21 Burst results for "James Robinson"

Fresh update on "james robinson" discussed on Big Blue View

Big Blue View

01:11 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "james robinson" discussed on Big Blue View

"Mayfield in the eight and three cleveland browns. Now go down to jacksonville to beat the now one in ten jaguars. Twenty seven to twenty five baker mayfield to bit shakey to begin this game missing a couple throws but he ends up hitting austin hooper with one touchdown and ends of finding jarvis. Landry a monster. Eleven target eight catch one hundred and forty three and one game baker mayfield. Finish this game. Two hundred the eight yards. Nineteen twenty nine passing two touchdowns with only sack twice. But it was jarvis landry and it was nick chubb man nick. Chubb nineteen carries for one hundred forty four yards and a touchdown cream on ten carries for sixty two yards and kareem hunt. Really didn't do anything to the air. Had to targets did nothing. That's kind of his stick kind of usually what he does. Well but landry man had an excellent outing and just was able to kind of put this passing offense on his back with the assistance of baker mayfield. Obviously who's throwing the football. But mayfield can be eradicated at times the jacksonville. Jaguars made his game really really close to be honest. Coming back in the second half. I mean this game going into halftime with seventeen to thirteen and jacksonville's able to put up twelve points in the second half to ten points from cleveland. Cleveland gets two point edge. Jacksonville duval drove down the field towards the end of the fourth quarter and went to tie it up with a touchdowns james robinson they go for two and mike glennon couldn't complete it but mike glennon for mike. Glennon wasn't terrible in this game yet. A couple erin throws you see here and there but he finished twenty completions and thirty five attempts for two hundred thirty five yards two touchdowns zero interceptions and they were just handle the ball. James robinson twenty two carries for one hundred twenty eight yards and a touchdown call. John had a really acrobatic touchdown run yards after the catch. That really assistant. Mike glennon four catches for ninety six yards and a touchdown the rookie from texas really big guy filling in for another really big guy. Dj char- who was out keelan cole. Three for forty. Four in this game tyler Three per sixteen with that one touchdown but really all came down to that. Two point conversion that would have forced overtime and things would have got really really interesting jacksonville. It's not forget one in ten. They wouldn't other game. They're basically playing themselves out of the chance. Jets might fall into a win because the jets do fall into a winner. They trip and fall right into a win. Jacksonville that number one. Pick as of right now but the wait and see if that continues but jacksonville. Their team is it's beat up first off. And it's just kind of disgraceful. The moment i mean they just fired their general manager david caldwell and doug marrone is probably gonna be on the way out as well. Cleveland goes down and this is. Cleveland is a team that you can pick on easily right but hey these are the games that you win on the.

Baker Mayfield Mike Glennon Jacksonville Bit Shakey Austin Hooper Jarvis Landry Nick Chubb Jaguars Kareem Hunt Cleveland Browns Mayfield Landry Chubb Jarvis
Browns survive late scare, hold on to beat Jaguars 27-25

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

Browns survive late scare, hold on to beat Jaguars 27-25

"Thicker Mayfield gone three straight games without a touchdown pass before connecting with Jarvis Landry in Austin Hooper for scores and the Browns twenty seven twenty five victory over the Jaguars may feel completed nineteen of twenty nine passes for two hundred fifty eight yards in his first good weather game in a month helping Cleveland improved to eight and three for the first time since the old Browns did in nineteen ninety four the Jaguars had a chance to tie it following James Robinson's four yard run with two fourteen left but Mike Glennon's sailed a pass out of the end zone on the conversion try I'm Dave Ferrie

Thicker Mayfield Jarvis Landry Browns Jaguars Hooper Austin Cleveland James Robinson Mike Glennon Dave Ferrie
"james robinson" Discussed on Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

04:43 min | Last week

"james robinson" Discussed on Fantasy Football Today Podcast

"And he's got great match up to what he's he had a great call. Last week that henry would would play while against the dolphins he finally scored. You know maybe now he gets on a roll the start henry. Sit jake luton. Let's talk about james robinson here so mentioned this on yesterday show. He's had a really easy schedule. This year not easy cake. Yeah he. I get which i know what you're going to say but ten weeks into the season the guys averaging like one hundred yards a game. You probably didn't say you didn't know what i was going to say. Well look we're we're doing a show about whether we're starting arrested in guys and you want to have a conversation about james robinson. I don't believe there's a conversation to have that was just gonna ask. What do you think his favorite movies. That's all okay. So i could see people being concerned in wanting to bench james robinson because first off the the nature of looking at your lineup are projections from sportsline. James robinson project. This is he typically is so you have like. I'm starting to andre swift over james robinson. I think there's a higher ceiling for the andre swift. Given his matchup he's been essentially just as good as robinson for the last three games Dramas and better but you know so. It hasn't been for mine and then you look at what harris is facing non-key. Pr you look at. What is facing in non. Look at what balaj is facing overall so i would play robinson over those guys but i could see the temptation to get away from it. Because it's dealers are kirke. They are very good against running backs. And it's going to be a tough game for james robson. We saw him struggle once. Already against the texans when they sold out to stop them and we'll see the same thing happens again. The other thing is they've got four losses this year by ten or more points in three of them. He had eleven to thirteen carries in less than fifty rushing yards. But he did mostly find a way to be productive. You know he would catch balls. He score touchdowns something like that he gets basically all touches. They don't have chris thompson anymore. So you would think even if they are losing the that would help him. Npr and and we shall see if he does not have a good game here. Then then. I think we're going to start saying. Oh what's going to happen down the stretch for james robinson but we talk about that on sunday night and then. Dj chuck is around thirtieth or so in the rankings. Top thirty six npr and He's fine. I guess not an exciting start. Would you start. Let's get some some running backs. Would you start duke johnson or.

james robinson James robinson james robson andre swift henry jake luton npr chuck duke johnson Npr harris chris thompson
"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

05:07 min | 2 weeks ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"At school. Because it's just like usually are like fifteen minutes long and each day job episode and it's just like a dope way to kind of quickly. Stay up to date on. What's happening like you know. Political news political situations that are occurring. I think it's not too heavy. You know it's not like some stresses you out or that puts his burden You hear a bunch of negative. You're nothing just a couple of people that are you know super in depth in immersed in politics and that's their careers and they They talk about it. And i guess that's like fifty minutes long hit a couple of subjects a day or maybe as one topic. That's huge. they talk about. I'm sorry. I think it's a smart way to stay educated on it while not beating yourself up with it or being dragged into like negative conversations or anything like that So npr politics podcast fifty minutes politics. Just get your your dose for the day just to stay just to stay on top of this stuff. 'cause it does matter even though allow people don't wanna discuss it tabby but It's a good way to just stay in tune and just keep yourself in check with it. That's what i got guys. That's how i got adam josh. Don't wanna be one jump out here with something that you wanna share. Yeah i came to the table with something this week In all the years. We've done the podcast. I do not know that i've ever recommended music So i feel a little little insecure but I'm gonna. I'm gonna try and hold strong because you know it's not. It's not every day that i come across an album that like i end up playing on repeat but that happened recently. Actually over the summer disband released a single. That was a big fan of them. Before i came across the single and was really excited to see what else they would produce and they finally released. The album of the band is called stoplight. Observations and thou called orange. It just came out last month. And it's it's a real short album. It's only seven songs And they're described as a southern electro rock and but Really like the things that i hear. Most in it is is they have kind of like a A little bit of a motown funk southern rock feel but they're super unique in the sound play and really more than anything i think. It has phenomenal production value and great sound mixing and overall just has like a really cool listening.

adam josh
"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

02:40 min | 2 weeks ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"I'm still. I'm still a little bit gun shy from my alex collins nightmare i got. I think he's right. That's fair all right. The next one here the bucks. The tampa bay bucks have three wide receivers who are locked. In as no less than a flex start each week resum season fowler novell adam. It's a foul in it sucks. But that's the reality of it. I mean it's so crazy. I think i mentioned the pod before but i often play with the buccaneers on madden. And right now. They're just insane. It's so crazy that does not translate but does not translate. So i mean it seems like mike evans is an afterthought just because tom brady doesn't push the ball downfield. That's what mike evans is. Good at chris. godwin is going to have some relevance. But he's been banged up all year. Antonio brown looked ok in his first week. A man he looked great but his usage was okay. Crawl had been getting consistent usage. So i think that more than anything. It's just gonna be so to find anyone that offense reliable week to week because they've they've got so many options there that they even have a good week. It's gonna be you know hit and miss for who it is each week that actual is productive. Yeah yeah it's it's a it's a weird situation matches. It sucks because you know there's big time fans of all these guys people everywhere we all love him and you know on the field. As far as how they perform out there We love what they're capable of and it's just you know it sucks. Whim goes off. Or you know they all just kind of eat into each others in a production but josh. Do you feel like when you have these guys on your team that you know there's other players that you really feel like you feel super confident about over these guys. I would start all three of these guys. I feel like i feel like it might be. It might be a frustrating own where you know like you were saying it could be a patriots. Backfilled the a feel for us for the rest of the air. But i think that. I think that these three guys are going to create a lot offense and probably scores month predictable fantasy points. So you know buckle up. Yeah it'll be exciting to see how they grow as far as the rest of this year if it continues to get better and better and better or if there's just this kind of stagnant thing was we'll see how it plays out the last one i have. Here i think is interesting..

buccaneers mike evans alex collins godwin novell tampa bay Antonio brown tom brady josh
"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

04:05 min | 2 weeks ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"I don't know if i would agree but in that same. Right i think cooper kupp was pretty damn consistent last year too so i don't know i see the similarities but not necessarily in the it's super difficult and will kill you trying to predicted yeah. It is a little less difficult because robby anderson. Good and d- more isn't right josh. Oh okay yeah that that's great. That's a great question to ask. So like the rams offense is super starved. For air yards. Like cooper cooper kupp. Sixty four air yards per game. Robert woods fifty five. And if you go over to carolina anderson and more leads getting aid air yards per game. So i think this is an opportunity for me to kick jared goff and say that he's trashed and and i just am really really hoping that we see a late season flipped to dj more getting the targets out of this guy has this jared goff knows and galore in the last three minutes or we shall. We missed him. Men all yellow says. The when jared goff has a top five week this week you guys just just remember how good he is also while we're on the topic Hey guys how bad is. Brandin cooks is bad. 'cause to me. He looks like he's really good like week after week. It's super interesting. How that works. You know when you get rid of a terrible coach. How can change in offense and how no matter what team brandin cooks goes to. he's awesome. Yeah yeah i. I just wanted to get that in there. He's a pretty good backup willfuller. I mean that's totally fair as cheap is still like a top twenty four top thirty wide receiver which most people were thinking. He wouldn't come close to this year. There was some definitely some people. Were concerned Again give you credit there. I'll give you credit there on the last question. We have because we pushes episode back a day. Not we Somebody pushes episode back a day with no ac in the forecast as me he has. We had a question which is about waivers which for most are done and passed. But you guys want to answer it as a waiver. Wire question this week. It's brad duff at breadknife. Nine on twitter. If you're gonna follow he's asking. What was our three waiver editions. For week ten Do you guys want to approach us as just players that you actually did. Add this week that you feel really strong about obviously at this point is like i said it's passed for some people waivers about time they hear this episode or do you mean you only towards the future for next week. How do you guys want wanna answer brats question here. I mean as far as looking forward towards the next week preemptive pickups i if you play in leagues that dupleix defenses. I do like preemptive pickups ups especially when you have a team that is performing so poorly in the nfl right now. So i think if you can pick up the chargers who are play the jets next week or even the vikings who are gonna play the cowboys used those are fine like reach ahead pickups especially coming down the stretch you need to win games those type things against games in your favor As far as like particular players. I don't i i don't have anything that shopping off. Too soon josh. Do you have any players at you. Did pick up on waivers this week that you really were excited about. That is potentially. Maybe they may have Definitely or they're kind of sleeper waiver. Pick more than the obvious that would've snatched up instantly. Okay so players on picking up on waivers. This week Tyler ervin wherever i could getting. Kalem balaj richie. James had a big week..

jared goff cooper cooper kupp josh Brandin robby anderson Robert woods twitter Tyler ervin rams carolina brad duff James cowboys nfl
"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

03:24 min | 2 weeks ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"Wait wait to see the targets reduce reduce reduce and then go trade for him Hoping that the person thinks it's over. It's done i just see how this plays out all gonna be there after this year. Like what's going to happen. You know he could be. You could be a good player next year and maybe have more clear role. So i think he's a fun guy like target at this point on josh. Do you feel one-season wonder here. Or terrell owens already doesn't have to be to are low and it's just a consistent force in the eagles offense. I feel like he's probably the eh number two wide receiver who is capable of carrying more way when he has to carry more weight. But he's always gonna have that susceptibility to target competition. Is it like marvin jones like yeah. I respected mohamed. Sanu but marvin jones is another good name to pull out there. It's one of these guys and we're just crossing our fingers and hope to god is not nelson agholor. What's don't don't do that. don't do that. Know nelson agholor shade on this podcast sir. Instead of the bill segler is a big for the raiders but he is the poster boy for. I get targets when people are hurt. Believable josh will not be on next week's episode. Let we go ahead and tell you there will be no ice storm. But no nelson agholor slander. Sir all right awesome. I hope we hope he answered it there. At the i think we i think we cover that one on the next one barrel another amazing listener the show barrel joffrey at barrel joffrey gaskin messaging follow. He's asking our dj more robby. Anderson curtis samuel basically just a new robert woods cooper. Kupp brandin cooks situation. Where all pretty damn good but never on the same week and will kill you basically trying to predict it so adamant you to go on this one. I i know you have a lot of love for these rams wide receiver. So i'm curious your thoughts on what barrels asking here it. I get where barrels coming from in this regard Just the last year. It seemed like the rams had the best wide receiver core but as the war on it was extremely difficult to predict which these wide receivers is going to go off. And then if you remember it was tyler higby through the end of the season so in that regard. I don't see that happening carolina. 'cause i don't really think they have any other options outside of these guys to be fantasy relevant. I also don't think it's the same. Just in regards of robert woodson cooper kupp have both kind of the top twenty four wide receivers and that offense Dj robby anderson. Maybe could do that. But i. I really see carolina more as like a robby. Anderson is gonna get the bulk of the targets. They're curtis samuel is going to be used. The most uniquely and dj more is going to be more like a move your move the kinda receiver that offense so for me just the style in which they play and and kinda how they're going to be utilized is similar but i think similar in the sense it will be tough to predict. Maybe i think robby anderson is going to be pretty damn consistent though so..

Dj robby anderson josh curtis samuel marvin jones rams nelson carolina joffrey gaskin terrell owens robert woodson cooper Kupp brandin raiders tyler higby eagles Sanu
"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

03:07 min | 2 weeks ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"Swift. I mean i'm gonna lean antonio gibson but it gives an worries me too because they're using. Jd is take like a Amount there and it makes no sense a mean all right with it. Just in tonio gibson was a receiver like it makes sense for him to catch the ball and they're using them more than the running game and using someone else in the passage it just makes no sense. It is funny. Everyone's like are. We sure this guy can carry the ball and here the washington. We'll show you all will do with them. That will that's all we'll do is let them run the ball Yeah it is another one of those weird running back ricky situations but yeah i mean it. It's good to see guys like and gibson in having these moments it sucks ac- other guys that we thought would do better struggling a little bit But it just again. It goes to show you man when you're playing dynasty or your drafted really late in even redraft. Whatever you know these guys. James robinson zack. Moss is starting to come on like we can't. We don't even talk that much but he starting to come on a joshua kelley doing decent and san diego with the opportunity. So you know these guys were the ones that were later drafted. And they're outperformance of the guys who were drafted much much much earlier so Again a perfect science. We can't predict how these teams are going to us guys and the success. They're gonna come out of the gate with I just wish the lions would stay consistent and just like at least made the with the guy and you can you know. Give the guy some runs but let him be the man there man i'm takeover but it is what it is so yeah we we all think he can do it again. It's whether the lions will allow it. The last one here is another ricky met. A lot of rookies jumped on my list. This week To put up twenty plus points last week. Adam you do it again. Yeah i mean it was really very jekyll and hyde like it's it's almost like they had training wheels on him the first week but this week in the of this past week he came out it looked fantastic and offense was running just as well as it did under ryan fitzpatrick. So you guys. I mean it's obvious. They have weapons lost preston williams. So i can understand a little bit of concern but going against the cardinals amid they're gonna need to score points. I think the game projects to the shoot out so a window that was that was last week. I'm at the chargers. But yeah i mean thing with the chargers though it's still projects to be a shootout and i think because of that too is a good position to be in a good spot sparked for anybody who's by and then also just you know somebody who if you've been streaming is is definitely gonna option. Yeah yeah no. It definitely was It was it was good to see josh. Are you excited about this man. Do you think we can get a pretty strong performance. Rest of season from two hours. Do you think we're gonna get like dips. You know up and down. I i wanna see to succeed. Just because in the future..

antonio gibson chargers lions ricky Jd James robinson Moss ryan fitzpatrick cardinals san diego joshua kelley washington preston williams Adam josh
"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy  | Pop Culture

Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Clock Dodgers Podcast - Motivation | Fantasy Football | Comedy | Pop Culture

"To be there at the spot so so yeah that's that's awesome and Yeah let's let's hope that at team can hold for seven weeks. Tim congrats on that Like you said hopefully it hold. Its is asking a lot. It's a long path to even have a team like that. That steadily in contention is pretty surreal. so yeah it'd be it'd be sweet if it hits them and that's why that's why you play those large tournaments neo to take those opportunities and i've never never had that sort of success before i've i've definitely done well in baseball for many years. Now but that would that would be awesome dope dope dope all right so that's some good victory laps. If you guys want to here so that we did wrong. Go back and listen to last episode as i can tell you can. That's where you can find that Injuries before we get into anything else. Injuries hit on some. You know some of the bigger players some of the bigger names enjoy christian. Mccaffrey found his way back onto the injury. Lists adam. i jinxed. Sim you guys know i did. I'm on twitter in the group chat talking about how mike davis is completely irrelevant again and seem going gonna be our week. It's you know it. It's wild but a hats off to you guys. I mean you're both on. Mike davis it was definitely the right call. I mean he has been nothing but extremely productive and cmc's absence so he should be once again this week. I think it's hilarious. That i don't know if you guys are paying attention to the dfs at all but Undrafted kings. he's the stone minimum at four thousand this week so he'll be one hundred percent owned. I i've been playing age or f gangs but i thought that was super interesting But yeah i mean. Mike davis must start. All you lineups this week for sure chris. Mccaffrey has such a good game. Man sucks sucks is what it is right. We'll just keep prize this away. This year has gone man. You just gotta kinda role with these these punches hit with Kyle allen had season ankle injury Season ending ankle injury season ending ankle surgery. There we go. He had surgery season. So if you were using him in superplex or any of those scottish football he like that that's over. It's done david. Montgomery i don't know if you've anything new on this your bears fat. But he's going through concussion protocol on. I think he's been cleared or anything yet So yeah hasn't been cleared as of wednesday when we're recording this I mean even if he is cleared. I think at this stage is definitely at best flex where i mean. He definitely has not lived up to expectations. Say that much story. You guys all in on ryan dude. I have so much ryan. Yeah four this or on waivers at age just. I've just been looking at david. Montgomery and expecting him to stall out fail so ryan all has has made his way onto a lot of spent the bet on the right horses for that purpose like that non. Montgomery bill is probably the ram move. I don't i don't know. I don't know how i feel about all i think that You know that is the andy reid coaching tree. So i do think that the bears scheme you know good plays in the running game Now that pretty well last week. So yeah i mean he is definitely somebody who's going to be flexible the montgomerie's yeah and we It's one of the pay attention to another concussion. Guy out there as david johnson I haven't seen that. He's been cleared yet either. so your boy duke. Josh boy do. I got a like the duke jones candles running out a wax. It needs to happen happen now. it has to happen a week..

mike davis david johnson Montgomery Kyle allen Mccaffrey ryan baseball twitter Tim Josh adam. chris andy reid superplex
How One Covid-19 Victim Was Lost in the Chaos

WSJ What's News

12:06 min | 4 months ago

How One Covid-19 Victim Was Lost in the Chaos

"Images and stories from the pandemic that will be seared into many people's memories forever. One of them was the discovery in April of rental trucks, holding dozens of dead bodies out a funeral home in New York City. The people found that day were victims not just of the coronavirus, but of a system overwhelmed one of them was seventy two year old nathaniel hallman. He lived in the Bronx with his wife Mitzi. They were married for forty two years. He repaired whirlpool appliances and in retirement he and his wife or a Deacon and deaconess at the Church of the Meek Baptist. Harlem they visited. visited the sick and shut ins in early April at the height of the pandemic and New York City home in was at a Rehab Center in the Bronx, where he was diagnosed with nineteen, the sent him to the hospital next door where a few weeks later he succumbed to the disease, but that's not where the story ends. It's where it begins our reporter Michael Phillips. He died on April Seventeenth, at Saint Louis Hospital and his goddaughter hope who is a very astute person. decided she would take responsibility for making sure that he was cremated and taking care of and and so his wife is widow. mitzi wouldn't have to do it. And so hope was under the impression that she had only seven days to get his body in the hands of funeral director, or the hospital would give the body to the city, and the city would bury him in a mass grave on Hart Island, which is a the Potter's field for New York City. One hundred and fifty years that the people have been left behind have been buried on on heard island. And, so she thought okay I've got a week to find somebody to take care of the body, and she started calling funeral homes, and they were all full. This was the height of the epidemic of hundreds and of New Yorkers were dying at a day on the day that that Daniel died three hundred eighty four New Yorkers died. And so the funeral homes would just overloaded. She called something like twenty funeral homes, and they all said we can't take him. Her Middle Son was even doing an internship at a Newark New Jersey funeral home and they were full to take Nathanielsz bodies. So she grew more and more panicky over the course of the week, and she contacted a family friend Reverend up in Connecticut, Marshall, Morton and Reverend Morton being in the you know the business of of being a clergyman new number of funeral home directors called up an old contact that he had named James Robinson. Mr Robinson worked out of a funeral home in Neptune City New Jersey as well as one in Brooklyn. And so he said, according to Reverend Morton I'll take care of this for you. I've got it and please. Please take the body down to my funeral home in Neptune. So the Reverend and hope son managed to find a funeral director, who would could drive the body out of New York to Neptune New Jersey Neptune city. And deliver it just before the what hope thought was the deadline at the hospital. They get the body out of there, so they took the bodies of Neptune city Mr Robinson the funeral director was not there. A person who was there said I'm sorry. I can't accept this body. They called up. Mr Robinson the funeral director. And this is where there's a lot of disagreement about what took place, but from the point of view of the family and Reverend Morton. What happened was Robinson said. I didn't mean for you to take it to. New Jersey Take my place in Brooklyn, this is something that that Mr Robinson disputes. He says he never said such a thing. The driver took the body up to Brooklyn to a funeral home called likely funeral services on UTICA avenue in Brooklyn. He dropped the body off there with the people who were there. They put it in. A refrigerated truck was parked on the street. And the family assumed everything was OK at that point. The body was supposed to be cremated on the twenty ninth so a few days later. And when hope called the the crematory to ask whether or not or godfather had been had been cremated, she got an answering. Machine were closed for maintenance the next day. She got answering machine message, but Never received confirmation he had been cremated. During this time news broke about all these bodies in Brooklyn in U. Haul trucks, and that was the same address where they had dropped off Mr Hallman. So hope began to panic and put things together. She called up the Reverend. The Reverend put things together. They all started to worry and at that point they tried to get Mr Robinson to explain where the body was. They tried to get a funeral home to explain where the body was tried to get the city. Medical Examiner explain where the body was, and they just couldn't find. It took until the fifth of May until. Finally learned that her godfather's bodied Nathaniel Hamad's body had actually been in the back of an unrefrigerated u-haul truck left on the street in Brooklyn, just a horrible horrible discovery, and it wasn't the end for Nathaniel. Family, who then spent several weeks trying to get his body and arranged for his final resting. What happened after this? There was another misstep when the bodies were discovered at the funeral home. In the U.. Haul trucks hope called the city medical examiner's office. They had come over. You know when the when the police got there and the after nine one one call reporting bodies and trucks on the street. You know hope called everybody. She could find the governor's offices. The attorneys general of the State of New Jersey and New York. You know. Where's My Godfather? And when she called the medical examiner's office, they had already collected sixty one bodies from the trucks and from clerk. Lee's funeral home itself, including many that would simply on the floor in various states of undress, and on the floor of the Chapel at the funeral homes just loaded with bodies. And so she when she called the medical examiner's office, they went through the list of all the bodies. They retrieved from the funeral home from the trucks. And Nathaniel Holman's name was not on the list, so for days and days she couldn't find out where he was. She even went over with Reverend Morton to the funeral home. Mr Clearly was not there at the time. Mr Robinson was not there at the time and she said. My father was here. Where is he and couldn't couldn't get an answer? And, what happened was and the fifth of May. That medical examiner's office discovered that the name on his paperwork had been reversed as hallman nathaniel so when they had looked up the bodies they had. When hope it call then they looked in their record, says he will what bodies we have. Do we have in home? It came up as a negative. The only had a home in faneuil. And by the fifth of May, they figured this out, and now remember he died on the seventeenth of April, so we're no weeks into this, and only then does hope discover that. In fact, her godfather had been in one of trucks and was now in the care of Medical Examiner's office. At that point, the the medical examiner said look. We have him safe. He's in. You know in cooled unit, so he's he won't decay. To be blunt about it. You can leave them here until you find a funeral director. WHO's able to cremate him? which is what the family wanted to do, so they held onto him and it wasn't until five weeks after his death. I think thirty nine days exactly after his death that they were able to get him cremated, and now his ashes are in an urn that his his widow Mitzi keeps at her bedside Michael. What else did you hear from city officials in response to this as well as from the quickly funeral home. The state authorities suspended Mr Claes. Licensed to act as a funeral director, and then held a series of hearings online hearings to decide whether to permanently revoked his license for you know poor practices, the ruling has not yet come out. They've had three hearings and the lawyers have submitted final closing statements, but the administrative law judge has not yet ruled on whether to revoke his license in listening to the at least one of those hearings, and in talking to Mr.. Claes attorney, he's basically the the argument is they were holding the bodies in the U. Haul trucks as they were moving them from the refrigerated truck which was. Recognized waited two whole bodies into the funeral home to be packaged up four cremation. And so he said we would keep them in the in the U. Haul trucks for a while and then move them. It was hard I think for the prosecuting attorney. I guess he'd be called the prosecuting attorney. Understand that because the argument is why not just move them from the refrigerated truck all the way into funeral home instead of stopping. This is just a matter of a few yards, so stopping and putting them in a truck. Mr Quickly. That's Mr Clarke's defense as well as his lawyer said to me. Look the whole city was inundated with bodies. Just wasn't enough. Space to handle the mall and so things happen. And he said that he thought it was unfair that his client Mr clinically was being singled out when so many other funeral homes were also overcrowded in his in his argument. So, that that is his defense Mister Robinson's defense. He has not been charged with any anything by the state. He has not been his has not been suspended, but in talking to him, his argument is. I never had that body. I never signed any paperwork saying that that body was under my control so everyone who says that I did agree to take control of Mr. Hammond's body is line. That is his argument. There are text messages back and forth in which he says that he would take care of the body, but he also said and give me the paperwork, so there's now a lawsuit underway Msci Hallman and hope dukes. Who is the the Goddaughter of Daniel? Hallman have filed suit against the he quickly home as well as Mr. Robinson And are seeking damages for what they describe of course as mistreatment of Nathaniel remains. Michael as you say, and as you've heard from many of the people in this story, Nathanielsz body was one of dozens discovered in rental trucks during the height of the pandemic. What did reporting out the story and what happened in this one case? Tell you about what happened here in New York at the height of this. So, what are your takeaways from this tragic story? This won't come as a surprise to anybody but. When the pandemic really hits and went really hit New York. Hardest I. At least in the United States of course. It just overwhelmed the system. The city and the people who who manage these things would just not ready for overwhelming the doctor. Was Internal Internist resident at Saint Barnabas Hospital. Who took? Mitzi up to see Nathaniel before he died is she would cry constantly into her. into a mask and goggles because there's just so much misery. All around her. And the same situation occurred with with the body's. Just the city. Wasn't prepared for the awfulness that that's that hit it. I can't judge whether they should have been more prepared. Or there was some mistake making made made at some point. That's not really within my capacity to judge. But, certainly, it was overwhelmed. And that meant that there are a lot of a lot of collateral damage and. Michi and hope, and of course Nathaniel himself were part of that collateral damage, and now I think. Between lawsuits and historians and journalists looking back at what happened. We'll start to peel that apart and figure out. Who did what who could have done things that were you know could have done things better and who who? Who did the best they could?

Mister Robinson New York City Nathaniel Hallman Reverend Morton Nathaniel Director Brooklyn Mitzi New Jersey Funeral Michael Phillips Neptune New Jersey Neptune Cit Mr Robinson Neptune City New Jersey Bronx Mr Claes Mr Clearly Mr Quickly
"james robinson" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"james robinson" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Maryland place for you would you like to give me your ballot in some trusting person so sure you take him in for me I can save the postage and then bill goes in burns up so she's putting that into this into a relief package James Robinson probably Robbins what a great piece on this in USA today he often writes for National Review board of contributors author of this time we went he went this a lot of these examples are from him this work so what I telling you judge people by what they do in a crisis what some people can be great upstanding citizens or appear to be until there's a crisis you're seeing the actual Nancy Pelosi you're seeing the woman the one I lived in DC I learned that every morning every morning she goes down to have her hair done professionally traverse even worked on professionally every morning that's our focus and what are you to her what is your pain what is your worry it's a product but she can sell for money influenced by the case of the Kennedy center.

Maryland James Robinson USA Nancy Pelosi Kennedy center Robbins National Review
"james robinson" Discussed on Big Brains

Big Brains

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Big Brains

"Okay so let me get a little historical with you for a moment if we look at societies falling back to arguably the Mess Potassium Times James if you were going to say. Here's where I start looking at studying. These things are these things learned over time or they forgotten over time and we we are doomed to keep learning these lessons over turnover again. Yeah to me. It's not. It's not really a matter of knowledge if you asked me about. Why did ancient Athens? The boom economically. I tell US similar story. Orient Emphasis in the book is very much on persistence. We start the book by talking about this famous prediction. When the Berlin Wall fell down that all the world was going to converts to Liberal Democracy by Francis Fukuyama the end of his refers to the what still remains a question of whether that process Is is one that can terminate Whether that evolution you know finally culminates in a certain kind of civilization That in a certain sense will be the last last civilization that mankind will achieve. Because in a certain sense. It's the it's the right. Point is the one that fits human nature in an appropriate way. But of you is that no actually. The patent history is not convergence. It's divergence China's being where it's been for over two thousand years Yemen. We actually know quite a lot about Yemen going back ACA files in years and and and it looked pretty like it does now a thousand years ago so this is not this is not something. `Bout Nobody's bouncing about. You're kind of stuck. In these very different steady states you know these very different types of Leviathan and our story about the history of Europe or how Europe develop these types of shackled Leviathan. That also steeply historically rooted has to do with the collapse of the western Roman Empire and the way that these Germanic tribes which had very participatory three political institutions merged with late Roman state institutions administrative institutions legal institutions fiscal institutions to kind of bring this balance between state and society. Together that's the roots of this thing. That's a long time ago. So actually there's a lot of what social scientists will pop off dependence in this process depend depend okay. Once you get a particular constellation of institutions in a society that that it does tend to reproduce itself. So that's why you have this divergence knock convergence now of course it's also true that societies do you go out to the corridor so particularly we talk about the German case. So I'd mentioned the Germanic tribes so you might think okay Germany. Germany should be in the cargo and it is in the long run but also if you think about German history this claim moments where they went out to the corridor. Think about the Nazi state. Fifteen years there's a bottom up push out of the state that's that's an interesting example of disillusionment with institutions the inability of institutions to resolve conflicts to resolve economic problems the crisis of the depression. The hyperinflation what I find super interesting is that you get these. Very unstable dynamics can throw a society out of the corridor. Oh but when they crash you get back into the corridor. Germans after nine hundred forty five has a kind of common understanding of how things were going to work and how institutions ought to be structured and they were able to recreate this shackled Leviathan. They had a blueprint for creating the shackled Leviathan from understanding. How did that from the pulse? which which nobody in Haiti? You'll Sierra Leone has. I can't imagine that there's not a listener paying attention to this right now. That's it's not of course thinking about in the US and you mentioned that there certainly some evolutions and things that are going on in some things that president trump identified that that argue are really. We got exploited. Do you look at this and say that. We're we're moving toward a APP center despotic state right now in the United States. So that's something we should be concerned about. I didn't think I think so because I think the the history of the US going back to this kind of historical path dependence the history of the US suggests that the institutions are capable of responding funding to these challenges people have to make compromises. They have to make new deals. They have to make coalitions and I think that that's what has to happen in the US. Now and I think in the past suggests. There's a reason to be optimistic that that will happen. You know I think. Democratic politicians are probably woken up at this point and realize there are a lot of problems. They weren't very aware of alignment. I'm English you know. And in the Brexit context I always think people say oh. What a terrible thing? This referendum Watson. How David Cameron was was so crazy? But actually I think the opposite is true you know what the referendum shows is that. There's a deep seated animosities although deep-seated discontent about the way many things work that the political elites were not aware of now they are absolutely and that's a good thing. Capitalism is the engine Jennifer prosperity actually sows the seeds of its own demise. Could both be right. I'm Kate Waldoch from Georgetown University and I'm loses in Ghana's from the University of Chicago Geico were the hosts of capitalism. It's a podcast about what's working in capitalism today and most importantly what isn't we're gonNA share the sort of irreverent banter. You'd hear between economists set a bar. That is if economists were to go to a bar subscribe to capitalism. You can find US wherever you get your podcasts. You think about an an and we've we've talked about the DOODOO travel the world in you lecture you speak are people looking at you and saying I want to figure out in my country what I should be learning from and we bring in economists we bring in politicians we bring in scientists. Are You finding that you're consulted and saying being helped me understand as I'm looking to evolve my society you know I. I don't consult in the sense of governments. Pay Me to come and tell them what to do. I actually sleep. I had one experience with that. I didn't enjoy a tool. Why didn't you enjoy it? Because I felt I felt everybody was over promising. You know my view of the world does she want to understand how to improve economic performance in Columbia for example we have these general ideas about institutions inclusive institutions. But as soon as you're in the business of trying to give policy advice then all the details become extremely significant so what you have to do in Columbia is going extremely different from what you have to do in Sierra Leone or what you have to do in Argentina and then you need a lot of thick knowledge of those societies and and and and so. That's I think this business of running around the world telling you know Kazakhstan. What to do is is a fool's game you know and I felt extremely uncomfortable comfortable personally to be involved in that? I've never done it ever since but actually going and telling people about my ideas and talking to them they can do with it what they will. Yes I know for me I you know I find that incredibly interesting also just learning about the people the way people think about their problems and the challenges. Well let me ask you I if this is not a consulting assignment but if you're with students and and the question came up with all the knowledge that you have and the question was well how do you develop. You're going to start with a clean sheet sheet of paper and design the perfect society. How would you think about doing that? Oh yeah that's I'm not sure I have a good answer to that. You know one of the things that I personally find. Very enjoyable is all sort of diversity in the world. What what impresses me about the history of humanity is the incredible bull diversity of the types of societies that humans have created? I think there's fundamental political and economic problems that people have to solve in these societies. RT's and they sold them in different ways because humans are creative and innovative. Or you know it's interesting if you think about like Homo Sapiens Homo sapiens spread all over the world world without species. They got to greet lake. They calculated greenland but there wasn't like a Homo Greenland. What did they have? Did they do that. They adapt to such a totally different environment. Without Specie acting they invented igloos. You know an ice fishing so I I think that's that seems like a kind of wacky example but I think actually it tells you a lot about boy social sites so interesting all those different ways you can do things cultures and everything you can still have prosperity so you can still have public goods. You can still have investment so so all of that variation is consistent with having basic inclusive societies. You know for us. That's the story. That's the big story is human innovation and creativity and humans create these very different types of societies and some of them diffuse and spread right and others. Don't and and that's that's the patent so I think we would like to do is probably write a book where we could convince people that this was the right way to think about things. I think we've done bits and pieces of that in these two books but I don't think we're quite there yet. We don't have quite the Roy way of doing that yet. Your Book. Why nations fail was an international best-seller? Hopefully your new one will will follow suit issue. Write these books walks. What do you number? Why do you think that they get the attention? They do. At least what why. Nations fail an energy. Think your hope people get something out of it. What is it that you were hoping for? How do you think that's happening whereas the attraction? Well Yeah I think. Academic research is so impenetrable for for non academics. The languages all the methods are impenetrable but often the ideas can be said in quite a simple way. Why and I think Dr Ronald we sort of read everything? We've always been inspired by political science by anthropologists by reading history by All sorts of things one of the reasons why nations fail is that many of the things that we found inspiring or stimulated research. We'd never able to include in an academic paper because that's just inappropriate. You know it's it's not scientific or whatever some we saw. Well Gosh all these things have inspired us and helped us think. Think about the world. Maybe that'll inspire other people to and it's been surprising. I mean we never thought the book was going to be successful to be honest with you. We we thought we'd have a shot at it but we were expecting to fail. dismally dismally But it's been it's been incredibly rewarding you know. Oh I would argue that that the the simplicity and clarity of inter enter outside the corridor is also a compelling and hopefully understandable concept that will push this conversation even to next degree. Well we're hoping so too but We'll have to wait and see. Big brains is a production of the U.. KAKAPO podcast network. If you like what you heard please give us a review and a rating. Our show is hosted by Paul Rand and produced by mean Madoda Thanks for listening.

United States Sierra Leone Berlin Wall Germany Europe Francis Fukuyama Yemen Athens Haiti China Columbia Paul Rand Kazakhstan Dr Ronald David Cameron Jennifer Ghana
"james robinson" Discussed on Big Brains

Big Brains

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"james robinson" Discussed on Big Brains

"Certain books that are just so important that you see them everywhere. Maybe you know the guns jobs in steel guns. Germs and steel by jared. Diamond is certainly one of those books. It redefined the way we thought about human history by arguing that some nascent succeeded while others failed because of their geographic locations and available available natural resources jared diamond. He's a very good friend of mine. We actually edited together. Wants and he's been a great inspiration for me on many levels but I actually think fundamentally the mentally his explanation of human history is wrong. It's not about exhaustiveness progeny factors that condemn certain societies to poverty. Bless them with prosperity is really about how humans themselves organized societies. That makes the difference. James Robinson is a leading political scientists and economists at the University of Chicago as well as the Director of the Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution Solution of global conflicts. He's the author of his own. Well renowned book. Why nations fail? which gives a very different view of human history? One that tells a a story about how our political and economic institutions have determined. Why nascent succeed and why they don't I mean given probably one hundred talks about? Why nations fail? This boy and what I see is that this notion of extractive inclusive institutions is very simple and it resonates with people because it gives a language anguish for helping people kind of pro sessile this information that they have in the world but they don't really know how to organize it will order it. Why nations fail was a huge success now? Robinson and his Co author Darren Awesome Oh glue have written a sequel. It explains how and when these institutions come about and wire road looks the way it does it. Economists understand what generates prosperity they understand. It's about investment in public goods education and property rights and innovation. And so to me. I've never been interested so much in rich countries because like what's curious is why is it that when everyone agrees why. Why doesn't that get going in Haiti? Not High Sierra Leone like so to me. The puzzle is always being about pull countries and about why poor countries can't take advantage of all the stuff which is in economics textbooks from the University of Chicago. This big brains. A podcast about the pioneering research in pivotal breakthroughs that are reshaping our world on this episode James Robinson and the prosperity and poverty of nations. I'm your host Paul Ryan. It's one of those questions that so simple to ask but it seems almost too big to answer. Why do some nations fail while other succeed? There's there's probably few people on the planet who are harder to find an answer than James Robinson and his co author. Darren Awesome Lou. Successful countries in our view are just countries that manage to generate high levels of living standards for their people and failed countries. Our countries that don't where whereas mass poverty and deprivation okay and so when you think about it is. Is there a fundamental idea of things that if if you had to summarize what it is that that pushes nations to fail or to succeed. How do you typically talk about that? I think it's whether or not nation succeeds or fails. Sales depend on how the people in that society themselves Organiz Thought Society Organiz institutions the rules that create different different patterns of incentives and opportunities that may some basic but it's actually a radical idea for decades scholars have argued that what separates successful and failed veiled. Nations is their geographic location resources our culture to illustrate why those theories don't work. We need to go to two towns along the southern border of the US Nogales Arizona. In Nogales Mexico. Yeah we thought the boat with these social scientists were called natural experiments way. You have kind of experimental like variation in the way society's organized holding constant cultural factors all geographical factors so it it's a powerful way of trying to show that these other types of theories that people often like can't really explain what you observe and what really matters about new guidelines which is essentially one town with offense running down the middle right is that the northern half is in the United States and the southern half is in Mexico north of the fence in Nogales Arizona Arizona people invest in businesses and houses without fear of theft by others or the government. Their kids are in school and they have relatively good incomes south south of the fence. Whoever in Agali's Mexico incomes dropped to one third education rates plummet and infant mortality rises yet? There is no difference difference in geography or in climate and very little difference in culture on either side of the fence. So what exactly has caused the differences in living standards if you talked about over the last hundred years why was Mexico so different from the US. Well first of all Mexico had this autocratic one-party state until extremely recently the PRI from the late nineteen twenties right the way through in the nineteen ninety s pre was created military leads clinging to power after winning the Mexican revolution so there was just one hegemonic political party a long period of economic growth marked by authoritarian controls characterized Mexico. Go in the one thousand nine hundred forties fifties and sixties. There was no accountability. There was no political competition. There was no Democrat democracy at all. So that's it's part of what we call inclusive political institutions is about. It's about having political power. Broadly distributed in society so People's preferences count on it's also about the state and the capacity of the state so the Mexican state has just been much less able to develop capacity to provide public goods and all And why is that well because it was used as a tool of patronage and politics by the one party state soon our theory the first layer is is economic institutions wins that create different patterns of incentives and opportunities in the economic sphere but lying behind that is political institutions. Politics is is is the study of how societies make collective choices and for us the way. The economy's organized is a collective choice economic institutions the rules property rights nights. Whatever it is that comes out to the political system so looking behind economic differences must be political differences Robinson and Awesome Mug Lucy there are two kinds of institutions extractive an inclusive understanding how they work creates a useful framework for figuring the nation's succeed or why they fail? We'll start with extractive institutions look at the specific institutions of Haiti or Sierra Leone. What was Becky Stan? Obviously the details are extremely different near the way the labor market works the way property rights to land. So you need a language which sort of says okay. Hey the details. They're all different but actually the institutions have this one thing in common okay there extractive and what does that mean. It means they take away people's incentives there's an opportunities will they concentrate incentives and opportunities. Somebody's incentives well. You think about the security of property rights if you go to rural Haiti property rights are very ill defined. Nobody has a proper title given by the government there's endless disputes over boundaries. Over who owns walked. So if you're thinking of investing and saving and building ditches investing in your land forming the fact that your property rights are contestable will and vague and insecure undermines or incentives. And this makes sense right. If you live in a place where your land home or possessions. Since could be and regularly are taken away by others with the government you're not gonNA have an incentive to invest and no investment means no long-term growth often these states concentrate the wealth of the country amongst a few of the top back extracting it from the arguments through taxes and labor so we talk about slavery slavery or the way many colonial societies will constructed. You know if you look at South Africa for example under a tight apartheid really began in nineteen forty eight but separating black Africans from the white minority had long been a policy aimed. Laws made white people officially superior and the large black majority face discrimination in in every aspect of their lives where rules and regulations stopped black people occupying many types of professions stop. Black people owning land pushed black people. People into these Bantustans. There were separate public facilities transport and schools interracial marriage was banned many had no right to citizenship. And we're regarded as aliens ends in major cities now here's clear. Examples of how people's incentives and opportunities were were were stripped away so what do inclusive institutions look like so here's a good example of an inclusive institution which I think sort of drives the point home the patent system in the book we have a photograph of the patent. Edison took out when he invented the lightbulb right. The economists no since the work of Robert Solo in the nineteen fifties fifties what drives economic growth is incentives innovation new technologies productivity increasing devices machines. Ideas is and so. How do you get that going okay? Well ideas Easy to copy. You know I could come up with the idea for light bulb and you could say that's a great idea. I'm going to use that to do something else. So that's a problem from the incentive point of view because it means If I have an idea maybe I can benefit from it but you can also benefit from it. The two so the the wealth that idea generates spills over every way semi private. Incentives are different from the social incentives. So the idea of a patent what is by protecting your intellectual property rights you kind of bring the private incentives.

James Robinson Haiti Mexico Darren Awesome Lou United States Arizona University of Chicago jared Nogales Mexico Organiz Thought Society Organi High Sierra Leone Agali Nogales Sierra Leone South Africa Paul Ryan Edison Robert Solo
The Black Widow of England: Mary Ann Cotton

Female Criminals

12:53 min | 1 year ago

The Black Widow of England: Mary Ann Cotton

"Abuse but Marianne was no ordinary woman and ears she'd been rehearsing for her mother's death two daughters named Margaret had already died in her care only nine days turn Mary Ann's arrival in Siham Margaret Stott was also dead soon after her mother's death thirty four year old Marianne and thirty four year old James Robinson moved forward with their nuptials on August eleventh eighteen sixty seven they held a small wedding in ship where mouth Marianne was five months pregnant their honeymoon period didn't last long although Marianne now had all the well security she could ever dream of she still wasn't happy under her skin Marianne was flailing if only she'd been able to settle in she could have lived out the rest of her life and luxury but as the saying goes idle hands are the devil's play thing Marianne found that her life of wealth and security didn't bring her the peace she'd originally hoped it would she grew to disdain James Robinson once again she was desperate to relieve herself of her marriage Marianne preceded with her now usual Mo I she eliminated unwanted step children through the month of April eighteen sixty seven child after child died a son and two daughters all the while Marianne helped herself to her husband's wealth without his permission or knowledge she withdrew his entire savings account today the equivalent of roughly two thousand three hundred dollars it's hard to say where the money went but in addition to taking Robinson's money Marianne also pawned her linens and close for even more cash but that St L. wasn't enough she borrowed another five hundred sixty three dollars in Robinson's name this proved to be a grave misstep as the loan in company notified her husband of the funds he owed Robinson was both befuddled and enraged he felt that Marianne had greatly over stepped her bounds by borrowing and spending without his consent in November of eighteen sixty nine Robinson through Rianne his home he may not have realized it at the time but in abruptly breaking off their marriage he saved his own life and that of his remaining children as we discussed last episode the laws of Victorian England made legal divorce incredibly difficult although men had more options than women Robinson's still would have needed to go to great lengths to dissolve his partnership he never bothered although their marriage was over in all but in name Marianne remained Robinson's legal wife without a divorce she risked bigamy charges the next time she identified a potential spouse and victim but for once Marianne wasn't set on marrying for wealth because justice she found herself estranged from Ron Robison Marianne learned that her longtime lover Joseph Mattress had recently become a widower for most of Marianne adult life she'd only wanted a few things wealth freedom stimulation and the one true love of her life the perpetual Liane unattainable mattress in eighteen seventy for the first time thirty-seven-year-old Marianne and mattress were both single and finally after years of sneaking around in shame Marianne moved into his home so they could finally be together yes Marianne was technically committing adultery but all it took was a move to South Hatton where no one knew her past and Marianne was able to openly stay with her lover thanks to poor record-keeping in the era no one was wise to Marianne secret it seemed that Marianne had finally found her romance Nick happy ending but in only a matter of months she learned that life with mattress wasn't as idyllic as she'd always believed it would be and soon her fairytale transformed into a horror story coming up next Marianne cotton's life with Joseph Mattress takes an inevitable tragic turn I have some exciting news for you too thank you for your unwavering dedication and support we've released our entire back catalogue of shows and they're already in your feed that's fifty episodes A female criminals that are available to listen to right now be sure to check out some of my favorite episodes like the one on Lizzie borden and what drove her to become a not aureus figure or are episodes on Phoolan Devi the bandit queen of India who struck back at the ruling casts after she suffered violence and discrimination listen because of her class and gender whether you're reliving some of your favorite episodes or hearing these fantastic stories for the first time these V the episodes are available right

Marianne Margaret Thirty Four Year Two Thousand Three Hundred Dol Five Hundred Sixty Three Dolla Thirty-Seven-Year Five Months Nine Days
"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

"In real danger of jumping out of narrow but avoid that than in the history of having was liberties than having economic twos of institutions is likely to empower civil society to defend itself against autocratically does a bit in countries in which historically hasn't been the case in some of these institutional problems have not been as far resolved as we might have imagined ten years ago we're much more likely to see the continuation of kind of presbyterian and i think we're we're not quite seeing that yet it's a little bit too early to to go by imperial evidence over the last few years but better very plausible fury as to what's around the corner are there any lessons i know that you'll book is not about lessons but other any lessons that the citizens of those lucky countries inventory corridor should take from his work for how they can defend the country's how they can ensure those country stay within minority colorado rather than jump outside of it even if it's as was the case in germany brief period of twelve years which can as bad example amply illustrates be disastrous for world we has absolutely so this is not a cold for complacency the nazi state it was a brief period on when it collapsed i know what i find remarkable is the extent to which that some common understanding in germany about how to do things in how to organize saying in you know so that's very much what the book is about these kind of low frequency ways in which society conceives of solving these problems but of course that's spins out of control in the way that the nazi state that it creates enormous misery and chaos so it's not a goal for complacency it's to decide we're all parts of society we have to do all bit in defending liberty as inclusive institutions and that means.

colorado germany twelve years ten years
"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

"By the virtuous cycle that places that are already within venero commodore already have avoca inclusive institutions can benefit from is that right guesstimate of way you shake out or how how do you think you can help to explain what's going on with populism taksim in what what will likely trajectory of these properties leaders in the countries ruled by might be those are very important sensitive issues i think in a week tried to talk about this a little a little bit in the chapter books too long so this chapter is way into the book is called red queen out of control so one mechanism we emphasize a lot is how when you're in the corridor that the solta competition between states in society and in this competition both the state and the society not changes you know you could say state tries to control society in society pushes back and tries to control the state and we call this the red queen effect from alice through the looking glasses kind of competition where you stay balanced you stay in the corridor but i think you can also spin out of the colorado army tried to tell the story of this is a deeply rooted did historical process but also if you start thinking about germany to take a random example you could see that many instances in history where the germans jumped into the corridor what was the absolute state building projects after thirty years war bismarckian unification what was the nazi nazi state in some sense it was a jumped out to the corridor but take the nazi exhau- it wasn't a jump out of the car dole precipitated by elites capturing capturing institutions like in zimbabwe it was actually a popular upsurge of discontent about society that hitler was able to tap into the nazis were able tap into so yeah that's rather extreme example but in some sense populism is the kind of bottom disillusionment with these types of institutions that risks throwing you out of the corridor so that's i think how we would think populism in our context text news a why is it that people get so disillusioned with the institutions why is it that some people kind of buy into this interpretation of the world you you just outlined done kind of thing of some leaders being able to solve the problems i i'm not sure i have a good idea of about i think you can point into structural features you know rising inequality all kind of social distance between elites and people in the united states kind of the flyover of a country psychology that many people in the east and west coast in the united states have but i'm just saying how would you think about poplicemen off area i think that's how we say you should think about it but i personally find there's many things were populism does i think i don't understand i don't really understand why people people think that president trump is going to solve their problems i mean it is a massive disillusionment with institutions but i would say you know going back to the way you introduce this is that again if you think historically like i do you start thinking well the united states had really bad presidents before roosevelt violated violated term limits in the most sneaky way he proposed packing the supreme court in many ways those are too far more radical things than anything president trump from has proposed yet ulysses grant was a terrible president so the US has had bad presidents who wanted to accumulate personal power our who wanted to undermine the institutions before and i'm sure you know the federalist papers back to the united medicines whole point is that you know you can't design institutions officials relying on well-meaning people you have to design them anticipating not well meaning or even competent people that's the whole point and i think hungry you know i think what we've looked from this e u process is that these histories of institutions on the organization of societies these are important you know you make greece into denmark overnight or not even ten or twenty years the european union in many ways create create dysfunctional dynamics which have made that harder to do i don't know hungry it's will but i would say probably deep-seated low-frequency institutional national issues they haven't been solved by european integration all the collapse of socialism and the reason element of meeting version exactly as you say so i suppose visit the mixed news on the populism front was just to say that perhaps aside is like the united states is.

venero thirty years twenty years
"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

"Tradition asian on these tribes is fused with roman law in order to set up his condition i don't think we know enough exactly about why clovis did that you know he was a solta took political entrepreneur you could say that's ideas come in and end contingency i think it is i think actually we understand the ideas better in the chinese unease case that we do in the european case in the sense that clovis himself didn't write about this or if he did it has survived we have you know other kinds of secondhand accounts house by gregory of tours for example of what was going on in this period of the franks but also incredible facts which are consistent with this idea of we know which is if you look at for example the spreads of parliamentary will the incidence of parliamentary institutions in europe it coincides almost is perfectly with the spread of these germanic tribes why different from the south of italy italy's communes come from the lumbar the carolingian the north of spain the south of spain why is it that nevada wherever have these cool taxes and andalucia doesn't it's the germanic tribes right so there's a remarkable correlation in western europe between the origin of these representative institutions and the spread of these germanic tribes at the collapse the western roman empire and we do have these windows of this engineering i mean one thing that's very interesting that we talked about in the book also if you come i'm trusting legal institutions early legal codes in western europe like the solid law which cloves promulgated they dramatically different from chinese legal codes like the keno hand legal codes the solid law is a soda bottom up code vacation of social looms in it was actually written written by clovis in mumbai assemblies where people were chosen to kind of police together right than that and how did they write them down the franks thanks were literate with the help of roman lawyers so it's this little baltimore code vacation of social laws if you look at the chinese legal codes it's kinda talk down engineering project to micromanage society so talk to us is incredibly significant in terms of just the jailing of this particular piper society in western europe and that's that's the tradition that goes right away through to the lauren we don't learn how clever himself was thinking about it so this this is like sort of interpretation of what went on as i say we actually know more about what was going on in china i think what we put out in the book actually is if you go back back earlier than this in china because you could say in china the pivotal moment is significantly earlier which is the first dynasty the chain dynasty emerges but there's lots of evidence of participation in seven believes signed you know there's a famous kind of aphorism in jose which is a third century BC he kind of philosophical tracts which is the king is about the people all the will to the will to can hold up the boat or it can sink the boat you know what the peter king does the statement about participation in what you see with the jin empire is sort of intellectual project going back you'll suggestions about ideas it somehow is legalist philosophers come with an intellectual project of how to organize society this is how to organiz society and that's what they tried to implement and that to us sets off a dramatic divergence in china and that's what you will today we're starting to get with a picture of how it is but some countries manage to stay within this narrow corridor but perhaps in a way it's easier to explain why some countries end up outside the corridor and again the idea is that people on both sides of carlos to wise it china go from having these early participatory traditions from having this this idea about the king having to be held up by the water in the wooded decides to let it sink ben profit goes too much centralized tradition and an autocratic tradition edition that was then in place for essentially couple of millennia while the the story we have in the book is small differences initial conditions you could say that yes there is these he's traditions of accountability and assemblies of participation walter the boats in china but it's slightly skewed towards the power our of the state compared to what you were in europe and maybe got be causing europe you have the roman republic you have athens and so long and enroll kleisthenis they're all notions perhaps deep more deeply embedded notions solve this balanced in europe that come into play yeah what's interesting about clovis visiting the solid law is at that moment actually very little evidence of the solid law has nothing to do with rhode island law for example it's only later that the theodose codes on roman lowell starts getting kind of incorporated into that but you could say it was in the ad you know he was interacting with these romans clearly who must have been familiar with all leased ideas so it could be that idiosyncratic fractures like that that influences initial balance so again our ideas it's not that the chinese at rice the the europeans at with some big kind of fundamental difference between chinese culture job raphy or just small differences in his balance of our lead to very different low run dynamics they kind of cumulate what about the other end of a corridor so that helps to explain why it has in some countries stayed ends up having older the power and society ends up having little power why is it other parts of the world the state was never gets off the ground the kind of way we need you didn't order to create the conditions for economic growth and tumor liberty well the argument in the book comes straight from the chinese case you know so some sense the creation at this very centralized despotic states in china avi would be that's very threatening to people's liberty ching dynasty didn't last very long because there was a mass uprising against the micromanagement so of you is if you take africa we there's a lotta fabulously illustrated ethnographic examples of this is it's the kind of antagonism to hierarchy and the concern that hierarchy will be used to kind of despotically that makes people very anxious about on leads them to try to stop it you know what i mean again go back to look what does look say i'm sure you know the exact expression but dumb i'm gonna paraphrase look you know the people should people be worried about paul oh cats and foxes that they risk being devoured by lions so my experience in africa in my reading of the ethnic graphic literature which is extremely extensive on this is the africans very very worried about being concerned by lions why is it that african sasaki's a so small scale you know i've been working up in the plateau title in central nigeria spot size of metropolitan chicago the sixty eight different ethnic groups these incredibly small scale societies society's why did they never cumulate into something bigger something larger i don't think it's because africans don't get that there were vintages of this they just don't know how to control it so that's the basic argument in the book that what leads you to the other side of this corridor is this inability not to create hierarchy and control it but that doesn't create that doesn't great liberty either as we were discussing earlier to what is the difference in initial conditions there if it sort of that you can't quite create a structured rule that allows the state to flourish why is it that the carding harding in tribes the debt that the tribes in as you know toys is described did not yeah it's a great question there's two ways of thinking about that one way is just again again very idiosyncratic that was nothing like bureaucratized rolin state institutions in anytime ever in sub saharan africa you maybe in the nineteen th century you could say the asante stay till the begun does stay cut in if you think about the late roman empire the whistle very elaborate bureaucracy chrissy sisterlove administration taxes why did that emerge as it did in the mediterranean basin again that comes out of the local tradition the photo egypt greece okay so maybe that's just a completely idiosyncratic features will history that's wall to lousy this thing to emerge it could also be that there is something about africa that is just something about africa that makes it really difficult to kind of solve this problem to create hierarchy get done the control we discussed that a little bit in the book as an example we talk about in the book if you look at the history of greece you see the greeks were great at taking sort of social goals and converting them into constraints authority you know think about ostracism think about so lows hubris law it it was also taking social loans and using them as mechanisms for controlling elites so that you could build kind of centralization than hierarchy but you had tools controlling it but then we come trust in africa you see very frequently which cross accusations are used as a way of controlling people if you get too big fuel boots roots i accused of being a witch but it's very hard to use which cross in the way the athenians used ostracism you not just the athenians but it's very hard to use that why why is that well because witchcraft is just kind of connected with all sorts of other things too for example in many african societies assumed as somebody will illo died the null hypothesis was that they'd been killed by which croft i mean that's still true today in many parts of africa so it was very difficult to disentangle this one use of witchcraft offer controlling elites from the other ways in which cross was understood in society so they couldn't do which crossed what the greeks did with ostracism now gotten and why is that why couldn't they do the the answer to that any theory there's gonna be some things that are exempt from this so i think that's two explanations it could be as idiosyncratic story story about rodman institutions but it could be that there's something different about africa and i'm not really understand that but they will all all right that's really helpful one feeling that i think rita is off when gotten rid of venero corridor will get as well is slight hopelessness now i'm known to be pessimistic for so we're part of his him club on that but i guess i'm wondering about what i'm worried about is that if the reason why some societies prosperous another poll the reason why some societies able to afford citizens a lot of freedoms and others iva tyrannical relaxed alexa state institutions to make sure that people are protected from neighbors is in the woods of the gallic territories in the early middle ages or if they are in what happened in dynasty two thousand five hundred years ago in china does that leave us with any scope scope for political action today what does that mean for people who live in societies but not prosperous who live in society is that don't have much freedom should convey basically just kick back and save as nothing we can do and you know let's hope to migrate to places with things about at what hope is that as understanding handing these long range starkly institutional sources of the present condition might actually empower us to overcome some challenges not me i think there's plenty of hope i got interested in social science because i lived in love with developing countries than i was a kid i just was very curious as to why will look so different depending on where you wouldn't it i think that's fine i think that's interesting but the important takeaway is this balance of power it seems to me history never repeats itself cleaned muslim societies don't have to go through the same process that western europe went through i think the lesson that hopefully will take out of this is this balance of power he's a so we talk about you know lots of more recent sorta transitions at the end of the book where we tried to interpret successful transitions through the lens of the theory you know in different parts of the world in lake st in nigeria in bogota in colombia as successful transitions why because they combine this elements of building state and society together i mean i would say wolf i like.

clovis two thousand five hundred year
"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

13:49 min | 1 year ago

"james robinson" Discussed on The Good Fight

"There's a famous aphorism in honsi which is a third century BC philosophical tracts which is the king is about the people although walter the water can hold up the boat or it can sink boats the peter king so that's a statement about participation and now the good fight with yasha monk for the last episode i did with foolhardy thing talking about italian politics a few few days before everything inevitably changed so now i'll do foolhardy thing talking about british politics before everything inevitably changes but forget about the minutia of the fights going on at the moment important for i think what's interesting from the perspective of populism in the fight against it is to step back a little bit and understand the basic political clash what's going on at the moment as one that's representative of what populace due to political systems everywhere it is a clash between parliamentary sovereignty between legitimacy of representative democratic institutions and popular sovereignty the importance of the will of the people as interpreted by its supposed- spokesman so britain time has had the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty the idea that is parliament we elected representatives of people who intrepid what people want and trying to come up with the best solutions and pass the loss because the referendum in twenty sixteen created two options one of which gave a clear mandate for what would happen next namely to remain in the european union and another to leave which didn't create a very clear mandate because there's all kinds of ways of leaving the european union from essentially staying in the cinema could could remaining bound european regulations having a very tight relationship of europe to crashing out without any deal at all any set of politicians cannot claim to speak for the people and that is exactly what has happened over the last two years the hardest brexit tears the most eurosceptic forces have kept saying you know what that labor put forward anything the theresa may put forward it is a sell-out they betraying the will of the people there are enemies of the people as newspapers have titled at some point what you need is me the populist fighting four the true will of the people the first person who who inculcated that was niger for rush who managed to rise very quickly with his brexit party as a result and now that patten seems to have passed to boris johnson in very telling historic post the conservative party has branded itself itself the people's party it is the people's party because supposedly it alone is able to speak for and interpret put the views of ordinary britons and because it alone is a legitimate spokesman off the british people it even justifies to rogin suspending the british comment i don't think british democracy is about to die i didn't think witnessing in britain what we're seeing hungry but might even be seeing in a place like india brazil but it is nevertheless quite astounded how quickly the populist energy has managed to find a place for itself in the british political system we have now seen but transformation formation of the most historically influential political party in the country into populist party and we have seen somebody for the first time shelter i suspend parliament to stop it from operating precisely because they knew that it it would go against the will of the person county holding power in this case bras johns and we will see that basic mechanism the clash between in popular sovereignty and parliamentary sovereignty playing out in not of different countries in all kinds of different ways of the next years as as well so this is something that i think we can take away from the minutiae of the debate over brexit weather knock there'll be a new election whether or not we will end up with not well it's a real pleasure to introduce this conversation with james robinson james is a university professor at the harris school of public policy z. at university of chicago he has for a long time in working together with darren asamoah glue they had a very influential bestseller called nations fail though is published earlier this decade and now they have a new book which is no less ambitious and no less insightful called the narrow corridor states societies teeth and the fate of liberty we talked about everything from the importance off political institutions attempts to understand why some countries have a prosperous and others are poor importance of a healthy state that is checked by a healthy civil society in order to allow for human liberty and how difficult it is to get to that narrow corridor this is a conversation that really help you understand a tremendous amount mound about why some countries are rian prosperous and others are struggling in the world today i'm very excited for you to listen to our conversation welcome to the podcast james thank you thank you very much so i think the right way to start understanding incredibly extensive what which really is incredibly vicious in the scope of things but it tries to explain is to understand why is both in fail some big international bestseller new book coming out the narrow corridor you focused crucially on institutions why is it that institutions in your mind the key to understanding economic prosperity of human liberty and why have we failed to adequately see this so far you you know when i was a student in economic the theory of economic growth or i learned microeconomic theory and i tried to apply that to understanding all the variation variation that you see in the world i just felt it doesn't contain what's necessary to understand the variation you know this this notion that you have factoring diamonds sold technology you'll preferences or i did think that helps you understand what goes on just for example physical factor endowments darwin's landmark capital labor you can't understand the consequences of that curriculum development or even politics unless you understand property rights san who has access to land in what conditions on how can it be transferred so you go to africa you have some notion of what markets in factor markets supposed to look like and you realize that they don't look like that at all that the way that organized is completely different than it has also consequences for economics politics so oh i'm so happy with these notions of incentives nino that economists have but incentives function within this kind of web of rules that very different structures that influence people hugely so i don't know it's always seemed obvious to me that economics never never really contained masoum economics doesn't contain what you need to explain all this variation in the world and i was very influenced when i was undergraduate do it by reading north and thomas's book the rise of the western world which is an institutional theory of the industrial revolution and a lot of our early work was in some sense trying to tight those ideas and operationalize them kind of mathematically and empirically anina why did we start with all this politics well not thomas is book is all about politics it's all about how political revolutions on political change created the institutional structures that allow the industrial revolution to happen so to give the very very crude summary of various subtle book my understanding of a core tenets of why nations fail this that yes of course incentives matter that people people are able to gain polity to produce a lot of course in exchange them inversely any circumstances economically but you don't have to have a right climate i met you don't have to have a veru material you don't have to have one cultural whenever culture but what you have to have is a set of political institutions susan's but actually make with wild to invest in things that make it worthwhile to work hard and a lot of time because of extractive institutions that's not advocates now at first glance somebody who hasn't read your will might think that only pushes levels nation one devil back because because after all how is it that institutions manage crave was right kinds of incentives so what role does history play in helping to explain why some societies sided have been able to build those inclusive institutions that provide ride incentives abbas have miserably failed at it i mean that's a great question i think you're right exactly the right way to think about it is in terms of these layers you know that when you're talking about the economics it's kind of economic institutions that are important property rights do things like that but in view that's an outcome of a political process the choosing economic institutions emerges out of political process so then you need to understand the types of political institutions that create different sorts of economic institution so then why do these different political institutions come from and actually i thinking getting y nation style we didn't do such a great job of explaining that i really that's what the new boat the narrow corridor is about it's trying to study wearing earth did this divergence agents in political institutions with massive economic and political and social consequences come from i think we take a few kind of bites at the cherry in why nations nations file research has been on the colonial will for example trying to look at seoul's variation in political institutions in economic institutions institutions within the colonial world and how come some parts of the colonial wolves likes america ended up doing better than other parts like south america but yeah you could say that's a very specific historical epoch i think you know my view is that human creativity innovation that that creates differences and human creativity innovation is not closely tied to climate tour ecology or culture the understanding that pattern in the past is deeply poff dependent and innovations happen people come up with new ideas and new ways of solving things and new ways of thinking about the world and innovation and critical philosophy which is one of the things i think that's hurting impulsive just coming up with different different ways of thinking about society and people's roles in how you organize the watts legitimate and those innovations takeoff will they spread till they don't until they backfire you have to back in history and think about innovation in human society in how the cumulated in some parts of the world and how it spread to other parts the will and so the new book is really trying to think about that providing a simple framework for thinking about innovation historical innovation and the path dependent the consequences of that so as you said that so very historical thing and you have to think about these innovations on it's not something deeply tied to structural factors factors so this is one question i had as i was reading nations fail which is that you emphasize in my mind rightly the importance of these historical juncture us so those moments went societies can start going in one direction rather than another often because of factors that look reasonably mine a time one particularly tickly important one you outline is the black death the past europe which obviously a huge historical event but it just has subtly different impacts on belabor supply apply in places like the united kingdom on one hand and in places like central and eastern europe on a hand and that assets those two sets of societies up for more inclusive or oh extractive institutions i was wondering at the time to what extend ideas can play a crucial determinant of role invokes historical junction talk to what extent is this determined response with just related supply is the fact that slightly differently in one country robert another because of black deaf is just a little a bit more devastating in one place or another for whatever biological reasons wisit also that societies become discombobulated whatever relative equilibrium rhumba had before is knocked off because of physics tunnel shop like a huge epidemic and that some degree of contingency in how a set of actors at that particular moment element decide to respond to.

walter two years one hand
"james robinson" Discussed on The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"james robinson" Discussed on The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

"The TV themes game on radio x. Right? Well, most of these from nineteen. Okay. If not all. Are these genre specific or are they just TV shows? They are mostly my favorite shows from from back in the day. Okay. So your case means get into your head, what you're watching in the nineties, and you'll be watching the to that big shows the nothing bizarre. Okay. Not necessarily children's TV things. They don't watch cartoons all of the time. Just check it out in the nineties. Yes. Eighty seven. Yes. TV themes game on radio. Thanks. Do I one when you know Showtime oppose? It might witness Dom. Seriously? Yeah. Yeah, because I'm slight distracted by James Robinson, Facebook page of hidden it. No one will say, I'm not bothered. Hidden it Nomo say nothin' or of hidden it. How'd you Facebook page? Now you can do this but the. But you have your frightens. Yes. So when you post the know your friends still see it know why I might be private. That's what love that anyway. Game on radio. Thanks. Okay. Fantastic. I one when you know what it is. Joe girlfriend? No. TV themes game on radio. Thanks. I'm playing with as a team. Yep. Chryssa pippa. Yeah. Okay. You ready. Does that is that private message page to play. Guys ready to place. I may have just. Oh, you'll girlfriend is replied saying we can definitely see this. No. Yeah, see what you're writing. Jeez, notifications that's play this TV themes, gay radio, thanks. Green green. Great. We passed that last week. Did you stop new melted. Swag, speeding ticket actually. So. Are you ready now?.

Facebook Joe girlfriend Nomo James Robinson
"james robinson" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"james robinson" Discussed on WGTK

"My pillow for more on this in due course as i was saying earlier in the program sunday is father's day if you're lucky enough to have a father in your life make sure you acknowledge him there's a book called his father's face written by a religious writer name james robinson he talks about how a federal prison chaplain wanted to improve the morale of the prison so on mother's day he approached a major greeting card company and ask if you could have five hundred greeting cards and the company felt good pr gave him free five hundred reading cards he goes to the prison extremism to the men and morale did in fact improve so father's day comes around you know i'm going with this story goes to the same company get five hundred cards goes back to the prison not a single inmate wanted to send a card to his father not one when my father and i reconciled and had this eight hour conversation my father mentioned to me that one weekend he left my mom intended to to leave us to move out he said do you remember that i said no i don't i thought i'd probably have a you're gone and he said he slept one night he got an apartment furnished it everything set there one night he couldn't do to us what his father did to him the man he never knew so my father came home after running away from from school for one day and my father and my mom were married for fifty six years and while i did not get along with him we had a ten hour eight hour conversation when i was twenty five years old in which for the first time i saw my father cry when he mentioned this man named elder who was not his biological father who is physically abusive to him into its mom and he told me that his mom had a series of boyfriends each one more irresponsible than the other one he comes home at the age of thirteen and he has a quarrel with his mom's then boyfriend mom's side who the boyfriend throws my father out of the house thirteen athens georgia jim crow south at the beginning of the great depression my father said he walked down the road to whatever job he could ultimately he became a pullman porter on the trains they were the largest private employer of blacks in those days.

athens writer james robinson georgia pullman eight hour twenty five years fifty six years ten hour one day
"james robinson" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"james robinson" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"And on a frequent basis he doesn't reinforced their case for them and they end up counting themselves so separate the the separate the difficulty of applying our faith to trump from the general question here because there is a difficulty applying our faith to anybody the faith has ever been applied because we all have cracks and blemishes the hope though is that there's a light in there that shines through those cracks and blemishes there is no such light with trump and that's what that's what makes it problematic it is not problematic to associate our faith with a worldly figure all of us are worldly figures the problem is associated with one who clearly has an resolved in unconfrontational broken this and instead of resolving it or confronting it doubles and triples and quadruples and quintuplets down on a not broken that that's not as in on my face that's not as it on my face that's not as it on my face that's not as it on my face that's not as it on my you know what i'm saying we all can see it we all can see it and then a finally enough people it's the upper has no clothes we all know that he's naked but nobody will dare say anything to him because they want a seat at the court that's the issue that's the issue that's what we need james robinson in these guys to stop hanging out with trump and paul the white but to look at trump do you guys believe.

blemishes james robinson trump paul