports moving along Nonni you imports and exports wasting transit until Levy's a page and Pete, what completed a maze of the new show. The UK government says funds business in Europe should prepare full and it ends up a hard Brexit. All kids coming and going from the EU will have to clear customs contain a poll like this one, the country's largest that could mean survey delays and congestion. Come Brexit day. The EU is the UK's biggest trading partner, a heartbreak and British ports. We'll have to clear about two hundred million extra shipments year four times today where you would anticipate a four hundred percent increase in the volume of work that we would have to handle if we're going to have to suffer hard Brexit. And I say, suffo- seacoast it would be a difficulty. This is a commission invoice invoice from China glimpse of just how one Stephen. Nick could still supply chains this stuff like a half, plank, gloss, Donna toilet roll, light up glasses, what you deal with it next. Into the customs tariff here this tell me how much he's played Royal. This is nine hundred five, five, nine, eight point. Seven percent tariff on a light up drink glass and that has to be paid before it can leave your businesses like Nigel Costes the impact could be devastating the exports Qatar, speak is across the EU what I'm selling a thirty pound speeco is going to be a twenty four pound charge. It makes it really difficult at cost. He plans to pass onto the Cosima laws. The issue we've got competition in Europe. We heart against a large German company and they've got the rest of Europe to exports free. He says he'll have to high most off, maybe even open a Europe office to head off the red tape and taxes that would really affect our margins. A Mike is less competitive waves of a new deal Brexit rippling far beyond the country's ports. Shirts, you'll be reporting on. I keep looking at these interesting stories of important stories of exactly who's who's being affected on one. Thank you. Now, as we doing now, we'll go home the last half hour of trade, and we need to show you what's happening the milk. It's a rallying their up strongly. There are two distinct reasons and they're running on the hopes of fresh US trade talks with China and don't technology stocks with apple. Well, look at the big boat Beijing's welcomed. They'll for new high-level trade talks from the United States, president tweet, president, tweets, maybe that was a Freudian slip. President Trump tweeted. We are under no pressure to make a deal with China. They are under pressure to make a deal with us all they I, by the way, as we stock discussion Jamie met so is had the Atlantic Council, senior fellow McKinsey pollen Nasir's inland joins me from Washington good to see you Susan. Down the line. I to you, Jay. To have your phone ready, you'll phone your talk, your hyphen, your computer. Whenever it is because there's a question that you can join at CNN don't come join in just a moment. So Jamie mezzo the talks with China, there are the threat of is the real threat of two hundred billion dollar small in tariffs with hundred billion dollars ball still to come right? What happens next? Well, obviously the Trump administration wants to have this threat, but they're cautious about going forward. And that's the reason why even at here at the eleventh hour secretary Mnuchin said, we've heard it some people in China want to have talks. Therefore we're responding to the non invitation with an offer of talks. So there's a lot of game playing that's that's happening. Does he sound a zave they won't it, or are they making noises they're making noise is to try to enhance their their. Both sides are in many ways locked in. It's not gonna be good for anybody. If the United States imposes these these tariffs and it's not going to be good for the United States. If China doesn't open its markets, there's probably some kind of deal to be had, but everybody is locked in and that's what makes this situation. So so dangerous and the Trump administration is right that China has gotten a lot of he's gotten away with a lot of questionable behavior, but they've done a terrible job of a widening all the leverage to try to drive change. Susan, the issue is could not come into more prestige in time. It is ten years. I would be just ten years since the financial crisis. An everyone says trade worries could be the the the fuller. So onto this question in west, the next one bring well, we won't view us to join in. I while while your own get out your phones Toplitz you computers go to CNN dot com. And this is what you see, where will would it be. United States with the next crisis with trade walls and going that Europe with its Brexit woes. China, wet growth is slowing other emerging markets, Susan. All right. Well, I think we've done a really good job at fighting the last crisis. So banks in the US and Europe hold a lot more capital. That means that they're safer. The world is also less inner connected in terms of some of the hot money that was sloshing around before the crisis. But of course, there are still worries. So over the last ten years of really super cheap credit, lots of emerging markets were able to borrow at historically low rates. Loaded up on that vicious, fascinating, seventy percent of people say the voting at the moment. Cnn.com the United States is the most worrying in China, which has movable come to, you just isn't China, which has more problems, arguably is only town at seven percent. Well, I think that viewers have not seen your show yet. Richard is the problem. I think that if we look at jet in China, for instance, it has quadrupled over the last ten years. So China's companies now have twice as much data as US companies adjusted for the size of their economies. So definitely debt is a worry in China as well as other emerging markets. We're seeing the news in Turkey in Argentina. Lots of countries are starting to face the fact that they've

China Europe US EU UK Brexit Susan pot Brexit CNN Richard President Trump Beijing Jamie mezzo Stephen Nonni Qatar Nick