35 Burst results for "Jamie Floyd"

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Evening, WN my seas. Shawn Carlson and Jamie Floyd. Here you are listening to market place. All things considered his back at seven. You've been listening to us come to you throughout the evening and throughout the week, In fact, talking about our fault Pledge drive here at W. N. On DH. Not too long ago. We really hit a milestone. We met our goal for this fundraiser, so we won't extend a huge thank you to everybody who has done their parting contributed to WN. If you have not yet had a chance to give. We still need your help. You still can't help. Ah, We don't know what the future's going to hold, but we know we're going to do it on. We'll do it together. That is your contributions that that help Keep us on. The army truly cannot do it without you. So you couldn't give it WNBC dot or you could also call and make your contribution securely over the phone by calling 888. 3769692 again. The number is 8883769692. And Sean, You know, we had been asking our listeners to help us meet a goal, a goal that we have now met. But we never really meet our goal here at New York Public radio WN I see in Gotham is because It's an ongoing project. This experiment in public radio. It's a successful experiment. It's one that means we're free of commercials were free of external pressures that advertising.

Shawn Carlson Jamie Floyd Gotham New York army Sean
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Listening to W N Y C. I'm Jamie Floyd. Thousands of homeless New Yorkers have been moved from shelters and into hotels across the city. But now facing pressure from some neighborhoods where those hotels air located, Mayor de Blasio says, the homeless will we moved back to shelters WN Mrs Morello, I've Iraq reports back in April, the mayor said moving homeless people out of crowded dorm style shelters would help control the pandemic. We will use those hotels aggressively as a tool. Within four months, the city relocated the majority of single adults 10,000 people. I some measures. The initiative has worked really well, according to WN Y. C's analysis, just 0.6% of homeless people. Passive positive for Kobe did over the past four weeks lower than the city's general population, but then an uproar in the Upper West Side. It has to do with hotels converted into residents in this bastion of progressive politics, taking it pretty hard line about the scores of homeless people, not in my neighborhood Upper Westside Edition This time unsavory images. Residents in Manhattan began complaining about drug use, lewd behavior and loitering after homeless men were moved into their neighborhoods. And last week, Mayor de Blasio set We're going to start the process of figuring out where we can get homeless individuals back into safe shelter facilities. And reduce the reliance on hotels. Hotels is certainly not where we want to be in general, and we're going to start that process immediately. Councilman Steven Levitt says the administration is being influenced by the backlash. It's not good policy. It's pretty simple to me. The science is dictated by the fact that we have a public health emergency so long as they have a public health emergency. This is the policy that should be in place. So far. The city has given out a few details about the plan, including when it will start Shelter providers were blindsided. Catherine Trapani represents those non profits were now running both their shelters and the hotels. But you don't want to happen is you say OK, original accomplishment and move everybody. Back to a congregant site would move all those protective measures. And then you're in the scenario where people may be a trick again. A group of Upper West Siders says they'll file a lawsuit unless the administration announces an action plan by tomorrow. Homeless advocates say they, too, will sue. If people are moved before it's safe to do so. Marella Iraq WMD I see news. Across New York prison officials have suddenly stopped testing for suspected drugs. Investigative reporter George Joseph has more in an internal memo. Last week, prison superintendents were ordered to stop using drug tests from a North Carolina company called Cerci. Authorities wouldn't say why they suspended the tests, but they did confirm that they're reviewing their procedures. State documents make clear that these tests are for screening, but officials weren't doing follow up tests in the lab to verify the results. And we're using the search. He tests alone to charge prisoners with drug possession. It is troubling. In any circumstance when you see a screening a presumptive test used for a final decision that's Dr Peter Stout. He's a forensic toxicologist in Houston, which had a similar scandal because of the way police were using these kinds of drug tests. They work by inducing a color coded chemical reactions. So they devised these little pouches and things that are useful in the field to add a little bit of drug into it, Shake it up, and it gives you in the field on indication of this, maybe heroin or this, maybe cocaine, he says. Agencies like these kits because they're cheap, fast and easy to use. But they also can produce false positives and can result in discipline such a solitary confinement or the loss of family visits. The prison authority hasn't said how many prisoners may have been disciplined because of search, he test results. Martin Garcia is a community coordinator for the prisoner's advocacy group worth rises. He says authorities should have had a higher scientific standard from the beginning that it being proactive. They're being reactive and you're home. You're harming people. You're harm If he was families, you're harming people that you claim to care about. And you know, responsible for Garcia is a former prisoner himself. He says. The way the prison system used these drug tests lead to mistrust and that your family is looking at you like if he really innocent that he just do this, like he messed up and he doesn't want to admit it. He's not changing Select. Now you have a distrust with your family, the company behind the test. Cerci didn't respond to requests for comment on New York's decision to stop using their products in the prison system. George Joseph W. N. Y C news LGBT.

Mayor de Blasio Councilman Steven Levitt Dr Peter Stout Martin Garcia George Joseph New York Upper Westside Edition Jamie Floyd Upper West Side Iraq Upper West Siders drug possession Mrs Morello Manhattan George Joseph W. N. Y Catherine Trapani North Carolina Kobe
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W N Y C. I'm Jamie Floyd 100 years ago Today, women gained the right to vote when the 19th amendment was ratified. Victory came after many women had endured prison, conducted hunger strikes and marched and picketed for years. But today there remains work to be done for many women who are still disenfranchised at voting booths across the nation. A new site. The 19th nonprofit newsroom with staff of mostly women wants to empower more people, mainly women of color to finish that work by reporting that focuses on the issues we face. Joining me today CEO and co founder of the 19th, Emily Ram Shaw and editor at large. Erin Haynes. Welcome to you both. Thank you. Thanks. So much for having Emily what coverage gaps in the mainstream media. Are you seeing? That drives you to seek to start your own newsroom? Sure, so this started for us really? You know, four years ago during the 2016 election cycle when I was sort of looking at so many questions around electability and likability during the presidential election, featuring the first woman presidential candidate, and it just felt like a moment then and it feels like an even bigger moment. Now we're still asking those same questions that for us seem very gendered, very sexist. No, we are presenting coverage that really tackles all issues through a gender lens and seeks to give women an equitable seat at the table in the nation's media coverage. And it's interesting that you mention Hillary Clinton, of course, who ran for president and lost in 2016, but she wasn't indeed the first We've had Victoria Woodhull going all the way back to 18, 72 and other women who've run for president, underscoring the ways in which we still strive for power in this country, but somehow seemed to fail eyes that part of your mission trying to unpack and unravel. Ah women and our effort to achieve equality at the voting booth and in the corridors of power. Absolutely, if for us the importance of the 19th is that women are disproportionately affected in so many arenas that we intend to cover. Whether it's the role of women in this cove. It induced she session or the role of women on the frontlines of our health care system. But no Where do we think it's more important to highlight this coverage? Then in the halls of Congress and in the halls of state legislatures in the highest office in the land, where we still in this modern day, see women at such a disadvantage? Aaron. Lots of women are still disenfranchised women who've been in prison, for example. Are you hoping that your coverage will lead to an expansion of voting rights for women? Our newsroom is absolutely one that committed to the expansion of democracy and make this a more freer and fair society. I mean, we're marking the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment, for which our newsroom is very probably named, Put an asterisk and that's intentional because the omission in a racer of black women from the suffrage movement was intentional, and so in honoring this landmark legislation We're not only above all honor those who were denied that, But we recognize that this is unfinished work that continues and we certainly want to be part of completing that work. I really want to dive into this debate over how we remember the history of suffrage in this country. Because, as you say, Erin, it was not just a movement of white women, which is how it is often remembered and portrayed. Even at the time, many white suffragist did not see black women as allies or as a priority. On yet you've named the publication the 19th with that asterisk. So So how should we wrestle with that history? And how will you reflect this history in your mission in your staffing in your coverage each ofyou police take that on. Maybe Emily you first. Sure the asterisk is the lens through which we think about all of our coverage, which we think about building this newsroom in this moment. No 75% of our journalists are people of color. We are really trying to practice what we preach standpoint of building a newsroom that truly reflects America's women. So Aaron I struggle with this as a black woman journalist that Intersectionality as A person who cares deeply about race but also about women and our rights. How do you resolve or wrestle with those issues? Well, Jamie, I will tell you It has definitely been a journey for me as well. And somebody that that most of my career writing about the intersection of race In culture and politics and it really it wasn't until I came to the 19 that I was really able to grant the totality of my lived experience to the newsroom and to this work, right? And so being able to think of the dual identities that I carry in approaching, the work has been revelatory. For me. It has been very refreshing, you know, but the Astors for us is also So much about who is not being seen who is not being heard and really reflecting the marginalized in our community so that we can really make this a home for all women. When I hear you say the marginalized Of course that goes well beyond gender, I think about the marginalized, disable Tio trans community people who are imprisoned. I mean, I could go on the conversation can only be a few minutes here on all things considered. But can you say a little bit more about the communities? You hope to serve Jamie? Everybody that you just said, and You know, one thing that is so amazing about the vision that Emily had for this newsroom. Is that kid born not only to be able to reflect these women, but also to bring this news To these women wherever they are right? And so what That means is that we are producing journalism that is free to consume and free to republish under our nonprofit business model, and it's not enough to just have these Women reflected in our coverage if they never even get to see it behind the pay Walter to read what we said about them. And finally, I noticed that your mission or part of the mission of the 19th is to create A platform for civil conversation at a time when we have very uncivil discourse in our country, and that you you're seeking to build community. What's the goal there? Most newsrooms really don't prioritize civil conversation and community building. Why is that a priority for you? You know, I personally believe that if the same women are talking to the same women all the time, we don't move the needle. So for us, it's really critical that conversations are civil and empathetic and thoughtful. For us. That's where all of it begins. That's where our community begins. Emily Ram Shaw is CEO and cofounder and Aaron Hands is editor at large of the new site, 19th. Thank you both so very much. Thank you, for including us. Thank you so much for having us. With no crowd and very few life segments. This year's Democratic National Convention is pretty much appear TV event Last night was the.

Emily Ram Shaw Jamie Floyd Aaron Hands Erin Haynes CEO editor Congress Hillary Clinton president Victoria Woodhull America co founder Walter Intersectionality
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Census Bureau is cutting short. It's door knocking efforts, prompting outcry that the White House is pressuring the bureau to wrap up for political reasons. I'm Jamie Floyd, this is all things considered on WN. GOP leaders say, renewing a $600 per week unemployment benefit will discourage Americans for getting back to work. The evidence says. Otherwise, you have to factor in all of these other important economic factors that are driving people's decisions in order to understand what people's choice sets actually are both sides of this debate coming right out plus leaders of the White House Corona Virus Taskforce testified on Capitol Hill today facing questions about their response to the pandemic, how they answered after news headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Speer. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says talks for new pandemic relief aid will continue in coming days. She and the top Democrat in the Senate, Chuck Schumer, are slated to have another round of talks with White House officials. NPR's Claudio Gonzalez reports. The two sides still remain far apart, though. Speaker, Pelosi says Democrats or Republicans are still struggling to find agreement on what another wave of aid could look like, She said Republicans haven't signed on to a longer extension of the extra $600 a week and unemployment benefits, which expires today, and she blamed Republicans for playing a role in the devastation wrought by the virus there DeLay Their denial there. Distortions have caused death as it stands, Democrats or Republicans. Competing proposals remain at least $2 trillion apart. Claudia De Santis, NPR NEWS Washington When I was chief of staff, Mark Meadows, meanwhile, is accusing Democrats of refusing to negotiate. A federal appeals court today has overturned the death sense of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for his role in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. The court ruling today The judge who oversaw the case failed to adequately screen jurors in the case. Potential bias. Three Judge panel of the U. S First Circuit ordered a new death penalty phase trial to determine whether the 27 year old should be put to death. Tsarnaev was convicted on 30 charges in connection with the attack that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others. Drives. Lawyers contend intense media coverage made it impossible to have a fair trial in Boston. The Trump Administration is announcing fresh sanctions against China over alleged human rights abuses. NPR's John Rule, which reports this time, the U. S, is taking a bit of vast, quasi military organization in the far western part of the country to officials linked to it. The sanctions target, the Shin Young production and construction Corps, commonly known as the Big One. The Big One was created in the 19 fifties out of military units to boost the region's economy and act as a border militia. Now encompasses millions of people and overseas, a network of businesses across Xinjiang, which is home to the weaker ethnic group. Critics say that being one has in some ways been akin to a colonising force of predominantly Han Chinese who make up the vast majority of China's population. In recent years, the government has rounded up hundreds of thousands of Uighurs and other Muslims in Xinjiang and put them in so called reeducation camps in the name of fighting.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Democrats NPR White House Corona Virus Taskf Census Bureau White House Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Boston Xinjiang Jamie Floyd Jack Speer China Chuck Schumer GOP Claudia De Santis Claudio Gonzalez U. S First Circuit
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:52 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Jamie Floyd the Cove it 19 pandemic has hit the cultural sector hard. This week, we learned that the Tenement museum laid off 76 workers. We've also heard about furloughs or layoffs over the past few months from the American Museum of Natural History. The Guggenheim, Carnegie Hall and many smaller organizations here to talk with us about the economic picture for our cities. Almost 2000 culture and arts organizations is Lucy Sexton, She's the executive director of New Yorkers for Culture and Arts. And shoddy Lythcott, CEO of the National Black Theater. She also chairs a coalition of theaters of color and together They're two of the leaders of culture at three. It's a daily zoom conversation that started at the beginning of this pandemic. Hundreds of the city's cultural leaders share resource is and support one another on those calls. Lucy and Shadow. Welcome to WNYC. Thanks for having us Nice to be here, Lucy, let's start with you. The cultural sector employs about 300,000 people in New York City. Can you give us an overview of what The financial picture is for cultural organizations Right now, Right at the beginning that shut down museums and theaters and spaces where people could come together and unfortunately We will also be among the last to re open. So we have started. You know, we started the pandemic and and lost a lot of income. New York City cultural institutions, lost a total of $550 million through May alone, and had some relief come in in the form of the payroll production program and some emergency funds from philanthropy. But that was really to take us through about eight or 10 weeks. Now. We're getting to the end of that time. And we're about to fall off a cliff unless there is not some major federal relief coming in the next stimulus package and shot day beyond the economic crisis. Ah lot of local organizations say that the uncertainty is hitting them hard. The city and state aren't really issuing guidelines. The uncertainty around win exactly culture can come back into Riel life bases and is weighing. I think I know lots of our organizations, primarily because we need to be able to paint a picture for our staff for our stakeholders and ultimately, our audience. Let's think about the worst case scenario. What if the federal government does not step up? And if the city and state do not? Give you the funds, you say unique. What then? I think we're facing to be dramatic about it a mass extinction event because and especially with organizations that are smaller organizations of under $250,000 a year budget Many of them do not expect that they will be able to survive and get through. Unfortunately, those smaller organizations organizations which are off often based in and serving March life communities, right communities of color communities that have been hard hit by Cove. It They're one of the responses to this crisis is the organization that you're coordinating. With your daily call culture at three else about that, and why it's become important. Lucy first sure it is a call that started the beginning of the pandemic by Taren Sacramone. It's been a fantastic resource in that it is a space that we can Share information. You know, we can share information on how to apply for your PPP long. We can share information on how to give it your program online on Deacon. Just give ourselves the support that we are not alone that we are doing this together. In a day. So what I would add to that is it's this completely democratic space that brings together cultural leaders from across all five boroughs. But it also merges them with immediate connective ity tow our elected officials and some of the philanthropy world as well. So on this call every day Not on Ly is culture leaning and leveraging each other's kind of Resource is wisdom experience, but we're joined by friends and government and we got to say Here's where we're scared. Here's where we need support, and they could immediately come back every single day, and it was a feedback loop that never has existed to my knowledge in the history of the cultural sector in New York. No culture at three is really beautiful. And then as as we have progressed through this crisis with the murder of George Floyd, this immediate response for racial equity and justice. Is a conversation that gets picked up through the conversation of navigating co bit of navigating all of the different responses that are organizations or having and chardonnay You run an arts organization, one of many in Harlem. What would happen to the neighborhood if they failed? So I would shudder to think what would happen to Harlem and communities like Harlem where are anchoring institutions are cultural institution. So much of Harlem is how we gather So much of Harlem is our interconnectedness with culture with our music, our dance our performance. We're leaning on each other in ways that culture at three does, but we're hyper focused and hyper local on how not only do we Saying, our institutions But how do we sustain and continue to nurture and beat the communities that were so committed to serving? Your organizations are all in crisis. But culture didn't really shut down. We're seeing online offerings from musicians and theaters. And some places Juice. Botanical gardens, for example, are starting to open up. What What do you see the role of culture being in the city right now going forward. You know, people need to connect with each other. They need spaces to to move tohave Damn, Andi. We're seeing that in the online programming, which has been robust. One thing that's been happening you know is that it's getting bigger audiences. You know. Mark Morris did an event Mark Morris dance Company and 3000 people watched and they would all know just Say that every major crisis economic crisis in particular that New York has faced culture has gotten the city through it. But what we're asking is help us. Help you. We really need the federal government to step up and say not on Ly is Culture and economic driver nationally specifically in New York City, But also it is It is medicine for our communities for our residents, and we can get through this and we can be innovative and weaken. Be nimble, but we have to have a place at the table to help shape what recovery looks like. Cha Dae lythcott Lucy Sexton, two of the leaders of culture at three. It's a consortium of hundreds of local arts organizations. Lucy and Shadow. Thank you so much for taking the time. We really appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you for having us. Time now for our documentary of the week with Tom Powers and Raphael in a house.

Lucy Sexton New York City Harlem New Yorkers for Culture and Ar federal government Tenement museum New York American Museum of Natural His Carnegie Hall Jamie Floyd Lythcott executive director CEO National Black Theater George Floyd Tom Powers Taren Sacramone
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm Jamie Floyd for decades New York city's police unions have played a major role in crafting local policing policies often pitting themselves against the city and the state in the process mayor Blasio has accused the unions of holding police reform back a try to undermine efforts to bond police and community they try to undermine progress now the movement for police reform is shining new light on these unions and their power Nick Pinto reports on the NYPD for Gothamist and he joins us now to discuss just how these unions became so influential and what criminal justice reform could mean for their future Nick let's get right to it the police benevolent association is the city's largest union right that's right and did it start out like other labor organizations designed to improve working conditions for its members or has it always been more of an advocacy group its history actually goes back to the nineteenth century long before municipal unions were were recognized at all and it was a sort of a of a fraternal organization that sort of came together to pass a death benefits but beginning in in the nineteen sixties and seventies it took on a much more political there were of spring court decisions which granted a lot of rights to the to the people who police were arresting and interacting with so it really constrained and that left police officers you know with a real sense of grievance no PBA president Pat Lynch who's in his fifth term has risen to become one of the most vocal defenders of the NYPD one.

Jamie Floyd New York city Blasio Nick Pinto NYPD PBA president Pat Lynch
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm Jamie Floyd even as the country slowly reopens some nonessential workers like hairstylists and barbers are continuing to do business underground WNYC's Karen rouse reports all right thank you it's a sunny Thursday in April and a barber named he has just finished cutting the hair of a long time customer dressed in a mask and gloves the sprays the chair with Lysol and wiped it down inside the central New Jersey shop is dark we have to cut it dark can I have the right side of the TV all because we don't want to draw your attention D. was allowing us to use his first initial to protect his identity is a former marine who refined his barbering skills on military bases across Europe and the Middle East now he's defying governor Phil Murphy's closure of nonessential businesses in what feels like a covert operation we called underground road type stuff like telling his customers to park in front of other businesses in the same shopping plaza not directly in front of his and I had to walk around the back and call me and then I'll cut their hair that way and forwarding the barber shop phone to his cell so loyal customers can still make appointments he does take steps to limit the spread of the virus like only allowing one client in the shop at a time warm warm warm right now I got one here and I got one comment he is among thousands of small business owners and employees who are stock because it's now against the law for them to work he has a family is cable has already been cut.

NYC Jamie Floyd WNYC Karen rouse Europe Middle East Phil Murphy New Jersey
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm Jamie Floyd your city neighborhoods hardest hit by covert nineteen are ones in which residents are already struggling with chronic illness economic insecurity and hunger W. N. Y. C.'s Yasmin Khan reports that a community health center in the Bronx is witnessing firsthand how the viruses attacking not just people's health but their overall survival Velma Delgado feels lucky that she has a deck off of her Bronx apartment she lives in Throggs neck across the street from a cemetery she likes the quiet and the outdoor space they helped her manage her anxiety and issue she was working on before the virus outbreak and it's heightened sense in the middle of the day when I'm by myself it feels like it's been we don't you don't eat it the world's been around Houston in the middle she says these episodes come from a fear of how dangerous the virus can be and just being confined to her apartment more she talks herself down from these moments NEO exhale inhale exhale doesn't building she has not become sick with covert nineteen nor have her two adult children to live with her they're both still going out to work every day once a medical assistant one works and facilities at a college but Delgado knows to people who have died and she knows the Bronx has the highest infection and death rates of the five boroughs that reality hangs in the air like the virus itself the agony and the people's faces you see them they still scared but people have to go to work because they have to pay the bills you know Delgado gets counseling through union community health center in the Bronx that's a center that offers a range of services primary care urgent care pediatrics since the virus outbreak the center has seen an increase in patients seeking mental health services Mildred Cassiano is the director of behavioral health there she says each therapist is speaking with as many as fourteen to seventeen patients a day it's an indicator of the amount of patients that are experiencing anxiety and depression due to loss of income managing kids guilt over bringing the virus home to family Casciano says patients get on the phone and talk about their inability to sleep constant crying and grief this is becoming a daily norm for us where which is saturated with stories of death the providers that union community health center saw this coming the center serves a high poverty population it has six locations and a mobile unit with close to forty thousand patients on its roster many of them have chronic health issues like diabetes or asthma many are essential workers so how do you make sure they're doing OK that's the big question for doctor of an SSL Saito a pediatrician at union who manages the center's covert wrist pants were putting the gas had a horn everything take telemedicine so far they've been doing some health appointments by phone some in person now they're trying to get video appointments up and running which they'd been talking about for months and now we're like okay we have to do it there's no choice Sensata rode up guidance for all providers.

NYC Jamie Floyd
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm Jamie Floyd some of New York city's temporary field hospitals may stay open for the foreseeable future in case of future covert nineteen now breaks later in the year governor Cuomo says sites like the Jacob Javits center haven't been needed as much as officials feared but it's going to remain close to large events for now it is twenty five hundred bed so it's a great facility but it's also in the convention center can't reopen the convention center obviously as it when it's with the hospital beds in it Cuomo says the Westchester convention center will also be maintained as a temporary hospital in case of a second wave of covert nineteen the U. S. Supreme Court has ruled in a major decision on gun rights involving a dispute over New York city's former ban on transporting guns the case was a challenge by gun owners to New York city's now repeals limits on transporting personal firearms the justices ruled today that there is nothing left for them to decide now that the city is ease its restrictions on taking licensed locked and unloaded guns outside the city limits a new state law prevents New York from reviving its band the Supreme Court had seemed poised to use the case to expand gun rights nationwide but other gun cases to remain in the high court's pipeline and the justices could decide to hear one of those next term and W. NYC staff and listeners are mourning the loss of longtime host Richard hake who died Friday of natural causes W. Q. X. our morning news host Kerry Nolan started at W. NYC at about the same time as Richard nearly thirty years ago he was fresh out of Fordham and already had a knack for connecting with his listeners we bonded over our respective musical idols Streisand for him Springsteen for me he was smart funny kind a consummate radio guy and my friend Richard hake was fifty one years old in our newsroom will have a remembrance coming up later this hour after news headlines currently forty nine degrees in Central Park at four oh six.

Jamie Floyd New York city Jacob Javits center Westchester convention center U. S. Supreme Court W. NYC Richard hake Kerry Nolan Fordham Springsteen Central Park governor Cuomo Streisand
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says the stimulus bill to combat the economic impact of the covert nineteen outbreak must include more relief for workers congressional leaders are negotiating a potential one trillion dollar measure to help spur the economy in part through direct payments to Americans speaking with N. B. R. Schumer said the federal government can not to fall short this is a crisis and and if we if we don't act boldly it'll linger for a very long period of time and that'll be much worse economically and end up costing us more Schumer says he does not believe the current proposal from Senate Republicans goes far enough president trump has already signaled a one signed rather a one hundred million dollar bills to increase testing for the corona virus and to guarantee paid sick leave in New York City public schools chancellor Richard Carranza is calling on department of education staff to volunteer to supervise the children of New York City health workers and first responders W. N. Y. C.'s Jessica Gould reports in a tweet chancellor Carranza says he's asking staff to help their neighbors help the city a survey asks whether employees are administrators teachers counselors or food workers what languages they speak and whether they can work mornings afternoons or all day officials say they're only calling on current deal we staff and people who work for nonprofit partners because they've been vetted the city.

New York N. B. R. Schumer trump Richard Carranza W. N. Y. C. Jessica Gould chancellor Carranza Jamie Floyd Senate president chancellor
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Roger stone a long time ally of president trump was sentenced today in federal court he will serve forty months in prison I'm Jamie Floyd this is All Things Considered on W. NYC in last night's of presidential debate Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren took aim at former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg over sexual harassment allegations Mister mayor are you willing to release all of those women from those non disclosure agreements so we can hear their side we'll hear more from senator Warren after that strong performance coming up this hour and the corona virus outbreak in China continues to have ripple effects on both sides of the Pacific Ocean on global health and the economy the latest coming up live from NPR news in Washington I'm lectured me saying president trump's longtime friend an informal adviser Roger stone has been sentenced to forty months in prison and peers Ryan Lucas reports stone showed little emotion as the sentence was read aloud in federal court in Washington DC in a packed courtroom judge Amy Berman Jackson spoke for nearly an hour before pronouncing stone sentence she said that stone was not as some of his supporters have claimed prosecuted for standing up for the president instead she said he was prosecuted for covering up for the president stone was convicted last year of obstruction witness tampering and lying to Congress about his efforts to contact wikileaks during the twenty sixteen campaign judge Jackson said stones lies impeded a congressional investigation into Russia's election interference they also threatened she said quote the very foundation of our democracy stone declined to address the court before his sentencing he is expected to file an appeal the president meanwhile has not ruled out a possible pardon for stone right Lucas NPR news Washington again trump is not yet saying if you'll pardon Roger stone but he said that I'm not going to do anything in terms of the great powers bestowed upon a president of the United States I want the process to play out I think that's the best thing to do because I'd love to see Roger exonerated and I'd love to see it happen because I personally think he was treated very unfairly trump was speaking in Las Vegas two days before Nevada hold its caucuses re sender of member station K. U. N. R. reports Democrats in rural communities could run into significant hurdles when they caught the Saturday don't know that it has a fair amount of cities the vast amount of the state is a sea of sage brush with very few towns and that makes it tough for some counties to caucus Pershing in white pine counties in the northern part of the state only have one kaka site available in one day for early voting give me a call chair of the rural Nevada democratic caucus as some have to travel up to one hundred miles to join in I do know some people that you know have challenges with transportation maybe not the best ice site and then some people to say Hey that's too far to go to participate Cole says there's more volunteers helping out this year in rural counties will be able to pull off a smooth caucus for NPR news I'm breeze under in Reno NPR's Windsor Johns reports the president is moving on to Colorado springs the latest stop of his reelection swing through the western US compass taking part in a series of fund raising and other campaign events this week in California Arizona and Nevada tonight will appear alongside Colorado senator Cory Gardner the rally comes less than two weeks before voters in Colorado go to the polls on super Tuesday trump lost the state in twenty sixteen to his democratic rival Hillary Clinton NPR's Windsor Johnston this is NPR news and you're listening to W. NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd governor Andrew Cuomo is once again pushing for the band of the sale of flavor to E. cigarettes at a press conference today Cuomo said he'll be pressing state lawmakers to pass legislation to prohibit flavored vape products including menthol and to increase fines for businesses that disobey literally every day more kids are getting addicted and this is a top priority I have included it in my budget but one way or the other by April one this has to become law last September Cuomo tried to ban E. cigarettes with an executive order but that was blocked by a lawsuit from an E. sake manufacturers group and they are the laws you admits that a New York City official made a mistake in trying to influence the annual count of people experiencing street homelessness his response follows a W. NYC report that a senior official at the department of social services urge non profit partners to find more bad for the homeless ahead of the count so that the total number will be lower that was absolutely wrong for that official to do and she's been told that in no uncertain terms that's just not how we do things that's wrong the results of the account will be available this spring last year's count found three thousand six hundred new Yorkers living on the streets and the judge has dismissed a lawsuit to transfer a Bronx zoo elephant to an animal sanctuary the animal welfare welfare group non human rights project argues that happy the elephant is entitled to legal person hot they say she's being illegally imprisoned in a one acre enclosure at the zoo the judge said happy is not a person and should remain with the caretaker she trusts the forty eight year old Asian elephant has lived at the Bronx zoo since nineteen seventy seven the zoo's director says happy will continue to get excellent care and has regular.

Roger stone trump Jamie Floyd president
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To supporters I'm Jamie Floyd this is All Things Considered on WNYC we have new details on the Saudi Arabian gunmen who killed three sailors at a Florida naval base social media a tribute to the shooter suggest he harbored anti US military and anti Israel sentiment now other Saudi national studying at U. S. military bases are being sent home plus what's happening with Foxconn and say it ain't so Joe the Houston Astros stole signs of opposing catchers so what's the penalty we'll find out after news headlines live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine herbs Attorney General William Barr says twenty one Saudi military cadets are being kicked out of the United States as NPR as Bobby Allen reports the decision to expel the Saudi nationals follows the deadly shooting at a Pensacola naval base last month Barr says it was an act of terrorism when a Saudi military student killed three young sailors and injured eight other people in early December Barr says the gunman was motivated by radical jihadism and anti American sentiments the shooter was killed on the scene investigators then launched a probe of all of the eight hundred and fifty Saudi military students in the US Barr says the inquiry found that a number of them had either shared extremist material or child **** online twenty one cadets have been dissing rolled from their training curriculum in the U. S. military and will be returning to Saudi Arabia Barr says the Saudi government agreed the material authorities found in the U. S. was on the coming to the Saudi military Bobby Allen NPR news Washington the host is expected to vote this week to officially appoint managers sense and the articles of impeachment to the Senate and your skills he's no reports house Democrats will meet first to discuss who will represent them at the trial Democrats will meet behind closed doors Tuesday to discuss managers in the Senate trial that lies ahead Republicans have criticized house speaker Nancy Pelosi for waiting this long to release the articles of impeachment close he says the delay was necessary to highlight her expectation that the Senate process will not be fair once the house votes the Senate can begin preparations for a trial in pairs Kelsey snow reporting the Jersey senator Cory Booker is dropping out of the democratic presidential race and there is also a caller reports bookers campaign says it doesn't have enough money to keep going in an email to supporters Booker said his campaign needs more money to continue money it frankly doesn't half for many months because campaign has struggled to take off voters praised his charisma and optimistic message as a black candidate calling for unity but that failed to translate into concrete voter support and he was lagging in the polls it also failed to qualify for the debate stage tomorrow in his email Booker cited the likelihood that impeachment would keep him busy in Washington the next couple of weeks he still intends to run though for reelection as a center in New Jersey that's my holiday NPR news the Houston Astros which was accused of cheating during the World Series in twenty seventeen has fire to executives manager AJ Hinch and GM Jeff will know that after the pair were suspended by Major League Baseball for stealing signs for opposing teams during the World Series and also the twenty eighteen season Esther's owner Jim cranes as neither man endorse the plan but they also didn't do anything to stop it Houston was fined five million dollars Wall Street higher by the closing bell the Dow was at a record today on optimism about the U. S. signing a preliminary trade deal with China on Wednesday getting eighty three points this is NPR and you're listening to W. NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd as you've just been hearing at New Jersey senator Cory Booker has dropped out of the democratic presidential primary saying his campaign doesn't have enough money to continue NJ TV reporter David Cruz says bookers message of love and unity failed to gain traction with voters in the broader context of the Democrats this season no they're not looking for love and unity they want somebody who can go toe to toe with Donald Trump Booker fail to qualify for tomorrow's democratic debate in Iowa he weighs only about twenty two million dollars that's less than half of the top contenders his departure leaves one African American candidate in the democratic field former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick the second largest shelter in the country the thirtieth street men's shelter has been played with serious safety issues including widespread asbestosis that's according to a new report Greg Smith that reports for the new site the city and he says the asbestos issue is made worse by renovations which the nearly ninety year old building often needs you do renovation of the elevators then you could potentially trigger a system that seems to be what's happening on multiple floors Smith says that despite significant amounts of us best does the building cannot be closed during the abatement because of all eight hundred fifty beds which are necessary in the article in the city said that over one hundred code violations have been reported the MTA says it expects subway service to return to normal for the evening rush hour after a water main break caused major disruptions this morning the pipe broke on Broadway between sixty second sixty third shortly before five AM the MTA says workers have drain some five hundred thousand gallons of water from the subway system and are now inspecting switches and signals between fifty ninth street and Columbus circle and seventy ninth street the city's department of environmental protection says it's also restored water service to the affected.

Jamie Floyd
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm Jamie Floyd one into three Newark public school students attend a charter school the schools have experienced rapid growth over the past decade imparting courage by the infusion of private money into Newark schools during Cory Booker's time as mayor but in a stark reversal the superintendent of new York's public school system wants to close four of the city's charter schools and to ban most new charters from opening altogether here to fill us in on the latest is Patrick wall he's a senior reporter for the education news website truck beat Newark Patrick welcome back to W. NYC thank you for having me so first of all tell us about superintendent Roger Leon's letter to new Jersey's department of education what's the asking for from the state so superintendent Leo and sent a letter to the state last month and that was because these four schools in New York are up for renewal which is something that all charter schools have to undergo every few years in order to continue operating and Leon was arguing that the state should not renew the schools which would in fact make them close down at the end of the school year can you say more on about why he wants to cap the growth of charters in the city I mean what spurred this for certain the core reason is that as the sector has expanded its it's happened at a rapid pace over the past decade if you go back to two thousand eight two thousand nine school year only about four thousand five hundred students in Newark who go to public schools went to charter schools if you fast forward a decade almost nineteen thousand students last year went to charter school so that's meant the district has had to lay off lots of employees it's had to close schools and so he's arguing that if that continues to happen the district is going to have to continue to shrink his hope is actually not just to keep the families that they differ currently has been actually to expand the district to add new schools and in order to do that he needs to kind of put a stop to the growth in Newark starter sector and Leon is the first superintendent hired in new work since the city regained local control of its schools after more than two decades of state control so there's yet another complicating factor in this particular story about charter schools how is his priorities differed from his predecessors that's right Leon represents really in new year in Newark the state had taken control of the Newark public schools in the nineteen nineties and in twenty eighteen the state gave back authority to the school board and they chose Roger Leon as their first superintendent it in meanwhile there's another big change which is that under that year of rapid growth of charters in Newark the governor at that time was Chris Christie the mayor into work as many people might know was Cory Booker in both of those folks were very supportive of charter growth as was the superintendents that the state had appointed now we have a new governor cover Murphy who spend a little more skeptical of charters a new mayor here rats Barocco who also has questioned the need for this sector to grow and the new superintendent so that entire political landscape has shifted here and I think this new kind of front in this debate over charter schools is partly reflecting this new climate in Newark and across the state how successful has the city's charter school sector band I mean do they outperform their district counterparts and how do they do income Paris in with charter schools elsewhere yeah new York's charter sector is actually considered to be one of the higher performing in the country and it also on average the charter schools here do you perform higher than the district schools on average again that there is so the city charter schools are effective at the same time the district has improved a lot in recent years it's test scores have also improved compared to other high party district its ranking has gone up and that's something that Turner advocates will point out is that even though that charter sector has grown it hasn't led to a decline in the districts performance how likely is it that the superintendent's request will be approved well that remains to be seen it down that state is expected to decide this by about by the beginning of February there was a point to last year in and the year before when the seat was doing a review of the charter school law and so we in there haven't been on a lot of new charter schools approved or existing ones renewed during that period and so this is kind of important moment to see how the state response to this demand Patrick wall is a senior reporter for chalk beat Newark Patrick thank you so much thank you so much for having me the Jewish community here in the New York City area is feeling under siege unprecedented anti semitic violence has prompted more security and Jewish neighborhoods and at synagogues but for some Jewish New Yorkers that's not enough they're taking matters into their own hands W. N. Y. C.'s Matt Katz has more it's a rainy night in Brooklyn and everyone headed into this store front Jim for martial arts training is this.

NYC Jamie Floyd Newark
McConnell: House Democrats may be too afraid to transmit impeachment to Senate

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

McConnell: House Democrats may be too afraid to transmit impeachment to Senate

"The house of representatives voted to impeach president trump yesterday bought the house has yet to send the articles of impeachment over to the Senate for trial I'm Jamie Floyd this is All Things Considered on W. NYC house Democrats waiting to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate is sparking a reaction from Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell prosecutors are getting cold feet and second guessing whether they even want to go to trial plus whatever your political beliefs of president trump's impeachment proved inescapable with saturation media coverage and the coverage all throughout social media

Senate Jamie Floyd Donald Trump W. Nyc Mitch Mcconnell President Trump
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC I'm Jamie Floyd when refugees flee their homeland there's family separation there's physical and psychological trauma and there's the challenge of assimilation that's true whether the immigrant ends up in New York City or Tokyo this week W. N. Y. C.'s Matt Katz is bringing us stories from the global refugee crisis in his series called unsettled and he's focusing on a country we don't hear much about when it comes to refugees Japan today we need a couple of newly arrived immigrants from Cameroon and Tunisia who are broadening the idea of what it means to be Japanese I met a lot of new immigrants to Japan and inevitably we all got around to talking about the same thing the wireless is something else public bathrooms in Japan are super clean welcoming and high tech exceed the forget myself and I'm just comfortable taking on lifetime hindering him on these rose recently fled a civil war in her country of Cameroon in central Africa and she's now making a long shot attempts at winning asylum in Japan which is notoriously resistant to immigration she only ended up here because she happened to secure a Japanese visa Japan a country she knew almost nothing about was our fastest way to safety she's been here almost a year now and she's whole areas actually my countrymen if you have to use the public toilet does the worst thing that can happen to you despite our laughter rose has plenty of worries about her nineteen year old son who seeking asylum in Minnesota about the police beating back home in Cameroon that left her with a scar and lingering head injury rose didn't want us to use her real name because her family is still in danger and so talking about the simple joy of using Japanese toilets the excitement of something new that brings welcome solace to Corp any where you find yourself you Freedia off to do a lot of adjustments most of the refugees if not or that I've made I just Japan doesn't welcome immigrants in part because keeping foreigners away keeps Japan unique strict rules govern life right down to the sorting of trash the thinking is that people just can't come and learn how to be Japanese but as migrants seeking safety or living wage increasingly moved to Japan they're challenging that idea and I don't mean that he'd built Correa from Tunisia she's applying for refugee status in Japan because she says back home she faced discrimination for being gay you know you've only been here a few weeks but do you think like if you were to live here for a long time that you could become Japanese or do you feel like you've always got to be an outsider for me I think I can be one hundred percent believe me because this country if you like connected with long time ago it's not new unlike rose that he knew a lot about Japan before she got here she's a huge fan of anime specially it's music in Japanese maybe they do this like rose now he will have a tough time convincing Japan to let her stay of the thousands of immigrants just a few dozen get refugee status each year but in the meantime she's allowed to live freely while her application is reviewed that he'd adores Japan she likes how they don't throw their trash on the street the trains run on time that religious people don't push their views on to others she sees Japan as a refuge but for the like minded she chose Japan she didn't randomly end up here like many refugees but she knows it'll be hard to win legal status I'm okay with that when a country's tried to protect freedom and protect its values and its tradition.

NYC Jamie Floyd
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:51 min | 3 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Speaking on the south lawn of the White House the president clearly seeking to distance himself from her testimony while also questioning her effectiveness I really don't know our but if you look at the transcript the president of Ukraine was not a fan of hers either I mean he did not exactly say blowing things I'm sure she's a very fine well but I just don't know much about her trump recalled you've on of issues U. S. ambassador to Ukraine in may the impeachment inquiry was sparked by a whistle blowers report on a phone call in which trump asked the president of Ukraine would best to get his domestic political rival trump accused Democrats of attempting a coup reverses surprise twenty sixteen election victory the justice department is trying to find out more about the author of the forthcoming book about the trump White House called a warning as NPR Lynn Neary reports the anonymous author of the book is said to be either a current or former senior official in a letter to the publisher has shed the DOJ warned that the anonymous author may be in violation of non disclosure agreements including those which are required to get access to classified information the DOJ asked to show ID to provide any agreements the author may have signed as well as dates of service and agencies where he or she worked all of which would clearly identify the writer in response a shirt said it is committed to maintain the confidentiality of anonymous the javelin literary agency which represents anonymous issued a strongly worded statement supporting has shed saying quote our author knows that the president is determined to unmask whistle blowers the agency said this will not prevent a book from moving forward Lynn Neary N. P. R. news Washington the major U. S. stock market indices continue to forge ahead on new highs with a rally carrying into a fifth week as investors mall over third quarter earnings numbers the Dow was up a hundred and fourteen points to twenty seven thousand four sixty two the nasdaq was up forty six points this is NPR you're listening to W. NYC I'm Jamie Floyd New York city's police commissioner will step down at the end of the month and hand over Raines to a current N. Y. P. D. chief W. N. Y. C.'s Yasmin Kahn reports commissioner James o'neill is resigning after three years in the top spot and about thirty seven years with the NYPD he is known for implementing a new model of neighborhood policing that's had a focus on building relationships with communities especially following the death of Eric garner a Staten Island man put in a chokehold by a police officer in twenty fourteen o'neal made the decision to fire that officer just a few months ago mayor de Blasio is promoting the NYPD's chief of detectives Dermot Shea to be the next commissioner police reform advocates question the choice saying Shea has expanded gang and DNA databases to inappropriately surveil communities of color and tomorrow is election day holes in New York City will be open starting at six AM and close at nine PM a number of revisions to the city's charter will be on the ballot along with the physician of public advocate in New Jersey people can cast their votes between six AM and eight PM all AT state assembly races will be on the ballot New York state board of elections as two hundred fifty six thousand people have already cast their ballots in the first year of early voting across New York state and New York City is marking the stomping grounds of one of its great poets with the sign at the corner of Ryerson street and dekalb Avenue in Brooklyn it's now called Walt Whitman way and it's near the spot where which men finished the book that changed American literature leaves of grass Brad Vogel of the Whitman initiative says that throughout the eighteen fifties young Walt Whitman would wander the streets of Brooklyn for inspiration having a street codename for Whitman is is entirely apropos because his poetry is not refined and secluded in the manse like some of the poetry that came before it is out there with the people the Whitman initiative is celebrating the bicentennial of the poet's birth this year currently fifty four degrees partly cloudy on Walt Whitman way at seven oh six support for NPR comes from LifeLock reminding consumers that only one in five victims of identity theft discover their staff through a bank or credit card company learn more at LifeLock dot com this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Elsa Chang in Culver city California and our merry that was Kelly in Washington DC today the story of the house impeachment inquiry was the story of what did not happen for senior White House officials were supposed to appear on the hill to testify they did not show up here to explain why is national political correspondent moralizing him more hi there we're what more than a month into this now some people called on to answer question show up others do not why did those on today's roster not appear well it is a little confusing because the White House of course a very famously that they didn't want to cooperate at all some people have honored the subpoenas other people believe they have legal grounds to be immune from testifying to Congress and their lawyers after having been directed by the White House not to testify not to honor the subpoena they've gone to court and they're asking the judicial branch to adjudicate this who wins out in this constitutional class the let the clash the legislative branch of the executive this is frustrating a Congress they think it's a stalling tactic and they've said this could result in an article of obstruction one of the articles of impeachment could be about this refusal to testify but if it's a stalling tactic it would appear to be working his people did not show up they haven't testified right but it doesn't seem to be a giant roadblock to the impeachment inquiry which is steaming ahead they're starting the house is starting to release the transcripts of the closed door testimony they say we're going to have public hearings sometime this month so it sounds like it's not going to derail the impeachment proceedings coming soon listen on one of the people who was invited asked to testify today the person with but probably the most prominent role in the story would be John Eisenberg from the National Security Council who is he why would his testimony have been so significant well he's the top legal counsel at the White House normally you would never hear about him he actually has a triple barreled title he is the top legal advisor to the NSC he's the assistant to the president and he's a deputy counsel to the president for national security affairs and according to former Attorney General Michael move Casey who's worked with Eisenberg in the past says all of those titles show how confident the White House was in Eisenberg's judgment you don't get to be any of those unless people have a great deal of confidence in your judgment I don't know anybody who's ever been all three and another person who worked with him in the past John knew who worked with him at the office of legal counsel in the George W. bush administration says that Eisenberg has a V. a reputation for being very careful thoughtful and very private Quincy he was paranoid if people thought he was just because they see him being very careful about who is allowed to have access to what classified information so Eisenberg's job was to protect the institution of the presidency from dumb ideas other once he was the one other job title yeah yeah well he was he was supposed to say this is illegal or unethical or it violates domestic law or international law and he is the one that according to reports from the closed door testimony heard the complaints about the officials who were very nervous and worried about the call they felt that the president's request to the Ukrainian president to do an investigation of the vines was inappropriate this is how the system is supposed to work they took their complaints to the White House counsel he took some notes then he decided to put the rough transcript of the call into a special highly classified computer system where few people would get to see which and the question is why was he trying to cover something up was there some very good reason to do this that we don't fully understand yet when what we know all right well that is the big question Democrats say it's a cover up but according to a lot of former and associates that I've talked to say that at least in the short term and might have been a good idea he put it there while he tried to figure out the legalities of the situation he didn't wanted to leak in the meantime but this is what the Democrats want to talk to him about and of course it's unclear if they ever will get to know I was gonna ask are they ever going to get to speak to him what well I think the court will have to rule that the subpoenas can be enforced before we hear from John Eisenberg is NPR national political correspondent Marlena's sin the White House thank you Mara thank you a persons political affiliation can tell you a lot about their views on a number of issues when it comes to gun control though a person's gender is also a crucial indicator and peers Danielle Kurtz lavine explains Tom please keep this to gun stowed away out of reach of his four children the handgun is in a biometric safe tucked away in a dresser in his and his wife's bedroom okay allotted for that I got to keep the wife knows we're here also in the safer the magazines for his semi automatic rifle a gun that is tucked away on a high closet shelf under a pile of Cincinnati Bengals jerseys they are my kids don't ask about it but yeah it does they are in a recent poll glaze was one of thirty nine percent of voters who said that it's more important to protect gun rights than to prevent gun violence fifty six percent of voters feel the opposite do you mind odds yes my husband don Kathleen Weber lives a couple of suburbs away registering owners is not a bad idea I think removing as many of the assault weapons from our streets is a really good idea Tom Kathleen both live in big picturesque houses in the Toledo suburbs they're both registered independents and they represent one of the largest divides on gun control in the country the gender divide their already huge gender divides in American politics more women tend to be Democrats and more men tend to be Republicans but according to Lee nearing off director of the Marist college institute for public opinion the distinctions and gaps that exist along gender lines when it comes to gun related issues and certainly issues dealing with gun restrictions are unusually wide two thirds of women say controlling gun violence is more important than protecting gun rights less than half of men agree and that divide is even wider on some gun control proposals like a ban on so called assault weapons and the mandatory gun buy back program laci's evidence of this divide in his own marriage and talking to his wife about his fears about the government trying to take his weapons you're not going to markets adamant about that one M. double pike because my wife loved this make she's one take it nope I'm not gonna take it but the gender.

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"WNYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd the New York City police officer killed early Sunday was hit by friendly fire police leader said today W. N. Y. C.'s yachtsman cont reports officer Brian Moore king was the second officer to die in the line of duty this year and also the second to die by fellow officers police commissioner James o'neil says the department is still reviewing body camera footage from the scene but what they do know is that multivitamin his own weapon five times other officers on the scene fired ten two of those rounds hit McKean it was a violent struggle and from start to finish from first round to last round was ten seconds the suspect they were pursuing Antonio Williams was also killed in February detective Brian Simonsson was killed by a fellow officer during a chaotic shoot out when responding to a robbery the number of New York City empty retail spaces has nearly doubled over the past decade as a result of rising around online competition and a glut of new construction that's according to a report from the city comptroller Scott stringer gonna miss Elizabeth Kim said today that empty storefronts affected neighborhoods beyond their economic toll here she is on the Brian Lehrer show the store fronts which many of them have been there for decades there come kind of like cultural landmarks and they kind of orient you as to where you are the city comptroller is proposing an agency to help businesses navigate bureaucracy while that of lawsuit ministration once a statewide tax on vacant spaces. and the artist can Hindi Wiley's thirty foot statue in Times Square of a black man on horseback is receiving positive reviews mostly so far Andre ivory Maranta is an African American performer and commutes from Newark everyday he says he's happy to see himself represented in such a grand statue say look let me.

robbery Newark Andre ivory Maranta Scott stringer Times Square Hindi Wiley comptroller Brian Lehrer Elizabeth Kim WNYC Brian Simonsson Antonio Williams James o'neil W. N. Y. C. officer Jamie Floyd New York ten seconds thirty foot
"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"jamie floyd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On W. NYC I'm Jamie Floyd in Newark New Jersey officials say residents can go back to using city distributed water filters governor Phil Murphy announced today that filters used in many of Newark's homes seem to be working as intended these results are a welcome jolt of positive news that allows us collectively to charge ahead in implementing our short medium and long term solutions as announcement calve six tumultuous weeks for new Jersey's largest city last month elevated lead levels were found in two out of three homes equipped with these filters which were distributed last year after the city's water treatment process was found to be ineffective that led to federal intervention and a bungled rollout of a bottled water distribution program that led to renewed questioning over the city's management of the whole problem here with the latest is W. N. Y. C.'s going Hogan back from Newark Hey grant hi Jamie so governor Murphy joined at Newark's mayor raspberry rocker and other state and local officials to announce these at preliminary testing results sounds like good news what do they find that's right they say the filters are working in fact ninety seven percent of the filters they tested worked at first drop that's when you turn on the tap water right away and ninety nine percent worked after running the tap for five minutes the city the state the federal government they've been working together to test these filters in more than three hundred homes they took about seventeen hundred water sample since August to reach this conclusion and what the results are today they're reiterating that residents can go back to using these lead safe water filters the state department of environmental protection suggests running the tap for five minutes in the.

NYC Jamie Floyd Phil Murphy Newark new Jersey W. N. Y. C. Hogan governor Murphy department of environmental pr five minutes ninety seven percent ninety nine percent
Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census

All Things Considered

00:40 sec | 4 years ago

Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census

"This is NPR. And you're listening to WNYC in New York at five oh four. I'm Jamie Floyd legalizing, recreational marijuana, passing congestion pricing and rapidly increasing renewable energy usage. These are just some of the items on New York governor Andrew Cuomo to do list for this legislative session at the state of the union address this afternoon governor Cuomo conceded, the laundry list may seem ambitious. It's a lot no doubt about it. But there's been a lot that has been bottled up for many many years that we couldn't get done. And in many ways, I feel the state is now liberated with the Senate Democratic caucus. And of course, it's the state of the state the governor called on lawmakers to continue passing progressive legislation in the coming weeks among his top budget priorities. Cuomo said our public transportation and infrastructure, healthcare and cutting taxes for the middle class. For years, the NYPD's response to questions about its use of surveillance technology has been to neither confirm nor deny whether records bowed. It exists. It's called the glow more response. But now in New York state court judge has ruled in a case over whether NYPD spied on the cell phones of people attending black lives matter protests that the police can no longer keep that claim of confidentiality. It's a win for civil libertarians. And state supreme court Justice, Arlene, blue shot down, the NYPD argument that responding to complaints would compromise counterterrorism or criminal efforts because the police in question, we're not the people in question rather were not breaking the law at the time New York Times reporter, Ali Watson covered the case. Judge's ruling right now, depending on whether or not the NYPD appeals actually puts a very firm boot the neck of his response. They can't really use it in the future. The NYPD does have thirty days to appeal. The ruling. A statement a spokeswoman said that it uses the global response exceedingly sparingly and only after careful consideration of the interests involved tonight, mostly clear, a low around twenty seven degrees. Currently, it's thirty four degrees. The time is five oh six support for NPR comes from C three providing a software platform that enables organizations to deploy artificial intelligence in IOT solutions at industrial scale. Learn more at C three dot AI. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro in a Senate hearing room today attorney general nominee William bar has been walking a fine line bar is pledging to protect the Justice department. But he also says the president has sweeping constitutional authority NPR national Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been following these confirmation hearings and joins us now to talk about them. Hi, hey, okay. He has been nominated to lead the Justice department at a time when the president is attacking it. So how did bar address that tension today? Well, Bill Maher said he has a very high opinion of deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, he says he has no reason to doubt that the Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. And he says he doesn't believe that special counsel. Robert Muller would be conducting a witch hunt in fact, Barr says he would quit rather than fire Muller. If there were no good cause to get rid of him. And as one of Muller's friends for thirty years Barr says it's unimaginable that. Muller would do anything to prompt? A firing Senate Democrats went into this hearing wanting bar firmly committed to protecting the Russia investigation. Did they get that commitment? Not affirm one Ari Dianne Feinstein, the top democrat on the committee was pressing Bill bar a lot about what people will learn in the end about the Russia probe. Will you commit to making any report Muller produces at the conclusion of his investigation available to congress and to the public as as I said, my statement, I am going to make as much information available as I can consistent with the rules and regulations now Bill bar talked about wanting transparency, but he also said that he s the attorney general make the ultimate call about what becomes public and later on Senator amazing. Geraldo, Hawaii said just asking us to trust. You is not enough. She said this president will do anything to protect himself, and Mr. bar was kind of tough in his response. He said, I'm not going to surrender the responsibility of the attorney general. To get this title. We know that bar has had some contact with lawyers involved in the investigation. Did we learn anything new today about his interactions with the White House? We did bar told lawmakers he actually met with President Trump awhile ago, and the president seemed to want bar to join his legal defence team bar politely declined. He said he didn't want to stick his head in a meat grinder bar. Also said he discussed some legal theories with attorneys for the president the vice president and with Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, but bar said he didn't recall learning anything of substance. Anything confidential about the pro from the beginning of this investigation. The issue of recusals has been a very big deal. What had bar say about recusals today? He said he thinks Jeff Sessions. The former attorney general probably did the right thing to recuse himself in Democrats pressed bar to step aside to given this context with lawyers involved in this investigation and a memo he wrote criticizing the investigation, but here again, far would not commit. He says he will ask career. Ethics officials at Justice to evaluate the question, but he won't necessarily do what they advise. He also said the president is not above the law. The president can't for example, offer pardons to people who promise now to incriminate him taking a step back. There is one question about Bill bar that people on both sides of the aisle have which is why would he come back to lead the Justice department after twenty seven years to be attorney general again in excellent question bar, basically says because he loves the Justice department as an institution he says, he's sixty eight years old, and he has nothing to lose. If you take this job, you have to be ready to make decisions and spend all your political capital and have no future because you have to have that freedom of action, and I feel I'm gonna position in life where I can do the right thing and not really care about the consequences and Ari so far nothing has emerged to block Boris path confirmation. NPR national. Justice. Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Thank you. My pleasure for analysis of the hearing and of what Bill bar may do if he's confirmed. Let's bring in Jennifer dascomb. She's an associate professor of law at American University. She used to work at the Justice department. Professor Daska welcome. Thank you. So to the central question today, which is whether bar will protect the Muller investigation based on what you heard from his testimony. Are you persuaded that he will? So he he answered that pretty clearly he said that he he likely I mean, he had he would protect mother and the absence. Something extraordinary that mother would be allowed to continue. I think the key question and the one that several senators pushed on the a question of what is going to be made public, and what's going to be made available congress. We heard Bill bars say repeatedly that he was committed to transparency, but transparency considered students consistent with the law transparency consistent with rules and regulations and bar. Has a very broad view of executive privilege and a very broad view of executive power including power over criminal investigation. So when he says he needs to be consistent with rules and regulations on the question of whether whatever final report Muller producers should be made public. That's what he would be referring to executive privilege that the president might say, no, exactly executive privilege abroad claims our national security, our range of different reasons. Why transparency would be limited according to his his views and the president's articulation of of what's necessary to keep private secret. He also as we just heard there from Carrie Johnson did not seem to suggest that he's likely to recuse himself from overseeing the Mueller investigation. Did that surprise you in any way? It comprises me only because it seems like a clear case where recusals would be appropriate, but he has been consistent on along in suggesting that he would not recuse himself. And I wasn't surprised that he didn't change his mind today. But giving his engagement given the nemo that was that he chose to write and to send to the president about concerned about obstruction of Justice charges targeting the president and given what he acknowledged today about conversations, it seems like this would be a clear case for recusal has been consistent about that. Well, that prompts my next question, and it's one that he was asked today by senators in in one way or the other a number of times, which is would he protect the independence of the Justice department against executive overreach. Do you think when push comes to shove Bill would tell the president? No, no, sir. You can't do that. So again, I think it depends on what's being asked. And he did get today that there were certain red lines that he went cross, but that being said he has an expressed repeatedly previously very broad views of executive power and executive privilege, and there are certainly in a whole range of areas in which the president could assert executive privilege in my assumption is and based on bars previous, writings and statements. That bar would agree. Did you learn anything about Bill today that you didn't already know? Some of the contacts that he's had were interesting to hear about you know, he is as as expected he was incredibly articulate and and respectful. I think that the key is is reading the testimony in light of what he started written in the past. Did you hear anything today that might derail this confirmation that poses a serious threat to his chances of being confirmed? I'm just given given the politics and given the makeup of the Senate unlikely at this point is there a question to you to you would have asked him that the senators did not. Again, I think that really pushing him on this question of transparency what happens when the president asserts a claim of national security what happens when the president says, you know, we just want a very brief cursory summary of this report sent up to congress. What do you do? Then you would have liked to have heard an iron clad, whatever Muller wants to be made public. I'll back. Exactly, that's Jennifer Gasco. She she choose constitutional and national security law at American University Jennifer desk, thanks so much for taking the time. Thank you.

President Trump Bill Bar Justice Department Robert Muller William Bar NPR Attorney Executive Nypd Bill Carrie Johnson New York Senate Democratic Caucus Senator Senate Andrew Cuomo Bill Maher American University
Nancy Pelosi on Record Number of Women in Congress

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | 4 years ago

Nancy Pelosi on Record Number of Women in Congress

"Under a partial shutdown. She called on members to respect each other and the truth in dealing with one another Don gonyea, NPR news, Washington. Members of the US. Congress are a largely religious group, or at least claimed to have a faith NPR's. Tom gjelten says about nine and ten say they're Christian with Catholics the most popular denomination. Among the members the religious profile of congress comes from the Pew Research Center based on how members describe themselves across congress, just one member democratic Senator Kirsten cinema Zona reports having no particular faith, among all US adults one in force has that one explanation for that disconnect. Maybe that candidates think voters won't approve of someone who's unchurched. So they're reluctant to describe themselves that way, no matter their actual beliefs. Thirty percent of members say their Catholic of the Protestant members Baptists have. The largest share more than six percent identifies. Jewish three times the share of Jews in the US adult population. Tom Chilton NPR news, Washington, Mexico's foreign affairs ministry says it's calling on the US government through its embassy to investigate a January first incident in which US agents fired tear gas into Mexico agents said they were attempting to disperse a group of rock throwers in the first hours of new year about one hundred and fifty migrants attempted to breach a border fence in Tijuana was financial markets plunged again in the second trading day of the new year all three of the major US stock market indices closing down more than two percent stock market jitters were prompted by Apple's warning showdown in China admitted escalating trade war between the US and China. Arthur Dong is a professor of strategy and economics at Georgetown's McDonough school of business overall, the United States economies far less dependent on exports. We are very heavily diversified service based economy, and so on that respect the United States. You know, is is I think sitting. In a in a better position overall. But it certainly will be some some repercussions felt apple stock dropped almost ten percent today racing more than seventy four billion dollars in market valuation. The Dow was down six hundred and sixty points. This is NPR and you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. A federal judge is blocking implementation of a New York City law that would have regulated Airbnb home hotel business. The law would require Airbnb and other short term rental platforms to divulge the names of hosts and addresses of rentals. But the court said the amount of information amounts to unreasonable search and seizure. The law was to go into effect early next month will now be put on hold while the lawsuit moves forward, mayor de Blasio had championed the law saying it would it make sure the city's precious housing supply could be devoted to New Yorkers rather than tourists. A special election for New York City. Public advocate is set for February twenty six it's the first citywide especially election since nineteen fifty and WNYC's bridge Bergen reports the rules are unique for this race. You won't see anyone running as a democrat or Republican to actually appear on the ballot candidates must create their own party name. And collect nearly four thousand signatures from registered voters. And there's another quirk, Melissa Mark Viverito. Former city council speaker running on the fixed the MTA party line explains. The other interesting thing is that unlike a primary here whoever files I their petitions is first on the ballot Merck. Marito is vying for that top spot. Among nearly two dozen declared candidates turning in her petitions just one day after candidates were allowed to start collecting them. New Jersey is one of the state's least affected by the partial shutdown of the federal government. That's according to a new study, which says the Garden State will be hard hit by delays in process. Messing federally financed mortgages, but less so in other categories, New Jersey ranked forty four th out of fifty states and the district of Columbia the study by the financial website, wallet hub, ranks state based on the number of federal jobs contracts, real estate activity, national parks, and percentage of families receiving food assistance. New York ranked thirty fifth on the list in part because New York is among the five states, receiving the least money in federal contracts. The district of Columbia, not surprisingly is most affected by the shutdown. Currently forty two degrees. Partly cloudy at six oh, six support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton family foundation dot org. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelley the government shutdown grinds on over funding for President Trump's border wall. But meanwhile, the Trump administration is moving ahead with plans to construct or upgrade border fencing, some one hundred sixty miles along the Arizona and California borders with Mexico, active duty military will take up the task here to tell us more is NPR's Pentagon. Reporter Tom Bowman and Tom what exactly is the task with? What is the Pentagon going to be doing? Well, I'm told this fencing said likely combat engineers for the fencing portion of this effort, but it goes beyond that homeland security's requesting medical units, of course, two children died along the border with in the custody of US officials at the centers they need additional help for the migrants coming through and also told aviation units would be part of this as well. They provide surveillance along the border to help customs and border protection, monitor any movements. And again, this is so. Support for that effort. Active-duty troops can't get involved in any arrest or detention of any migrants, it's against the law and to be clear. This is something new. This is on top of the existing troops already deployed to the border. Right. So this is new this is just coming out. Now this request was made from homeland security. How many more we talking? Well, we don't know at this point. I heard some one official said maybe thousands of troops and other said, well, the existing truce might be able to help. There are now twenty three hundred act of troops there on the border along with twenty one hundred guard forces they could provide some of this effort, but clearly they're going to send additional troops. They could change them out or some could be extended but acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan hinted about more support at a cabinet meeting at the White House yesterday. Let's listen restoration of the fences building out and additional mileage from the law. The army Corp. Engineers is dialed in on doing this cost-effectively quickly on the right amount of urgency as to where we built additional stand up walls quickly get after the threat. The threat is real. And he goes on to say that he'll provide assistance to homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen who's making the request to the Pentagon anytime line on how long these duty troops might be there. No idea. I was told it could be months to construct the fencing or shore up existing fencing, you know, we're talking one hundred and sixty miles or so now fencing right act of troops were supposed to end their deployment, by the way at the end of the month. So some could be extended maybe other units could take their place. But what we don't know. Right. Will the Pentagon is working on the specific? So we don't have a lot of detail at this point. Let me insertive skeptical question here, the president has said if he doesn't get money for a wall from congress. He might just order the military to build it is that what is going on here. The president doing something of an end run around the border standoff. That's quite possible. At this point, the talks with congress, the Democrats in particular appear to be going nowhere. The Pentagon the president wants five billion dollars for the wall. The Democrats saying that's far too much. In the standoff continues the government shutdown. But of course, a Pentagon has not shut down. And they're ready to take orders from the commander in chief. Thank you. You're welcome NPR's. Tom Bowman one person. And we'll be looking at the Trump administration's immigration policies is the new chairman of the House Judiciary committee, New York, Democrat Jerrold Nadler, welcome to the program. Thank you. Now. Your committee has oversight over many key areas. Right Justice department, voting rights and an immigration as we mentioned on that last issue. You told CBS that the zero tolerance policy that led to the separation of migrant families on the border was a deliberate creation of the White House that they're trying to make things as miserable as possible. In quote, if kids die there apparently willing to have that. Yes. To investigate the deaths of those two migrant children. Yes, we are. We're going to investigate the deaths of those two migrant children and the entire family separation policy. And there are a lot of questions. How could they for example, deport parents to foreign countries? He's making no provision to give the kids back I or even to figure out identification for the kids. So we have kids now months later that may never find your parents again. State-sanctioned kidnapping. Does it feel like investigative actions and oversight? That's really the only recourse. Democrats have right now. Does it feel like you have no real ability to change Trump administration policies? No doesn't feel that way. At all. And you can't talk about that the first day of democratic control, and the new congress, we have a we have leverage investigation, and, publicity, and and oversight is a major constitutional responsibility. And ability that we have the number to the power of the purse, you can't pass a budget without the house as well as the Senate, and we can put requirements in that budget. We can put limitations on the use of funds we can put requirements for the use of funds and so forth. So even if you cannot pass. Subject matter Bill through both houses of the president would veto it. They can't pass a budget without the house consent. So we have considerable leverage. You've also on another topic. You've sponsored a Bill that would protect the special counsel office. Robert Muller was investigating interference in the two thousand sixteen election introduce that Bill today, and you've also threatened to subpoena acting attorney general Mr. Whittaker what do you hope to learn from him? We are very concerned about a massive fraud. And the American people by the president by his campaign in order to obtain office through fraudulent means hush money payments to women Michael Cohen working with the Russians plus obstruction of Justice in the investigation of that we have to look into all of that. And the special counsel is looking into that or into some of it insofar as they may be crimes, but we have to look into all of that to protect the integrity of our elections and the integrity of our democratic system and to protect the American people from being defrauded by by the Trump campaign Ovalles future campaigns for that matter. So that is the prime thing that we have to do we have to put an end to Republican efforts over the last two years to interfere with an undermine the special counsel's investigation. If the Muller investigation uncovers evidence of high crimes and misdemeanors are you prepared to pursue impeachment? And even if it's politically unpopular it's too early. To talk about impeachment. But what is important at this point is to follow all the facts where they lead to make sure that those facts are public and to make sure that they're not interfered with by the Trump administration. So if a special counsel issues report, we have to make sure that that report is is it becomes public. If necessary we'll subpoena it necessarily will quote Muller to testify in front of the committee about it. We have to make sure that it's not varied by the Trump administration. Bye bye Whitaker or by bar. The President Trump has been implicated and campaign law violations. As part of Michael Collins plea, something like that an impeachable offense. It could be that. I don't wanna get into impeachment now. 'cause it when we're not prepared for that. At this point. The some of what he's been accused of could be impeachable. Offenses. But the real question now is to find out what happened to find out. What frauds were committed but frauds against American democracy. And to make sure the public knows that the public can judge, and we can judge in the judiciary committee instead of where we should go from there whether to be impeachment whether it should be protective legislation for the future. Whatever it may be. And you were earlier you were speaking about William bar, the White House nominee for attorney general. Yes. And and the acting attorney general Mr. Whittaker is it possible that you will overplay your hand.

Trump Administration NPR United States President Trump Congress Pentagon Washington Apple Tom Gjelten Robert Muller New York City Mexico Tom Bowman White House Tom Chilton Don Gonyea New Jersey
Eiffel Tower to close Saturday over planned protests

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 4 years ago

Eiffel Tower to close Saturday over planned protests

"Eleanor Beardsley, your news Paris on Wall Street, stocks were mixed on news of the arrest of a chop. Chinese technology executive on suspicion of trying to evade US curbs on trade with Iran. The Dow Jones industrial average closed down seventy nine points at twenty four thousand nine hundred forty seven the NASDAQ was up Twenty-nine points. This is NPR. You're listening to WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd to bystanders were wounded in a Bronx gunfight between police suspected shooter last night. Police shot and wounded a man they say was trying to flee the scene of a drug related shooting, a female bystander and a twelve year old girl were hit in the exchange and transported to the hospital all three or in stable condition. No officers were injured. The NYPD says officers were in the university heights neighborhood at about six PM yesterday when they saw masked suspect with the backpack running toward them. He produced a firearm and exchanged gunfire with police. The suspect was shot in the neck and foot officials have recovered the gun. They say was used in the shooting along with the backpack, which they say contained drugs from an earlier robbery. And the NYPD officer accused of fatally choking a Staten Island man for years ago is scheduled to undergo a departmental trial. In mid-may, an administrative judge is set the date today shortly after the two thousand fourteen incident, a grand jury declined to indict officer Daniel Pantaleo on criminal charges now and NYPD watchdog this villian complete review board is pursuing the departmental case at a rally outside police headquarters, the victim's mother, Gwen Carr said Pantaleo is not the only one who should be held accountable. Actually Justice would look like when everybody who was involved in my son's murder that day stands accountable and lose their job at today's hearing Pantaleo pleaded not guilty. And it's now up to Albany to decide whether to legalize recreational marijuana by candidates for New York City. Public advocate are already offering their plans for how to spend the tax revenue it. Could generate former council speaker, Melissa Mark Viverito says at least half of it should be used to fix the subway. And we need infusion of revenue now for the MTA not five years from now three years from now. And if we legalize marijuana this is one of the foster sources of revenue that we can see in the state of New York. She says the revenue could also support communities of color who have been disproportionately affected by marijuana enforcement. But public advocate candidate Rafael Espinel says all the money should be spent on public housing and building out low level offenders, currently thirty two degrees in central park

Nypd Marijuana New York City Daniel Pantaleo Melissa Mark Viverito Eleanor Beardsley United States NPR Rafael Espinel Officer Jamie Floyd New York MTA Paris Executive Iran Robbery
Student loan company Navient used deceptive practices, audit suggests

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 4 years ago

Student loan company Navient used deceptive practices, audit suggests

"Washington debate is slated this evening between two candidates in unexpectedly. Contentious Mississippi Senate race, Republican Senator Cindy Hyde. Smith faces a runoff next week against democrat. Mike Espy the runoff race has become embroiled in controversy after a video surfaced on Twitter from a campaign event for Senator Cindy, Hyde Smith in Tupelo Mississippi earlier this month, and it she can be heard praising supporter by saying, quote, if he invited me to a public hanging. I'd be on the front row given Mississippi's history of racist violence against black people many observers heard that comment as a disturbing reference to lynching Hyde Smith who is white said in a statement that quote, any attempt to turn this into a negative connotation is ridiculous her opponent. Former congressman in US agriculture secretary. Mike Espy is African American. No candidate got more than fifty percent of the vote on November six sending the race to a runoff. Next week. You're listening to NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd, the head of New York City's board of election says the ballot is the reason for long lines on election day, the perforated to page ballot presented a series of problems never before experienced by the board or anywhere in the country. The only executive director Michael Ryan, he spoke to city council members during a nearly four hour long hearing today said his agency just didn't have enough time to test the scanners with that amount of paper city council speaker Cory Johnson said he expects a full plan from the city and state officials about how to fix these issues for quote, the next election and the one after that and the one after that. The man accused of killing a New York City. Toddler best known as baby hope has died in custody. The New York Times reporting that Corrado Juarez died Sunday due to complications related upon create a cancer. The fifty seven year old former restaurant worker was awaiting trial for the last five years. What is was charged in the murder of four year old on Djelic Custodio whose body was found in a cooler left in a wooded area area in upper Manhattan back in nineteen Ninety-one. Prosecutors say she had been suffocated and molested her killing remained unsolved for more than two decades, and predatory lenders in New Yorker taking advantage of an arcane legal document that allows them to immediately sees borrower's assets when they default, and in some cases, even when they don't the loophole is called a confession of judgment it forces small-time borrowers to forfeit their rights. If the lenders. Decide to sue Bloomberg BusinessWeek reporters Meyde Meidlinger says that most of these lenders are actually from out of state. The lenders have figured out that the New York state court system is the best for what they're trying to do here. And so they typically go to upstate county clerk's offices where people are just kind of sitting there rubber-stamping these judgments, there's no judge involved and mitre says these are impossible to overturn forty seven degrees. Support for NPR comes from i-drive may grow remote PC, providing real time remote access to PC's Maxon servers from anywhere for use win telecommuting or for remote management. Learn more at remote dot com slash NPR. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Ari Shapiro before heading to his mar-a-lago resort for thanksgiving today. President Trump took questions from reporters on the lawn of the White House as his helicopter waited. The topics included his statement on Saudi Arabia. A legal setback on his new asylum. Restrictions and his daughter Ivanka is use of a personal Email address. He spoke out against the ninth circuit court of appeals the federal appeals court for the western US. That's where judge yesterday temporarily halted the administration's new restrictions on asylum-seekers, Trump suggested the court was biased. No matter. What you do? No

New York City Hyde Smith Mike Espy NPR United States Senator Cindy Hyde Senator Cindy Tupelo Mississippi Mississippi President Trump Washington The New York Times Twitter Cory Johnson Ivanka Audie Cornish Senate
Gulf Coast braces for Gordon to strengthen to hurricane

The Takeaway

00:49 sec | 4 years ago

Gulf Coast braces for Gordon to strengthen to hurricane

"Tropical storm, Gordon is expected to strengthen into a hurricane by the time. It makes landfall tonight on the north central Gulf Coast. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports the biggest threat will be floods. Forecasters say Gordon will likely come ashore in Mississippi as a minimal hurricane but a wide stretch of the Gulf Coast is preparing for life threatening inundation from both storm surge and heavy rains, Richard Pasch with the National Hurricane Center says four to eight inches of rain is likely with higher accumulation in some areas, we can have isolated totals over portions of Louisiana southern Alabama. Southern Mississippi parts of Arkansas, western Florida, panhandle in some locations as much as twelve inches. The governors of Louisiana Mississippi and Alabama have declared states of emergency voluntary evacuations are underway in flood

NPR Mississippi Alabama Debbie Elliott Gulf Coast Wnyc Senator Bob Menendez Gordon Brad Kavanagh Governor Cuomo Louisiana National Hurricane Center New Jersey Paterson New Jersey Mayor De Blasios Jamie Floyd New York City Richard Pasch President Trump Senate
Marijuana, Bill De Blasio and Governor Cuomo discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:18 sec | 4 years ago

Marijuana, Bill De Blasio and Governor Cuomo discussed on All Things Considered

"On Monday the US and Mexico reached a tentative deal on, a revamp regional pack that excludes Canada America's second. Largest trading partner business leaders from both the US and, Canada urging negotiators degree to a version of NAFTA that continues to include all three. Nations President Trump has set a Friday deadline to come up with a

Marijuana Bill De Blasio Governor Cuomo Brooklyn President Trump United States Canada NPR Wnyc Chris Alexander Canada America Partner Jamie Floyd Donald Trump Nypd Archery New York Mexico Senate
Trump says he’ll sanction Turkey over U.S. pastor’s detention

All Things Considered

05:10 min | 4 years ago

Trump says he’ll sanction Turkey over U.S. pastor’s detention

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein the Trump administration is fast approaching it's court ordered deadline to Rian unite the remaining migrant families separated at the southern border by the federal government but as Texas public radio's Ryan poppy. Reports, at least one congressional lawmakers unconvinced, the administration will meet the goal during, a closed-door meeting US homeland secretary Christine Nilsson told. A group of lawmakers that included congressman Joaquin Castro the administration is on track to comply with southern California U S District judge. Dana sat Ross deadline, I'll be surprised if they actually meet the. Deadline because there are still hundreds. Of people that need to be reunited for them to meet that deadline as she did say that they know the. Identities, of, every, child, and every parent however Castro says during that same, meeting Nielsen also sat the administration had deported four. Hundred sixty three migrant parents without their children? Nielsen told Castro that the federal Government was assigning these children a guardian and would eventually be. Placed in foster care for, NPR news I'm Ryan poppy in Austin attorney general. Jeff Sessions is standing by his deputy rod Rosenstein my deputy, rod, Rosenstein, is highly capable I have the highest confidence in him sessions comment. Comes after a group of hardline conservative House Republicans introduced. Articles of impeachment against. Rosenstein last night they. Argue he failed to provide documents from the Russia probe which Rosenstein overseas sessions is urging lawmakers to focus on more pressing issues the Trump administration is threatening to impose sanctions on Turkey if it doesn't free an American pastor NPR's Michelle. Kellerman, reports on Kara's responding by accusing, Washington of damaging the US Turkey alliance, pastor Andrew Brunson was let out of a Turkish. Jail this week after one and Half years. But it's still under house arrest President Trump says on. Twitter this innocent man of faith should be released immediately and vice President Mike Pence says the US is ready to impose significant sanctions. On Turkey release pastor Andrew Brunson now or be prepared to face the consequences He was speaking of the, State Department I ever, conference to advance religious freedom a spokesperson for Turkey's president calls the threatening language unacceptable n calls on the US to adopt a. Quote more, constructive position Michelle Kellerman NPR news the State Department in one of the, worst single. Day losses in stock trading history Facebook stock. Collapsed today wiping. Out one hundred nineteen billion dollars market value this after a disappointing earnings report yesterday. And in a look at Wall Street in general the Dow closed up one, hundred twelve points at twenty five thousand, five twenty seven this is NPR. And you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd Wednesday's elections in Pakistan were just the second time. In the country, seventy year history that one civilian government handed power to another after, serving out a full term but not all Pakistani Amirah Are celebrating the transition as a democratic. Milestone twenty two year old Ali Molik. Works at Lahore Pakistani deli in SoHo. And he thinks the vote count was unreliable I, don't accept these reserve because they one that happen by, election commission the. Accepted and they said these some electronic problems the unofficial winner of Wednesday's election was former cricket star Imran, Khan, PTI party's opposition, parties have cried foul and allege widespread vote rigging in the national election mayor de Blasio is taking another step towards expanding his. National political, profile he's launching a new political action committee he says the money raised, will go. Towards travel costs for himself and first lady. Shirley McRae anticipated. State and federal candidates we have a lot we have to get done for New. York City it cannot be done just here there are things in York seed, needs that happened in all Albany that happened in Washington that cannot happen with the current political status quo Blasios says the pack is different from his controversial campaign for New York, which got large donations from people with business. Before the city that led to federal and state corruption investigations Bossio says. The new pack will limit contributions and banned donations. From corporations LLC's and people registered as doing business, with New York, City and the area around the intersection where a steam pipe exploded last week is almost back to normal emergency management officials say thirty six of the forty five. Buildings initially declared off limits and Manhattan's. Flatiron are, now open nine other buildings do remain closed they're being. Decontaminated for us, best does all streets and sidewalks are. Open except for the area immediately around Fifth Avenue and twenty first street. Currently eighty three degrees and overcast..

Rod Rosenstein United States Congressman Joaquin Castro Michelle Kellerman Federal Government NPR Turkey Andrew Brunson Ryan Poppy Dana State Department Nielsen De Blasio Washington Manhattan Christine Nilsson York City President Trump
Trader Joe's worker was killed by officer's bullet, LAPD says

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 4 years ago

Trader Joe's worker was killed by officer's bullet, LAPD says

"Down and have, one on ones, with foreign leaders but what I think matters is the message and if the message is stop, meddling, in our country stop violating our sovereignty than I support. That but that's the. Message that counts meanwhile Ryan dismissed Trump's plan to revoke security clearances from top former national. Security officials calling it a mild form of quote trolling rather than a serious attack, on descent the LAPD is confirming that it was a police officer's bullet killed a trader Joe's employees in shootout at, an LA store over, the weekend and he over-centralisation KPCC reports police. Had been aiming at gene Atkins After he had shot at them LAPD. Chief Michael Moore said, trader Joe's assistant manager. Melita Caratto was exiting the store at the same time officers were returning fire on, the gunman headed. Inside that's when the officers bullet hitter coronal ran back into the store in class behind, the manager's desk, her death is prompting scrutiny of the officer's. Decision to fire near a busy store front the chief is standing by their. Split second choice made as the gunman was on his way inside I believe my officers actions were, taken to defend themselves and in direct response. To the deadly threat posed by. Atkins, though it wasn't his bullet Atkins is being charged with the employees murder for, NPR news I'm Anne Gilbertson in Los Angeles all street end of the day in. Mix territory the Dow up one hundred ninety seven points to close a twenty five thousand two hundred forty one the NASDAQ down one point, at seventy eight forty and. The s&p five hundred up thirteen at Twenty eight twenty. This is. NPR and you're listening to WNYC I'm Jamie Floyd attorneys for Pablo v Asensio are asking a. Federal judge to release him from detention the undocumented. Immigrant was detained in June while delivering pizza to the fort Hamilton military base in Brooklyn much of. Today's court hearing focused. On whether the case should be argued in New York or New. Jersey where the man is being held legal aid attorney Gregory Copeland is part of the of Asensio's. Legal team and he says moving the case New Jersey would only delay things this case is about a family that was torn apart and I think that having that family reunited as soon as possible is. What matters here the federal government says the events yo is deportable because he was, ordered to leave the US voluntarily back in twenty ten the de Blasios administration is trying to raise. The ratio of female to male statues in New York City which is now abysmally low thirty Eighty. Three year old Brooklyn resident Aimal monsoon says her choice would be civil rights leader and investigative journalist. Ida b wells she never got the recognition that she needed even posthumously when, she passed away their, time doing a bit, on her at all but the work that she did is still felt today so I would go and put an altar statue the. Group she built NYC is taking suggestions on which female, historical figure should, get a statue, tune into the Brian Lehrer show. Tomorrow to hear deputy mayor Alicia Glen described details on, how to submit your nomination and you can call in to and in New Jersey the. Meadowlands racetrack has taken a nearly three point five million dollars in sports bets since it began accepting them nine days ago. Baseball betting generated the bulk of that total with the race track reporting earnings of more than one million, dollars over the July fourteenth weekend And another six hundred fifty thousand dollars just this past Saturday so.

Gene Atkins Lapd JOE NPR Assistant Manager New Jersey Brooklyn Officer New York City Gregory Copeland Meadowlands Racetrack Melita Caratto Brian Lehrer Ryan Chief Michael Moore Federal Government Fort Hamilton Alicia Glen New York Asensio
Ivanka Trump fashion brand shutting down

All Things Considered

01:27 min | 4 years ago

Ivanka Trump fashion brand shutting down

"The brand's ability to grow when Donald Trump was, elected his family was criticized by ethics watchdogs for deciding to continue to own and frosted. From various businesses while also running the country first daughter Ivanka Trump arrived at, the White House, with, a fashion, brand named after herself but as she. Became a presidential advisor she stepped down from managing the company and. Put it in a trust now. Ivanka Trump says because she plans to stay in Washington, indefinitely it's only fair to her team and partners to close down the Ivanka Trump fashion brand this is NPR, and, you're, listening to, WNYC I'm Jamie. Floyd local officials are criticizing the owner The daily news that decision to lay off half the newspaper's staff mayor de Blasios called the decision greedy saying trunk that Chicago based company that owns the, paper should, sell, the daily. News. To quote someone committed to journalism Trump has made cuts across many of the. Local papers under its control including the Baltimore Sun and. The Chicago Tribune appearing on WNYC's the takeaway New York Times media reporter Jacqueline Peiser also questioned trunks broader strategy I personally don't. Understand why they find the interest in buying these media companies if they don't care about. Journalism trunk acquired the daily news last, year from longtime owner mort Zuckerman for one dollar more buildings closed after..

Ivanka Trump Donald Trump Mort Zuckerman Chicago Tribune Mayor De Blasios White House Jacqueline Peiser Chicago NPR Advisor Baltimore New York Times Floyd Washington Reporter One Dollar
President Trump, Iran and President discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

04:42 min | 4 years ago

President Trump, Iran and President discussed on All Things Considered

"Live from NPR news in. Washington I'm Janine Herbst White House press secretary Sarah Sanders is refusing to say, whether President, Trump consulted. With national security aides before sending a late night tweet that. Appeared to, threaten war with Ron the tweet came in response to, remarks from Iran's president Hassan Rohani warning that, war with Iran would be the mother of all war NPR ceremony Kevin has. More from the White House Trump's tweet and all caps warned Iran's president to quote. Never ever, threaten the United States again or you will suffer consequences, the likes of which few throughout history have suffered before questioned about the tweet White House press secretary Sarah Sanders pointed to the Iranian leaders remarks the president's been I think pretty strong since day one in his. Language towards Iran he was. Responding to comments made from. Them and he's going to continue to focus on. The, safety insecurity of American people senators declined to give details on what it would take for Trump to negotiate directly she. Said the goal is to? Keep nuclear weapons out of Iran Hands Trump recently pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal over the objections of many US allies Serra mccamman NPR news the White House newly released. Commercial satellite images indicate North Korea has started making good, on its pledge to dismantle a space launch rocket engine testing complex as NPR's. David welna reports it's the first sign that Kim Jong UN is fulfilling what President. Trump says he promised, to do in their meeting last month, in Singapore the satellite photos. Were published by thirty eight north of respected independent website that analyzes developments North, Korea they, show before. And after shots of the so high satellite launch site with. The partial, dismantlement of a rail mountain structure where space launch vehicles, are assembled it also appears to show the, complete dismantlement of a rocket engine vertical test stand six weeks ago President Trump. Declared North Korea was destroying the site the website however says the demolition work seems. To have, begun only in the past two weeks other reports indicate North Korea is actually ramping up its nuclear. Weapons program David welna, NPR news Washington in Toronto an investigation continues into why twenty nine year old Fazle Hussain opened fire and the busy greektown section of the city Sunday night killing, two people and. Wounding thirteen others he was found dead after exchanging gunfire with police but it's unclear if he died from the shootout or a self inflicted. Wound Toronto police detective sergeant Terry Brown we have control of the city this is an, incident that has occurred is tragic incident there are many many many moving parts and victims to this incident but we will get through this family says he suffered from. Mental severe mental health problems but they could never have imagined this happening Wall Street ending the day, in mixed territory the Dow down thirteen points the. NASDAQ up, twenty, one the s. and p. five hundred up five points you're listening to NPR. News from Washington And I'm Jamie Floyd for WNYC in New York former New York state legislative employees who say they've experienced sexual harassment, while working in the capital are calling. On the state attorney general Andy elected officials to, release them from nondisclosure agreements members of the sexual harassment working group say the state, utilizes NDA's to keep victim. Silent by threatening monetary penalties attorney. General candidate zephyr teach out says this contributes to a. Culture of silence, around, investigating and punishing harassers at the state level, nobody understands who and how and where they should go to get a final result and, no one is finally responsible teach out is calling on, the state's ethics commission to be, more transparent about investigating harassment, and project witnesses who do come forward after some setbacks the fifteen month old. Pilot program to clean up the Ghana's Canal is in its final stages. EPA regional administrator Pete Lopez said today it took longer than expected. To figure out how to dredge the canal problem, started when crews began to install steel plates along the sides of the canal initial approach was a little too vigorous for the canal. Was creating some some vibration that was causing some, problems with the Jason building so we. Had to rethink that the vibrations even caused the promenade of the whole foods in Ghana's to sink slightly into the canal the says the pilot which focused on only small portions of the canal is, six months behind schedule full dredging on the rest of the waterway won't begin until..

President Trump Iran North Korea NPR Washington Fazle Hussain White House Harassment Sarah Sanders Press Secretary Janine Herbst White House David Welna United States Ghana Toronto Attorney Kim Jong Un
Manafort trial delayed as judge approves immunity for 5 witnesses

All Things Considered

04:34 min | 4 years ago

Manafort trial delayed as judge approves immunity for 5 witnesses

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Janine, Herbst a federal judge granting a bid to delay the criminal trial of President Trump's former campaign. Manager Paul manafort's trial was set to begin this week NPR's Windsor Johnston reports his, attorneys are getting, until the end of the month two review documents in the case the defense team had requested a delay after receiving more. Than one hundred thousand documents related to the case over the. Past month. Many of them came from electronic devices seized from manafort's former business partner Rick gates who has already pleaded guilty to charges and the special counsels Russia investigation the judge also granted the request for. Five witnesses to testify with immunity Manafort faces sixteen. Counts including Bank fraud tax evasion and conspiracy most of the charges, stem from activities that predate the five months Manafort worked on the Trump, campaign none of them relate directly to allegations? Of coordination with Russia Windsor Johnston NPR, news Washington President Trump is considering revoking security clearances for six former Obama. Administration intelligence and law. Enforcement officials including former CIA director John Brennan and former FBI director James. Comey home Trump fired White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, says in some. Cases these people, quote monetize their clearances both Brennan and Komi are frequent Trump critics US Olympic swimming star Ryan locked he is in trouble again, the US anti doping agency suspended him for fourteen months for a rules, violation ATI winner of twelve Olympic medals was previously banned for an incident at the 2016 Rio. De Janeiro Olympics NPR's Tom Goldman has more the US anti-doping agency you Sada is, not suspending Ryan, locked de for taking a banned substance his punishment is for violating a rule about IV infusions in the violation appears to. Be self inflicted in may locked e posted an Instagram photo, showing him Hooked up to an IV with the. Caption athletic recovery with some hashtag vitamins the picture, prompted a, you Sada investigation which determined he used the IV with a legal substance, but without a required therapeutic, use exemption locked he, has acknowledged quote there are rules. And you have to obey, them the, Thirty-three-year-old can't. Compete until next, July he still, plans to train for the twenty, twenty Olympics tangled -ment NPR news an investigation into the sinking, of, a, duck. Boat that left seventeen. People, dead look at whether operators violated the coastguards rules on entering the water during, a storm the Viviers vehicle capsized on a lake in Branson Missouri last week as the area was under a. Severe thunderstorm warning with your hurricane strength winds. US coast guard captain Scott Stormer says the boat was raised from the. Water today one of the focuses of the investigation certainly is to determine the vessels condition throughout the casualty the NTSB is also investigating this is, NPR news And I'm Jamie Floyd for WNYC New York, lawmakers are expressing skepticism that the Trump administration. Will meet Thursday's court, order deadline to reunite migrant children taken from their. Parents at the border New York congresswoman. Nydia Velazquez says the administration's failure will not go on noticed Mr President history will judge you but most importantly voters will judge you maybe a November the. Administration failed to meet an earlier deadline to return all children under five to their. Parents by July tenth fewer than half of those, families were reunited by that date hundreds of forcibly separated children were brought to New York, and the daily news has laid off half of its newsroom staff that happened earlier today. The newspaper a fixture in New York City for the last century was sold last year for. Just one dollar to the owner of the ship Kogyo trip. Photographer Todd as l. was among, those who lost his job and governor Andrew Cuomo says he was taken by surprise by. The lay, offs and that he reached out to the paper's owner to offer help if there's a way for the state to be helpful financially We will, be because we want to keep that institution sprung it's a New York institution we want to keep those jobs. In New York the newspaper says it will focus more on breaking news and it's digital audience will have complete. Coverage coming up after news headlines New York City officials say nine buildings affected..

NPR President Trump New York Paul Manafort United States Ryan New York City Washington Windsor Johnston John Brennan Nydia Velazquez Andrew Cuomo Director CIA Rick Gates Russia Branson Missouri White House
Jury convicts ex-N.Y. state senate leader of soliciting bribes

All Things Considered

02:59 min | 4 years ago

Jury convicts ex-N.Y. state senate leader of soliciting bribes

"To sell out America proves the Russians must have something personally politically or financially on. President Trump earlier house speaker Paul Ryan and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell reaffirmed America's. Alliance with NATO and Europe it was a departure from President Trump's. Remarks ahead of the meeting with Putin when Trump called, the Twenty-eight nation European Union a trade. Folk Trump's summit with Putin was held days after special. Counsel Robert Muller indicted twelve Russian military intelligence officers for their roles in the hacking of. Democratic Party, and other government, computer systems in other, news the Environmental Protection Agency is considering limits on the science it uses to make regulations NPR's. Rebecca hersher, reports many, scientists are alarmed by. The proposal air water and chemical regulations are based on scientific studies for example studies. About how, particulates in the air affect. People's lungs or how common chemicals, affect cancer risk many of those studies analyzed confidential medical data information that's used. For research but not released the public now the EPA with support from fossil fuel and chemical industry groups is arguing. That, such, research isn't trustworthy because the, raw data can't be made public the proposed rule. Would exclude such studies from Regulatory consideration many scientists and doctors disagree at a packed public hearing dozens of. People testified. That the rule would undermine the scientific process and would weaken public health, regulations Rebecca hersher, NPR news this is NPR and you're listening to WNYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd the. Former New. York state Senate, leader and his son have been found guilty of bribery. And extortion it's the fourth corruption, conviction, of a. Major state official far this year Karen, DeWitt reports, from Albany dean and Adams scallops had been. Convicted in, two thousand fifteen of crimes that included the elder scales arranging no show jobs were three hundred. Thousand dollars for his son but the conviction was overturned on appeal in the retrial jury for the. Second, time found both Scelo skill ty- on all counts in the second trial dean skeleton took the stand and testified that he did help get his. Son jobs but he said it wasn't an Exchange for political favors in the. End the jury didn't buy his version they instead agreed. With the prosecution that the job payments to Adam actually bribes and a federal judge has temporarily blocked, the government, from transferring. Any migrant children who had been sent to New York until. They can meet. With their attorneys hundreds of kids were sent to foster care agencies in New York after being separated. From their parents at the US Mexico border and must now be reunited, with them but Hassan she, fa- kala of the legal aid society in New York says the government was starting to move the children without telling their attorneys asking for is forty eight hours so, that we have.

President Trump New York Putin NPR Rebecca Hersher Senate Dean Skeleton Environmental Protection Agenc America Mitch Mcconnell Nato Robert Muller Democratic Party Europe Paul Ryan European Union
Nevada execution blocked after drugmaker protests use of its sedative

All Things Considered

04:37 min | 4 years ago

Nevada execution blocked after drugmaker protests use of its sedative

"Live from npr news in washington i'm deal willman president trump and german chancellor angela merkel held bilateral talks today during the nato gathering in brussels speaking through an interpreter mirko said she was grateful for discussions with trump let me say that i'm a very seasoned jazz for the exchanges us at indeed community to have an exchange about economic on pursue such as migration and also the future of a chafee nations earlier in the day trump blasted germany for its joint natural gas line venture with russia's saying merkel's government is captive to that country a nevada judge has delayed an execution because the drug maker has objected to one of its products being used as part of the lethal injection npr's aina jaffe reports that scott raymond dosier was scheduled to be executed tonight in the northern nevada town of ille if the decision holds this would be the first time that an execution has been halted because of a successful lawsuit by drugmaker alvin said it didn't want it sedatives my dazzle them to be used in a quote botched execution the company also claimed that the state of nevada had obtained the drug under false pretenses drug company sandoz has also objected to nevada using one of their drugs in executions that has not formerly joined the lawsuit fortysevenyearold scott raymond dosier has said he'd rather die than live in prison and that he doesn't mind zach is painful he was convicted of murdering and dismembering twenty two year old jeremiah miller who'd come to a las vegas motel to purchase ingredients for manufacturing methamphetamine either jaffe npr news the celebrations have begun in croatia following that country's come from behind to two one win over england in the world cup semifinal croatia was behind one nil until the sixty eighth minute and the go ahead goal came in the one hundred ninth minute with stocks the dow jones industrial average closed down two hundred nineteen points the nasdaq also was down forty two this is npr and you're listening to wnyc i'm jamie floyd wnyc has learned to young migrant children separated from their parents at the border were successfully reunited with their families here in new york wnyc's beth fertig has more sources and city government say immigration and customs enforcement brought to father to new york on tuesday to reunite them with their young sons that was the deadline set by a federal judge in california for the trump administration to reunite kids under the age of five with their parents the two families were received by lutheran social services and catholic guardian services hundreds of migrant children in new york were separated from their families after illegally crossing the border but government officials say they don't know how many are under the age of five federal officials did not respond to requests for more information about the children tune into the brian lehrer show tomorrow morning at ten for the latest on the trump administration's family separation policy and how it's playing out here in new york jersey city's mayor wants officials to scrap a contract to detain immigrants at the hudson county jail this in response to wnyc's report that the recently expired contract with isis close to renewal wnyc's matt katz reports steve full of is the mayor of one of the most diverse cities in the nation and the largest and democratic controlled hudson county he says if you oppose president trump's immigration agenda you can't jail the immigrants victimized by most if not all of the elected officials here speak to the fact that we don't support the trump policy but in actuality when you look at what they're doing they're actually doing something that opposite what they're saying essex in bergen county's also contract with ice the gel immigrants the three counties are paid six million dollars a month and mayor de blasio is denying allegations that he violated immigration laws when crossing the border during a visit near el paso last month the claims are outlined in a letter from us customs and border protection which was obtained by a p de blasio joined about twenty other mayors from across the country at the border to visit a holding facility for immigrant children he was denied entry he and his security detail went into mexico and then crossed into the us to get a view of the facility the letter was sent june twenty fifth to the nypd who runs the blasios security detail a spokesperson for the mayor says the group did nothing illegal tonight isolated showers and thunderstorms currently seventy seven degrees in central park at.

Washington Angela Merkel Brussels NPR President Trump Chancellor Nato Seventy Seven Degrees Six Million Dollars Twenty Two Year Twenty Fifth
Private sector adds 177,000 jobs in June, ADP says

The Richard Eeds Show

03:55 min | 4 years ago

Private sector adds 177,000 jobs in June, ADP says

"Live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer muchmaligned environmental protection agency administrator scott pruitt has announced he is stepping down npr's scott detro is more over the past few months pruitt has faced scandal after scandal from reports he authorized excessive spending for personal travel and security to reports he rented a room from a lobbyist at a below market rate to reports he used his official position to try and land his wife had job among others throughout all president trump's stuck by his administrator but now trump says he's accepted pruitt's resignation during his time on the job the former oklahoma attorney general started the process of unraveling scores of obama era environmental protections chief among them the federal government's main plan to lower national carbon dioxide emissions by shifting the energy sector away from coal scott tetreault npr news deputy epa administrator andrew wheeler will take over as acting administrator effective monday the trump administration says it will extend temporary protections for immigrants from yemen because of the country's brutal civil war npr's joel rose reports the department of homeland security announced the eighteen month extension thursday the decision means the roughly twelve hundred and fifty yemenis can continue to live and work legally in the us until at least march of twenty twenty the trump administration has shown great skepticism about temporary protected status or tps it's already announced the end of tps for hundreds of thousands of immigrants from other countries including el salvador haiti that led immigrant advocates to worry the administration would do the same for yemen but the department of homeland security says it will extend tps for yemen because of the civil war that's killed thousands and brought the country's economy to a standstill however the administration will not accept any new applicants from yemen unless they've been in the us since before 2017 joel rose npr news you've been services secretary alex as ours says the government will meet court deadlines too reunite migrant children with their parents also noted many of those reunited families will remain in the custody of immigration authorities are telling reporters today the government has been keeping tabs on the more than two thousand children who are separated from their parents at the border we do know i want to be very clear about this where every child is and we know each is being well taken care of federal judges ordered the children under the age of five be reunited with their parents by tuesday the rest by month's end as our says dna testing is being used to speed up the process strong private sector jobs numbers for june or generating optimism that when the government releases its more inclusive employment report tomorrow it will show similar gains payroll processor adp says the figures show private employers added one hundred seventy seven thousand jobs in june tech sector rally helped boost wall street today the dow jones industrial average was up one hundred and eighty one points the nasdaq rose eighty three points the sp five hundred was up twenty three this is npr and you're listening to wnyc in new york i'm jamie floyd a staten island woman who climbed the statue of liberty yesterday has been charged in federal court the us attorney's office for the southern district of new york has charged theresa kumo with trespassing interfering with a government agency and disorderly conduct she pleaded not guilty a climbed the base of the statue at around three o'clock yesterday afternoon where she waved a t shirt that said rise and resist and trumpcare makes us sick after nearly a four hour standoff that forced the evacuation of liberty island to pd officers mounted the base wearing harnesses and arrested komo new york city will soon dispatch groups of counselors and peacekeepers to crime scenes throughout the city starting in january the city will send mobile trauma units to offer mental health care and.

Washington Jack Speer Scott Pruitt NPR Administrator Eighteen Month Four Hour
Trump administration must turn over information about 2020 census question

Kate Dalley

02:47 min | 4 years ago

Trump administration must turn over information about 2020 census question

"The us justice department more from npr's yuki noguchi glencore shares plunged after it revealed that is under investigation for violations of money laundering and corruption laws the investigation relates to its operations in nigeria the democratic republic of congo and venezuela over the last decade but the company was already under scrutiny for its ethics glencore which operates metal minds and makes and markets agricultural and energy commodities already faced a potential bribery probe related to its mining operations in the congo the company says it is reviewing the subpoena you can achieve npr news washington major us trading partners including the european union china and japan are voicing their concerns about possible us measures on imported autos and parts they appeared before the world trade organization japan's warren such measures could trigger a spiral of countermeasures on wall street the dow dropped one hundred and thirty two points the nasdaq was down sixty five points this is npr and you're listening to wnyc i'm jamie floyd the new york city public housing authority now says it needs thirty two billion dollars to make repairs and improvements over the next five years that's a twentyseven percent increase over its previous estimate andrew ryan a consultant for the citizens budget commission says the authorities only slated to get a quarter of what it needs if you go on this path you are not going to reverse the decline of niger which is already insignificant state of disrepair ryan says federal state and city governments have all failed to support public housing for decades a federal lawsuit challenging a question about citizenship status on the us census is moving forward federal judge in new york has ordered the trump administration to provide information on its decision to include the question on the twenty twenty cents is form in a hearing today judge jesse furman said there is evidence the administration acted in bad faith new york new jersey and several cities and states around the country are suing the us department of commerce and the census bureau over the question arguing it could result in an inaccurate count by discouraging immigrants from participating in the survey and the mta has released the beta version of its new app it's called my mta james ramsay from wnyc's we the commuter project tried it out he says all it works well as an accurate countdown clock if you're standing on a hot subway platform it has some other shortcomings the problem is once i'm on the train and we stall out in a tunnel for about eight minutes and not only is the announcement on the intercom unintelligible but there's no way in the app for me to send a message to the mta saying i'm on this train stalled out.

New York James Ramsay Department Of Commerce Andrew Ryan Bribery Venezuela Yuki Noguchi Wnyc MTA Jesse Furman United States Niger Consultant Jamie Floyd Japan China Washington Congo
After Harley spat, Trump says other motorcycle firms may come to U.S.

All Things Considered

02:20 min | 4 years ago

After Harley spat, Trump says other motorcycle firms may come to U.S.

"Of a stronger economy carmakers reporting higher sales month of june embarrassed dustin dwyer looks at the numbers vehicle sales were up about four percent overall for the month according to an analysis by automotive news the biggest gains were in trucks and suv sales while sales of cars actually declined for some companies ford for example said it's trucks were up three percent an suv sales were up nine percent compared to last year while car sales declined fourteen percent fiat chrysler says it's ram pickup had its best june ever and the jeep cherokee had its best sales month ever automakers are expecting the good news to keep coming in the months ahead thanks to a strong jobs market and recent tax cuts that may give more americans the confidence to buy a new vehicle dustin dwyer npr news president donald trump is continuing his war of words with iconic american motorcycle maker harley davidson after harley announced it might move production out of the us because of new trade tariffs trump now says the administration is courting other motorcycle companies to come to the us harleys announcement might move production of motorcycles sold in europe to facilities outside the us drew condemnation from the president harley was hit by retaliatory tariffs put in place after you wash announced on a host of european goods a wall street today the dow closed down one hundred and thirty two points the nasdaq was down sixty five points this is npr and you're listening to wnyc in new york i'm jamie floyd governor andrew cuomo wants state health officials to oversee the blood testing of children who may have been exposed to lead paint in new york city's public housing buildings the announcement comes after it was revealed that new york city has not been notifying parents of the results of earlier tests that show children living in nitra apartments could potentially have toxic levels of lead in their blood cuomo says his office has been receiving calls from anxious parents they're in certain because they've heard so many different accounts state health commissioner dr howard zucker will meet with representatives from various new york city agencies nitra tenants groups and the federal government to develop an independent system supervised by the state hundreds of thousands of children could be eligible city hall says it's current program a free testing and home inspections.

New York City New York Dr Howard Zucker Nitra Andrew Cuomo Jamie Floyd President Trump Ford Federal Government Commissioner Dustin Dwyer NPR Europe United States Harley Davidson Donald Trump Cherokee Fiat Chrysler
NYPD guards media outlets after shooting at Maryland newspaper

All Things Considered

02:37 min | 4 years ago

NYPD guards media outlets after shooting at Maryland newspaper

"The justice department turn over documents related to the russia investigation and the hilary clinton email probe and bureau's ryan lucas says the measure passed on a party line vote the nonbinding resolution gives the justice department until july sixth hand over the documents which have been subpoenaed by republican led house committee's republicans say they need the materials as part of their oversight of the fbi justice department democrats say the resolution is part of a gop campaign to undermine special counsel robert muller's investigation they say republicans are trying to pave the way for the president to fire deputy attorney general rod rosenstein who oversees the russia probe the justice department says it has already turned over nearly nine hundred thousand documents to congress house republicans say they need more records including those related to the surveillance of a former trump campaign aide and they're threatening to hold rosenstein in contempt if he doesn't provide them ryan lucas npr news washington in a report by the state department is warning the children separated from their parents and held in government run facilities do not receive adequate emotional support npr's jackie northern reports it also says children in that situation and be easy targets for human traffickers he annual trafficking in persons report grades how governments worldwide comeback economic and sexual slavery one section describes the potential longterm problems of separating children from their parents and placing them in institutions it says even well run residential institutions are unable to meet a child's need for emotional support the report comes at a time when the us faces backlash for separating families that cross the us mexico border illegally state department official says the us has mechanisms in place that screens trafficking indicators when children crossed the border unaccompanied or if they're separated from their parents and are in care jackie north npr news washington toys r us says it shuttering its last us stores by the end of the week the company which also owns babies r us has been hobbled by five billion in debt after a leveraged by out on wall street today the dow closed up ninety eight points the nasdaq rose fifty eight points you're listening to npr this is wnyc i'm jamie floyd the nypd late this afternoon posted officer officers outside of major media outlets in new york following the shooting at one of the country's oldest newspapers in maryland police said the critical response teams were sent to various news organizations out of an abundance of caution as you've been hearing a gunman at the capital gazette in annapolis maryland shot multiple people at their offices maryland police say they have the suspect in custody our coverage continues right after news headlines port authority of new york and new jersey directors are delaying their vote on whether to raise the minimum wage at its airport above state mandated levels the agency announced today it will extend the multiple the public comment period by thirty days port authority executive rick cotton said the agency wanted to consider several issues brought up by employers including whether the cost of benefits can be considered as part of the hourly wage latebreaking comments with some very complex issues rutted four and we had to do our due diligence in march the port authority voted to approve a draft proposal that would gradually boost the minimum wage to nine hundred dollars by the year twenty twenty three airport workers currently make about ten dollars and forty five cents per hour and some types of electric bikes will officially be legal in new york starting next month the city's department of transportation.

Justice Department Hilary Russia Nine Hundred Dollars Ten Dollars Thirty Days