18 Burst results for "James Weldon Johnson"

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:55 min | 3 months ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"To the Royals for outfielder Franci Cordero and two players to be named later. Boston also received minor league right handed pitcher Josh Win Kowski and a player to be named later from the Mets. Mets received outfield prospect Khalili from the Royals and in the NFL. The Denver Broncos have released quarterback A J Boy a one year after trading for him. Boy a missed the last four games of 2020 due to a six game suspension for violations of the leaks policy on performing enhancing substances. He will also be suspended for the first two games of the 2021 season. Move will free up $11.7 million against the Broncos salary cap, and the team will now have just under $31 million worth of salary cap space as they begin to work through their offseason plan. Mandy West with your I. Heart radio sports report Need more open The free I heart radio app for the best sports stations in the country and the most sports podcasts with the biggest personalities in the game on demand. On now, Look back at this week in history on I Heart Radio This'll week in 1915 ASCAP. This founded the American Society of Composers, authors and publishers among the founding members of ASCAP, where the musical giants of the Time Irving Berlin, James Weldon Johnson, Jerome Kern and John Philip Sousa. In those days, songwriters made their living primarily from the fees earned through the sales of sheet music. This week in 1929, Sir Alexander Fleming discovers one of the greatest modern medicine developments by accident. Fleming was a young bacteriologist, having left the plate of staphylococcus bacteria uncovered. Fleming notice that a mold that had fallen on the culture had killed many of the bacteria he identified. The mold is penicillin. No, Todd, um, similar to the kind found on bread. On February, 14th 1929 Fleming introduced his mold byproduct called penicillin to cure bacterial infections. This week.

Franci Cordero Jerome Kern Josh Win Kowski John Philip Sousa James Weldon Johnson February, 14th 1929 Khalili Mandy West $11.7 million 2021 Broncos American Society of Composers Alexander Fleming 2020 six game Fleming two players Boston Royals NFL
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"I tell you, this guy is this guy's fascinating Figured Rustin, Hey, wrote poetry played football. He was raised by his grandparent's the ninth of 12 Children. You believe that? Um, he was a member of the end of the Deep and W E B. Du Bois and James Weldon Johnson were frequent guests at his house. And when he was growing up, these things all made it impact, he said later. My activism did not spring from being black. The racial injustice that it was present in the country during my youth was a challenge to my belief in the oneness. Of the human family. This is what the left is leaving out now the oneness of the human family. They leave it out in their expectations for co vid. They just think they have to force everybody to do it. Instead of making a good case to the American people, and the American people will do it because we're not bad people. We don't want to kill each other. There are some dopes out there that might do this or that. But for the most part, we are one family. Throughout college. He was arrested over and over again. He did sit ins and marches and one for the communist and one for the Quakers. 1941 he met President Roosevelt in the Oval Office. Um, a politely yet confidently. Ruskin told Roosevelt that if he didn't desegregate the military, Ruskin would lead a march on the capital. And that's when we got executive order 880 to the Fair Employment Act banning discrimination in the military. By the way we didn't have. We didn't have segregation in the military. Until Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson. Resegregated the military and then it took this guy meeting with FDR to say can we can Can you please stop this? He also led a movement to desegregate interstate bus travel. 1942 he got on a bus in Louisville headed for Nashville. He talked about what it was like he said I was I was going by the second seat to go to the rear and a white child reach out for the ring of my necktie. And pulled it. And his mother said, Don't touch him and word. He's thought about that the whole time. And here is this child that was innocent and didn't have any of that hatred. And was being taught that hatred. And probably was taught that blacks like to sit in the back of the bus. And he had bothered him just outside of Nashville. Police stopped the bus. He was arrested, beaten and hold to the police station but not charged with anything. But why did they stop it? Because he sat right behind the white person. He didn't go to the back of the bus. He wanted that kid to know. We don't like sitting in the back and we're not different than you. This is way way. This is 19. What is in 1942? This is way before anybody else. He grew to dislike antiwar activism. Especially the kind and Vietnam war. He was repulsed by activists who cheered for America's defeat. He was deeply disturbed by the prospect of Vietnam's people coming under the the thumb of a totalitarian regime. He said. The Soviet model, the Chinese model or wrong He said. The people on my side who are willing to work with Communists and Maoists, in the name of peace are politically naive at best. Where is this guy now? Where is this guy? Now? I disagree with a lot of what he believes. On a lot of what he believed he still believes in America. He had reason not to. Still believes in America can really look at the situation and go. No, these are bad guys doesn't believe in violence believes in freedom. It's a It's amazing. He was the chief organizer of the march on Washington for jobs and Freedom, and that's the I have a dream speech. Shortly after four young black girls were killed in a bombing of the Baptist Recherche in Birmingham. Reminder of what happens when you peacefully speak out. It's usually met with extreme violence. But his I have a dream speech change things. And the bombing was followed by the Civil Rights Act of 1954. He saw the rise of the black power movement, not a fan. He disliked identity politics founded, counterintuitive, divisive, alienated, is anyone On the left listening to him. It's alienating and divisive. He came to despise communism and you know he became You know, he's he's not a guy that the left light. They scrubbed him largely from the civil rights movement. 1987. He was rushed to the emergency room of Lennox Hill Hospital complaining of abdominal pain. The next day, he went into cardiac arrest and died. It's on Lee in the last 15 years since Obama that they've re introduced him to the American people. But they re introduced him as just an icon of the LGBT movement,.

Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson Quakers. James Weldon Johnson America Nashville Rustin President Roosevelt Du Bois Ruskin Vietnam FDR Lennox Hill Hospital Obama abdominal pain executive Louisville Oval Office Lee
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:40 min | 11 months ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Campaign has unveiled code nineteen guidelines ahead of the president's planned rally in Tulsa tomorrow in response to a request from the bok center for health and safety campaign safety plan has been issued and they say it should be taken seriously officials saying everyone at the rally will have their temperatures taken and that masks and hand sanitizer will be provided for everyone Oklahoma's governor Kevin Stitt met with the president a few days ago to discuss the stage three opening process a Georgia non profit has started a fundraiser for the fire to Atlanta police officer accused of killing race card Brooks the Georgia law enforcement organizations saying on Facebook that it's raised two hundred fifty thousand dollars to pay the legal fees for fired police officer Garrett rolls and the organization claims and it's supposed the arrest of Rolf is political in nature saying that it's been overwhelmed with support for the officers because and today's Google doodle is paying tribute to Juneteenth the animation on the search engines home page allows important chapters in American history like African Americans becoming landowners and getting the right to vote to become easily accessible the musical doodle is accompanied by a reading of the poem lift every voice and sing by James Weldon Johnson and for U. S. A. radio news I'm Chris Barnes thousands of people contact InventHelp monthly about their intention or new product do you think companies would be interested in your idea do you want to try to get a patent.

InventHelp Google Garrett Atlanta Georgia Chris Barnes James Weldon Johnson president Rolf Facebook officer Kevin Stitt Oklahoma bok center Tulsa
The Red Summer

Black History in Two Minutes

04:43 min | 11 months ago

The Red Summer

"Reeling from the unprecedented devastation of global pandemic. Nurturing wounds from a brutal military victory abroad. Struggling to accommodate demobilized soldiers into a slumping economy fraught with heated competition for jobs. Jim Crow separate, but equal policies endorsed by the president of the United States himself. Now firmly in place as the law of the land. White supremacists targeted terrorist attacks. On an all-too-familiar scapegoat. In another epidemic GLAC citizens found themselves on the lethal end of an outbreak of racial violence in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine, so horrific that the civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson called it the red summer. The events unfolding across the United States today. In the wake of the brutal murder of George Floyd. are in eerie repetition of events that marred the history of race relations in this country. Almost exactly a century ago. African. American soldiers returned from Noble Service in Europe during World War One fully expecting that their sacrifices to their country would at long last entitled them to their full rights as equal citizens. Instead The uniforms they wore, literally became targets on their backs. wbz Do boys famously said that we return from fighting we returned fighting. We've saved democracy overseas and we're going to save it in the United States. That didn't happen. Between. November of nineteen, nineteen with a country devastated by an influenza pandemic known as the Spanish flu. Racial unrest rolled through the south and north in the Mid West where the great migration was just unfolding in its earliest years. The immigration of course had transformed large parts of the north and the West. In, Nineteen fifteen, there were hardly a few black people in Chicago Nineteen Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety one point. Two million people have spread themselves across the map. This demographic transformation of the color of the urban, north. Coupled with the stresses of a postwar economic downturn, combined to create the volatile conditions under which African American workers. Conveniently became magnets for white resentment in fear. The pushback was fierce. Chicago was wracked by fights along a dividing artery between one population and the other hundreds of people are dead. Cities are smoldering. It was one of the most vicious virulent violent race riots in our nation's streets. Small towns were also shaken by race fueled violence in Elaine Arkansas, for example, white vigilantes joined plantation owners. Sheriff's Deputies and even state officials to battle with faecal. And Uprising. Hundreds of black sharecroppers were murdered. Merely for trying to form a union. Yet in the aftermath, a grand jury callously indicted more than one hundred black women and men for their so called crimes. Of course, racial violence was anything but new in the America that time. Still. Amid the fallout from the Great War the rising generation, calling themselves new negroes. Was Not about to fold their tents. Instead read summer saw black. Americans, not only picking up arms to defend themselves. But also utilizing political organizations like the end of way C. P.. To challenge the violence in Congress in the courts in the media. And on the streets. In if we must die. The poet Claude McKay. Captured the tenor of the Times. In, his immortal call for defiance in the face of tyranny and terror. What the before us lies the open grave. Like men will face the murderous cowardly pack. Pressed to the wall dying. But fighting back.

United States Chicago America Jim Crow Mid West Claude Mckay James Weldon Johnson President Trump Murder Glac Europe Elaine Arkansas Noble Service George Floyd. Congress
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:53 min | 11 months ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Same lift every voice and sing was written as a poem by African American educator and activist James Weldon Johnson in the late eighteen hundreds it was first recited by students of the segregated Stanton school in Jacksonville Florida on Abraham Lincoln's birthday in nineteen hundred the read Joe all see James Johnson's brother John Rosamond Johnson set the poem to music and in nineteen nineteen the song was adopted by the NWC P. over the years countless choirs and performers have lifted up their voices saying it's words of hope historians say that this year will certainly be one for the books and they've been hard at work preserving people stories for future generations A. B. C.'s Devin Dwyer has more on some of those efforts a worldwide repository built by a team of universities a journal of the plague here gathering more than five thousand pieces so far many showing the double impact of covert in civil unrest StoryCorps preserving hundreds of people telling their own stories in their own words archiving them at the library of Congress yet another creative way to celebrate the class of twenty twenty while the traditional pomp and circumstance isn't possible the senior class of Kennett high school in north Conway New Hampshire got to ride a ski lift to the top of Cranmore mountain and get their diplomas and pictures taken on the summit Cranmore mountain ski resort offered to host the ceremony at no cost to the school grads could take for gas with them on the left we're back at the show and the marketing director for Cranmore mountain and Kennett high school graduate herself spoke with NBC ten how cool is it to be I'm living in a ski town and be able to graduate at the top of the mountain another team up between CNN and Sesame Street tackling the issues this time the pandemic yesterday morning doctor Sanjay Gupta join cookie monster Elmo and the count to talk about coronavirus the town hall discussing the importance of distancing and wearing masks they also got a visit from gold medal winning gymnast Simone Biles and Laurie Hernandez with tips on how to stay active while staying at home Joe Biden spoke to the Nevada democratic state convention yesterday held virtually this year the democratic presidential candidate spoke of the ongoing racial justice protest saying that we're witnessing a battle for the soul of this nation it's hard for us to take a hard look at the uncomfortable truths out there it's time for us to face the deep open wound of systemic racism in this nation it's three fifty two do.

marketing director Nevada A. B. C. Jacksonville James Weldon Johnson Joe Biden Laurie Hernandez Simone Biles gold medal Sanjay Gupta CNN NBC Stanton school Cranmore mountain north Conway New Hampshire Kennett high school Congress plague Devin Dwyer John Rosamond Johnson
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KTOK

"Seven six one one. And now a look back at this week in history this week in nineteen fifteen ask cap is founded the American society of composers authors and publishers among the founding members of as cap with the musical giants of the time Irving Berlin, James Weldon Johnson, Jerome Kern and John Phillips Sousa in those days songwriters made their living primarily from the fees burn through the sale of sheet music. If music did not pay. It would be given up wrote chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes in a landmark supreme court decision in nineteen seventy this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. In Chicago, four men dressed as police officers entered the headquarters of George bugs Moran and Chicago and killed seven of his henchmen. The men actually worked for rival crime boss, Al Capone, and the act is now known as the Saint Valentine's day massacre. Also this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine sir. Alexander Fleming discovers one of the greatest modern medicine developments by accident. Fleming was a young bacteriologist having lift a plate of staphylococcus bacteria. Uncovered Fleming notice that the mold that had fallen on the culture had killed many of the bacteria. He identified the mold as penicillin Notadze similar to the kind found on bread on February fourteenth, nineteen twenty nine Fleming introduced his mold byproduct called penicillin to cure bacterial infections and this week in one thousand nine hundred sixty five Canada officially changes its flag to the maple leaf since flying Britain's Union Jack flags since sixteen ten today. Canada's red maple leaf flag is one of the most recognizable flags in the world. That's your look back at. This week in history. My son Aiden has asthma. Secondhand smoke has triggered his asthma so badly he ended up in the emergency room spent multiple nights in intensive care. Now, he's on a whole bunch of medications. My tip to you is don't be shy about sunny people not to smoke around your kids. Half of US kids are exposed to secondhand smoke. If you or someone, you know wants help call one eight hundred quit now a message from the US department of health and human services and CDC when the.

Alexander Fleming Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes penicillin Chicago Irving Berlin Aiden John Phillips Sousa George bugs Moran Al Capone James Weldon Johnson US Jerome Kern Canada staphylococcus US department of health Saint Valentine CDC
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"You've talked about these songs all over the world. I wanna know. And you've been to Africa a lot, I believe. Right. I mean, that's also part of your experience anyway, one trip to. Okay, I you just bring back a lot of stories everywhere you go. I think I wanna know. What was it that that came together in the lives and the spiritual sensibility of those slaves that that you know that that connected them so powerfully to really those are the best attributes of Christianity you're talking about. They're not often practiced, right. Most people can't internal my list things there. Bodied in this in these songs. You know, James Weldon Johnson talked about this as this was this. The verging of of the spirit of Christianity with the vestiges of African music or an African sensibility. I mean, do you have any ideas about what made that such a special fusion or thought about it a lot? Yeah. And one thing that occurs to me if we go back to two. The cultures of the slaves that came from many different African nations and languages. But one thing they had in common was they believed in supreme deity, but they believed he was very busy and very, very holy. And in order to get to them, you had to go through the ancestors wasn't very dissimilar to the way Europeans fell with the saints and so on. When slavery took place. And there was also this this concept that you commune with deity with magic shining songs. If your songs come forth with great fervor, you not only reached the deity comes and possesses you becomes part of you and gives you the strength to do whatever you've got to do to win your battles to harvest your crop. And when people were taken suddenly as slaves when they were literally kidnapped from their normal lives, whatever those lives were. They were taken away from the land of their ancestors. The spirit of the ancestors couldn't cross the water like the native American. You know the place where you were born in sacred, and so when they were taken on these boats from away from their homes, they experienced the most deep desolation possible because not only were they being removed from their friends and kindred, but they were being removed from their God and they had no way to get to God because the ancestors were way back in Africa on the land. And I imagine and I think that's the only thing we can do. We can only use our imaginations to really discover how folk music emerges because I'm sure music is still emerging today. We just don't know which songs are going to appear two hundred, here's but the same processes taking place. I think that when the slaves heard about this Jesus, the master's religion, I gotta realize this. They were not impressed by the masters. Christianity, man say. Well, right. This is why it's even surprising that they adopted exactly because they saw all of brutality. They saw the hypocrisy and again, we're the brunt of it, but they heard about this Jesus, This man of sorrow who suffered and dente fide, they thought, and then they were told the Jesus is the son of the high God. No wait the son of the high God. We can get to the high God through this guy. And his story sounds like our story. He's born in terrible circumstances. He's mistreated. He's finally abused and killed goodness. Maybe he will carry us to the high God. Then also they heard stories about Daniel in the lion's den. My goodness. They love that story because they identified with Daniel tell 'em as you know, one thing that's striking is connected with the spirit of Christianity rather with the than with the church, the institution or the way it was being practiced. Yeah. Okay. So why is the Daniel story? So tell the story and tell me what the connection is between those people and that story sing the song from the store. Didn't my Lord deliver Daniel. This is gonna be edited, so you can say, things you don't have to worry about. We don't have to be perfect. Yeah, I think so. Didn't my Lord deliver Danielle deliver Dan deliver, Dan didn't deliver. Why. Didn't delivered. Then you. Why not? He delivered Deng from the lion's den Joan from the belly of the we, the Hebrew children from the fiery furnace..

Daniel Africa James Weldon Johnson Dan den Joan Danielle Deng
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"North mainly to flee the persecution of racism and brought us to a place that was an international community and every once in a while, I would hear my mother or my father singing a little song very quietly. They wouldn't sing openly for my grandparents, and I said, what's that? Oh, nothing. Nothing you know. Do you think that these were songs you know that they really carried around inside them? Maybe they were consciously humming them or. The heard them from their parents and their grandparents, and they they just which songs that they sang for comfort, you know? So I think and it was only as a as prepared to speak with you that we all actually try to. Diminish that in our memory memory, we celebrate this music now, right? Can culture as a whole celebrates music. We don't think very hard or very often about where they came from and how that is speaking to us. Also through this music. And it was also as I started to prepare the, you know, this question that James Weldon Johnson raises in that in the book that you gave me from nineteen twenty five book of spirituals, who wrote this music the that there must have been barred that there were. There were great artists at work. I mean, I'm wondering at any. Is there folklore around that that that comes came down to you through your family, or is there a memory of that or you know, what do you think, or what have you learned. I discovered a few things as a teenager. I met a woman by the name of Jesse. Anthony. Who was I think she was over eighty when I met her and somehow she was coming to our church and we young people would go to her house to collect her to bring her to church and on. Well, he was an African American woman whose parents were slaves in Virginia, and she sang spirituals, and she'd heard me singing. So she she just sort of took me under her wings from the teach me these songs and she had a suitcase full of stories that she'd collected over the years of the spirituals. And she would tell me she'd say child when they sang this song, this is what they were talking about. You know, people don't know this and she had stories for every tell me story telling one that you're a member of how many other five. It's a body of five hundred or six hundred songs, right? No five or six. Come down at least one of the stories I seem to remember that she told it was about emancipation day had come, and there was a group of former slaves now on an island off the coast of South Carolina, and my parents were from South Carolina, all my family, and they were waiting for the misery of the government to arrive in his little boat. The tell them that they had received the deeds to their land because the government had promised them not only freedom, but forty acres a mule. And so this was going to be great wonderful day, and the former slaves had gathered together on the island waiting with baited breath. And finally, they saw the boat of the officer approaching and they could tell even from the distance that his face was not happy, and it's countenance with someone sad, and they said there was a grown that just came from the crowd and. One of the older women from the crowd just stood up and began to make up a song on the spot. Show you what this? Yeah, I do. I'll go to the piano k. Song, she sang. Nobody. Nope. Nobody knows. Nobody knows trouble see. Hello. And then she spoke looking to the people around her. She said, sometimes I'm up sometimes. Yes. Two. Trouble. See nobody knows. Look at the people standing by she said, all you see me going loan. So, and they answered. I've got much trials. And they answered. Ooh. Nobody knows. Jeez. Nobody knows trouble see. Glow..

Jesse James Weldon Johnson South Carolina Anthony officer Virginia forty acres
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"North mainly to flee the persecution of racism and brought us to a place that was an international community and every once in a while, I would hear my mother or my father singing a little song very quietly. They wouldn't sing openly for my grandparents, and I said, what's that song? Oh, nothing. Nothing. You know. Do you think that these were songs that you know that they really carried around inside? Maybe they consciously humming them are? I think they, they heard them from their parents and their grandparents, and they just were songs that they sang for comfort, you know? So I think and it was only as I as I prepared to speak with you that we celebrate this music now, right culture as a whole celebrates music. We don't think very hard or very often about where they came from and how that is speaking to us also through this music. And it was also as I started to prepare the this question that James Weldon Johnson raises in that in the book that you gave me from nineteen twenty five book of spirituals. Who wrote this music the that there must have been barred that there were. There were great artists at work. I mean, I'm wondering at any. Is there folklore around that that came down to you through your family, or is there a memory of that or you know, what do you think, or what have you learned. I discovered a few things as a teenager. I met a woman by the name of Jesse. Anthony. Who was I think she was over eighty when I met her and somehow she was coming to our church and. We young people would go to her house to collect her to bring her to church. Well, here was an African American woman whose parents were slaves in Virginia, and she sang the spirituals and she'd heard me singing church. So she, she just sort of took me under her wings from the teach me these songs, and she had a suitcase full of stories that she had collected over the years of the spirituals. And she would tell me she'd say child when they sang this song, this is what they were talking about. You know, people don't know this and she had stories for every story. One of the stories I seem to remember that she told it was about emancipation day had come, and there was a group of former slaves now on an island off the coast of South Carolina, and my parents were from South Carolina, all my family, and they were waiting for the misery of the government to arrive in his little boat. The tell them that they had received the d. Leads to their land because the government had promised them not only freedom, but forty acres a mule. And so this was going to be great wonderful day, and the former slaves had gathered together on the island waiting with baited breath. And Finally, I saw the boat of the officer approaching and they could tell even from the distance that his face was not happy, and his countenance was somewhat sad, and they said there was a grown that just came from the crowd, and one of the older women from the crowd just stood up and began to make up a song on the spot. Show you what that's on. I'll go to the peon. Okay. She sang. No. Tread see. Nobody knows. Nobody knows the trouble. I see. And then she spoke looking to the people around her. She said, sometimes I'm up sometimes. Oh yes. Times. Name. Treadle see, nobody knows..

Jesse James Weldon Johnson South Carolina Virginia Anthony officer forty acres
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

"The success of both the women's suffrage movement and also prohibition both of which came in around eighteen i'm sorry nineteen nineteen nineteen twenty and so james weldon johnson and the end up lacey pe believed that if the federal government could get involved in people's lives to the extent that they would tell them what they could drink that they could surely get involved to stop people from burning other human beings alive so they went ahead with the help of a white congressman named dyer from saint louis and both in the twenties and the thirties the end of lease ep mounted several very powerful campaigns in congress to get a federal anti lynching law passed the approximate congressman dire take in his bill to to defining and trying to prevent luncheon the well as i said before the sense was that this was not murder in other words the there was a constitutional issue in that the southern states pointed out that first of all that the federal government had no right to involve itself in criminal local criminal affairs in the south and these were just murders and that the states were perfectly able to take care of them the federal governor the those advocating federal bill insisted that this was a different type of crime that it wasn't just murdered but rather a form of anarchy in which laws were ignored and so that was really the basis that they used that they felt it really boiled down to this ageold argument in this country between federal and states rights in other words that were americans federal citizens who were entitled to protection from the federal government or were they citizens of the states and thus criminals were to be dealt with on a local level it's interesting you read that one of the reasons why congress's finally ready to really listen to this anti lynching bill was that there was a lot of fear in the north that lynching would follow the black migration to the north and that the north would have trouble.

congressman dyer saint louis murder federal government congress james weldon johnson
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

"She was outraged about lynching and she was really the first anti lynching crusaders who appear she got involved in eighteen ninety two she was a journalist in memphis and three of her friends who ran a grocery store were lynched because their business was a threatening the business of a competing white grocery store and so when that occurred she realized that the rationale about black rapists threatening white women was really just that it was just like a rationale or an excuse because these friends of hers had been perfectly legitimate businessman she began a to'realize ing about lynching and researching lynchings herself in the south and for her trouble she was driven away basically the mob trashed her newspaper office and warned that if she ever came back she herself would be lynched so she moved to new york and went on a kind of about fifteen or twenty year international crusade both in britain and the united states lecturing writing about lynching all she could do really was try to bring it to people's attention in other words at that time many of these events occurred in the south where news of these events didn't necessarily always come out or by the time it did it was so shaded against the person who had been lynched that there wasn't a great deal of sympathy sympathy in america for the victims so what ida wells was trying to do was basically call attention to what a what an outrage this was and get some coverage of it get people alarmed about it and try to sort of change the dynamics of that the lynch's were the criminals not the victims the end lacey pe began an anti lynching campaign in one thousand nine shortly after it was founded you're right the james weldon johnson the writer lead their anti lynching legislative effort how did the end of lacey pe decide that they should try to get federal legislation that would outlaw lynching i believe it was probably inspired to a certain degree by.

memphis new york britain united states america ida wells lynch james weldon johnson writer twenty year
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The success of both the women's suffrage movement and also prohibition both of which came around eighteen i'm sorry nineteen nineteen nineteen twenty and so james weldon johnson and the end of lacey pe believed that if the federal government could get involved in people's lives to the extent that they would tell them what they could drink that they could surely get involved to stop people from burning other human beings alive so they went ahead with the help of a white congressman named dyer from saint louis and both in the twenties and the thirties the end of lease ep mounted several very powerful campaigns in congress to get a federal anti lynching law passed now what what approach to congressman dire take in his bill to to defining and trying to prevent luncheon the world as i said before the sense was that this was not murder in other words the there was a constitutional issue in that the southern states pointed out that first of all the federal government had no right to involve itself in criminal local criminal affairs in the south and these were just murders and that the states were perfectly able to take care of them the federal government or the those advocating federal bill insisted that this was a different type of crime that it wasn't just murder but rather a form of anarchy in which laws were ignored and so that was really the basis that they used that they felt it really boiled down to this ageold argument in this country between federal and states rights in other words that were americans federal citizens who were entitled to protection from the federal government or were they citizens of the states and thus criminals were to be dealt with on a local level interesting you write that one of the reasons why congress was finally ready to really listen to this anti lynching bill was that there was a lot of fear in the north that lynching would follow the black migration to the north and that the north would have trouble.

congressman dyer saint louis murder federal government congress james weldon johnson
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The human holocaust possible what was her approach to trying to stop lynching just as the court you read suggested she was outraged about lynching and she was really the first anti lynching crusaders who appear she got involved in eighteen ninety two she was a journalist in memphis and three of her friends who ran a grocery store were lynched because their business was threatening the business of competing white grocery store and so when that occurred she realized that the rationale about black rapists threatening white women was really just that it was just like a rationale or an excuse because these friends of hers had been perfectly legitimate businessman she began a ing about lynching and researching lynchings herself in the south and for her trouble she was driven away basically mob trashed her newspaper office and warned that if she ever came back she herself would be lynched so she moved to new york and went on a kind of about fifteen or twenty year international crusade both in britain and the united states lecturing and writing about lynching all she could do really was try to bring it to people's attention in other words at that time many of these events occurred in the south where news of these events didn't necessarily always come out or by the time it did it was so shaded against the person who had been lynched that there wasn't a great deal of sympathy sympathy in america for the victims so what ida wells was trying to do was basically call attention to what a what an outrage this was and get some coverage of it get people alarmed about it and try to sort of change the dynamics so that the lynch shire's were the criminals not the victims the end began an anti lynching campaign in one thousand nine nine shortly after it was found in you right the james weldon johnson the writer lead their anti lynching legislative effort how did the end w c p decide that they should try to get federal legislation that would outlaw lynching i believe it was probably inspired to a certain degree by.

memphis new york britain united states america ida wells lynch shire james weldon johnson writer twenty year
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The human holocaust possible what was her approach to trying to stop lynching just as the court you read suggested she was outraged about lynching and she was really the first anti lynching crusader to appear she got involved in eighteen ninety two she was a journalist in memphis and three of her friends who ran a grocery store were lynched because their business was threatening the business about competing white grocery store and so when that occurred she realized that the rationale about black rapists threatening white women was really just that it was just like a rationale or an excuse because these friends of hers had been perfectly legitimate businessman she began aditorial izing about lynching and researching lynchings herself in the south and for her trouble she was driven away basically the mob trashed her newspaper office and warned that if she ever came back she herself would be lynched so she moved to new york and went on a kind of about fifteen or twenty year international crusade both in britain and the united states lecturing and writing about lynching all she could do really was try to bring it to people's attention in other words at that time many of these events occurred in the south where news of these events didn't necessarily always come out or by the time it did it was so shaded against the person who had been lynched that there wasn't a great deal of sympathy sympathy in america for the victims so what ida wells was trying to do was basically call attention to what a what an outrage this was and get some coverage of it get people alarmed about it and try to sort of change the dynamic so that the lynch's were the criminals not victims the end of lacey pe began an anti lynching campaign in one thousand nine nine shortly after it was founded in you right the james weldon johnson the writer lead their anti lynching legislative effort how did the end wc p decide that they should try to get federal legislation that would outlaw lynching i believe it was probably inspired to a certain degree by.

memphis new york britain united states america ida wells lynch james weldon johnson writer twenty year
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tell us do oh come on alive tell the new this to me the s that is beyond say featuring kendrick lamar and freedom from her album lemonade i don't know if you heard about this but saturday night i know people who set alarms for one thirty in the morning sunday mornings they could see this live beyond saying that song along with maybe the greatest stage show of all time as she headlined coachella with a two hour concert concert that people are calling vague chela it's being called a historic performance by concert goers critics and lake top entertainers od black culture called all those things but really everyone seems to agree that it might be one of the greatest performances ever unstaged over the past decade included a marching band sat on bleachers beyond z play with elements of historically black college football halftime shows drumline one hundred dancers a special edition of james weldon johnson's lift every voice and sing a song that's known as the black national anthem jay z beyonce his husband came out to do it on dejavu her sister solange took to the stage took a dance off of their big sister kelly rowland and michelle williams joined beyond safer say my name soldier and lose my breath former members of course all of them of destiny's child the epa concert featuring a nod to the great nina simone every timely tributes and saturday was the same night that nina simone along with sister rosetta tharp we're finally inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in cleveland along bon jovi the cars of the media blues and dire straits among many others either way if you haven't seen that beyond say probably on youtube by now it's it's sort of must want incredible coming up on q donovan woods a musician known strict back intimate records donovan woods and his.

kendrick lamar solange kelly rowland michelle williams epa cleveland james weldon johnson nina simone rosetta tharp donovan woods two hour
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The same way during and after phyllis we lose lifetime her work was used by abolitionist as evidence that africans were humans with souls and intelligence equal to that of europeans but not everyone had seen her work as evidence of the intrinsic humanity and equality of africans thomas jefferson criticized her work heavily in notes on the state of virginia in seventeen eighty seven he wrote quote misery is often the parent of the most affecting touches and poetry among the blacks as misery enough god knows but no poetry love is the particular east room of the poet their love is ardent critic kindles the senses only knocked the imagination religion indeed has prison has produced a phyllis sweetly but it could not produce a poet the compositions composed under her name r below the dignity of criticism i wanna time travel and may be um uh yeah i wanna say bad things to thomas jefferson that's what's up aside from jefferson's disparagement we lease work started to fall out of favour in the 19th century as it was overshadowed by slave narratives and the work of people lake frederick douglass this was especially true since we lease enslavement had taken place in such relative comfort we don't want to downplay the fact that she was still in enslave person but it it there were certainly stories that were allowed darker out there circulating so her stood in sharp contrast to the writing that was tied at the time to the antebellum south by the turn of the 20th century writers and critics or pointing out a range of perceived shortcomings than fylla sweet leaves work including that she wasn't personal enough see wasn't genuine enough hints he cared too little for other enslaved africans in the words of james weldon johnson he was riding in the 1920s he preface to the book of american negro poetry quote one looks in vain for some outburst or even complaint against the bondage of her peop.

phyllis virginia thomas jefferson james weldon johnson
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WJR 760

"Trained to provide it is pioneering work we are bringing together something new and needed to those who are ready to try it so apparently this is an unusual if you recall back in august vouch hillary supporter is actually went to the love domain venice california to cuddle away their election day pain and then after trump won the apparently generated cuddle orgies spiked in november after president trump won so awkward so terrible so awful and yet so predictable for my generation the millennials only we could be stupid enough to reinvent things like relationships and physical comfort as let me hire a random person to come over to my house so that i can hugged them for an hour how about forming a real human relationship people you know like with a human like a whore lay in the walk both oh yeah and i think that our civilization may be in a fair bit of trouble not speaking of our civilization being in a fair bit of trouble the new york times has an article today about why it is good at colin kaepernick a is uh is boycotting the national anthem they're still obsessed with this thing they say basically that black people all along he felt uncomfortable at the national anthem and that it's no wonder that the the national anthems been boycotted as an article by brent staples over in the new york times and he talks about how the colin kaepernick as well in line with people who have hated the who've hated the the national anthem for for quite a while what this this columnist says his the histories of the white and black anthems are strikingly different apparently there's another anthem called lift every voice in saying that was used by a lot of black communities the history of the white and black anthems are strikingly different james weldon johnson and his brother jay rosman johnson row lift every voice in singing 1900s celebrate abraham lincoln's birthday at a time when the government seemed to have abandoned altogether the promise of reconstruction the starspangled banner began as an ordinary song they competed with other songs for space in the american imagination it was not until the early 20th century that are required the stature of a sacred written became an of loyalty test and excuse for people who call themselves patriots to harass and beat people who dissented from the songs message the.

trump new york times colin kaepernick brent staples james weldon johnson abraham lincoln hillary election day president jay rosman johnson
"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"james weldon johnson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"For healthy living customer traffic leader nancy pelosi and senate democratic leader chuck schumer who will lead a press conference later today with house and senate democrats there are expected to call upon congressional republicans to bring the dream act for a vote on the house and senate four are they criticize the president's decision to in the obama era daca program daca or deferred action for childhood arrivals granted work permits and took away the risk of deportation for more eight hundred thousand young immigrants brought into the united states illegally as children its constitutionality has been questioned in congress has six months to come up with an alternative programme chicago was among a number of us cities were demonstrators rallied and marched in protest of the decision to rescind daca i say this and you heat will over thousand people gathered at federal plaza in the loop late yesterday afternoon after rallying there they marched to the immigration and customs enforcement headquarters that clarke in congress parkway chicago's board of education is facing a lawsuit over sexual abuse a plaintive claims he was sexually abused by more than love it while he attended james weldon johnson elementary school in north london they'll he claims the board new love it was not fit to work with children nineteen others say they were abused by love it when he worked at a mentoring program in chicago during the nineties i love it was fatally shot by one of his victims back in two thousand the board of.

nancy pelosi the house president united states congress chicago federal plaza james weldon johnson elementar senate chuck schumer senate democrats obama clarke london six months