19 Burst results for "James r Hansen"

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

Dare I Say

08:54 min | 3 months ago

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

"Jane Fonda was arrested five times for environmental protest outside the Capitol this fall. She accepted a BAFTA film award while being taken into custody and photographs. The actor cast a striking figure in handcuffs in red will coat. It's a color fitting for the protests which are inspired by global school strikes and called Fire Drill. Fridays fresh from her arrest streak. The activists joined environmental justice campaigner and community organizer. Peggy Shepherd to record a live episode of Dare. I say in partnership with AMEX AT SAKS fifth avenue in New York City Peggy has been at the forefront of the Environmental Justice Movement in the US for a long time. She founded nonprofit organization. We Act for Environmental Justice in North Manhattan in the eighties. It helped low income New Yorkers in particular communities of color fight harmful environmental policies. It now fights for better environmental and health policies on a local and national level in the I live recorded episode of Dare. I say peggy and Jane discussed civil disobedience the green new deal resilience and why it is important for women to lead the climate conversation. How can we remedy empathy crisis? That has hurt generations of Americans. Why is the cult of rugged individualism driving climate disaster? What can older generations learned from teenagers at the decades on the frontlines? Peggy and Jane Have Not Stop Fighting. They are women who dare. Hi You know. We have a lot in common where activists arrested. But why have you decided to be arrested and to be active at this moment in time over Labor Day weekend? I felt great malaise because I drive an electric car and I do away with single use plastics and I make all those right personal lifestyle choices but I knew that they're not going to be able to scale up in time to get us where we need to be is a good place to start but it's no place to stop and so. I read a book by Klein that talked about a green new deal and talked about gratitude and it inspired me to get out of my comfort zone as Greta says we have to do and not behave business as usual as you know better than a lot of people. We have decades many decades more than forty years writing speeches and books and getting the word out about the science. What the science says. And we've marched and we've rallied and we've played nice and it hasn't worked enough and we only have eleven years left and so we have to up the stakes and I think we have to mobilize and go into the streets and put our bodies on the line and engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested. I don't WANNA BE ARRESTED. But you know you have to be willing to risk it so I went. I moved to DC for four months to win gaijin fired real Fridays because Fridays is the day that Greta and the student climate strikers have chosen to strike for climate so I want to support them and helpless their message teenagers today were born more than a decade after NASA scientists warned Congress about climate change in nineteen eighty eight. James Hansen told lawmakers at the time that he was ninety nine percent sure that human activity was causing temperatures to rise. Teenagers today have inherited the climate crisis. They have grown up. In a world of apocalyptic headlines and increasingly volatile weather. It's no surprise that they are extremely intelligent educated and now taking to the streets sweetest teenager. Greta Tonsberg inspired a wave of student protests across the world when she skipped school to strike outside of her country's parliament. And so how do you feel that? We really can motivate young people and youth to really be the strong activists that they need because they are going to inherit this climate this globe right now. What I'm feeling is I don't need to motivate them. They're motivating me. They're the ones because they see that we've taken their future not we. The fossil fuel industry has is robbing them of the future and we can't let them shoulder this burden by themselves. So Granny's unite. Older people have to get out there and and we have to stand along side them. This is a collective crisis that's going to require a collective solution that means all of us together because it is a stomach and we know that we can each take the issues that we need. Whether it's changing light bulbs whether it's recycling. We know that we can do all of those things. But we know that it's systemic and that we gotta come together collectively to educate our elected officials and to pressure the policymakers to really pass the kind of legislation that we all need. But we know that we can't do that with the message. Simply reducing carpet or a message. Simple energy efficiency. We've got a really embraced the values that appeal to all of our communities because Oliver Communities are not whole. They're not healthy. We know that millions of people in this country are living with bad air. They don't have clean water and they are disproportionately impacted by pollution and the Environmental Justice Movement has really for the last thirty years were to achieve environmental protection for all communities and we know also that when we talk about climate change and you hear people talk about climate justice. Climate Justice is not just a cool phrase. It's really a term that is focused on the most vulnerable communities. And how we've got to take action to ensure that the most vulnerable are protected because when that happens we're all protected and so we've got agreement deal and we know that that's been an important framework that's been proposed and it's wonderful that she was not prescriptive. Afc and the others who have talked about this framework we know that it has motivated sectors of of our country to get together and fill in the blanks. What they think is a green new deal what they need for their communities and for their lives and that's been a very important motivator. I think in this moment for a long time. There's been this rap that the environmental movement is white and elite. I think even Obama kind of felt that way but my experience is that that is not the case and then in fact people of color who live in the frontline communities have been very much at the forefront of the environmental movement and are the bravest strongest voices. It's a stereotype that people of color don't really care about the environment. Because they're really concerned with with jobs and food and of course we're all concerned with that but what? I've found predominantly above ninety sixth street when we have monthly membership meetings. It's not the more fluent Brown's donors who are coming out on these sites. It's people from public housing. We get so many calls about air pollution coming into their apartments about odors and emissions from trucks cars buses. We have worker training program for under employed young men and we invited them to come to our membership meetings to hear about issues of climate change or toxins in and chemicals cosmetics and they were able to understand the issue they were able for the probably the first time in their lives to talk to an elected official and tell them what they felt in what they needed and so it's about support. People know what they need. They just need some support to be able to advocate and to be able to. Maybe have a place to come and use computer. Have a place to come and ask some key questions. Let me just tell you that the upcoming mayoral public housing tenants are going to be a major factor in who gets elected and we're going to be organizing them and there's coalitions all over the city to ensure that some of the most vulnerable people are the ones who are going to be part of the solution and so I would simply say that the most vulnerable when we address them we lift all boats. It's not about trickle down. It's about lifting everyone up together and that's what creates an equitable and just society.

Peggy Shepherd Greta Tonsberg Environmental Justice Movement Jane Fonda Official United States Amex Oliver Communities James Hansen North Manhattan New York Barack Obama Granny Klein
"james r hansen" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

03:06 min | 11 months ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Back to the nineteen sixties right these headlines from the going back as far ars ne. Here's one from nineteen sixty seven dire famine forecast by nineteen seventy five all right. This is from the Los Angeles Times. It's already too late for the world to avoid a long period of famine. A Stanford University Biologists said Thursday sound familiar nineteen sixty nine the trouble with almost all environmental. Oh problem says Paul Erlich the population biologists is that by the time we have enough evidence to convince people you're dead from one thousand nine hundred seventy air pollution may obliterate the sun and cause a new ice age in the first third of the next century. That's from the Boston Globe years from what am I looking at the Washington Post in one thousand nine hundred seventy one DR S. I. Rassoul of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA and and Columbia University says in the next fifty years so let's see that's right now. In the next fifty years the fine dust man constantly puts into the atmosphere by fossil fossil fuel burning could screen out so much sunlight that the average temperature could drop by six degrees is going to get much much much colder scrolling forward in time okay. Those are the seventies. Let's go into the nineteen eighty. acid rain kills life in lakes acid rain which has already wiped out out the fish in the one hundred ninety seven in New York's Adirondack Mountain Lakes is rapidly killing other lakes in nearby eastern Canada ten years later the US government government declared that acid rain was not a threat nineteen seventy eight no end in sight to thirty year cooling trend nineteen eighty eight a gradual rise in average sea level is threatening to completely cover this Indian Ocean nation the Maldives of eleven ninety six small islands within the next x thirty years according to authorities all right from nineteen thousand nine. Oh a New York City's westside highway to be under water by twenty winning Nineteen James Jim Hansen the scientists who in one thousand nine hundred eight predicted the greenhouse effect before Congress looked out at Broadway in New York City and said Ed what you're saying about the greenhouse effect. Is Anything going to look different down there. He said yes. The West side highway will be underwater more. I'm just I'm just going through these The Guardian in two thousand four the Pentagon tells Bush climate change will will destroy us so so this has been going on for a long time it is clearly some kind of religious guilt reaction to progress to comfort it has been sold from different points of view who is going to get colder. It's going to get hotter. That's going to get flooding. Let's let's take a look at some of the things that happened. I let's let's play a video with Bjorn Lomborg who is one of the best of these guys because because Bjorn Lomborg says he says look I'm going to accept on faith that what the scientists say is true about some of the problems that are facing us and he knows some of these scientists and he says look the not wine.

Bjorn Lomborg New York City Paul Erlich Los Angeles Times Stanford University Adirondack Mountain Lakes Boston Globe New York Ed DR S. I. Rassoul National Aeronautics and Space Washington Post Maldives Indian Ocean US James Jim Hansen Congress Canada Columbia University
Former Vice President Al Gore talks climate change solutions in the Twin Cities

Climate Cast

10:37 min | 1 year ago

Former Vice President Al Gore talks climate change solutions in the Twin Cities

"Former Vice President Al Gore comes to Minnesota. I'm N._P._R.. Chief meteorologist Paul Hutton here. This is climate gas. He's arguably the most important historical figure in expanding climate change awareness in America <hes> and the world his two thousand six film an inconvenient truth introduce climate change science and solutions to millions. His work earned the Nobel Peace Prize this weekend former Vice President Al Gore is here in Minnesota training twelve hundred climate activists through his climate reality project. He sat down with me at the event in Minneapolis Mr Gore thanks for taking the time to talk with us on climate cast today and hey welcome to Minnesota. It's great to be back. You know you're here in the the twin cities this weekend for this climate reality project training event. Why did you start climate reality and what does this accomplish well because I came to the conclusion Susan that the only way we can change policies in time to solve the climate crisis is with grassroots pressure from every state in our country from every county and so I decided when my first movie came out I used one hundred percent of the profits from that movie and the book to <hes> to set up the climate reality project and to mobilize Aisa thousands of people tens of thousands of people to put pressure on their elected representatives and business leaders and civic leaders and community leaders nice to to make the changes that we need to make let's go back thirty one years ago this Summer Nastase Dr James Hansen testifies before your your committee in Congress and he says there's a ninety nine percent degree of confidence for a cause and effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming? How important was that testimony in your path to climate change awareness well? I think that was an important moment. <hes> in making lots of people realize is that this is for real and we need to do something about it unfortunately in the wake of that hearing and the others that I and other members of Congress Health <hes> the fossil fuel <hes> industries took the playbook prepared by the tobacco companies companies back when the doctors and scientists say hey folks <hes> smoking cigarettes causing lung cancer or disease and they hired actors dressed up as doctors and put him on T._V.. To falsely tell people that there was no health problem at all well that same blueprints what's been used by the fossil fuel companies with the point of bring that up is in a healthy democracy where the truth was turned into power testimony like that of Jim Hansen you asked about would have led to dramatic policy changes reason it hasn't is because of the political influence of the coal companies the oil companies in the gas companies but we're gaining on them and these grassroots activists including an impressive number of them here in Minnesota are really making progress ars you talk about policy. You came within a whisker of the presidency in President Gore I like to think it would have been completely and totally different of course in our country. A president has to persuade the Congress Congress and asked to be a skillful politician and getting support for his or her initiatives but I like to think I would have been able to to put in completely different policies that would help to avoid some of this <hes> heartache and hardship and I still think we can do that. We've lost some ground for sure. Some damage has been made inevitable now unfortunately but we still have time to avoid the most catastrophic consequences so rather than looking back and crying over spilt milk as they say. I look forward and try to figure out what I can do to serve in different way. Just watch you give what we might. Call the talk talk at this climate reality event not that dissimilar from the one you used in an inconvenient truth but how has your presentation changed in the thirteen years since the the movie is changed dramatically in a lot of ways because I can bring up examples of floods or droughts or storms or whatever whatever not from ten years ago but from yesterday or last week and literally every night on television news is like a nature ager. I threw the book of revelation and the examples that illustrate all of what the scientists have been warning us about are all around us now every single day. I think that does make an impression on people I know it. Does it makes an impression on me. Yeah I WANNA get your assessment of where we are with the big big picture on climate change today. We're seeing the positive side rapid progress on solutions like renewables Minnesota here. We generate twenty five percent of our electric power. You're from renewables as you know last year. That's way faster than people thought it would happen fifteen years ago. Public opinion is shifting. We know that a little bit and yet greenhouse gas emissions are still rising globally and this administration is basically a wall or going backwards on solution so what's the right urgency level here and what's your assessment of how this plays out for the next ten to twenty years the dramatic truth is that those of us who are alive today we have in our hands decisions to make that will have enormous consequences for thousand generations to come. Tom and that sounds overly dramatic but it's the case. We're putting one hundred ten million tonnes every day of this heat. Trapping pollution into the sky stays there for a thousand years on average and it's trapping so much extra heat <hes> the amount of extra heat energy every day is equal to five hundred thousand or Rocha uh-huh class atomic bombs exploding every day. That's crazy but that's what we're doing. Now what I think you're getting at in the first part of your question is how do we see this. They're contracting interesting trend some good some bad <hes>. We're gaining momentum for the solutions but we're not yet gaining on the crisis crisis because the crisis is still getting worse faster than we are mobilizing solutions yet because we're gaining momentum we may soon have within our capacity the ability to gain on the problem there was a famous economists in the last century name. Rudy Dornbush who once said things take longer to happen than you think they will but then they happen much faster than you thought they could. I think think that it's likely to be true. Where are solutions to this crisis. It's taken longer than many of us thought. It would hoped it would anyway but. But I think that we're now getting to the point where it could happen faster than anybody can imagine to take one example <hes> when the cost of electricity <hes> pity from solar and win gets not only cheaper than electricity from Cohen Gas but way cheaper then no matter how much political political power the fossil fuel companies have it would just take a complete idiot to continue spending way more money than necessary to create dirtier and expensive electricity when you can have it for much cheaper when cleaner air and more jobs and I think we're right in that region now where we're going to see see this flip over and more rapid change. I hope that I'm not pollyannish or overly optimistic but that's the pattern I see unfolding right now. Let's talk about about how that seems to be happening a little bit. I mean if you look at investors. The big insurance firms Swiss re Munich REC- this changing catastrophic loss model we saw P._G.. Any go bankrupt <hes> because of the fire liability in California right. I mean some saying that's the I fortune five hundred climate bankruptcy. How important is this growing investor risk awareness in driving that positive change you talk about Oh. I think it's extremely important there was a story this this morning about the largest private investor black rock losing many billions on fossil fuel investments and they're still the largest fossil fuel in bed. I'm not picking on my in respect them a lot but there so many investors who are taking a close look at the fact that these carbon assets <unk> are really not that different from the subprime mortgages of a few years ago you know there were seven and a half million subprime mortgages meaning mortgages that it looked as if they were triple. A. Rated assets with a value that was based on <hes> false assumptions when actually they were worthless because they'd been given out to people that couldn't make monthly payments and good make down payments and there was a mass delusion and people finally pull pull back the layers of the onion enough to see the truth of it and they suddenly collapsed and that's what caused the credit crisis and then the great recession well. We've now got twenty two trillion dollars worth of carbon assets the reserves of coal and oil and gas and the stocks and these as multinational companies that are based on the assumption that all that fossil fuels going to be burnt well it can't be burn won't be burned not just because of some mm treaty or some law but because solar and wind is going to be much cheaper and efficiency is reducing the demand for what they're selling an electric cars or a progressively destroying the market for liquid petroleum assets and it's only a matter of time before they wake up to this the largest sovereign wealth fund in the world the Norwegian Fund which got all his money from oil and gas. They're really smart. They just announced they're going to divest one hundred percent for from oil and gas assets a so those who are taking the time to read the handwriting on the wall are coming to the conclusion that they need to get with this change and move onto into renewables and the sustainability revolution.

Minnesota Vice President Al Gore President Trump Chief Meteorologist Fuel Industries Minneapolis Congress Paul Hutton Congress Congress Dr James Hansen America Mr Gore Congress Health Gore Cohen Gas
"james r hansen" Discussed on Back To Work

Back To Work

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Back To Work

"But. We gotta do your we've got to open. I wanted to tell me about BUSTER. On a having so much. So good Merlin. Started. So good. Okay. This is Cohen brothers thing. I know and it's got the guy. It's the guy from the movie that I like yes in that. This is AJ was his name. Robert Earl Hugh's James William Hansen that won't go with three names. Tinley Nelson Nelson got in three Tim, Tim Blake Nelson it. He's great short stories, right? Each one's like a freestanding the word that I would use would be vignette. He is in the opening vignette, and they oh, he's the framing device boy. Well, no because this is what's great about it. I thought it would be I don't wanna ruin anything. But you find out in the first vignette don't don't tell me too much because I will watch it. You gotta watch this. I'm right. I'm good on as much watching the why? Now, I watched at once all the way through and loved it. And I thought there there isn't there's a couple off color words in it. That might offend. There's the use a couple words sure there's one scene where there's an implication that Sex's taken place, but you don't see anything and other than that. This is I you know, I watched this with what's he saying kids, let my son watches with me got. And at the one point where there was the implication that some business had gone on. I said to him. I said do do you know where he's going? And he said, no, I said he's going to a whorehouse. And he says what's that? And I said this is a place where prostitutes work, he said, what's that? And I said don't worry too much about what that is. It's a place where adult stuff can happen. And he's he's like do do. I want to watch this. I said that not there's nothing gonna happen. It's just the implication that something grownups do takes place. And he was fine with it. Understood that and didn't Detroit's planning brand got pushed out a window. I can't. Private to talk. But so anyway, at the very least Merlin, you're gonna love this. I think name. Big name a year ago or something I didn't watch. It's good. I saw when the nnounced in. I thought this looks like a really good thing. I'll watch it's on Netflix, which I have and I can watch I can launch. I absolutely love this thing. I've seen survivor so I should probably use the break. Yeah. You've got to watch this. And you can you can pause after each yet. If dare but it oh, good. It's so good and the pure saying, I should watch is what you're saying. Like like, I'm almost winning. Okay. An all I'm going to say is this. Okay. Do you remember Dudley from? From Harry, Potter Potter fame. Harry Potter films leaders Li yeah. Yeah. He's in this. It is up to you to find out who he is. It's going to blow you away when you see it that's off tune unit. No, I'll petunias in in in in Corliss. And I believe. Yeah. Okay. All right. I see my cue if I can figure where it is in the queue. Place. Funny games with where you put the and the last one is so good. So all right. I feel like it's the way it's the way that I'm guessing feels about the finder who Tom way Linley Tom Wade's the ocean doesn't want me today. Earn your turn turn out just roll. Go to head the queue hit the film. Along long pipe there tangled to this. Aw. The door. You've got to watch break map. Bo you could do the whole cow. Sure. Nickel. Wow. That was been sitting in a pot for him. It's good that might be almost at the level of your MARCY. Way whole south five children. All right. So what? And another show ends without doing your topic. Hey, what what? No, no, no, no, don't we gotta we got a. Yeah, we truly should do. We should see. Now, we built it up too much, and I feel terrible. So listen to this for me, go to TV slash BTW slash forty-three..

Tim Blake Nelson Harry Potter Tinley Nelson Nelson Cohen Linley Tom Wade Netflix Detroit Robert Earl Hugh Potter Potter Corliss Dudley James William Hansen Li
"james r hansen" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on KPCC

"So at this point Pomeranz, this feeling pretty good. I think we were feeling like we're making progress. Nineteen Eighty-eight was also an election year. And today I'd like to begin to outline what I do about the environment might plan for how we as a nation, and as a people can lead the world to a new recognition of the importance of the environment. And so George H W Bush campaigns on the issue, some say these problems are too big. Impossible for an individual or even a nation as great as ours to solve the problem of global warming. He says if ten be done, and we must do it. It means we're going to do something about the problem. The White House will do something about the problem. From NBC news election headquarters. This is election night. Eighty-eight said George Hw Bush gets elected and industry starts to brace for new regulatory policy or even climate legislation. But shortly after he enters office there, emerges, a very strong divide between different factions within the White House on one side, the EPA administrator and the secretary of state or pushing strongly three for ABC. a global treaty and on the other side Johnston. Ainu new chief of staff whose deeply skeptical My of name is Robert the science shawna's, Aaron and I'm of any the owner efforts of neuro located to in Pasadena, introduce regulatory and policy I am an related underwriter to of climate KPCC. then sununu I became definitely encourage basically, the business owners to a check out difficult KPCC. the It's obstacle been wonderful working to moving with them forward. and their staff is So incredible. in response to this And the listenership internal the people that listen to back the programs and forth conflict are exactly within my the White target House. market. Al For Gore underwriting information Goto, decides to KPCC hold another hearing dot again ORG with James Hansen. slash To support put pressure on the slash White House to underwriting. commit fully to the global negotiation process for Welcome treaty. back to the frame. I'm So John horn. as usual, Dana James Gioia Hansen is California. sense, his Born prepared and testimony raised a to Hawthorne the White House boy for a who provable. went on to chair But the National this time it Endowment comes back for the arts heavily for censored six years. with all kinds And of deletions now he's wrapping up his that term distort as California's his scientific poet findings laureate and during also his two year additions stint his goal was to visit that all fifty make arguments eight counties about economic in the state policy and much of that travel essentially saying has been that done there via should be road no regulations trip. KPCC's that at all compromise arts education the economic goals reporter, of the country. Carla havi Wow. are tagged So along for Hanson one of the last legs rather of that than journey fighting when with I asked the White Dana House Gioia, sensors, I could hit you ride with him. he I didn't accepts actually all think of the he'd changes. say. Yes. But But then he on makes a Thursday a call afternoon, to gore he and pulled tells into them the what's KABC happened parking gore lot. asks Hanson, can I tell this to the New York Times and Hansen says shore and the times publishes a bombshell story saying that the White House is trying to censor an ASA. Scientists the administration censored testimony by Dr Hanson to make his conclusion seem less serious and less certain. So it's a huge embarrassment to the White House, and they have to apologize. They claim that the censorship came from a functionary five levels down from the top. And they shortly thereafter, recommit to the international negotiation process for a climate treaty. And they save for the more that the US will lead the effort and who was that anonymous censor to Hanson anyway behind the deletions and the additions so nobody knew. Do who this sensor was at the time. But when asked John sununu about this during my reporting, he said that the directive had come from him. We need action. And we need it. Now every American deserves to breathe clean air. So in November. There's a meeting in Nordic in the Netherlands, which will be the first high-level diplomatic meeting about the framework for a global treaty on climate change. Every country since its environmental minister. So the the US is equivalent is the head of EPA William Riley, who's the strongest proponent of a treaty in the White House. But it's the union doesn't trust him. So he sends an ally as a kind of minder to make sure that the US doesn't accept any kind of binding proposal. There were a group of us advocates who were there on the last day. There's a major session that's close to everyone except for the diplomats and Pomeranz and his fellow activists camp out outside of a big conference room at a hotel where this is taking place. We were there to bring attention to the success or failure of the meeting, and they wait as the meeting goes longer than expected deep into the night and finally into the next morning, and we try to find out what was going on trying to bring some attention to the meeting to the media that sort.

White House Dr Hanson George Hw Bush Pomeranz Dana James Gioia Hansen White Dana House Gioia US Gore EPA KPCC NBC Pasadena New York Times John sununu chief of staff California
"james r hansen" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And then Robbie said, basically what Michael Keaton says in the movie, which is I don't remember it. But it was on my watch, and we should have gotten it. And then Tommy and I debated for a solid fifteen minutes about whether to put it in the movie. Almost not going to be in the movie Tommy base. I mean, look, you know, I mean, we love Robbie right? And it doesn't exactly make Robbie look great. But frankly, it's more of a. What I very quickly argued Tommy was this is much more of an indictment of the paper and of the institution than it is Robbie. No, it's not. He didn't vary. Correct. So, you know, it's it's just one of those things where we did we had a little bit of a day debate. But I'm very quickly went to come on. It's so good hockey. You not put that in. Now, we're gonna we're gonna have a spoiler section for. I man we're not there yet. But I just I just want to get into it. You're talking about research the second ago, and I know that you worked with James r Hansen the author of the alarms drums. Yeah. Book and he spent a lot of time with Armstrong. Yeah. And I know the two of you worked so closely. So well together that you even released an annotated screenplay version of first man, which I got right here right there, looking in fact, I thought I'd ask a trivia question. Whoever answers correctly could walk away with with a brand new cop can't. He me because I'm terrible. All right. Let's do you want to do that. Now or do that after we do that in a little bit? But so so tell me about when you first started working with James, and what it was like for you on this project because having interviewed you for the cover story of backstory magazine, I know that you got pretty much every nut bolt and screw and on. On crafts completely correct? Because you went on a deep deep dive. I mean, you know, I I should curse the day. The Tom McCarthy taught me to dive deep and I should curse the day. The Damian Chazelle convinced me that this is going to be this is going to be anything less than than impossible. The two things that were just so challenging with this where the technical, and you guys have all now seen mean, it is just brutal. And and and as you know, an actor actually said to me after seeing the film, he said, I can see the hundreds of pages that are on the cutting room floor, and that's totally true to get those scenes, right? The technical scenes like we had to so much work and heads are overwrite so much. You know and make sure it was all technically accurate. And so it was it was a. The technical of this is brutal. 'cause it ranges from, you know, incredibly well covered stuff and Apollo which you can't get wrong because everyone knows it in the space community to stuff that you know, the mission control stuff in. Gemini. I mean, there are no transcripts for that. So I literally had to get with Jerry Griffin. Who is in Michigan troll playing the GNC gyns? He not playing he was actually the guidance navigation and control flight controller, and he literally had to walk me around through each of the eight main flight controllers, and what they would each be saying in each of the five sections when there because Damien wanted to shoot a documentary style, which meant I had to have language for all of it. 'cause you never knew what camera is going to be on who. So I mean, I wrote forty pages of dishing dial just from Michigan Charleston. Crazy. I was in San didn't a bunch of it not end up in the sites like three minutes. It's in the move those guys like. Hearst for date..

Robbie Tommy base Damian Chazelle James r Hansen Jerry Griffin Michael Keaton Michigan Charleston hockey Tom McCarthy San Hearst Armstrong Michigan Apollo Damien fifteen minutes three minutes
"james r hansen" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Anyone listening to your scientific opinion? I look at this as a citizen we'll get outta here with your opinions as a citizen else. Would we accept the you tell me now what else we? We accept this. If someone told me, hey, Trevor, these test results say that you have cancer. But I'm not a doctor. I think you're fine. I would not be like, oh, no, no carry-on, kerryon. Yeah. Tell me your thoughts on my health. You know, he is he is he is right. Why would we ever listen to sell one who admits they're not a scientist lecturing us about? Science like climate change like say at the United Nations General assembly in two thousand fourteen when famed actor Leonardo DiCaprio went before the general assembly and said, quote, I am not a scientist. But I don't need to be because the world scientific community is spoken. And they have given us our prognosis if we do not act together, we will surely perish non-scientists Leonardo DiCaprio telling us, we are all going to die. But we don't have to listen to Leonardo DiCaprio because he is not a scientist. Al Gore won a Nobel peace prize for a slide show in which he predicted that the polar ice caps would be ice free by twenty thirteen. It's now twenty eighteen and Santa and his elves are doing just fine. Thank you very much. Let's listen to scientists though. The preeminence climate. Scientists of the last four decades undoubtedly is James Hansen Hansen is the leading light in climate science and has been since at least the mid nineteen eighties. In fact, in nineteen eighty seven he gave a landmark speech in which she described three scenarios for.

Leonardo DiCaprio James Hansen Hansen United Nations General assembl Al Gore Santa Trevor four decades
"james r hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"This radio. Can you hear me? Another four coming up here on nightside. And again, I hope that you enjoyed the last hour as much as I did. I man the life of Neil a Armstrong by professor professor emeritus, James r Hansen obviously, the movie is out. But you might want to look at that book. He's a professor of America's of history at Auburn. And he's a former historian at NASA. And boy, this is quite a story for those of us who live at the time. It was an extraordinary moment at a time when the country was deeply divided maybe as divided then as it is now, so we'll have professor Hinson back. I guarantee you and sorry about that little glitch at the end where we lost. But that's what happens sometimes you can we can put men on the moon. Sometimes we can't keep a cell phone working for an entire hour. Lemme we're a little bit behind here in the BC box offices. So let me if I could open up the BC box office real quickly for caller number eleven at six point seven nine. Three one ten thirty. We have another pair of tickets to the holiday favorite A Christmas. Carol at Bill hanney's, north shore music theater. Now, it's not on stage yet it will be. A it starts on December. Seventh is onstage through the twenty third of December. Take you right up almost Christmas. Showtimes in tickets, visit NS Mt. Dot org. NS? Mt. Dot ORG. Phone lines are already lighting up. You've got to be caller number eleven. We have another busy box office later on this hour. Now, I would like to go to an issue of a little bit of controversy that is going on. I'm sure that some of you, remember, the very fiery news conference that. A reporter White House reporter for CNN. Jim Acosta had this guy. Jim acosta. As far as I'm concerned as really I think. Spoiled for many people. What they expect to receive. What they what they expect to see at White House. News conferences. It's one thing to stand up and ask challenging questions. That's not a problem. Everybody in the White House expects that it's another thing to try to dominate a news conference. Now, this is the this is a little bit of what accosted did a a cost of who clearly just views himself as a. As a thorn in the side of this president. And again, this president has made plenty of mistakes plenty of things to question him on. But this was the exchange, and I'm gonna play it. This is the shortened version of it. But this it started off. Well, actually, I'll play the longer version a cost of starts off with a question. He he know that he's there to act up. He's there to give President Trump a hard time. And he's there to be disrespectful to the the office of the presidency, and he wants to debate Donald Trump about whether or not it's an invasion that is coming up from Central America. That's that's the argument. It's not a question. It's an argument. And finally, the president loses patience and blast him. And as you probably know his White House pass his hard White House pass, basically gives him daily access to the White House has been suspended. But this is what started it and today CNN has filed a lawsuit. That's what I want to talk about. But I want to refresh. Your recollection. This is Jim Acosta, I wouldn't even say questioning President Trump at a news conference where questions are. Are whatever expected it's.

Jim Acosta White House President Trump professor president CNN professor Hinson NS Mt BC Mt America Auburn James r Hansen reporter NASA Neil Armstrong Carol Central America
"james r hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Opportunity to meet the directors of admission at Harvard Boston collagen UMass Boston that's been the troika. A big Ivy league school big ah Jesuit private university here in Boston Boston College and the public university the biggest public university in the greater Boston area. Umass Boston come on in. You can meet the directions, the director of admissions the directors of missions. At those three grade schools will have a chance to talk with you could ask questions directly. Watch the radio show will take phone calls as we normally do we've done this program for eleven years eleven presentations will all been in studio, but this year, we will do it in the iheart theater, and you'll be up close and personal. All you have to do is talk to your mom talk to you, dad parent. Guardian can be an older brother needs to be someone over the age of twenty one with you. Six one seven nine three one ten thirty. Now, let me introduce to all of you a professor James Hansen. Who has had a very interesting academic career professor of history at Auburn university. He's also a former historian for NASA, professor Hanson. Welcome to nightside. How are you tonight? I'm doing very well. Well, when did I will win did you how did you become the biographer for Neil Armstrong? I mean, he was a fascinating guy. Obviously a towering figure for anyone who is who's over. I don't know fifty years of age who could remember the first moon landing. But historically, he was a giant of the twentieth century. How did you and he cross paths? And how did you win his confidence? When told he was a very. Not shy but not someone who who was out seeking publicity. Yeah. Exactly. Right. Well, it wasn't easy. I'll start with that. I was about twenty years into my career at the point that I I contacted Neal which was right about the year two thousand and I had done a number of books related to aerospace, both aeronautics and space exploration both asked. Nasa historian and just as an academic when my appointment at Auburn started in nineteen eighty six and I just I was teaching at seminar graduate seminar on space history. And after the students all went around sort of introducing themselves, and sort stating what kind of research topic, they might be interested in one of the students asked me what I was going to do next. And I said, well, I'd really like to write a biography of an astronaut, but the only one that really interests me is Armstrong, and I and I knew that he was a very private person and hard to get and even hard to find an address, you know, to ride them. But I threw my NASA contacts I found the post I got a post office box number in Lebanon. In Ohio, which is just a suburb a northern suburb of Cincinnati were Neal had a form he was living had been moving. I should say. And so I sent a letter unsolicited to kneel at this post office box in about two or three weeks later. I got a letter back from him. Which was very nice polite. No, you'd been contacted by any number of authors. And so I took the letter back to my students and showed them the letter just because Jesus need to get a letter from you'll Armstrong, and they encouraged me not to give up. But I knew he was not the sort of man you could test her. So I basically want his birthday rolled around in August. I sent him a gift box with two or three of my books, and he wrote me back a few weeks later, and you looked at one of them quite closely. And and that kind of just opened the door to further conversation, but it's a long story, which I'll keep not Embiid here by just by saying it took about two years before I finally got the green light from him. I mean as as quick as he could be in the car. Talk to them. They're playing or a spacecraft in terms of having to make quick decisions. He was unbelievably deliberate when it came to just about everything else. When did you? I mean, you you tried to contact him in two thousand when did you first meet him? I met him. I think right. It was right after nine eleven actually I remember that because I think was even in September of that year. And and he asked me to come visit him in Cincinnati, and it was really kind of odd. Because you know, he didn't give me an address. I didn't know where he lived for. Sure. All I knew. Doc. So he just said, you know, come to Cincinnati and get call me at this number, and I'll give you directions. Cut. Oh, actually, I called him. And I couldn't get an answer in. And I was worried he was you know, somehow gotten, you know, you had been hurt or something in the nine eleven event because he had a lot of corporate positions it related to New York City. I didn't know what happened to him. And I finally got a call from him. I you know, I was just hanging out in this hotel waiting for Neil Armstrong to call me. And I finally got the call, and then he gave me the directions to get to his house, and I drove to his house the next morning. And that was my first, you know, face to face meeting with them. I spent most of the day talking to him. And it went very well. I wouldn't have had any chance, you know, for it to happen. But it took even after that face to face meeting, which went extremely well. It's still took over a year before I had a real green light from him. It almost reminds me of the old comic book mad magazine. Spy-versus-spy you're in a hotel room waiting for a phone, call for direction said kind of sounds a little cloak and dagger issue, if you know what I'm saying? Well, you know, I think. What I came to realize in through my research over the years. Neil Neil had a he was such an iconic figure in people all wanted a piece of them. And and he had had people stalking him following him from airport to airport, you know, renting driveway, space and neighbors at neighbors property trying to get video of him. So he had become you know, he was really very careful about this. I think that is what explains that, you know, he just I mean, he he was pretty certainly knew who I was based on the book site sent him and he'd probably found out some things about me through the through NASA because I had had this early career with NASA. But still he was still very very judicious in what information he gave out about himself. What was there any mutual one of the things, I always try to do I believe in six degrees of separation in this always something that you know, that I know we able to connect with him at that level of did he lives, you know, such a such a parallel life to you. Even though you were involved in NASA. There was no. No cross-references. Was there? Anyone that kind of you could say, hey, you know, him you can you can talk to him about me. And I'm a good guy. And he's a great guy and anything like that. Or no. Absolutely. There was it was absolutely crucial factor. Before I tell you that that particular story. Let me tell you the other connections where I grew up in Fort, Wayne, Indiana and Neal was born in Ohio there about fifty five miles apart. When I when I went to Ohio State for graduate school. I drove right through Canada on the way to Columbus, Ohio. I drove within a mile or two the farmhouse where he was born. So Neil grew up in Ohio not far from where I grew up. He came from a farming family. So did I he was from Ohio which school at Purdue in Indiana. I was from Indiana went to went to a state, okay? Connection ship. Sure. But the real important connection was I was about twenty years into my career, and I had done a lot of things related to aerospace, and I had done a lot of oral history. At that point. I'd interviewed a lot of people and a lot of people turned out to be people that Neil had either knew about or himself could encounter in his career really going back to his ears. So I was in conversation within that first afternoon. And just you know, I I don't a lot of work on the history of NASA Langley research center in Virginia, which was actually the oldest of all the NASA facilities and even those back before the four NASA gotten to know, just one test pilot, really really well named Jack reader, you know, he's not a well known name in aviation history. But the reader is actually very significant test pilot for for NASA, and I had gotten to know him quite well, and I understood what it meant to be an engineering research pilot. You know, someone who was an engineer in the cockpit, which is exactly what Neal was. You'll have a grease and Purdue and in an article engineering, and that was the type of test warranty you done well, when I mentioned Jack reader, and I had no reason to think he knew Jack reader was I mentioned him. I forget how it even came up that I mentioned Jack reader and immediately meals is lit up, you turned to his wife, Carol who was coming in and out of the room listening to our conversation. He turned to Carol and said Jack reader was the best test pilot I ever knew. And then he turned back to me and said, and Chuck Yeager was the worst now people react to the second part of that. Because that's the only negative thing. I ever heard Armstrong say about anybody say that. Say that to me once again, so I can get all of that. So he's the best test pilot Jack reader, Jack reader is the best test pilot. I ever knew then he turned to me and said, and Chuck Yeager was the worst. Ooh. Yeah. It's the second part of that gets the reaction. But it was the first part of it really was a gave me a lot of credibility with Neil. Because just out of the blue. I, you know, I had mentioned someone to him who I had learned a lot about what it was like what it meant to be a true engineering research pilot in what that you know, exactly what kind of test piloting net was I just happened to mention somebody who meal thought was the best test pilot he ever knew. And so that gave me I think I saw right then. And there that I my credibility level had had gone up quite a bit. You made the connection not my guess is James James Hansen. Professor, I gotta take a pause here. Take up of commercials. I'm going to invite people to call if they want to get on the line, but they're gonna wait a little while because we're gonna we're gonna walk through this story for everybody for those in the audience who do not understand who Neil Armstrong is you got to know the first man the first human to set foot on the moon. And of course, that is the title. Of professor Hansen's book. I man the life of Neil a Armstrong very interesting very interesting for those of us who watched the moon landing. But it's also I think very interesting for those of you in the audience who perhaps do not realize what a significant event it was in the history of the United States. It came at a time when the country was in a crisis it attained it came at a time following a assassinations in the midst of very unpopular war, civil rights demonstrations. And there was this one moment in July of nineteen sixty nine where everyone's eyes were glued late at night on this black and white grainy live video from the moon. Six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine the story. More conversation, professor James Hansen in any questions. You might have. He's going to stay with us until eleven but not a second longer back after this..

Neil Armstrong NASA Neil Neil Ohio James James Hansen Neal Cincinnati Jack professor Auburn university Indiana Boston professor of history director Harvard Boston Umass professor Hanson iheart theater Chuck Yeager nightside
"james r hansen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Cloudy skies today. Thirty percent chance of showers highs in the mid fifties. Tomorrow, partly cloudy, highs in the upper forties with the lows anywhere. From the upper twenties thirties with the freeze advisory in effect. Black Friday sales event all month long at Brown dodge, Chrysler Jeep ram in divine. Not far from where you are. A twenty two San Antonio's first news, Mr. T, inventory Parker. Joining us on our live line, James r Hansen. He's a professor emeritus of history at Auburn university of former historian for historian for NASA wrote the book, the first man the life of Neil Armstrong, which also happens to be a motion picture starring Ryan Gosling first question for you. Mr. Hansen is have you seen the movie? I think it's been like thirteen times. Now, did you like the movie and was it did it stick to your book? Well, the book, of course, covers Nielsen tire light, right? And you live for eighty two years until his death in twenty twelve and the movie just looks at the period from the end of his test piloting in nineteen sixty one through the moon landing. So it's just an eight year period. But in terms of sticking to my book for that period of time. I think it stays pretty pretty close to it. Hey, James, good morning. It's charity you were given exclusive access to Armstrong private documents. What what stood out as most surprising to you based on your research? Well in so many different things. I mean, one thing about Neil meals character that stood out was I expected, you know, I I knew a lot of authors that had worked with other astronauts when their books and the and the astronauts had wanted quite a bit of control over the content was put together, and you'll was was not like that. Once he agreed to let me write the book. He just answered my questions and got me help get documents to see if I didn't if I didn't know enough to ask him a specific question. He he wouldn't come in and say Jimmy need to talk about this. You need to talk about that just answering my questions and didn't try to control the content of what I was saying at all. So I think that says a lot about his character. Definitely did he talk at all about the toll his NASA career took on his personal life. Well, you know. Yes. And no, I mean, Neal was kind of personality, and he never really focused very much on on on negative things are on his emotional reaction to different things. So Dallas something really that. I had to sort of interpolate from other things that you were saying, but he certainly, you know, he did not like the limelight. He did not like being, you know, being a celebrity and didn't consider himself one. So what happened to him after the moon landing which to me is as interesting as what happened to him during landing because he became this icon with all society and culture just expecting so much from him and projecting so many meanings on him that weren't really true. And he didn't enjoy that part of his his existence at all. All right. So what is planned for the fiftieth anniversary, which is coming up in August of two thousand nineteen well is pretty good celebrating anniversaries, but this is kind of going to be the mother of all anniversaries in the sense that his fiftieth anniversary of the first time you the human species stepped off onto another heavenly body. So it's gonna be a pretty major one. They'll be events in Washington and really at NASA facilities around the country, including in Houston. And then they'll be events certainly a Neal's hometown of walking that Ohio there. I know there are special documentaries born five-part series at TBS and National Geographic. I assume every network so it's going to be you know, this is about seventy five percent of the world's population. Today today was not alive in nineteen sixty-nine or so for them. This is like medieval history. They don't know much about it. And so this will be a time or a lot of education for young young people in a lot of nostalgia for people who were alive at the time. And if you haven't seen the movie, I suggest you read the book, I work, and I get the book. Of course, available at Amazon and should be able to find it at all of the different book nature bookstores. It's back on the New York Times list, and it by the end of the year be translated into twenty four four nine which is which is really exciting. And last question for you on the set a lot during the making of the movie, probably more. So than the producers wanted. Occasionally, they did tell me the story. You know, Jim. Sometimes the authors aren't even allowed on the set. So no, I was there almost all the time. I follow a really strong responsibility for Neil try to make sure that the movie makers kept it us up Antic as possible. And I probably didn't need to do it. Because Damian Chazelle director. I mean, these guys really themselves started to feel that responsibility to so they destroyed to do everything they could to keep it accurate within the within the framework of the story that they chose to tell Mr. Hansen. Thank you for joining us. He's author of the New York Times bestselling book. I man the life of Neil a Armstrong available at your find bookstores anywhere or on Amazon. He's also the co producer of the film starring Ryan Gosling coming up at eight forty something I learned from Saturday Night Live that I never knew before in the morning. It's the information.

Neil Armstrong James r Hansen NASA Ryan Gosling Neal Amazon Chrysler Nielsen Saturday Night Live Jeep San Antonio New York Times bestselling New York Times Damian Chazelle National Geographic Mr. T Ohio Jimmy Washington
"james r hansen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Hurry in. Now. The Toyota's tailgate event to get great deals on. I always say watch out for cheating. Sean, Hannity fine. Find folks all over the place. Wait a minute. We just found four truckloads of both Sean Hannity today at two on NewsRadio twelve hundred w away. I. August two thousand nineteen will be the fiftieth anniversary of Neil Armstrong's. I like to the moon has one small step. Joining us coming up next James r Hansen the author of I man the life of Neil Neil Armstrong, which is the first and only definitive authorized account of Mueller Armstrong the man who's one small step changed history. Also, co producer of the movie starring Ryan Gosling, anybody seen the movie not yet. I want to do to thinking hopefully, it'll be out around Christmas or maybe over the thanksgiving break. I'll go see. It was going to join us next. Are you traveling for thanksgiving? Megan. I am. Yes. They're going farther than fifty miles. Absolutely, mega charity. I know you're traveling. But you're not driving. No San Diego which is under a red flag. I hopefully everything works out for you. I don't want to see any troubles. This is I like, yes, I'm so anxious about it to you. She told you about. I told you about talk to you about it yet. I haven't talked to her about it yet. Okay. Coming up next James Hansen, author of the New York Times bestselling book. I man the life of Neil Armstrong charity what else is going on. The fire. That's destroyed. A northern California town is now the deadliest in stay district. Hundreds of Texas, firefighters and support personnel ourselves setting out for California this morning to help governor Abbott announced at two hundred firefighters with fifty five fire engines will be heading up from local fire departments. Statewide today is the federal observance of veteran's day honoring those who have served in the US armed forces. Which means don't look for the mailman. Also coming up the bear county sheriff's office is going to have to pay deputies overtime through the end of the year due to a staff shortage these stories and more coming up w away. I news time eight twenty one now, traffic and weather together from the way, I traffic center. Just fine last of our slow traffic. Right. Where he expect westbound worse by Parkway nacogdoches. The accidents long-gone who still have some heavy traffic backed apparent vital. Is that cleared out eastbound sixteen oh, four out around Bandera limited construction in the far northwest side. That's a real pain that's causing that. Eastbound four ten however Ingram through Fredericksburg still have some pockets of heavy traffic. Megan Bishop NewsRadio twelve hundred w away. The most wonderful.

Neil Neil Armstrong Sean Hannity Ryan Gosling James r Hansen Megan Bishop California Mueller Armstrong Toyota Bandera San Diego US Parkway nacogdoches New York Times bestselling producer Ingram governor Abbott Texas bear county
"james r hansen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"I will be one of those fifty four point three Americans on the road on thanksgiving than fourbillion Texans. Mr. traveling more than fifty miles away from home. The vast majority will go by car. So starting next Monday. It's going to be very very busy out there. The Wednesday the day before thanksgiving is generally considered to be the single busiest travel day of the entire year and analysts point to a lot of factors. The gas prices have fallen significantly we're down twenty one cents. Just in the past month. We have a lot of consumer confidence. The job numbers are hitting record lows more and more people are getting raises, and they just feel good about things generally. And that's the main reason why we're looking at a record travel season for thanksgiving. The travel week begins next Monday and ends the Sunday after thanksgiving. Now on the gasoline situation. There's a lot of factors at play the Saudi Arabians just said today that they would be open to a cut of a million barrels a day in production because of the falling prices oil has been in a bear market. Sure. Down twenty percent, west Texas crude and Brent crude which is the the European benchmark in the US benchmark are down substantially, and the reason for that is that the sanctions against Iran did not turn out to be everything. They were cracked up to be the White House allowed exceptions for the three largest oil importing countries in the world, which are China, India, and Japan, and since oil is a fungible global commodity that means that even though there sanctions against Iranian order oil Iranian oil is getting out there anyway and oil that's bought on the open market by China can easily be sent someplace. Else? So there's a lot more oil on the open market than anybody anticipated during the time when our prices were staying at summer levels when we were in October and even in early November. And now those concerns have gone away US fracking, especially Texas fracking is stepping up to the plate big time as we've talked before the United States became the world's largest oil producer in August and continued to be in September, the October numbers aren't India. Now that doesn't mean that we're not still importing ten eleven million barrels a day, but we are now producing far more than any other country. That includes Saudi Arabia that includes Russia so because of that OPEC is looking at whether or not it can afford to cut a million barrels a day in production. Now, that's the main and in some cases, the only source of income for a lot of those countries. And that's something they're going to take a real hard. Look at b before OPEC meeting in Vienna. That's coming up next month. But for now anyway. There are the concerns that we had there were keeping prices elevated in September and October usually prices really begin to fall in late July, but we saw prices remained elevated for some time because there was the worry about those sanctions. Now turns out the the sanctions, which took effect last week aren't nearly as big a deal is everybody thought. So that's why we're seeing prices fall to the point where they're almost down to the level that they were at this time last year, and we've been elevated above that level all year because of concerns about those sanctions, so the oil market is very much in flux, but we're certainly not looking at anything that's going to destroy anybody's travel plans. And it's going to be a very very busy time. So expect lots of company Ambi sure to make your hotel reservations. Now, if you have any sense because of we have four million Texans, traveling more than fifty miles away from home. They gotta stay someplace they gotta eat someplace they'll have to drive down highways someplace, and that means it's going to be crowded. Thanksgiving holiday for a lot of folks. That's W E news director, Jim force. You can catch him twice each morning. Seven ten and eight ten coming up before eight thirty James r Hansen author of the New York Times bestselling book, the first man the life of Neil a Armstrong. You also co produced the film starring Ryan Gosling, he joins us coming up. Whether you drive an SUV for the morning carpenters..

Saudi Arabians US OPEC India Ryan Gosling Saudi Arabia Jim force Iran Ambi director west Texas New York Times bestselling China James r Hansen Texas Vienna
"james r hansen" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"It's really different. It's it's it's good for me. I think to exercise the muscles in that direction. And but I never want to not be making features. If as long as they're still happening, which hopefully will be a while. Yes. Well, you've been very generous with your time. I cannot wait to see what you do next. Give it up again for Meghan. Thank you guys. Thank you for saying. And that's how the Cunanan went down special. Thanks again to writer director, Meghan Griffiths for coming down to chat about her latest film Sadie, and if you want to support independent filmmakers like Meghan. You could go watch that film right now on Amazon or itunes. So I hope you. Check out Sadie. And folks if you'd like to attend one of my events in Los Angeles, you could sign up for free emails to my screenings at backstory dot net slash events. And while you're there, I hope you'll also take a look at backstory magazine. We just published issue thirty four, and it has a first man cover. We did in depth interviews with screenwriter Josh singer director, Damian Chazelle and historian James r Hansen. So I hope you'll check out our long read cover stories issued thirty four also as an entire black screenplay to read along with an interview with its writer. Plus, our in-depth TV interviews for better. Call Saul kidding and Star Wars resistance as for in-depth film coverage. We have great pieces on apostle bad times of the royale. Halloween, hold the dark and the old man and the gun and more to explore and you could read the entire table of contents for all of our issues actually at backstory dot net. So thanks for stopping on by and supporting my passion project. It really means a lot to me the CUNY with Jeff Goldsmith is a copyright of unlikely films Inc. In twenty eight.

Meghan Griffiths Sadie backstory magazine writer director Jeff Goldsmith Josh singer Saul unlikely films Inc Los Angeles Damian Chazelle Amazon James r Hansen
"james r hansen" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Liftoff

"And so he actually goes to his wife at the at the house where they're having a gathering after after the funeral valley. It see and he says to his wife who's cleaning up helping helping clean up in the kitchen. He's like I need to go. And she's like, I got I. Yeah. I I'm gonna need a few more minutes to clean up in here. And he just leaves. He just gives a car and leaves. And when they go back to the Armstrong's house, and it's it's add white and his wife. That bring Neil Armstrong's wife with an with them. And Ed white goes in the backyard and starts to talk strike up a conversation, and we see some genuine anger in Neil Armstrong who basically says. What about me leaving the party gave you the impression that I wanted to talk to somebody? What about what about me standing alone in my backyard gave you the impression that I wanted to talk to somebody and it's passing because the answer is because sometimes human beings. Need to let their feelings out. Neil armstrong. But in this case. Nope, he doesn't he doesn't want to do that. It's it's fascinating. Right. Because you do get the sense of this guy. And you're like, wow. Like the stuff that he kept inside. Or didn't have the tools to deal with we sort of see that we see that story line. And then the astronaut space agencies storyline sort of come together. And when they're on the moon, and I guess like, I don't know if some point in the past we blew the spoiler horn. But we're gonna spoil the ending now. Did you know that landed on the moon? Spelled it done wasn't a hoax boilers for nineteen sixty nine. Well, spoilers for this the way the movie handles that I get where we see him on the moon. They've landed they've gone through that I will say even though I have, you know, all sorts of about this mission. Anytime. I see the haywar out of fuel in the mash alarm going off as they're trying to land on the moon. It's always stressful to me. Oh, yeah. I felt that way watching this film's like they're gonna make. Yes. Of course, they are. Because this is a movie based on thing that happened, but sort of a funny aside, but we see him sort of finally say goodbye, his daughter on the moon and. The movie portrays this as he has I guess like smuggled in a bracelet that she had or something with her name on it that you know, he had kept drawer locked away. So in that scene where he's overcome with emotion after they've had the kind of like wake after the the her funeral. What he we see that? He's got her little charm bracelet, basically and. And so yeah. And as the movies going on I'm like, oh, boy is that what is going to happen here because that's a very movie thing to do. But yes, that's is the guy who can't express his emotions very well at all has brought his dead daughter's bracelet to the moon to leave. Yeah. A lot of moon. Duston the theater when that scene was playing got a little got a little dusty in there. Yeah. Yeah. It was it was a it was a nice moment. And it's two people talking about this movie. You talk about the flag in a second. If you want, but. There is there are a lot of. Articles, and even some YouTube videos about this scene, and how how accurate it was or how did it actually happen? Did Armstrong actually do this and. People involved the book is that it's sort of based on rent by James Hansen. Hansen seemed to think that Neil did leave something of Karen his daughter something of hers on the moon to in some way. And and he felt convinced that although he didn't have any. There was no hard evidence of that. But he did have conversations with Neil with his wife at the time. And and other family members that believe that this may have happened..

Neil Armstrong Ed white James Hansen YouTube Karen
"james r hansen" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Total information on a Sunday morning. Michael Calhoun in for Brian Kelly. And let's check in. It's a weekend morning tradition. With Harry ham to talk about yesterday. Harry, by the way, thank you for the interview on the Saint Louis county, fair and air show. That was a great preview of the festivities continue today. Yeah. Nine to five today. I tell you the people that really come out despite the chilly weather, and it's a three hour airshow, Michael. And it's the best air show. I think I've seen them put on on balance. It doesn't have the blue angels in it like it will next year. But it's still well worth going out there but again bundle up books because it gets a little chilly on the ramp. Luckily, it looks like the the rain will move out today if you're headed out to joint base Chesterfield is that what they're calling it. They're calling it naval air station. That's right. Yeah. Yeah. Because because it's so so many navy aircraft out there. Well, listen, speaking of flying the big movie this weekend at the box office, most likely will be I man now follows the career of astronaut Neil Armstrong. I man on the moon from nineteen sixty one to nineteen sixty nine. Well, I'm probably gonna disagree with some of my other colleagues, but you know, it's based on a book by James r Hansen at good book. But I didn't put it up in the same category as the right stuff or policy are keen. I'll tell you why there is a lot about the moon landing and the mission to get to the moon and some of the serious challenges they had but the movie starring Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong and Clara for his wife. The movie is a very personal story about him. Now, Neil Armstrong was a very smart guy when he came to math and science highly educated, but he probably had the worst personality of any astronaut and the program he didn't like to sign autographs. He didn't like to pose for pictures. He was a little uncomfortable. When it came to public speaking, which kind of made his his landing on the moon a little difficult for in latter years. And this story is about him his family is marriage and the death of a three-year-old daughter. They had died of a brain tumor. In fact, the movie begins that way, so if you're looking if you're looking for a real NASA movie intervene of the right stuff for the power thirteen. This isn't it? There is a lot of mission of footage in there. There is a lot about that. But mostly it's about Neil Armstrong. And he was a rather I rather selling guy in many respects, and I don't think. Connects his character with the audience, very well. So I believe this movie, it's a well made movie. It's a very good movie many respects, but from the standpoint of audience appeal, I think I man may not be the first choice for a lot of folks. So by the way, if you're classic movie buff PCM's shows classic films. At I rented is all over the country today at the Chesterfield AMC theater in the Chesterfield mall. One of the few things left out there. Tune at seven they're showing Mr Smith goes to Washington, which is kind of fun to see in a major cedar on a big screen finally, Michael as we wrap up. A star is born is the best date movie here in Saint Louis. Bradley Cooper and lady Gaga are both Academy Award contenders. And next week at the same time, we'll be talking about. Rep's new main stage show, it's a doubt house par to brand new show, and it's a sequel to Henrik Ibsen original turn of the century actor eighteen seventy nine. Doubt south. It's an interesting show. Harry growing up one of my favorite favorite movies was Apollo thirteen. It was nice to hear you mentioned it. But I wondered how how this compared it looks like they both kind of touch on the Apollo one tragedy that went into the mission to the moon and the effort to get there and real quick since we're almost out of time. But house has Ryan Gosling is as the lead in this. He's very good. He's very good. But again, his character of Armstong was not Mr. personality. And I know they may sound a bit harsh on the we're not judging his professional contributions. But as a movie because of his personality and how well gasoline plays it. It doesn't have a lot of audience appeal. All right, Harry ham. Thank you so much, and I'll have to go check out. I man just because of the space connection like I said. Thank you very much. And again, the Saint Louis county fair and airshow and stem expo is from nine AM till five pm at spirit airport today. The rain will hopefully move out. We'll check news..

Neil Armstrong Harry ham Bradley Cooper Ryan Gosling Michael Calhoun Saint Louis county Chesterfield NASA Henrik Ibsen Chesterfield AMC theater Saint Louis Chesterfield mall James r Hansen Brian Kelly Mr Smith Armstong lady Gaga Washington Clara three hour
"james r hansen" Discussed on One Giant Leap For Geeks

One Giant Leap For Geeks

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on One Giant Leap For Geeks

"He's got a hit on them and they all converge on his one hotel and Vegas to kill him. And it's just this crazy shit that happens like if feels a lot like that movie, this particular one has Jeff bridges, dude. Chris Hemsworth is in it. Okay. The chick from fifty shades of grey, isn't it Dakota Johnson and his name and a few other people. But the trailers really vague about what's happening, but they, they all have some kind of secret like they're not being totally honest about who they are or why they are there. And it looks like Chris Hemsworth might actually be playing the villain in this, which that'll be interesting turn for him because he doesn't typically ease. Usually the. The goodguys the dashing, you know, good looking funny. But he, he looks like he's going to have a villain turn. This Jeff bridges is playing a priest in the movie, but he's not really a priest. The pantley in in just looks like a bunch of interesting characters that are going to be meeting up at this one place who all have their own agendas, and then all hell breaks loose, and then they kind of it's kind of like one of those survived the night movies. Glassman standing type shit, and I'm like, it has an interesting premise and I'm like this. This could be good. Like I don't know been want like you. You were the one that turned me onto. What about this? Has you interested? Because this was one of the ones that you said from earlier to quote earlier, like you don't go to a whole lot, but this one was one that you said you wanted to go. See, absolutely. I wanna go see this. It comes across a lot like like clue or any of the three in which you have a bunch of different people seemingly from different backgrounds or altogether broad, some location for unknown reasons. It reminds me a bit of like the cube or clue or something along those lines. And what really I'm really caught me. It's interesting was that Jeff bridges character plays a guy named Flynn. Okay. Okay. Like try now is. Yeah. Oh, cool. Oh, Flynn lives. Flynn lives? Yes. So if daft punk does the soundtrack to this? I'm so. I'm all over this shit yet drew Goddard he I'm pretty sure is writing and directing nece and he did cabin in the woods if you've seen that. Yes, and that's really, he's, he's going to, he's going to be doing this and he he's a good person where he like he takes like tropes that you normally see movies, and he kind of turns them on their head because all these characters look like caricatures. They're like characters, but I have a feeling he's going to do something different with them, like subverter expectations and just play with your your preconceived notions of how this movie's gonna play out. I'm really interested to see what they do with this. It looked interesting. So. I'm excited for it. Now, this one, the next one we got is going to be. This also comes out on October, twelve, I man. Now I man is the riveting story of Nasr's mission to land a man on the moon, focusing on Neil Armstrong and the years nineteen sixty through nineteen sixty nine a visceral first person account based on the book by James r Hansen, the movie will explore the sacrifices in in cost in the cost on Armstrong and on the nation of one of the most dangerous missions in history. Now, see, this is one I'm excited about. Yeah, I've always liked space. Sure. Ryan Gosling also the he doesn't really do anything for me, but. Yeah, ABS though. Do anything for me. Okay. Okay. I've tried multiple times and it's just like, but anyways. I've really been always interested in space always said, I'd never wanna go. Oh sure. But the stuff like space exploration, stuff like that real space exploration not, you know, nine stolen interstellar, you You know know. aliens and shazier. No real space for science. It's always interested me and this being about Neil Armstrong. I mean, big interest..

Jeff bridges Chris Hemsworth Neil Armstrong Flynn nece Dakota Johnson Vegas Glassman Ryan Gosling Goddard Nasr James r Hansen
"james r hansen" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"Three hundred which came out in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight so it's thirty th anniversary of venom and tom hardy playing another comp character after the underrated dark knight rises i love that film but i'm really looking forward to this movie i mean does that last seen in the trailer but he comes venom with the tongue right i mean like wow then you had me at tom hardy okay who's next for you number two we'll stay on the on the dark intern trend that i'm on carin qassam destroyer with nicole kidman i that is rumored to be at the festivals i imagine that we will see it in toronto doesn't mean that it's going to come out in two thousand eighteen but it could very well scorer fall released depending on the reaction this is nicole kidman leave is like a cop who went up against a colts years ago and now the coal to members of the colts have resurfaced i love the cast i think sebastian stands a part of it i think scoot mcnairy is but nicole kidman one of one of the greatest actresses around on the working with kasama on on a movie even involving a colts sign up calc asaba directed girl fight back in two thousand shells the invitation that was just one of the best films of the last decade so power tation is one that like kind of got under my skin i didn't like it on what did you like it more perry did you like it more twenty to the my next movie is bad times at the elber al i am a big fan surprise bribes of cabin in the woods so i was writing the excited that drew goddard was finally going to direct another feature film but still i wasn't really paying all that much attention to this and then all of a sudden we had that day in the office where of jillian trailers dropped one of them was for this and i was just my mind was blown i was not ready for any of that that cast looks incredible the style i want to see those movies so so badly can't come soon enough and just a name drop one particular person that i'm excited about also she's got spirit later this year tacona johnson i want to the point where dakota johnson gets the credit she deserves because good for her for taking fifty shades put her in the spotlight more maybe get more opportunities but she is a stellar actress and i feel like that movie has the twilight effect on her career where your mind just immediately goes back to that and she is capable of so much more about movie opens maybe we have a really say for that one i didn't write it down october okay now now i know it might be a bite the obvious picking this is one of my must see movies of the year going but but i'm actually more interested in the subject matter and then people who made the film although the people who made the film it is i man i man about neil a armstrong the first man on the moon apollo eleven it is directed by oscar winning director daming shizuo did he do of lolly and it is starring ryan gosling did he do he did lau hey first of all you might be in the minority here because like perry and are la la land no i love low and i love that movie i miss talking he's not gonna use this platform right now talking about that i'm gonna give you a pass on it because you like la la land i appreciate it okay well i man is based on the book about in the armstrong written by james r hansen it was originally optioned in two thousand three as a producing directing vehicle for clint eastwood so yeah interesting right but what's great about it is when ryan gosling and damages l i method talk about movies they are they were going to talk to do i man as they're moving together and then i think ryan gosling said something like well what else do you have and he goes why have this musical and well that conversation turned out pretty darn well but listen a lot of people knew armstrong he's listen it was the greatest human adventure of all time landing a man on the moon going from six fifteen minute flight in nineteen sixty one with allen show you around to watch that right man i.

tom six fifteen minute
"james r hansen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So right recess other side others republish the others these totals at the time the mit study was something that is you indicated showed twotenths of one degrees they didn't have a corner on the market as far as the studies at that time that there were many at that point we can provide those two you what's clear about pairs what's clear is if you go back and look at the criticism that was being led the that gives the pair's agreement it wasn't just from votes in this country who wanted to be ratified critical the processes the environmental left were was very critical of paris is that james was james james hansen is it individual who said at the time it was a fake and a fraud in in the general council the sierra club said the same thing so if you go back and read the media council much criticism the wars luca largely because it did not hold nations like china and india accountable is you know china did not have to take any steps if you've lines until two to until two thousand thirty india had no obligations until two and a half trillion dollars of aid were provided in russia when they set their targets they set nineteen ninety as the base line which allow them to continue emitting more co two in this country we had to has twenty six to twenty eight percent reduction in greenhouse gases which represented the clean power plan and then talk limit accident gender of the past administration yes or or the president.

paris fraud sierra club china india russia greenhouse gases mit james james hansen president twenty eight percent trillion dollars one degrees
"james r hansen" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"james r hansen" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"On pierce so with that with the entry questions about half and i don't know your name so you i believe that an yes ma'am the lemaire yes climb real threat interesting about all the discussions we had the last several weeks have been focused on one singular issue is pairs good for not for this country that's the discussions with the president lets but my focus the focus remained on whether put peres put us at a disadvantage and in fact it did at an economic disadvantage you may not know this but peres each set targets a twenty six to twenty eight percent with the entire agenda of the freeze previous administration we still feel forty percent short of those targets it was a failed deal to begin with an even if all the targets were met by all nations across the globe it only reduce the temperature by less than two cents at one degree so that is something that the pair the present focused upon with respect to how impacted us economically in whether there were good environmental objectives that were achieved as a result pairs his decision was no and that was the extent of our discussions gets listening listening court and in fact five others republish the others that is published at the time the mit study was something that that is you indicated showed to one degree they didn't have a corner on the market as far as the studies at that time the many that flight we can provide those two you what's clear about paris what's clear is if you go back and look at the criticism that was being levied against the paris agreement it wasn't just from folks in this country who wanted to be ratified critical the processes the environmental left were who was very critical of paris in fact james let's james james hansen it is an individual who said at the time it was a fake and a fraud and in the general council the sierra club said the same thing so if you go back and read the media counselors much criticism award because largely because it did not hold nations like china and india accountable as you know china did not have to take any steps of compliance until out to until two thousand thirty india had no obligations.

pierce president peres paris fraud sierra club china india lemaire mit james james hansen one degree twenty eight percent forty percent