31 Burst results for "James Webb"

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

Short Wave

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

"Science correspondent nell greenfieldboyce with some exciting. Strana me news high now. Hey they're re too so today. We're gonna talk about nasr's next big space telescope. The james webb space telescope. This is a behemoth that is sometimes called the successor of hubble and it will be the biggest most powerful telescope ever put into space. And i here. We finally have launched aid. It's been a long time coming. Indeed indeed it has and now it's supposed to launch on december eighteenth. Hasn't this telescope being in the works for over twenty years. Yeah yeah i i reported on it for. Npr back in two thousand and seven. That's when they built this giant life sized model of the thing and we're bringing around the country. I went to see it when it was set up here in dc down by the white house and all the monuments and to me it looked like this big ray gun that was about to zap the dome off the capitol building description. And that's an unusual. Look for a telescope right. I mean usually space telescopes look like metal tubes but not this one nothing like this has been put out into space before

Nell Greenfieldboyce James Webb Nasr NPR White House DC Capitol Building
"james webb" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

01:36 min | 3 weeks ago

"james webb" Discussed on Unexplainable

"They're hoping to find <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> the very <Speech_Music_Male> first light of the universe <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> still have to go <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> each. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This episode was reported <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by. Brian resnick <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and produced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by me. Meredith <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> odd not <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> noam <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hassenfeld wrote the music <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and edited the episode <Speech_Music_Female> with help from <Speech_Music_Female> jillian weinberger. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mandy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> knew in check. The facts <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> christian ayala <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> was on mixing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in san design <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and unsurprisingly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bird. Pinkerton <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wrote in awesome article <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> about <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> formula one for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> box this week. So <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you should <SpeakerChange> totally check <Speech_Music_Female> that out. <Speech_Music_Female> Lauren cats <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> heads up our newsletter. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> And liz <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ellie nelson is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the vp. Vox <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> audio <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can sign <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> up for newsletter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at vox dot com <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> slash unexplainable. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> An email. Any thoughts <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you might have about the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> show to unexplainable <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at box <Speech_Music_Female> dot com <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> unexplainable <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as part of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the box media podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> network. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We will see you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> next wednesday <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for <SpeakerChange> james <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> webb part <Music> two.

"james webb" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

05:59 min | 3 weeks ago

"james webb" Discussed on Unexplainable

"Answering.

NASA Has Completed Work on the James Webb Space Telescope

John Batchelor

01:15 min | Last month

NASA Has Completed Work on the James Webb Space Telescope

"Do we have left? We got about a minute. Okay. James Webb Telescope has passed its final checks The Hubble replacement, the Hubble replacement, and it's going to soon be shipped through the Panama Canal down to Karura. I'd like you wanna Karoo. Excuse me is it's huge, Is it? Is it fillets? Massive. Oh, I haven't seen it with the mirrors unfurled. I've seen it with the mirrors folded up, but it is Massive. It's going to have a about a 21 Ft Wide Mirror, which is three times almost three times the diameter of the Hubble. And it will be working in infrared, so you can see much further because it can see through Hubble's mostly visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. So an infrared you can see past all the dust and the junk that's out in the deeper parts of the universe. And really start looking back at the very edge of the beginning of time, which is very promising, and it's gonna be parked what they call Earth Sun l two or the Grange to which is a stable point out beyond, uh, Earth's orbit, so it'll be in the Earth's shadow all the time. So between that and the natural cooling, it's got and the artificial quickly and Scott's got sunshades that could pop up hopefully Um, you'll be able to start really answering some of these very basic questions about the beginning of the universe. So exciting, so exciting.

Karura James Webb Panama Canal Scott
Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

Geek News Central

02:44 min | 10 months ago

Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

"He may have been asked to have that. Removed nasa net nasa gets pumped for twenty twenty one with hype video full of moon dreams and mars. Hope nasr's big plans for the year but doing space is still pretty hard. Last year was a big one for space missions. We got We got man missions back to the international space station. After many years of the shuttle being retired it's amazing. How long we relied on the russians. Now we don't have to write them a check but the russians are still lifting astronauts. The iss many most of them are from other countries. Now the space agency released a video previewing hyping. His plans for the new year and the moon is the star of the show. Why are we going back to the moon. Really you know honestly is that. Make any sense for some of you. Don't think we went to the moon begin with i think they ought to land on one of those missions close to a nasa landing site from the early days in. Show us some of that stuff. Did they left while the video. Swallow hope and optimism We know that the space launch system has delays is largely because of coronavirus pandemic parts parts parts and parts and parts and parts. I'm having issues getting some stuff here too that i need because there's no parts the first big test of the orion spacecraft is in the works for twenty twenty one with artists one. But we'll have to wait and see if the unscrewed mission able to launch this year after all and Of course the presser veers roller is set for a landing on mars on february tnt. So we got that to look forward to the twenty one minutes of how or whatever it's called If all goes well mark the start of a long range plan to bring martian rock samples back to earth and of course the much much delayed. James webb space telescope is still on the calendar for an october thirty first launch date. We spent so much money on the james webb space telescope. I just everyone will probably be holding their breath all the way to or visit with this thing and at the same time. The hubble is well you know well at its end of life you know well close to its end of life issues and we got a lot of the hubble is operating in your systems have died and there's no way to go and repair it so I wonder what they're gonna would have to do. If the james webb space telescope had issues once they launched but so

Nasa Nasr International Space Station James Webb
Episode 136 Mega Movie Monster Mania pt 1 - burst 21

The Moratorium

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Episode 136 Mega Movie Monster Mania pt 1 - burst 21

"Let me scroll down here in verify that. That was current. What we got we got amazes monsters Yet, he knows your loan was nineteen, eighty I credit before the love boat and bosom buddies started in nineteen, eighty, nine, I love those and buddies. And Nineteen ninety-two as mazes and monsters. Now he just shows up as. A friend of a friend the the college student. I don't know. He looks really young and yeah he's trying to be nice and Quirky it works he he really does work for him in this film, but he's not a big role right Now, this film I think was totally either. In sync or ripping off Halloween. Okay. What Year did you say this? This is nineteen eighty. So Halloween was seventy eight. but Halloween to was what eighty two I think. But this sounds like the score could have been done by John Carman. Saint something's the scares not so much in the same thing it has the same trope that the woman can't do anything by yourself. this does have James Webb Hornet. Really, young, he's thirty four in this film and he's playing a professor who is banging one of his students guy. I I'm sorry you have to see him that way. Yeah. The student he's banging is Elizabeth Cam and Elizabeth Kemp. Came back to play and the clairvoyant. Who has also directed by the same guy okay. The Director of this film is Armand. Mastroianni and K and Toyo- on the Sandwich. Isn't it? It's a double decker sandwich. Yeah. Is Married to Mary Elizabeth Master Antonio to This guy also directed Cameron's closet Oh that's another. Another way back when for me that was nineteen, eighty eight for Cameron's closet. I remember that I had the Fan Goria that I kind of talked about Cameron's closet and I was so excited to see it. Also get it confused with cellar dweller and I'm not real sure which one is which. I think I got confused with the woman in White Lady and The lady in White Yes lady and I love that mood. Are you talking about the one with Lukas Haas and yes yes. Yes. That was a great movie director also he did. the TV movie for the ring which I clicked on. Not the same guy so don't even. That was Natasha, Kinski and Michael York and a Danielle Steele. Oh my God how? Eighties. Possibly, get. That that's painful. Is Very painful that was actually nineteen, ninety six how really? Got Horrible as why I clicked on it, I was like Oh man really and I no no. No. Thanks unless unless mustaches. Well, let's never yet but he directed like eight episodes of Friday, the thirteenth, the series also tales from the dark side. Music that.

John Carman Elizabeth Cam Elizabeth Kemp Mastroianni Cameron Mary Elizabeth Master Antonio James Webb Armand Saint Lukas Haas Michael York Danielle Steele Kinski Natasha
"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Using stroke for might be really distracting. And I definitely want any this explain left's coexist exactly so you just have to pick your times. There's one shot of yours where it's a door of some size and several scientists are positioned in a way. That looks like I've taught my cleaning it But it could have been many other more important aspects of their work. Can you describe that shot a little bit and How you position those those folks and and how you know how much of a collaborative effort that was or or how much how long it took? It wasn't collaborative at all of Yemen. Chat some those doors were really heavy. That's the shipping container for James Webb and the engineers and technicians. There are actually trying to get those doors latched and So I turned around I did have a wet in my hand and I was like how this shot it and it actually stayed in a raw format for a while before I get back to it in realize realized what I had and went ahead and and color corrected and that sort of thing so there's no additional light in particular image. It's one of my favorites. It happens all your all the photo muscles. I mean your documentary. Almost you got your news style moment there as well as setting up a much more involved shots and documentary do use macro lenses. When you're working on you know documenting pieces and parts and things like that? Do we wind up using and my last question is You know you mentioned in one on one of the articles. I read that you you know. There's some influence of science fiction films in your work and I was hoping you could mention. Maybe maybe some of the specific science fiction films you liked and watched and and how that you know few feeds into your work so I mean from a from. I don't know as long as I can remember independent science fiction. I'm I'm star Trek. You know the whole Captain Kirk. Spock used a mesmerizing rising. What I've come off from school to watch those episodes when I should have been done homework? You sound this way. Orange Teijin the right thing. I mean lately the aesthetics of I guess some of my favorite favorite movies I mean think. Let me think for second I like the latest blade runner I think he's amazing For meekness When I talk friends eight they really really like the movie but I love the of of Prometheus so I I I watch films multiple times with the sound down because I just want to look at the aesthetics of it see how it was lit the thing so I think I've seen blade runner? Maybe I WANNA say twenty twenty five times originally the sound on down. Yeah original but I've also done the latest one with the sound down. Quite ad Astra was really good. This is a sign up to keep the ask again High Tech Aesthetic for amazing. There's a remastered version of the original blade runner that POPs ops up in theaters every once in a while. It's like eight K. resolution. It's amazing. Get get a chance to raise odyssey. The screen excluding seventy millimeter at the Ziegfield theatre and surround. Sound good. Feel Oh yeah I mean I I I see that movie in your shots for sure absolutely anyway. If people want to see more of your work where can they go. INSTAGRAM websites Where can they find you work? They can find my work I'm on instagram. It's the light and the Lens. Let's my instagram bring handled And my website is gun. Photography Dot Com. Now we'll put that on or graying already Wonderful talk again. We enjoyed it as you can tell we had a great time here also The past hour so if we found the guy with the greatest photo acid search has been. This has been fantastic to get a chance to talk to you. Guys I I I can tell that That you guys Eiser Fan of science and space and that sort of thing it really comes across in our conversation came across in our conversation and I hope you follow this project to be honest i Taylor absolutely and a lot of a lot of our listeners will soon be tuning in to see what's going on there to a lot of good stuff here. He's been awesome really appreciate it flashes last night. Chris Thank you okay. That is a wrap. You know there are a lot of people out there who love taking pictures but for whatever reason still L. having subscribe to our show Jiyun anybody who might fit that profile if you do. Don't shame them but do encourage them to head on over to apple. podcast Google Google podcast stitcher overcast was spotify and subscribe to our show. It's free it's easy and tell them they can always find this on the beach. Explorer website as as well as the photography podcast facebook group for now on behalf of the entire crew including John Harris. Jason tables and thin thin born camps profoundly proud papa. Thank you so much tuning in today.

Taylor Yemen INSTAGRAM Ziegfield theatre John Harris James Webb High Tech Aesthetic Captain Kirk spotify Spock Jiyun Astra graying Jason apple. Chris
"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Using stroke for might be really distracting. And I definitely want any this explain left's coexist exactly so you just have to pick your times. There's one shot of yours where it's a door of some size and several scientists are positioned in a way. That looks like I've taught my cleaning it But it could have been many other more important aspects of their work. Can you describe that shot a little bit and How you position those those folks and and how you know how much of a collaborative effort that was or or how much how long it took? It wasn't collaborative at all of Yemen. Chat some those doors were really heavy. That's the shipping container for James Webb and the engineers and technicians. There are actually trying to get those doors latched and So I turned around I did have a wet in my hand and I was like how this shot it and it actually stayed in a raw format for a while before I get back to it in realize realized what I had and went ahead and and color corrected and that sort of thing so there's no additional light in particular image. It's one of my favorites. It happens all your all the photo muscles. I mean your documentary. Almost you got your news style moment there as well as setting up a much more involved shots and documentary do use macro lenses. When you're working on you know documenting pieces and parts and things like that? Do we wind up using and my last question is You know you mentioned in one on one of the articles. I read that you you know. There's some influence of science fiction films in your work and I was hoping you could mention. Maybe maybe some of the specific science fiction films you liked and watched and and how that you know few feeds into your work so I mean from a from. I don't know as long as I can remember independent science fiction. I'm I'm star Trek. You know the whole Captain Kirk. Spock used a mesmerizing rising. What I've come off from school to watch those episodes when I should have been done homework? You sound this way. Orange Teijin the right thing. I mean lately the aesthetics of I guess some of my favorite favorite movies I mean think. Let me think for second I like the latest blade runner I think he's amazing For meekness When I talk friends eight they really really like the movie but I love the of of Prometheus so I I I watch films multiple times with the sound down because I just want to look at the aesthetics of it see how it was lit the thing so I think I've seen blade runner? Maybe I WANNA say twenty twenty five times originally the sound on down. Yeah original but I've also done the latest one with the sound down. Quite ad Astra was really good. This is a sign up to keep the ask again High Tech Aesthetic for amazing. There's a remastered version of the original blade runner that POPs ops up in theaters every once in a while. It's like eight K. resolution. It's amazing. Get get a chance to raise odyssey. The screen excluding seventy millimeter at the Ziegfield theatre and surround. Sound good. Feel Oh yeah I mean I I I see that movie in your shots for sure absolutely anyway. If people want to see more of your work where can they go. INSTAGRAM websites Where can they find you work? They can find my work I'm on instagram. It's the light and the Lens. Let's my instagram bring handled And my website is gun. Photography Dot Com. Now we'll put that on or graying already Wonderful talk again. We enjoyed it as you can tell we had a great time here also The past hour so if we found the guy with the greatest photo acid search has been. This has been fantastic to get a chance to talk to you. Guys I I I can tell that That you guys Eiser Fan of science and space and that sort of thing it really comes across in our conversation came across in our conversation and I hope you follow this project to be honest i Taylor absolutely and a lot of a lot of our listeners will soon be tuning in to see what's going on there to a lot of good stuff here. He's been awesome really appreciate it flashes last night. Chris Thank you okay. That is a wrap. You know there are a lot of people out there who love taking pictures but for whatever reason still L. having subscribe to our show Jiyun anybody who might fit that profile if you do. Don't shame them but do encourage them to head on over to apple. podcast Google Google podcast stitcher overcast was spotify and subscribe to our show. It's free it's easy and tell them they can always find this on the beach. Explorer website as as well as the photography podcast facebook group for now on behalf of the entire crew including John Harris. Jason tables and thin thin born camps profoundly proud papa. Thank you so much tuning in today.

Taylor Yemen INSTAGRAM Ziegfield theatre John Harris James Webb High Tech Aesthetic Captain Kirk spotify Spock Jiyun Astra graying Jason apple. Chris
"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"We hope you're enjoying this edition of the B and h photography. PODCAST the best way to support the show is by subscribing on Apple. PODCAST Ogle podcasts. spotify or wherever you get your podcasts for links to gear and more information on today's guests check out the show notes in your podcast APP APP or visit our homepage on the H.. Explorer website and joined the B and h photography podcast facebook group. And now back to the show. Okay we are back before we continue with Chris just a little backup here. Are John Reminding me that. We didn't fact do a whole episode so we on the Hubble telescope a while back and we had a couple of guests who who they This is going back. Geez three years now we had Dr Jeff Hester who was a member of the team in That built a camera on the Hubble telescope and is credited with taking that photo pillars of creation. Right so take a look for that episode A in our archive. Yeah we also Avai on that episode. WHO's the imaging team leader at the Space Telescope Institute so it really fits in well with complementary show? Okay okay. A lot of the photography do I imagine is day in day out kind of stuff. It could be photographing anyway. It's basically documentation wrote a good deal of what you do is also Radha challenging because of the scale or technical complexity. What what's one of the more were one or two of the more complex photographs that you've been faced and you've been able to to pull off successfully one that comes to mind is A series of images that have made in Insein China's Chamber Ray where until the scope was cryogenically tested so The walls of the chamber were coated Anna. Basically a a matt black goading so it was just not for temperature control obviously also for light control and it was basically. There was nothing I had to had to light and that was. It was a lot of light US also at the pinpoint an area of L.. The Wall that was reflected in to the mirror. And that's where a pump the most of the life so that I could actually image the mayor that image which is actually it was pretty successful not one of those images rain and in that Gio in two thousand nineteen That was pretty challenging Anytime you're actually faced with with photographing the mayor. Jack you after figure out what's being reflected in there right so which often often means that? You're chasing around the room trying to figure out what actually is being reflected in America you have to like that of a couple of time. Exposures one in particular was almost a couple of minutes and The Room was pretty dark. Nothing but flashlights being used by The technicians and basically you know I had to go around the room and do some painting with light but I had to find the portions of the wall that reflected in the in the mirror again and that was pretty challenging. But it was fun at the same time you have to be careful when using flash could you overload certain circuits or do damage by using certain lighting equipment. We have run test on that and and it has been determined that we began damage. It okay good questions. Though you were talking about the mirrors and how you have to deal with those photographic ladder image is live your images show folks inspecting the mirrors with the rightly mark. One MoD zero human eyeballing a flashlight is is the is that the most most bestest way to inspect these mirrors or is there a laser and computer. That does a final scan of it or do you know so so that the flashlight flashlight inspections are contamination inspections looking for articles. You know that sort of I think the the other inspection. You're talking about they do that. It's called wavefront sensing so when its entire telescope. Let's put together and their wings. Were fully deployed deployed. They did basically shoot a laser at the at the mirror and then re the reflection in order to see how you know figure out what the focus point tour with his razor interferometry interferometry call. Is there a non human way of testing the merest for contamination before it's boxed up and put on the rocket they they do have even ways as well but when these were first unblocks The best way to do it and and I think the most fun for the contamination nurse. Yeah cleaner AH ultimate boxing video and for example you know when you're talking about this pretty complicated testing processes. How do you try to conceptualize that you know for your imagery? How do you kind of get a a sense of How do you how do I say this Documenting narrating and describing pretty complex processes with one image. It's difficult. Yeah but but you know it really disturbed with understanding what the processes are you know so in in once you understand stand what the processes are or what the what the intention of the of the test are what the engineers having mind you know you sit down and you talk to them and they square with his debts supposed to do and what they're doing. And then you can. You can come up with the concept it tells the story. Click and also about the You're describing the flashlight test in the dark time exposure how How cooperative are the engineers and scientists at that point when they know that you doing a Yourself a relatively complex photo and they need to do several takes or is that just people skills and your time experience there. You've developed relationships of people that are willing to work with you. I think it's a lot of the ladder. Just people skills and people really respecting what you do. But I think people understand that they're working on a mission that might change the way we look at the at the universe and they know that these images are going out and they want to be part. That's you know so so I I really get in a sense that everyone Really going to be out in some of these images of is it possible to put a number on the size the team or at least a core of the team that that's that you you work with every day I I'm going to say somewhere. We're in the neighborhood Four or five hundred people the terms of core that I might see every day and but there are many many more more booster. I'm sure question about I was reading that Y- back in August. The two halves of the telescope resembled and I guess that's out there where you are and was there a video team there to capture this because it would seem like any kind of thing where two things are coming together and that reminds me of the episode. We do on the anniversary of the Golden Spike where the two trains in order to document that. Do you have a video team. There's well or do you. Totally separate no will well. I work closely with him. But I try not to shoot video The Goddard has an amazing video. Team led by Mike and flair. And they shoot. They've been shooting video of the telescope. As long as I've been shooting still on that's great partners there And then another question I had had to do with with the the images themselves completed in how they decide and how you decide which ones do go out to the public and which ones may be you know sent nat. Go or or the magazine And how much yeah. What's that collaboration? Like so again. I'm pretty pretty much in control of of the images that in terms of selecting the images that have to go through an approval process to go public right okay and that puts me in a unique position. So that you guys on ever get a chance to see anything that I don't like everything you're saying here makes it sound like you have pretty much the perfect photographic job so good Gig uh-huh I had the experience of working with our directors in you use a group of images and they don't pick any of the ones that you yeah right so that respected I do like the fact that I get a chance to to make selections But then they have to go through even approval process which goes from the contractor's through NASA and there's several different layers of approval? Google has to go through the tar heels that were not releasing anything sensitive or proprietary. I once images let me just crashed through that process. They're they're made available to the public. Usually when our flicker site and Yeah it's it's not that works. Is there a security clearance. That's needed on on your end. Like a government security clearance or is it Is it totally separate. When you're working with NASA so You know yes or no. No I mean there are different levels of security clearance but yes there is. There's a level of Florence it from is necessary and I kind of the photographic says because you're a contractor and and you know your work is getting published in prominent magazines and I'm sure around the world I've seen on several websites energy pictures. Yeah who owns them. And who's getting listening fee good question. No one's getting we all own them. The ones getting the licensing you people or fish on the American breaking people on the photographs and the taxpayers official NASA in that you are you allowed to use them you want without. Are you allowed to profit by these. Were just allowed to use them for your own personal use or profit question question. You could actually tipped so I I think you could profit from so So the the the images are public domain windsor out. What about prints and I wanna ask that certainly about not? Because you know these could be in a gallery and people would want to buy one of these prints and large-scale print sales that little different and I hope it is for your K- in for you but also I. I've actually seen my photographs for sale on websites organized. Organize a part of the deal when I was on the Coast Guard. I took a photo of the aftermath of a Coast Guard helicopter crash and you can go online and buy a wall imprint of that or actually embroidered pillow about photograph coffee. You can get a car you can get it on a coffee. That's it okay. So well that's interesting. I would think that maybe you know in like we're we're talking about a gallery. There may be a little cottesloe when your contract that would allow. Oh you do to make prints and sell them in that in that regard But the I did want to ask about Princeton. And when you're shooting you think of of the prince that can be created aided these images because they're gorgeous and they're huge and you know why work in such a format like that if you're not going to kind of consider how big you can blow it up so so I do. Actually.

NASA spotify Dr Jeff Hester US Apple Chris Space Telescope Institute John team leader Princeton Avai America Radha Gio Insein China Google Jack Anna Mike
"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"We hope you're enjoying this edition of the B and h photography. PODCAST the best way to support the show is by subscribing on Apple. PODCAST Ogle podcasts. spotify or wherever you get your podcasts for links to gear and more information on today's guests check out the show notes in your podcast APP APP or visit our homepage on the H.. Explorer website and joined the B and h photography podcast facebook group. And now back to the show. Okay we are back before we continue with Chris just a little backup here. Are John Reminding me that. We didn't fact do a whole episode so we on the Hubble telescope a while back and we had a couple of guests who who they This is going back. Geez three years now we had Dr Jeff Hester who was a member of the team in That built a camera on the Hubble telescope and is credited with taking that photo pillars of creation. Right so take a look for that episode A in our archive. Yeah we also Avai on that episode. WHO's the imaging team leader at the Space Telescope Institute so it really fits in well with complementary show? Okay okay. A lot of the photography do I imagine is day in day out kind of stuff. It could be photographing anyway. It's basically documentation wrote a good deal of what you do is also Radha challenging because of the scale or technical complexity. What what's one of the more were one or two of the more complex photographs that you've been faced and you've been able to to pull off successfully one that comes to mind is A series of images that have made in Insein China's Chamber Ray where until the scope was cryogenically tested so The walls of the chamber were coated Anna. Basically a a matt black goading so it was just not for temperature control obviously also for light control and it was basically. There was nothing I had to had to light and that was. It was a lot of light US also at the pinpoint an area of L.. The Wall that was reflected in to the mirror. And that's where a pump the most of the life so that I could actually image the mayor that image which is actually it was pretty successful not one of those images rain and in that Gio in two thousand nineteen That was pretty challenging Anytime you're actually faced with with photographing the mayor. Jack you after figure out what's being reflected in there right so which often often means that? You're chasing around the room trying to figure out what actually is being reflected in America you have to like that of a couple of time. Exposures one in particular was almost a couple of minutes and The Room was pretty dark. Nothing but flashlights being used by The technicians and basically you know I had to go around the room and do some painting with light but I had to find the portions of the wall that reflected in the in the mirror again and that was pretty challenging. But it was fun at the same time you have to be careful when using flash could you overload certain circuits or do damage by using certain lighting equipment. We have run test on that and and it has been determined that we began damage. It okay good questions. Though you were talking about the mirrors and how you have to deal with those photographic ladder image is live your images show folks inspecting the mirrors with the rightly mark. One MoD zero human eyeballing a flashlight is is the is that the most most bestest way to inspect these mirrors or is there a laser and computer. That does a final scan of it or do you know so so that the flashlight flashlight inspections are contamination inspections looking for articles. You know that sort of I think the the other inspection. You're talking about they do that. It's called wavefront sensing so when its entire telescope. Let's put together and their wings. Were fully deployed deployed. They did basically shoot a laser at the at the mirror and then re the reflection in order to see how you know figure out what the focus point tour with his razor interferometry interferometry call. Is there a non human way of testing the merest for contamination before it's boxed up and put on the rocket they they do have even ways as well but when these were first unblocks The best way to do it and and I think the most fun for the contamination nurse. Yeah cleaner AH ultimate boxing video and for example you know when you're talking about this pretty complicated testing processes. How do you try to conceptualize that you know for your imagery? How do you kind of get a a sense of How do you how do I say this Documenting narrating and describing pretty complex processes with one image. It's difficult. Yeah but but you know it really disturbed with understanding what the processes are you know so in in once you understand stand what the processes are or what the what the intention of the of the test are what the engineers having mind you know you sit down and you talk to them and they square with his debts supposed to do and what they're doing. And then you can. You can come up with the concept it tells the story. Click and also about the You're describing the flashlight test in the dark time exposure how How cooperative are the engineers and scientists at that point when they know that you doing a Yourself a relatively complex photo and they need to do several takes or is that just people skills and your time experience there. You've developed relationships of people that are willing to work with you. I think it's a lot of the ladder. Just people skills and people really respecting what you do. But I think people understand that they're working on a mission that might change the way we look at the at the universe and they know that these images are going out and they want to be part. That's you know so so I I really get in a sense that everyone Really going to be out in some of these images of is it possible to put a number on the size the team or at least a core of the team that that's that you you work with every day I I'm going to say somewhere. We're in the neighborhood Four or five hundred people the terms of core that I might see every day and but there are many many more more booster. I'm sure question about I was reading that Y- back in August. The two halves of the telescope resembled and I guess that's out there where you are and was there a video team there to capture this because it would seem like any kind of thing where two things are coming together and that reminds me of the episode. We do on the anniversary of the Golden Spike where the two trains in order to document that. Do you have a video team. There's well or do you. Totally separate no will well. I work closely with him. But I try not to shoot video The Goddard has an amazing video. Team led by Mike and flair. And they shoot. They've been shooting video of the telescope. As long as I've been shooting still on that's great partners there And then another question I had had to do with with the the images themselves completed in how they decide and how you decide which ones do go out to the public and which ones may be you know sent nat. Go or or the magazine And how much yeah. What's that collaboration? Like so again. I'm pretty pretty much in control of of the images that in terms of selecting the images that have to go through an approval process to go public right okay and that puts me in a unique position. So that you guys on ever get a chance to see anything that I don't like everything you're saying here makes it sound like you have pretty much the perfect photographic job so good Gig uh-huh I had the experience of working with our directors in you use a group of images and they don't pick any of the ones that you yeah right so that respected I do like the fact that I get a chance to to make selections But then they have to go through even approval process which goes from the contractor's through NASA and there's several different layers of approval? Google has to go through the tar heels that were not releasing anything sensitive or proprietary. I once images let me just crashed through that process. They're they're made available to the public. Usually when our flicker site and Yeah it's it's not that works. Is there a security clearance. That's needed on on your end. Like a government security clearance or is it Is it totally separate. When you're working with NASA so You know yes or no. No I mean there are different levels of security clearance but yes there is. There's a level of Florence it from is necessary and I kind of the photographic says because you're a contractor and and you know your work is getting published in prominent magazines and I'm sure around the world I've seen on several websites energy pictures. Yeah who owns them. And who's getting listening fee good question. No one's getting we all own them. The ones getting the licensing you people or fish on the American breaking people on the photographs and the taxpayers official NASA in that you are you allowed to use them you want without. Are you allowed to profit by these. Were just allowed to use them for your own personal use or profit question question. You could actually tipped so I I think you could profit from so So the the the images are public domain windsor out. What about prints and I wanna ask that certainly about not? Because you know these could be in a gallery and people would want to buy one of these prints and large-scale print sales that little different and I hope it is for your K- in for you but also I. I've actually seen my photographs for sale on websites organized. Organize a part of the deal when I was on the Coast Guard. I took a photo of the aftermath of a Coast Guard helicopter crash and you can go online and buy a wall imprint of that or actually embroidered pillow about photograph coffee. You can get a car you can get it on a coffee. That's it okay. So well that's interesting. I would think that maybe you know in like we're we're talking about a gallery. There may be a little cottesloe when your contract that would allow. Oh you do to make prints and sell them in that in that regard But the I did want to ask about Princeton. And when you're shooting you think of of the prince that can be created aided these images because they're gorgeous and they're huge and you know why work in such a format like that if you're not going to kind of consider how big you can blow it up so so I do. Actually.

NASA spotify Dr Jeff Hester US Apple Chris Space Telescope Institute John team leader Princeton Avai America Radha Gio Insein China Google Jack Anna Mike
"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"He's also a contract photographer for the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center. And he has what must be one of the coolest gigs gearhead photography can land for. The past is ten years. He's been documenting. The construction of the James Webb Space Telescope which is destined to take over for the Hubble as Nasr's most powerful telescope. Chris Chris Work has appeared in national geographic the Atlantic and many other national and international publications. And he's joining us today via skype. Also joining us today today is our very own in-house space cadet todd born camp Todd is an in house writer who has written many stories about astro photography and all the gear that's related to welcome to our show. Thanks for having me so great having you know we we. We have more questions today than we've had for many I guess for people interested in this paper literally Let's just start off. You say that your refer to yourself as a technician rather in an artist. You want to elaborate on that a little bit. I initially started preferring to myself as a technician kind of as a A backlash to a colleague who referred to me as an artist. Kind of like no you don't you don't really fit in. Your work is to Artistic Dick for this environment and you know I kind of took a step back and said okay so I I see what he's saying and maybe to flourish in in this technical environment I have to sort of reinvent myself and let people know the technical power of photography and how it fits search technical environment. Do you think that being engineers they look at what photography's do in a way as folly. That's confidence it's sort of like we're doing serious. He stuff and you're kind of like playing around here and just on on on the sideline that's what it sounds like. Am I wrong. Well so I I would not say it that way because because because a lot of being engineers engineers are actually tigers and and I think they really appreciate If you understand the technology behind photography will right so if you come in as an artist they might not look at you the same way as if you talk their language is how do you know what you're talking about. So so if you're talking to a technologist allergists or an engineer. That is photographer. He let him know that you know your stuff and there's a there's A. There's a degree of respect. It's I candidate sort of you sort of you know so The Art of photography comes out after they see an image that you make sure you go. How'd you do you? You do have to kind of re prove yourself there but let me ask you You know with this attitude and an error the kind of the need to take on that attitude of that that kind of label or whatever you WANNA call it person. Listen Persona did did it bring a change in your work or did you already kind of go into it. Knowing that kind of style you wanted to present I I know. I don't think it changed my work. At all. To be honest you know I think that the constantly evolving Qatada for at least I have When I first came the NASA I mean before I started shooting actual hardware I was doing more public affairs styles. A lot of head shot at Salon Group photos. A lot of you know like awards Jerem grip and grin gripping grand xactly so so occasionally either they would be a call for A really cool image of a spacecraft. And I'd go and go into a clean room for fifteen minutes and get my shot leave and I was one of the only photographers that was shooting digitally at that time right so I could get my studying format format at that point. No wasn't actually was. I mean we're talking twenty years ago so we're talking about Kodak for sixty all right so so they add Kodak Doc. We're sixty that the battery had been depleted. And you could get. I don't know fifteen shots before the battery died but it was perfect because I was used to the shooting medium format tiger so like shooting a roll of one. Twenty shot right and So anyway I get my shots and Dan I'm Mike Light it and so I always took the extra step and people started to notice that. And that's how I got on the side On the more more technical side of goddess. Okay so maybe we should step back a second. Because you know you've got twenty years like you said and You know the the whole thing has been an evolution and obviously now. You're kind of you know fully ensconced in with the with the James Webb program but one of the things about how did you find out about this because obviously sleep. This was not on craigslist. Well I mean it wasn't on craigslist but I think it was in the paper uh-huh why did your eyes pop open when you saw this because this I mean this is really unique job so the eyes pop and then and with I can I can do this. I'm like everything that they listed there is like I mean I. It's Awesome I. Of course I took my work and I didn't have obviously the material that a or I didn't have the types of things in my portfolio illegal share craft exactly but what they could see the quality of the bright and like I said when I when I first came on it was more editorial obeys day and You know a lot of headshots and that kind of thing. They sold that in my work. This all to magazine work all the hip hop artists shot united. So they okay Baseball equality though. I think that was that was obvious. And where did the job. Why don't you have that stuff on your website? Is it something that Over the time. You're you're kind of now you want identify yourself as as this photographer or you know carry work. Yeah Yeah Yeah. I'll projects having I have. I really decided that I love sheeting technology. UH-HUH I love shooting space is is you know I've been doing it for the longest period of time And this the position the job where I am has really allowed me to explore This area so yeah. It's just something I really loved. Okay and and to say that I wasn't connected to the to the previous work would not be totally honest but it wouldn't wouldn't be alive either. You know I often found myself shooting things that are not really into this. Got Together gotTa make these images. But now I'm really really connected and can you maybe explain a little bit How would you describe yourself as contract photographer? And how how that works. But you've obviously been. There are a long time and you've evolved into very specific role so maybe talk about that a little bit and also general responsibilities as like on a day-to-day basis this or a project basis courts courts so fifty years ago Of course NASA photographers were government employees. So they actually work for NASA and I think there were probably dozens of photographers or a few that are pretty famous for their Apollo Images Kinda nameless with famous famous nonetheless But there is probably only one government NASA photographer right now. The rest of US did shoot for NASA are contract photographers. So we work for outs. I companies that have contract with NASA for service. Okay let's other words Gotcha interesting and and then like another. Follow up with the move to describe kind of go into the office every day. I mean do you go. I mean now you're in California but do you is it kind of day-to-day thing where you always going to be on site or or how's that work. It's a day to day thing. Yeah so And that's why I'm here in California because because the the spacecraft is actually here now So I'm always on call for photography and spend a lot of my day in the cleanroom in room making photographs of the activities. That are going on When I'm at Goddard I'm also working on a few other projects oftentimes they call me in for you know what they might call the beauty shots or they they they really cold. Such shots might go out to the public. And that's what You know that's where I really liked China's we're really like the you know works I mean we'll. We'll go ahead Chris. You just referred to the James Webb Space Telescope as a spacecraft which it is Right folks called a space telescope in the Atlantic article you refer to it as an observatory. And that's the first time I've seen anyone. I use that term so that is the technical term for so okay. So let's let's break hang on a few terms hear the the James Webb Space Telescope has a components right so there is the obstacle portion. An there is the spacecraft in the space craft includes Basically the little booster rockets the station keeping rockets. It's SORTA keeping position in that sort of thing and also includes the Sun Shield right whereas the optical portion as is the proportion that everybody knows knows with the mirrors the six and a half meter mirror that that is James. Webb's basic You know the image that everybody is so has a couple of portions when you put it all together. It's an observatory. You know. Just like the Griffith Observatory Koch.

James Webb Space Telescope NASA Chris Chris Work craigslist NASA Goddard Spaceflight Cente engineer Kodak technician James Webb skype Todd Webb Nasr Griffith Observatory Koch writer California Qatada James Dan I
"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"james webb" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"He's also a contract photographer for the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center. And he has what must be one of the coolest gigs gearhead photography can land for. The past is ten years. He's been documenting. The construction of the James Webb Space Telescope which is destined to take over for the Hubble as Nasr's most powerful telescope. Chris Chris Work has appeared in national geographic the Atlantic and many other national and international publications. And he's joining us today via skype. Also joining us today today is our very own in-house space cadet todd born camp Todd is an in house writer who has written many stories about astro photography and all the gear that's related to welcome to our show. Thanks for having me so great having you know we we. We have more questions today than we've had for many I guess for people interested in this paper literally Let's just start off. You say that your refer to yourself as a technician rather in an artist. You want to elaborate on that a little bit. I initially started preferring to myself as a technician kind of as a A backlash to a colleague who referred to me as an artist. Kind of like no you don't you don't really fit in. Your work is to Artistic Dick for this environment and you know I kind of took a step back and said okay so I I see what he's saying and maybe to flourish in in this technical environment I have to sort of reinvent myself and let people know the technical power of photography and how it fits search technical environment. Do you think that being engineers they look at what photography's do in a way as folly. That's confidence it's sort of like we're doing serious. He stuff and you're kind of like playing around here and just on on on the sideline that's what it sounds like. Am I wrong. Well so I I would not say it that way because because because a lot of being engineers engineers are actually tigers and and I think they really appreciate If you understand the technology behind photography will right so if you come in as an artist they might not look at you the same way as if you talk their language is how do you know what you're talking about. So so if you're talking to a technologist allergists or an engineer. That is photographer. He let him know that you know your stuff and there's a there's A. There's a degree of respect. It's I candidate sort of you sort of you know so The Art of photography comes out after they see an image that you make sure you go. How'd you do you? You do have to kind of re prove yourself there but let me ask you You know with this attitude and an error the kind of the need to take on that attitude of that that kind of label or whatever you WANNA call it person. Listen Persona did did it bring a change in your work or did you already kind of go into it. Knowing that kind of style you wanted to present I I know. I don't think it changed my work. At all. To be honest you know I think that the constantly evolving Qatada for at least I have When I first came the NASA I mean before I started shooting actual hardware I was doing more public affairs styles. A lot of head shot at Salon Group photos. A lot of you know like awards Jerem grip and grin gripping grand xactly so so occasionally either they would be a call for A really cool image of a spacecraft. And I'd go and go into a clean room for fifteen minutes and get my shot leave and I was one of the only photographers that was shooting digitally at that time right so I could get my studying format format at that point. No wasn't actually was. I mean we're talking twenty years ago so we're talking about Kodak for sixty all right so so they add Kodak Doc. We're sixty that the battery had been depleted. And you could get. I don't know fifteen shots before the battery died but it was perfect because I was used to the shooting medium format tiger so like shooting a roll of one. Twenty shot right and So anyway I get my shots and Dan I'm Mike Light it and so I always took the extra step and people started to notice that. And that's how I got on the side On the more more technical side of goddess. Okay so maybe we should step back a second. Because you know you've got twenty years like you said and You know the the whole thing has been an evolution and obviously now. You're kind of you know fully ensconced in with the with the James Webb program but one of the things about how did you find out about this because obviously sleep. This was not on craigslist. Well I mean it wasn't on craigslist but I think it was in the paper uh-huh why did your eyes pop open when you saw this because this I mean this is really unique job so the eyes pop and then and with I can I can do this. I'm like everything that they listed there is like I mean I. It's Awesome I. Of course I took my work and I didn't have obviously the material that a or I didn't have the types of things in my portfolio illegal share craft exactly but what they could see the quality of the bright and like I said when I when I first came on it was more editorial obeys day and You know a lot of headshots and that kind of thing. They sold that in my work. This all to magazine work all the hip hop artists shot united. So they okay Baseball equality though. I think that was that was obvious. And where did the job. Why don't you have that stuff on your website? Is it something that Over the time. You're you're kind of now you want identify yourself as as this photographer or you know carry work. Yeah Yeah Yeah. I'll projects having I have. I really decided that I love sheeting technology. UH-HUH I love shooting space is is you know I've been doing it for the longest period of time And this the position the job where I am has really allowed me to explore This area so yeah. It's just something I really loved. Okay and and to say that I wasn't connected to the to the previous work would not be totally honest but it wouldn't wouldn't be alive either. You know I often found myself shooting things that are not really into this. Got Together gotTa make these images. But now I'm really really connected and can you maybe explain a little bit How would you describe yourself as contract photographer? And how how that works. But you've obviously been. There are a long time and you've evolved into very specific role so maybe talk about that a little bit and also general responsibilities as like on a day-to-day basis this or a project basis courts courts so fifty years ago Of course NASA photographers were government employees. So they actually work for NASA and I think there were probably dozens of photographers or a few that are pretty famous for their Apollo Images Kinda nameless with famous famous nonetheless But there is probably only one government NASA photographer right now. The rest of US did shoot for NASA are contract photographers. So we work for outs. I companies that have contract with NASA for service. Okay let's other words Gotcha interesting and and then like another. Follow up with the move to describe kind of go into the office every day. I mean do you go. I mean now you're in California but do you is it kind of day-to-day thing where you always going to be on site or or how's that work. It's a day to day thing. Yeah so And that's why I'm here in California because because the the spacecraft is actually here now So I'm always on call for photography and spend a lot of my day in the cleanroom in room making photographs of the activities. That are going on When I'm at Goddard I'm also working on a few other projects oftentimes they call me in for you know what they might call the beauty shots or they they they really cold. Such shots might go out to the public. And that's what You know that's where I really liked China's we're really like the you know works I mean we'll. We'll go ahead Chris. You just referred to the James Webb Space Telescope as a spacecraft which it is Right folks called a space telescope in the Atlantic article you refer to it as an observatory. And that's the first time I've seen anyone. I use that term so that is the technical term for so okay. So let's let's break hang on a few terms hear the the James Webb Space Telescope has a components right so there is the obstacle portion. An there is the spacecraft in the space craft includes Basically the little booster rockets the station keeping rockets. It's SORTA keeping position in that sort of thing and also includes the Sun Shield right whereas the optical portion as is the proportion that everybody knows knows with the mirrors the six and a half meter mirror that that is James. Webb's basic You know the image that everybody is so has a couple of portions when you put it all together. It's an observatory. You know. Just like the Griffith Observatory Koch.

James Webb Space Telescope NASA Chris Chris Work craigslist NASA Goddard Spaceflight Cente engineer Kodak technician James Webb skype Todd Webb Nasr Griffith Observatory Koch writer California Qatada James Dan I
Mimicking Launch

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Mimicking Launch

"NASA is pleased to report. The James Webb Space Telescope has successfully passed another series of critical milestones rock concert next the spacecraft was placed on an electro dynamic vibration table and strongly but precisely shaken mimic all components of the Web Observatory are prepared to handle the brutal mechanical conditions. The telescope may face during launch technicians and engineers yeah now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W HR V.

James Webb Space Telescope Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Web Observatory
Engineers Connect Two Halves of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope for First Time

Morning Edition

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Engineers Connect Two Halves of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope for First Time

"The James Webb space telescope is much larger and more powerful than the aging Hubble Space Telescope it consists of two primary parts the telescope part made up of mirrors and detectors that will collect and process light from distant objects and the space craft part that contains guidance and other equipment engineers have been working on these two parts separately now they've been successfully joined together critical steps lie ahead the engineers still must check out the enormous sun shield that is essential for the Webb telescope to operate out of the sun's glare the telescope has had a rocky development process it's billions of dollars over budget and years past its original launch date that date is now set for sometime in twenty twenty one Joe Palca NPR

James Webb Space Telescope Joe Palca Npr
James Webb Space Telescope fully assembled in California

This Week in Science

01:53 min | 2 years ago

James Webb Space Telescope fully assembled in California

"James webb space telescope which is going to be an infrared telescope with a launch date of twenty twenty one which is finally completed. They built it all in. It's all in one piece now. This is this is is really good news. I've been on the the doubter side of whether the james webb telescope is ever going to end up out there but according to news out this week yes. Yes indeed we've built it. The next step will be launching it but once it gets out there these <hes> these researchers also modeled the trappist one system. This is a planet is is a system a red dwarf star which is kind of a planet's yeah yeah. It's got some really close close in planets that they pass in front of their star fairly regularly which would make viewing them pretty easily <hes> pretty easy and they also <hes> they additionally being red dwarf. It's not really bright so it. The brightness of the star doesn't <hes> it. It's not so bright that it outweighs that dimming from the transit transits of the planets that are going around it and so the it's a great system system to model and so they modeled that system in this particular study and showed what they should be looking for on the various planets that are orbiting around the trappist one red dwarf star and how we should be looking for it so modelled it in the near infrared and also <hes> medium <hes> infrared wavelengths to determine how we can look at the planets to figure out whether they have oxygen hydrogen in <hes> nitrogen what is in the atmosphere so

James Webb
NASA Shuts Down Spitzer Space Telescope After 16 Years

SPACE NEWS POD

02:31 min | 2 years ago

NASA Shuts Down Spitzer Space Telescope After 16 Years

"Spitzer space telescope, according to NASA will be decommissioned on January thirtieth of twenty twenty now that is due to the space telescope aging. And this is due to decreased functionality you see Spitzer. It has to rotate two point it's antenna towards the earth to transmit data back to us. And when it does this, it causes its solar panels to turn away from the sun in during. That time the space craft relies on internal solar power in a battery to operate. So every year, that Spitzer has been out there, it's there's solar panels have been tilting further and further away from the sun in scientists at NASA worried that continuing to operate Spitzer would deplete his energy source completely. And if this happens like in the middle of it experiment, they might not be able to retrieve the data that's already on Spitzer, so they need to basically save energy in order to shoot that data back to earth in Spitzer is amazing. Right. So Spitzer was only supposed to last five years in it. Lasted in additional eleven years, in during that time Spitzer gave us some of the most stunning images of Saturn's rings clusters of stars and. A small black hole from a nearby dwarf galaxy amongst a lot of other images. You can check them all out on NASA. It's all free to download free to check out. You can go to NASA dot gov in search for Spitzer or all the Spitzer news and all the everything that's happened with Spitzer throughout its time throughout at sixteen years exoplanets, galaxies everything Nobili stars solar systems. It's all there. Now Spitzer gave us some amazing data some amazing science, but it's going to be replaced by the James Webb space telescope, which is going to launch in twenty twenty one in the James Webb space telescope that J W. It's different than the Spitzer space telescope. It's going to be an L to a second Legrand's point. And it will orbit the sun, one point five million kilometers. It's about a million miles away from the earth

Spitzer James Webb Space Telescope Nasa Legrand Twenty Twenty Five Million Kilometers Sixteen Years Eleven Years Five Years
Milestones for JWST

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Milestones for JWST

"Nasa is pleased to report the James Webb space. Telescope has successfully passed another series of critical milestones. As it continues. Its March to the launch pad shoes innovation now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future to make sure all components of the web observatory are prepared to handle the brutal mechanical conditions. Telescope may face during launch technicians and engineers are intentionally putting it through punishing tests the space craft element and the tennis court size sunshield where the subjects of this. Latest ordeal. Massive speakers were used to bomb Bard web with powerful sound waves one hundred times more intense and four times louder than a rock concert next. The spacecraft was placed on an electrodynamic vibration table and strongly but precisely shaken mimic. Cking launch conditions now with the successful completion of its mechanical environmental testing the spacecraft is one step closer to a launch in twenty twenty one for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer police have a story idea for innovation now searches on Facebook, and let us now now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Nasa James Webb Facebook National Institute Of Aerospac Tennis Jennifer
One Step Closer to Launch

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

One Step Closer to Launch

"Nasa is pleased to report the James Webb space. Telescope has successfully passed another series of critical milestones. As it continues. Its March to the launch pad shoes innovation now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future to make sure all components of the web observatory are prepared to handle the brutal mechanical conditions. Telescope may face during launch technicians and engineers are intentionally putting it through punishing tests the space craft element and the tennis court size sunshield where the subjects of this. Latest ordeal. Massive speakers were used to bomb Bard web with powerful sound waves one hundred times more intense and four times louder than a rock concert next. The spacecraft was placed on an electrodynamic vibration table and strongly but precisely shaken mimic. Cking launch conditions now with the successful completion of its mechanical environmental testing the spacecraft is one step closer to a launch in twenty twenty one for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer police have a story idea for innovation now searches on Facebook, and let us now now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Nasa James Webb Facebook National Institute Of Aerospac Tennis Jennifer
NASAs new telescope

Your Weekly Tech Update

01:07 min | 2 years ago

NASAs new telescope

"This week. Nasa announced it will create the fear x telescope. It'll look at how our universe has changed, and how common the ingredients of life actually are in the Milky Way. It will collect data on more than three hundred million galaxies in one hundred million Milky Way based stars using optical and near infrared light sphere x will search for water and organic molecules in stellar nurseries. These are areas where stars are born every six months or so the telescope is going to take a step back and look at the entire sky, creating a kind of detailed sky map that will be used to identify targets for future missions like the James Webb space telescope. It will deliver an unprecedented galactic map containing fingerprints. From the first moments in the. A universe's history. And we'll have new clues to one of the greatest mysteries in science. What made the universe expand? So quickly less than a nanosecond after the big bang. The telescope is projected to launch sometime in twenty twenty three.

James Webb Space Telescope Nasa Six Months
"james webb" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"The run-up to the mission to get it proved to get it into development to get it launched that is a very long time line. So I don't think we'd see any missions launched until I don't know the twenty thirties at a minimum. But even then that seems like a stretch given the current process now that's a big caveat, the current process of planetary missions. Like, this is a very slow moving beast if we continue to see investment from benevolent billionaires and they start wanting to fund signs missions. We've heard a little bit of this about sending a mission to Enceladus or similar if you have some big funder come along that isn't a government and says I wanna fly mission out to Neptune. Tomorrow, you know, would would happen in the twenty twenty maybe it's plausible because that just breaks the mold. Of what we're typically used to. But when you're thinking in the traditional method mechanism. I think our our to do list, it's pretty full for the twenty twenties and even the early twenty thirties. So I wouldn't expect it to happen anytime before then. Pushing from Dave a quick one in your own opinion, do expect the James Webb space telescope to make it's twenty twenty one liftoff, Dave I'm going out on a limb. And I'm guessing that the James Webb space telescope will be the final area and five launch that ever was. It's just hard to bet on it making its launch date at this point. It's it's similar to the last thing where you're like. Okay. This has to be the last alight, right? We've got to be at the last day. And then there's always something that happens. So I would not be surprised to see it slip. And I just if I were a betting, man. I would just see if somebody would take my bet that it's the last Arian five launch just because I think that would be so. That would be a a right ending to the end of the James Webb story, or at least the beginning of the next phase of the James Webb story question from chase. He said, yeah. Kind of question he said space, I l is planning to launch the moon next month meaning this month, and it doesn't seem to be getting much coverage. Do you think it will be successful? So I think the reason that it hasn't got a lot of coverage is that there is a because of the nature of the mission the way that they're flying to the moon. There's about two months between launch and landing on the surface. So they might they might not want to want to over hype up front, and then have everybody wait two months to to land the kind of lose the thread on the media there. So I would expect once it does launch you'll see a couple of headlines about it. But once we get closer to April when they're going to be closer to landing. You'll start seeing a big wave of media at that point. Do I think it will be successful? I'm hopeful cautiously hopeful because they've you know, it's number one is a really cool mission. Because I think the total cost is like less than a hundred million dollars, and it's funded by space, I l and investors, but it's a nonprofit organization out of Israel. So it's not like a moon express or somebody who has stated intentions to sell missions commercially. They do now have a hand in the NASA commercial lunar payload services through partnership, but you know, this mission is purely a nonprofit mission research focused inspiration focused and more of a Ken. We do it kind of thing. And it was part of the Google lunar x prize, but they are pushing on to fly themselves. So it's really cool to see mission with that low cost doing this sort of thing. So I'm hopeful, but I'm maybe not confident that will it will land successfully. Before we get into the rest of the questions, I need to save very special..

James Webb space telescope James Webb Dave Google Israel NASA two months hundred million dollars
"james webb" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Has been pulled from a mission? What is it? Oh, yeah. This is very rarely in the history of space. This is only the sixth time it has ever happened in the most famous example, of course, is is Dc Slayton in the original years of NASA. The first seven astronauts, so it's rare thing to happen. It does happen once in a while. And it's a reasonable thing to happen. You know, you want to make sure the guys on the couch a healthy Olympic fly. This next story. I have a mixed reaction to congress now in the hands of the money. The purse strings are in the house of representatives. And that is democratic majority are threatening the wet James Webb telescope. So my reaction Bob is what took them so long. And does this mean. James Webb will not fly. No. It means. None of those things. The the democratic house has put out a one of its budget poll bills, none of which have passed because of the shutdown and the lack of money Trump's wall. But in them they're full budget for the James Webb telescoping twenty nine team. The report the budget. They put together. Says that they are really annoyed and disappointed about the mismanagement compl- quoting here madness management complete lack of capital oversight and overall poor basic workmanship on wet, and they basically say that if they don't stay on budget as planned they might cancel the mission the congress. Well, I don't believe him. This is just a bladder from congress that they're not serious. Congress makes these kinds of threats and has for decades everybody in the swamp in Washington knows that this is a typical by in situation. You you get the budget approved at a low amount. And then once it started, congress is compelled to keep giving money. Even though it goes over budget web is the is the poster child of the worst form of a buy in because it was originally budgeted a billion. It's now close to nine. Billion? It was originally supposed to launch in twenty eleven won't launch till twenty nine teen at the earliest, it's pretty much a disgrace. I don't take the Democrats seriously, and this web should have been caught a decade ago that eight billion they have spent trying to keep this thing going has wiped out the entire astrophysics budgeted NASA and prevented any other telescopes being launched, and that's actually a tragedy. We're now a decade more than a decade since any real serious telescopes have been washed away, many others because there's no money to pay for wet. And it's it's just a tragedy. And nothing's really changed. The next big telescope W. I is also a big boondoggle it's already over but in the design phase and behind schedule. And so it's just I don't take congress ceremony keeps the website behind the black. When we come back, the long term and short term effects of SpaceX is.

congress James Webb NASA SpaceX Dc Slayton Trump Bob Washington
"james webb" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The man singly responsible for us getting to the moon. Don't give. Me wrong. I give tons of credit, president Kennedy, and and and his great speech and his vision. And of course, president Johnson who continued that vision and president Nixon who made it all happen at the very end there. So all it, look it was it was a whole of government approach. But the the the gentleman that was behind that entire effort was a guy who came from the political arena. And and it's because he knew how he knew how to how to use the capabilities that he learned in in politics. And so I think I think there's there's no one right answer here. But I'm happy to I'm happy to be able to to serve in this capacity. And I look forward to doing it with for a number of great year. And speaking of the James Webb, you mentioned James Webb there. You made some recent music the agency with the James Webb telescope, which is sort of removing his for the next generation of space telescope observations. A great legacy of. And others. What's the current status of James Webb? I understand there may be a slight delay. But it's definitely still in the cards for the agency. Absolutely. There's strong bipartisan support for the James Webb space telescope there. There has been a delay. There is a cost overrun. I went back up to the hill and talked in a committee hearing with my my old colleagues and explain to them. How important this mission is not only to NASA, but to the United States and to the entire world what James Webb space telescope is going to enable us to do is see back to the very dawn of time. See back to the first light in the universe. You know, we have models here NASA. As to what, you know, the the beginning of the universe might have looked like well now, we're going to actually see it. We're gonna see it from from the beginning because James Webb space telescope is going to be able to see that far back, and you know, it's it's an amazing technological achievement. We need it to be successful. But at this point, we're looking at a. March twenty twenty one launch date, and and when that launch is successful and the checkout is successful. It's going to change. How we understand our universe?.

James Webb president Kennedy NASA president Nixon United States Johnson
"james webb" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The man singly responsible for us getting to the moon. Don't give. Me wrong. I give tons of credit, president Kennedy, and and and his great speech and his vision. And of course, president Johnson who continued that vision and president Nixon who made it all happen at the very end there. So all it, look it was it was a whole of government approach. But the the the gentleman that was behind that entire effort was a guy who came from the political arena. And and it's because he knew how he knew how to how to use the capabilities that he learned in in politics. And so I think I think there's there's no one right answer here. But I'm happy to I'm happy to be able to to serve in this capacity. And I look forward to doing it with for a number of great year. And speaking of the James Webb, you mentioned James Webb there. You made some recent music the agency with the James Webb telescope, which is sort of removing his for the next generation of space telescope observations. A great legacy of. And others. What's the current status of James Webb? I understand there may be a slight delay. But it's definitely still in the cards for the agency. Absolutely. There's strong bipartisan support for the James Webb space telescope there. There has been a delay. There is a cost overrun. I went back up to the hill and talked in a committee hearing with my my old colleagues and explain to them. How important this mission is not only to NASA, but to the United States and to the entire world what James Webb space telescope is going to enable us to do is see back to the very dawn of time. See back to the first light in the universe. You know, we have models here NASA. As to what, you know, the the beginning of the universe might have looked like well now, we're going to actually see it. We're gonna see it from from the beginning because James Webb space telescope is going to be able to see that far back, and you know, it's it's an amazing technological achievement. We need it to be successful. But at this point, we're looking at a. March twenty twenty one launch date, and and when that launch is successful and the checkout is successful. It's going to change. How we understand our universe?.

James Webb president Kennedy NASA president Nixon United States Johnson
"james webb" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on Liftoff

"Our buddy, oh Cyrus Rex is making more passes at Begnaud, although it's not gonna land and try to do it sample grab until twenty twenty. I think. Marzan site has a bunch of instruments that hasn't deployed yet to start monitoring the interior of the planet Mars. So that's awesome. And then there are two possible. Other lunar Landers beyond Chung, which are one from India and one from Israel is actually a as Rayleigh lunar Lander project that was leftover from when they were doing the lunar x prize that nobody won the prize, and that they're still hostility that might actually land to a moon landing this year. So we might have this might also be the year beyond commercial crew the year of. Moon stuff like a lot of moon stuff, which is which is exciting. It's not, you know, again, it's a little disappointing that we don't have a big launch of some mission to the outer solar system or something like that. But but we do have a bunch. There's still a bunch of going on in terms of planetary science. Yeah. James Webb telescope, not in your. It's still out there. Yeah. Out there. It's best not talking about things like dates or budget at the Zelano. The passage the passage of time from one year to another really does call into all of these things that are that are like, well, I guess twenty wasn't the year of commercial crew, maybe twenty nine. And all this doesn't rule out like the stuff that's going on. So Juno is still at Jupiter. We have the Parker right solar pro solar probe there..

Rayleigh lunar Lander Cyrus Rex Begnaud Landers Parker Zelano Chung Israel India one year
Golden Eagles, FOX and NASA discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

12:05 min | 3 years ago

Golden Eagles, FOX and NASA discussed on Science Friday

"But first Thursday morning to astronauts on route to the international space station had to abort their launch after a booster rocket malfunction. The made an emergency descent back to earth and happy to report both are doing well both landing safely. Rachel feldman. Science editor at popular science is here to bring us up to date on the launch and other selected short subjects in science. Welcome back. Rachel, thanks for having me IRA anything more about what went wrong there. So we know that about two minutes into the launch. There was some kind of booster failure. And they had to undergo what's known. As a ballistic landing ballistics descent, which is so called because usually they make kind of a shallow angle as they come down to create a little bit of lift and take away some of the the the force on on the astronauts during landing, and this is where the rocket is really coming down more like projectile, and this has happened before. But only ever during landings, which of course, appears a lot less dramatic because they were supposed to come back down to the ground in the first place. So this is the first time they've ever had to make such an aborted landing during a launch and the Russian space agency that immediately they would begin investigating so far that that's all we know. While the good news about it. Is that it worked right, right? Right. And again, this is a rare. But the kind of thing that astronauts trained for all the time. So not something that happens a lot. But certainly one of the procedures that they are expected to occasionally encounter. So, you know, not something we want to have happen. But something that is certainly on the roster of things they have learned how to handle well with the Soyuz capsules being the only way for humans to reach the international space station, isn't this now a little bit of a problem. There's no other way to get up there. Right. So there are I believe three so us missions planned that are now kind of up in the air because the Russian species agency again is undertaking this investigation, and so it's possible. Some of those will be put on hold and even if they're not, you know, those two crew members who were counted on who are now on the ground instead of on ISS mean that there's there's probably going to be a gap in staffing. You know, we have. Three people on the space station right now. But they're scheduled to come back in December. Now, they could extend their stay a bit. But the so yes capsule they have up there. That's going to bring them home. I believe it's only it can only stay up there through sometime in January. So that's the longest they'll be able to stay before coming back down. And that means that the species and probably will be uncrowded for some amount of time. Which is something that we know should be possible. There are procedures in place for it. But I don't believe it's ever happened before. Interesting. I'd love to check on whether their experiments up there that method. Yeah. You put on hold or whatever, certainly, you know, every astronaut who goes up has a fully packed schedule of scientific experiments so NASA and the essay and the Russian space agency are certainly going to have to at least a rework schedules. And I know there are a few spacewalks. That are now up in the air so to speak so to speak. And other bad space news, the Hubble has problem this week to right, right? But again, not a totally pessimistic. Message from NASA on that. So the Hubble is twenty eight years old and has done fantastic work. And hopefully still has a lot of years left in it. But it certainly is not a new telescope and the gyroscopes that we use to keep it in position while it looks out and takes all these amazing images of space for us. One of them is malfunctioning it's been glitch in for about a year and the backup that was expected to replace it didn't quite act the way NASA wanted it to. So the telescope basically went to sleep on the fifth of October, which is just to say it's not a collecting new images right now. While NASA tries to workshop the problem. They are optimistic that it's they're going to figure it out. They're going to either get the gyroscope working or figure out a work around. For a way to position it. In. The meantime, they expect it to continue working into the twenty twenties and overlap with its replacement the James Webb space telescope, but what's interesting is that the the big problem is that it was designed to be fixed during shuttle missions, and we don't have a shuttle program anymore. So we're kind of running out of ways to fix the Hubble. So it does have an expiration date now. The detail. Let's move on. Some other news is really interesting, advance and reproductive medicine. If if you're a mouse. Yes. Great great news for mice. The Chinese Academy of science put out a paper showing that they were able to use embryonic stem cells, and gene editing to create mice from same sex parents which has been done before. But they used a slightly different method these this time and while the mice with two dads only lived about forty eight hours, the mice with two moms lived to adulthood and had babies of their own. So it's just kind of like another small step forward in this growing body of work. That's teaching us how mammalian reproduction works and how we might be able to alter it. That is a question about why it worked with the mice with two moms and not the two dads. Yeah. You know, I it's just considered more difficult to do it with two meal, sells it comes down to you. They're they're not quite parallel. I hear it referred to a lot. It's like zipping up the chromosomes, and there are certain genes that while both parents have them they're turned off in males and turned on females and vice versa. And so it's about you know, tweaking sex chromosomes so that they dip together properly. Finally, there's a study tip for students, especially kind of memory tell us about that. Yeah. So this really cool. Font called San's, forget it guy. And it's actually designed to be slightly more difficult to read than than most. It's like kind of tilted and broke in. And it's all about this principle called desirable difficulty, which is a phenomenon in learning where you need something to be difficult enough that it holds your interest. You know, that it doesn't bore the person trying to learn the information, but not so hard that it keeps them from retaining it. So the idea behind this font is that it kind of breaks these traditional design principles. So that it gets your attention and me helps you retain information a little bit better. So there's no published paper on it. Yeah. So he can't quite say how well it works. But it is a really intriguing idea. Always interesting. Have you Rachel? Science editor at popular science. And now it's time to check in on the state of science. This is WWE St Louis. Radio news local science stories of national significance. California's Channel Islands a cluster of aid islands off of the southern California. Coast have been compared to the Galapagos isolated islands with unique ecosystems home to some species found nowhere else and five in the Allens became a national park in the nineteen eighties before that they were home to ranching and farming and home to the shoe much people for thousands of years before that, but a cascade ecological problems threatened, the island's Lance Roscoe, news director here at KCRW is with me now to talk about efforts to protect and preserve the ecology there. And we're good to be with your IRA. So tell us about the logical problems a little bit of a history. This nothing new right? No. It's it's really interesting. It's sort of like CSI for biologists. We had this whole chain reaction of things. But as you mentioned, we had the ranchers moved in and they brought in cattle, sheep, and pigs and other non-nato. Things to the islands. But what happened was after World War Two DDT ended up in the ocean? The DD ended up in fish. Now. The reason this is significant is the bald eagles which are native to the islands. Eat these fish and built up to the point in the bald eagles that whenever they would nest the eggs would crack so they would basically limit sit in the exit would crack and the bald eagles came to the point of extinction. So they brought in the bald eagles for a captive breeding program. So that opens another door golden eagles, which don't live in the islands naturally said. Hey, this looks like a great place to live because our nemesis is gone now. So so golden eagles moved out into the islands. The golden eagles when they moved out there. Started to eat the feral pigs around there. Also, this rare species of FOX it's called the island FOX, it looks like a cat. It's a tiny little FOX, they're cute. They're adorable looking and the island FOX, very curious about people, but the island FOX doesn't have it in their DNA to be on the alert for the golden eagles. So the golden eagles basically started feasting on them push them to the point of extinction. So you had this whole chain-reaction biologists. Looked at this and said, okay, we need to grab what I foxes we have left. We need to bring them in for a captive breeding program to try to save them. And so so you had this whole cascade of events. And so the biologists had to figure out how these things were interrelated, and they started to fix them. And it's fascinating. So what what do you mean, they started to fix them? So what happened was they finally got enough of the bald eagles that they were able to reintroduce them to the islands than the golden eagles move into the islands. They get a trapping program. They relocated them to another part of California and into Nevada as well. And then the island Faulk. Is had gotten to the point where they could re release them onto the islands, and they've just been growing it, Tim Kuhnen who's the National Park Service biologists. I've talked for twenty years about this project. He said maybe in our lifetime. We could see the island FOX recover it happened in less than twenty years. It's remarkable biologists. Around the world, we ended this because humans were able to fix the problem. But wait, there's more there is more because because there's other non native eucalyptus trees, and there's aunts. Specifically Argentine ants which you find on Santa Cruz island. They went in. And they said, okay, we're gonna dust for these ants. We're going to get rid of these ants. But the problem is how do you know that you've gotten rid of all the ants? Okay. I'm sorry. Go ahead. A little Cup about that. Yes. Very very effective to the point that we cannot find any aunts with us in our human abilities. We plow over sixty thousand dollars, right? A plant where we think we did a really good job on the treatment. And we're bringing out this dog to try to verify our results to ensure that we can say, okay, we're done. We did their education. Now, that's Christina buzzer with the nature conservancy. So what they did is this group called working dogs for conservation in Montana train the dog specifically to find Argentine the only dog of its type in the world.

Golden Eagles FOX Nasa Rachel Feldman California Editor Santa Cruz Island James Webb Space Telescope Chinese Academy Of Science Channel Islands Nature Conservancy Christina Buzzer Montana Wwe St Louis CSI Galapagos Tim Kuhnen
California ticket wins more than $522 million in Mega Millions jackpot

Joe Pags

01:05 min | 3 years ago

California ticket wins more than $522 million in Mega Millions jackpot

"Sold in San Jose California at Ernie's liquor store the California, lottery held a press conference outside the store the winter has yet. To be identified but he or she will get even more. Than they expected. Five hundred and twenty two million dollars but excitement throughout the nation. Was so crazy yesterday that it went up by twenty, one million dollars so the final mega millions prize is a wonderful astounding five hundred and forty. Three million dollars, one by a, Californian a single ticket ladies and gents. Press Lopez of the California lottery the latest US space telescope was supposed to be in orbit fourteen years ago it's now billions of dollars over budget and still stuck on earth and, congress wants to know why house science. Committee chairman Lamar Smith says the new, James Webb telescope is now more than eight billion dollars over budget it is truly Staggering newly confirmed NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein says the space agency, is embarrassed by so many human errors and delays but he insists. The telescope is unique we're going to change how we understand. The universe.

California San Jose California Jim Breitenstein Press Lopez Lamar Smith Nasa Administrator Chairman United States Congress Twenty Two Million Dollars Three Million Dollars Eight Billion Dollars One Million Dollars Fourteen Years
Triple Crown winner Justify retires from racing

Terry Meiners and Company

04:22 min | 3 years ago

Triple Crown winner Justify retires from racing

"AS that story in one minute first traffic and weather Busy out there this afternoon police are still trying to clear up an, accident there was some injuries. Minor lane and Preston highway they've. Been there for quite a while. They're just getting ready. To clear that up also Dixie in Johnstown road an accident another. One eastern Parkway Norris in Bardstown road, and Murray, up in the highlands. Six four eastbound or. Emphasis seventy one northbound watch for stalled vehicle they're wrapping up an earlier injury. Accident Snyder expressway eastbound just four Beulah church road are an extra forty and ten minutes Bobby Ellis NewsRadio eight forty WFAN I'm, wwl Kyi meteorologists Tiffany Savona. Here there Wednesday afternoon forecast the. Sun and clouds today is high. Temperatures climb into the, mid to upper eighties we'll say a few passing clouds overnight temperatures. Dropped seventy degrees by Thursday morning Thursday afternoon partly cloudy and very warm with highs around ninety degrees a week cold front will move. In Thursday night early Friday slight chance for an isolated shower or storm edged Wwl Kia. Weather forecast I'm meteorologist about eighty eight, at NewsRadio, eight forty w. h. a. s. our top story Triple crown winner justify will no longer race due to an ankle injury justifiable retire undefeated in his career after becoming the first. Horse since Apollo in eighteen eighty two to win the Kentucky Derby after not racing as a two year old the horse is the thirteenth triple crown winner in the. First to, do it undefeated since Seattle slew in nineteen Seventy-nine. Justify will return to Winstar farm in for sales in August there's a huge. Opioid summit underway today in Indianapolis the event is part of the state judicial. Branches effort. To, address the crisis the summit will focus on the science of addiction. Along, with treatments for substance use disorders meantime a new grant is helping Kentucky state police fight the opioid epidemic. Jill Lisa Chapman reports every. Ks p. sworn officer or, receive a kit that will protect them from dangerous drugs sergeant Joshua Lawson with Kentucky. State police says the thin no kits, were purchased with twenty, five thousand, dollars in grandsons from. Passport health plan they include tie back. Suits respirator mask then no protective gloves safety glasses Any portable gear back officials say the synthetic opioid drug. Has the potential to be deadly just, by coming in contact, with it Delina Chapman. NewsRadio eight forty, w. h., s a second summit between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin won't happen until early next year national security. Adviser John Bolton put out a statement saying a second summit quote should not take place until after the Russia which is over it's not known. When special counsel Robert Muller, will complete the Russia probe President Trump hosted EU president JEAN. CLAUDE Juncker at the White House today the. Talks were on trade but the questions at the photo op were. About something else ABC's Karen Travers reports from the White House President, Trump did not take any, questions in the, Oval Office today ahead of his meeting with the. President of the European Commission reporters shouted questions about Michael Cohen asking the president if, his former personal attorney and fixer betrayed him and if he was worried about what Cohen was going to. Say to with authorities the. President was also asked. Why Russian, President Vladimir Putin has not accepted his invitation to meet in, Washington Mr., Trump said. Several times thank you very, much his signal he does not want to engage with the press Karen Travers ABC news the white House Jay CPS prepares for the school year by hiring more. Bus drivers and monitors the addition of the. Drivers and monitors, was announced, during yesterday's board of education meeting the district's chief operations officer Mike razor says the district has hired a surplus. Of about thirty to forty bus drivers we're not out of the woods but the positive steps that have been taken by the administration and by. Our board to raise bus, driver paid to incentivize attendance that's really starting to work and. The the yeoman's work that's been done by. Our transportation department to recruit quality bus drivers we are in a. Really good position for the first day of school GPS classes resume, August fifteenth the latest US, space telescope was, supposed to be an orbit fourteen years ago it's. Now billions of dollars over budget and still stuck on earth congress wants to know, why how science committee chairman Lamar Smith says the new James Webb telescope is now more than eight billion. Dollars over budget it is. Truly staggering newly confirmed. NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein says the space agency is embarrassed by so many, human errors, and delays But he insists the telescope is unique we're going to change how we understand.

President Trump President Vladimir Putin Jill Lisa Chapman Karen Travers Michael Cohen White House Wwl Kia Kentucky United States Dixie Russia Indianapolis Seattle Bobby Ellis Wwl Kyi ABC
"james webb" Discussed on Pursuit With Purpose

Pursuit With Purpose

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on Pursuit With Purpose

"Welcome to pursuit with purpose i'm your host melissa griffin and i know firsthand that is way too easy this lip end the rat race of competition and comparison this podcast is all about meaning and fulfillment and how to bring it to your life today and every day so let's get into it hey brazil with purpose fam so about a year ago today's guest james webb more and i decided to meet for lunch now to be honest i didn't know a ton about james at the time i just knew that he had a popular mastermind group for entrepreneurs and that he had a really successful online business but that was basically it and i expect it or conversation to revolve around things like the latest business strategies and tactics but as soon as we sat down to eat it was clear to me that james is so much more than a business coach and for the next two or three hours we talked all about personal development spirituality and the crazy stories that had taught us something in our lives now not to mention james was funny and relatable we instantly hit it off and james brings all of that this fun and unique in our view now sure we do talk about coming business trends and predictions as well as jay james i real business of bartending program if you can believe that but we also dive into james's journey through his spirituality and through shifting his brand to talk less about marketing and more about mindset sound familiar i'm on a similar journey to which is why i love what james is doing so darn much now james combines self help with business strategy in a way that's seamless and in my opinion necessary and he and myself truly believe that if you want to create an incredible business and life you need to master your inner game i i'm so excited introduce you to a dear friend of mine let's dive in hey james welcome to the show was thank you so much for having me amazing okay so i have so many different things that i want to ask you about a kinda wanted to do all the things kinda wanted to do this interview because i personally want to pick your brain about a lot of different stuff and.

melissa griffin james webb jay james three hours
"james webb" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on Liftoff

"The shirts and the patch and everything click on that and you'll be you'll be on your way i'm i'm very excited to have mission patches jason yeah last long last long time it's hard to make patches turns out it is it is but then we got the bureau involved in they wanna put it on a hoodie to all all worked out so that's good and there's just a t shirt he wanted teacher other logo that works too all right we should get to the details we should probably start with the james webb space telescope which of course the stories are never really good news with the james webb space telescope these days because nasa did a briefing where they said that due to some things like damaged thrusters and torn sunshield they're gonna keep the telescope grounded until may twenty twenty maybe which probably given the overarching costs will put them over the cap that congress put on the mission which is which is not great at the same time this is the most sunk of sunk costs ever so they're going to they're going to keep they're going to keep doing it but it means they're going to get need to get reauthorization from congress i think yeah so so often yeah what about this one what do you what do you where are we with james webb i mean it sounds like it's just more bad news it's not their fault there was like a contractor did some damage to the space craft but still every time i talk at like james webb comes up i just put my head in my hands and start rubbing my is just one of those things that you just want it to go so well because it has such great potential and i feel like it's just setback after setback but yes so the problem really here is that north of grummin the contractor is currently working on the telescope twenty four hours a day seven days a week like there's literally no time for them like they can't add another shifts.

nasa congress james webb james webb space telescope twenty four hours seven days
"james webb" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"We always have what i'll call a healthy nervousness nobody should ever be too comfortable with a project this heart because it really is you're doing a first of a kinda while beef stubbed toes and things have gone wrong we never met a challenge that we haven't been able to solve into to say were sitting here today with a sunshield deployed in the optics completely integrated we've accomplished some of the most significant hurdles in the program and it works i've i feel great and then i go back to the meetings and i make sure we're all being worried enough so that we're prepared for him it's it's good to be worried on very excited at this is going to be an amazing telescope prequel i started my career on the hubble telescope hubbell when it was launched rewrote the astronomy books and now finishing my career in the james was space telescope and james webs going to revita him and it's not just the things we anticipate seeing but really just like with hubbell it's going to be what we never ever imagined powell who knows what the james webb will fine thank you to our guest bill likes gillian right and scott willoughby and of course think it easy to put the programme together do join us next week we'll move finding out why animals do good deeds and look after each other the naked scientists comes to you from cambridge university and is supported by the stf see the apsl seat and rolls royce i'm chris smith thanks for listening and the backcatalog to all of these programmes is available for free on our website naked scientists dot com.

hubbell powell james webb cambridge university gillian scott willoughby chris smith
"james webb" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"james webb" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Seven storeys high was built back in the 1960s and we took that chamber refurbished it and then we went into the chamber with the flight telescope beginning a less of this past summer and it turned out the be about a almost one hundred day test where we got down to these very very cold temperatures check the mirrors make sure you can focus the mirrors check their limits the scientific instruments when threatened tire tyretesting then you have to warm backup and just the warming cooling down and warming up each takes about thirty days so we had some challenges in the i think the biggest challenge that we had was hurricane harvey that hit in the middle of the test we had proximate one hundred sixty people down there on what we got through that we actually did some testing during that and the test has been wonderful is been a huge success um they just had the final data review all the independent folks that we brought in the look at that date and say yet looks good came out and said basically we have a great telescope um and a great set of instruments um so that was a huge accomplishment stack is can make sure that the tennis skate consider vibes the violent shaking and the extreme noise of launch so we go through with light coal by them ix testing which consists the vibration and acoustics testing vibrations simulates the vibration it will see in the rocket with a certain amount of mortars we actually shake it early on horta than what it would see in the rocket knowing that of its arrives that it can survive the rocket ride and it's the same thing when acoustics testing it's it's exactly what it sounds like you put it in a sealed room to really big speakers in you simulate the the sound levels that it would see on on the rocket bri say you at she set these to be even more intense than an actual launch would be right you want to you wanna make sure it survives he got to pick it up to another level they make sure there are some margin between what it sees in the rocket and what it can survive you don't want that to be the same because in you're getting too close to maybe damaging something and what we do is we test things before we go into vibration in the kusak.

harvey horta tennis one hundred day thirty days