23 Burst results for "James Menendez"

Hong Kong Media Mogul Sentenced to Another 14 Months for Pro-Democracy Rallies

BBC Newshour

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

Hong Kong Media Mogul Sentenced to Another 14 Months for Pro-Democracy Rallies

"This is James Menendez with news that life from the BBC Let's head to Hong Kong now where the media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been sentenced to an additional six month jail term for his role in an unauthorized gathering in October, 2019 at the height of the pro democracy

James Menendez Jimmy Lai BBC Hong Kong
"james menendez" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:58 min | 3 months ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"In London. Buckingham Palace has announced the death of his Royal Highness Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, husband of Queen Elizabeth. He was 99 years old. A statement from the palace said he'd passed away peacefully this morning. At Windsor Castle here on the BBC will continue to reflect on his life and his passions, including his time in the Royal Navy and will continue to get reaction from around the world. First, a summary Of the knees. BBC News with Debbie Russ. Buckingham Palace has announced that the Duke of Edinburgh has died. In a statement, the palace said it is with deep sorrow that her Majesty the Queen announces the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness, the Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully. This morning at Windsor Castle. The royal family joined with people around the world in mourning his loss. When Philip was 99, the longest serving consort in British history that you can't Queen Elizabeth were married for more than 70 years, Prince Philip dedicated decades of his life to royal duty serving the nation. At the monarch side, he was seen as a strong willed and independent man interviewed on his 70th birthday. He had this to say. Just doesn't what I think is my best. I mean, some people think it It was all right. Other people quite evidence. It don't What can you do you? I can't suddenly change my whole way of doing things. I can't change my interests. I can't change my way in which I react to things. It Z part of it. It's somebody's style. The prince returned to Windsor Castle in mid March after spending a month in hospital, where he had an operation for a heart condition. People have been laying flowers outside the castle's gates. Speaking from his residence in Downing Street, the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, said Prince Philip had earned the affection of generations around the world and that it inspired the lives of countless young people with his Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme. The world leaders have been paying tribute to the Duke, the former U. S. President George W. Bush said he had lived a long and remarkable life. India's prime minister and arrange Ramadi praised Prince Philip for his distinguished career in the military and for his community service. And the Canadian Prime minister Justin Trudeau described him as a man of great purpose and confection. And that's the latest BBC news. Listening to the BBC World Service with me James Menendez and a program to mark the death of the Duke of Edinburgh, which has been announced by Buckingham Palace. He was 99 years old tributes of being pouring in from around the world and here in Britain. The leader of the opposition, the labor leaders to kiss Thoma had this tribute. The UK is lost in extraordinary public servant in Prince Philip. He dedicated his life to our country. And above all, I think he'll be remembered for his support and devotion to the Queen..

Debbie Russ James Menendez Britain London BBC Philip Downing Street mid March Thoma Queen Elizabeth 99 Windsor Castle Royal Navy 70th birthday BBC World Service Buckingham Palace BBC News more than 70 years Duke of Edinburgh First
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Reuters in fact that these are live from the BBC in London I'm James Menendez during the pandemic especially in these early months much of the focus has been on the number of deaths and civic cases and the impact of those on health services but what about the longer term impact of the virus talk to still have much to learn about cave at nineteen but one worrying aspect of the disease is how it affects some people's lungs that's something that professor easily Jenkins of the UK's National Institute for health research has been looking at he's running clinics for those discharged from hospital with the current virus former problem that we're observing after an accident we keep covering you mania is breathlessness and fatigue so with respect to the lungs this is primarily breathlessness fatigue is more of a global viral response and in terms of what's causing that breathlessness there's a number of possibilities the woman most concerned about is assisting inflammation and potentials for scarring it is just explain what lung scarring is when your lungs get damage for whatever reason the server in the carpet cases of viral infection your body sets up a repair response and you can see this on the skin colonized America sensibles and then some people the scarring hills without any problems but in a proportion of people especially the older generation the scarring process is not working quite so well and rather than he or you get progressive scarring of the lungs are incredibly delicate the very fine structures and alveolus sack is small the the shaft of her about a thousand times old the shop this hat to any type of scarring causes major problems and if it progresses it can destroy the whole long yes you said progressive scarring so this isn't just damage that then heels and and because of this company saying that the scarring couldn't spread over the long does that what you mean yes Sir that's not common post coverage but it can potentially occur and that's what we're concerned the price of you being by this and by what you've been finding at the moment we haven't found out about securing with sort of we're looking out for it to try and make sure it doesn't happen I've been surprised by the number of people who've been breathless so the trouble with trying to understand a progressive disease is that you have to wait for the progression to occur to me that this happens and unfortunately that takes about twelve months to figure out the kind of a pandemic is less than six months old for most places we haven't actually been able to determine whether or not there is any progression what we see is a large amount of flooding damage a loss of which has gone completely better which is very reassuring disposables the we haven't had time to observe yet that we're most worried about is a lung specialist have you ever known an episode in which they have been so many people with damage to the lungs not advance the absolute crux of the issue this is a huge number of people organizing a severe lung injury over a very short space of time and a population who are vulnerable to developing lung scarring ninety elderly people with other medical problems such as diabetes and hypertension is it just the sort of people also cats progressive lung scarring so bent back is a big concern I don't know if the show whether it will happen but we are concerned that it might happen and I'm for people suffering from a symptom like breathlessness is it possible that they may never fully recover it's possible I guess and it's not the most likely outcome the most likely outcome the people is that they will dance better but for a substantial proportion with carpet we're not seeing them get back to as quickly as we would want and some people are actually getting more breathless programming that could infection than those the people that we're worried about so if you have to cope with it and you got severely breathless securing a kind of it and this lady gets easier with time then we are reassured but we are seeing occasionally at the moment that's some people rather than getting less breathless overtime I getting more breathless over time and these are the patients are most concerned about your dogs here as a human being would you want to get kind of it nineteen with that worry you deeply if you did it really worked you know it's a sitting kind of bits at first time but I worked on the curb records I've had your friends fortunately not relatives but friends you have how to Kerr good friends you have lost relatives to kind of it I have been really strong as someone who's looked after viral pneumonia is for the last twenty is a day to day clinical practice how nasty this far since this is the nastiest of viral pneumonia as I've ever seen and I would definitely want to avoid catching it if I could not just because it makes you feel so poorly at the time but the potential for long term consequences is quite substantial users can also confirm for those who may be feeling complacent about the pandemic thinking it's nearly over but from everything you said that this doesn't seem to be the case no it does I mean there's two big problems on is the continuing medical problems that are going to come as a result of this first wave and then any potential subsequent wives I mean people have not got hurt in unity there's no hiding unity to this at the moment but haven't been anywhere near the numbers of infections that you wouldn't need to see this tile off without the vaccine which means that there's going to be considerably more infections in the future if people don't observe social distancing people tend to take the proper precautions and we don't get a vaccine and said there's going to be more acute illness and more long term complications so it's really important that people observe the social distancing measures that have been recommended professor gives Lee Jenkins time now for the latest in a series of recent because the BBC explores what might change in the wake of the pandemic on an individual level and the societies we've been hearing from around wide range of people today we're gonna hear from Tara Westover the author of the bestselling memoir educated her journey from an abusive Mormon family in Idaho to gaining a doctorate at Cambridge university what lessons has she learned from lockdown in the early days of the pandemic we were told that covert nineteen would be the great equalizer that it would bring us together because it would affect everyone alike rich and poor urban and rural.

Reuters BBC James Menendez
Europe holds low-key VE Day commemorations due to virus

BBC Newshour

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Europe holds low-key VE Day commemorations due to virus

"Welcome to these after the BBC world service hello I'm James Menendez coming up today as the coronavirus tightens its grip on Brazil the world renowned photographer Sebasti O. Salgado tells us of the grave threat the virus poses to the country's indigenous peoples and takes aim at president Boston on he's bring more conflict mall destruction is becoming just as federation president also scaled back events to mark seventy five years since **** Germany surrendered to the allies victory in Europe day will have members of that moment here we are victorious exhausted my Darling we have really won the war I can't believe it the actor and the circus on the pitfalls of reading out all of the whole bit online for charity they'll be trips and stumbles on shore and it's it'll have a live feel to it including yes probably having to put up signs like back in five minutes festivities BBC news with sue Montgomery severely scaled down events are taking place across Europe to mark the seventy fifth anniversary of the defeat of **** Germany in the second World War big public commemorations was scrapped because of corona virus related restrictions Dania behind has this report investors still resonates these highly constrained circumstances where the final **** surrender was signed Germany's president Frank

James Menendez Brazil Sebasti O. Salgado President Trump Germany Sue Montgomery Europe Dania Frank BBC Boston
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:22 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We live in London. I'm James Menendez. We've been reporting extensively this week from Yemen about the war there, and it's Dr consequences for people that and we usually talk about the coalition that's fighting who see rebels and trying to restore the internationally recognized government is Sal de lead. But also closely involved a Saudi Arabia's allies in the Gulf, namely, the United Arab Emirates that includes places such as dobby and to buy a long piece of reporting by the website BuzzFeed has found that the UAE has been paying former members of the US special forces to carry out assassinations in Yemen, employees of a company called spirit operations group in Pittsburgh founded by a man called Abraham Golan. The investigation was carried out by that corresponds Royston. I asked him I who exactly where these mercenaries being paid to kale. Yeah. They've been trying to kill the enemies of the UAE in Yemen, and the specific enemies they were trying to kill. What were the leaders of a group called our Islam, which the UAE the United Arab Emirates sees as the Muslim Brotherhood branch in Yemen? And the UAE is declared war on the Muslim Brotherhood designated terrorist group, and yet it sensitive. I'm not sure they can openly do this and Yemen. So therefore, it was a covert efforts this team received cards and most of them are those cars with the leaders of Allah's, Laura and Yemen as well as apparently some sort of clerics who were outspoken political activists clerics, many of whom oppose what the UAE is doing in Yemen. Whether successful did is there evidence that they did manage to assassinate some of these people. Well, that's really the tricky part there were about at least two dozen of these people killed some of the same people who were on their cards. A we believe Gilmore and and go on. Individuals. I spoke to save recognize him the names. Gilmore says aside from the first assassination attempt a bombing. Adapt. He was not aware of any other actual missions. At the team did go on as you'll see in. The story did say they killed some others. But he won't say, which why did you decide to use American mercenaries for this mission? That is still a mystery. It would be clear why that use non UAE nationals right because they'd be doing it covertly and they wanted a plausible deniability. But one real reason is that the US has become really good at this. The US over seventeen years of counter-terrorism warfare has been sending these commandos that they send out into these on these missions. And sometimes they have in the past captured people. But usually it's appeared they're killing people in these nitrates and the team consisted of Americans. These are people who were highly trained. They were former seals former special forces and. In one case there was a current reserve seal, and that's what the team consisted of an presumably for them. It was lucrative. Yes. What we were told is the company had budgeted about twenty five thousand a month per American veteran to do this. And that's a good salary for these guys. That's a very good salary for for for anyone really. They were budgeted as base rate. Apparently, there were also could be bonuses on top of that there. There were a hit squad effectively that is one way to see them. Does is another word for it. So it's it's exactly what it is. It sounds like. Legal what they were doing under American law. I think it's more great. I thought it was one would fake it could be illegal in certain. There are there are American laws that prohibit people from going abroad to with that with the attention of killing somebody here as part of a military. These people in this company insisted they work as part of the US military and people have joined other militaries in the past they joined the Israeli defense forces, and and others that it does happen, and people aren't prosecutors very often if ever I'm on that point. Is there any evidence that the US government at the CIA knew what they were up to? It's the key question. We tried so hard to nail that down the best. I could come up with was that everybody. I spoke with said it's simply inconceivable that the J soccer joint special operations command and others like that warrant aware, given the fact that the US government trains, the military military's is armed by the. US government. The US gives them intelligence secretary Mattis was once an advisor to the UAE all sorts of you a US generals. I've worked with me. Secretary Mattis called it little Sparta. So given all this the idea that the UAE would hire an American Inc company staff with American veterans in a war, the US supports and the US government would know about it again. Experts say inconceivable both feeds Arum Rawson who told me it had no comment from the US government about his story. We also contacted the State Department and hit a brick wall there. Let's talk to our security correspondent Frank Gardner who joins us live Franklin. What do you make of this story is it ring true to you? Well, it's a very ritual piece of very thorough journalism, and there's no reason to necessarily for me to dispute any of it. I haven't seen these facts on the ground, but I lived in the emerets, and I've been on embeds where we as journalists have gone with you a units, and I've actually met an Australian officer who was succumbed to the military to build up their special forces. He was a Vietnam veteran. Or not and he was given the rank of Brigadier in the military. That's that's a very different kettle of fish to what we're seeing here, which is essentially an allegation of extra judicial killing. Now, very very bad. Things have happened in Yemen. And the U E is having to own system. Pretty uncomfortable questions about things that have been done by proxy militias paid by them where human rights abuses, have taken places taking place in places like McCullough in eastern Yemen. So I think it's plausible. Yes. Tell us a bit more about how this group how do they fit into the the conflict in Yemen? And why is the so opposed to them? It seems. We'll div. The big two routes is the crown prince. NBC's known as not to be confused with them Bs and for some time. Now, he has been convinced that political Islam in the form of the Muslim Brotherhood. To-to frank. I think breaking up gonna have to leave it at that was security correspondent Frank Gardner there and apologies for for what happened to that connection. You're.

US Yemen United Arab Emirates Muslim Brotherhood Frank Gardner Gilmore Secretary Mattis Royston Saudi Arabia James Menendez Gulf London Pittsburgh Abraham Golan NBC State Department CIA Arum Rawson Laura
Cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe's capital escalates; 21 dead

Global News Podcast

02:34 min | 3 years ago

Cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe's capital escalates; 21 dead

Cholera Zimbabwe Tamil Tigers Zam Besser Shubin Ethiopia Prime Minister Army Government Traer Kilinochchi Djibouti Harare Trae Africa BBC Abby Amit James Menendez Somalia IRS
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to NewsHour from the BBC. I'm James Menendez, the chargesheet against cycled Islamic state is a long and bloody one. But right at the top is the violence that the group perpetrated against the de community of northern Iraq for years ago. The UN calls it genocide the massacre of thousands of years ZD men and women and the enslavement of thousands of UCD, women and girls whole towns and villages were simply laid to waste. So what's happened to the survivors? Now that Islamic state's been driven out with me in the studio chief international correspondent lease at least just us who are the and why were they targeted in this way. Well, some of our listeners may remember the heartrending images which came from that remote corner of north in Iraq. Tens of thousands of UCD's fleeing in panic to the slopes of mount singer to flee the brutal advance of so-called Islamic state and western helicopters were sent in amid. Reports that the CDs were dying of starvation and dehydration and around the world people ask who are these e D's this very tiny community and ancient culture, and one of the world's oldest religions, and as you say what they did to this community, the brutal the cruelty of not just capturing thousands of CDs. But. Enslaving easy women the UN called it a genocide an attempt to wipe out to radically eight an entire culture. And I've been to the town to the village we have to call it, of course, show the village that I tried to wipe off the map. There are no sounds in this school, just chilling. Silence. Here in two thousand and fourteen more than two thousand people the entire village of oh. Were marched to the school separated by age gender. The men were lined up in shot. Women taken to a nearby town the younger to be sex slaves, the older women shot and buried in mass graves. A day seared in the memory of UCD's the worst of the worst crimes against this people committed here. Hop stairs in the classrooms. Desks overturned. Cake with dust. On this one. Someone has written the most beautiful school in the world. The next room or mattresses. Also. Full of dust. Camouflage clothing, women's shoes. Schoolbooks left opened. What happened here? He's state fighters. Could women. Captured in slaved. And raped repeatedly. We've stopped now at.

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is James Menendez with NewsHour live from the BBC. Now, the relationship between Pakistan, and the US has often been a rocky one, but things are being particularly shaky this year in January the American government announced it was freezing almost all security assistance to Pakistan because it said it had failed to take action against Islamist militants operating on its soil, including members of the Afghan Taliban last week three hundred million dollars of US military aid was cancelled well today, the secretary of state. Mike Pompeo's be meeting Pakistan's new prime minister Imran Khan in Islamabad. The BBC's seconda commodities on the line from there. Now under any information as to how the talks have been going. Well, we know that they've finished and micro PO paired is on his way now to to India, and he met as you say with the new prime minister in Ron Conway with the new foreign minister and with the head of the Pakistan army, so far the initial comments that have been coming out from the meeting seem to be fairly positive. We've got a comment from Mike Pompeo saying that he's hopeful that the foundation that was laid today we'll set the conditions for continued success fairly conciliatory remarks from him which while the go against the the kind of other tents build up. There was to the talks with for example, as you say the the announcement of those of that three hundred million dollars in security assistance being canceled. What does Pakistan's response being to those US accusations that it's not doing enough to combat militancy? Well, this has been a bit of a US mantra really constantly calling on Pakistan to do more to crack down, for example, on these safe havens that it alleges there are for the Afghan Taliban inside Pakistan, and to do more to bring the Afghan Taliban to the negotiating table. Now Pakistan denies that these safe havens exist at all, and it says when it comes to the Taliban that they have a very limited influence over them. And Pakistan is a very keen on pointing out the tens of thousands of lives that the country has lost in its own war on terror against militants and the military here has been very successful in driving out militants who have been launching attacks against Pakistani targets, the accusation from the west from the American particular has always been that they've been hand-in-hand secretly with Afghan focus focused militants like the Afghan Taliban. Hi, Connie network. And what about the new prime minister Imran Khan is this a difficult balancing act for him appeasing, the Americans on the one hand, but also appeasing a domestic constituents as well. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, traditionally actually foreign policy in Pakistan has really been the Demane of the of the Pakistani military for a number of years focused on in the last government didn't actually have a foreign minister almost as a kind of sign of a protest because foreign policy was being seen as being dominated by the Pakistani military, which has a very large influence in the country and the way the country's run. And it's the Pakistani military and elements of the Pakistan intelligence services that American the west have long accused of of working hand in hand with the Taliban to use them as a kind of proxy force to influence events in Afghanistan and rival potential Indian influence there. It's early days in Iran Khan's new administration and win yet to see how what kind of dynamic he'll develop with the Pakistani military and how much of a free hand he'll have to determine his foreign policy. He seems more in tune with the Cassini military, and there's some feeling that that could actually be beneficial with top the talks because it means that the Americans are talking to a United civilian and military front so good many, thanks gonna commodity commodity. Joining us live from Islamabad..

Afghan Taliban Pakistan Imran Khan prime minister Pakistan army Mike Pompeo US Islamabad BBC Ron Conway James Menendez American government India Afghanistan three hundred million dollars
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is James Menendez with NewsHour live from the BBC let's turn to Libya, now where according to the government about thirty people have been killed in clashes this week between rival militia groups in the capital Tripoli the. City along with much of the rest of the country has been plagued by factional violence ever. Since, the demise of the Tatum warmer Gadhafi some of those militia groups are under the. Nominal control of the United Nations backed government of national accord but still for influence within that. Fragile administration on a couple of, attempts to broker a ceasefire in the past couple of days have failed the UN, is currently, meeting some of the groups now who have been involved in. The violence well let be speaking to the head. Of the mission to Libya Hasan Salama and Austin I. For his reaction to the fighting this serious fighting clashes movement for fighters has taken place Unfortunately also we have witnessed indiscriminate attacks against residential areas it can be even more serious if nothing is done so what is being done just in the, immediate to try and bring about a truce because I mean obviously there have been efforts but the keeps breaking down doesn't it then it has. Been he's fired agreement two days ago on Wednesday it has been broken yesterday afternoon unfortunately and the night, was a bit edgy however today the situation is quite the and this allowed the mission to send a group on the ground in order. To push for the ceasefire to be respected by all parties and what do you think the. Cause, of the violence has been is it simply a tussle between rival groups for power. And influence when there is this suspect all the time most of the fighting is incited by By the. Fact that people are vying for a larger slice of. The government money in the past few months some groups outside typically have been angry that the groups within, simply are getting the better, share of the government to, support and? They have been threatening. To sort of change that all of things. So that as this aspect that, is. Always present in this kind of confrontation. Given, what you said at the beginning of that answer I mean isn't there an irony in the fact that the UN backed government is now having to rely on outside militias. To try to restore older when the situation in Libya is a? Bit different from that in fact many years ago then Libyan's have decided to put many quote unquote revolutionaries on? The payroll of the government to certain Extent they have some kind of an official cover whenever they move in one direction or the other but still they are more often than not following. The orders of their militia leaders rather than the minister who is paying them so what then is the long term solution, how are we going to end this system where those militias basically still. Exist and still hold the influence in the country well we have developed a, strategy but now we are entirely dedicated to reimpose this, is fire, because this kind of strategy cannot be implemented while the fire is taking place but we have developed a strategy in order to vet those militiamen who are now on the government payroll to see how. Some of, them can go, back to civilian life and some others be, trained to be truly working for the government than not For their. Respective groups yeah but just to be clear? Have have efforts of the moment to create an independent security forces police force of those been suspended you know one of? The, problems who are facing here, is that if we've been police force or. An army we need to quit the militias have equipment they have taken from the arsenals of. Moammar Gadhafi so we are somehow in the catch twenty two situation where those what access to Qadhafi's arsenals Arctic whipped and those we want to been lack the kind of. Equipment because of the embargo on exports of weapons to Libya that is underway And that was the head of the UN's mission to Libya.

Libya UN Moammar Gadhafi Hasan Salama James Menendez Tripoli BBC United Nations official Qadhafi two days
Cyberattack on Singapore health database steals details of 1.5 million, including PM

BBC Newshour

05:27 min | 3 years ago

Cyberattack on Singapore health database steals details of 1.5 million, including PM

"Reason for Paul Being Chinese film reviewer thinks it might have been wise to. Spend some of the vast special effects budget on the script This films biggest problem is the story in fact there really isn't a story nobody knows what these characters are actually doing In contrast to assume another Chinese film released at the same time has been a phenomenal. Success dying to survive is a low budget drama based on a true story about. Attempts to, smuggle cancer drugs into China it cost around eleven million. Dollars and has already made over four hundred million Raymond Joe says it shows that directors shouldn't take Chinese audiences. For granted the spectacular crash of the movie is a cautionary tale for hot money that has been flowing into China's. Tinseltown the abundance of investment. Coupla with, an alarming lack of originality. Has led to such epic flops as Assira Critic Raymond Joe ending that report from Steven McDonnell in Beijing You're. Listening to NewsHour from. The BBC World Service I'm James Menendez. Let's head to Singapore now reports. Of a major cyber attack there is a pit of stolen the health records of one and. A half million people that's, about a quarter of the population. Let's talk to Stefania Palmer Singapore correspondent? For the financial times have you with? Us, on the program what do we know about this attack well we know that. Is definitely the, biggest attack, cyberattack ever happening in Singapore's. History it, is really I mean the numbers. Are just incredible I mean one and a half million people you said. It's about a quarter of, the entire population of the country but on top of that what is really remarkable is that the attackers have really specifically and repeatedly targeted the prime minister here and in terms of, sending his personal details and information on his outpatients Dispensed medicines yes so. So what exactly did did they take? Then how much health or rather how? Much, data on on people's health background did they manage to get hold of so. Essentially they what, they targeted, for the one and a. Half million patients was actually non-medical personal data. So things like name address gender race data's birth the actual medical records. Were notes amended our tampered, with but that was sort of the main rationale there are also data stolen in terms of a dispensed medicines for outpatients and those were around one hundred sixty thousand people The targeting of the prime minister's intriguing detail then what does, that tell us potentially about who might have carried this out so the government to your has not specified who the perpetrators, may, be and what's also, the intentions may have been but the did say thoughts I have shown that there was a deliberate. And. Targeted and very well planned attack and they definitely was not work of casual hackers or criminal guns so they have not come out and said specifically what kind? Of organization may have been behind this but you know a number of experts say that if if it's. Not casual hawkers or criminal, guns, there, is a. Possibility that it might be government, backed government backed and. Who who have fingers being pointed out that. China I I have to say no one is pointing any fingers now. Because they're quite cautious in terms of giving any Kind of ideas specifically because the Singaporean government. Has not come out with any specific statement, but, I guess if you look at the most high. Profile attacks that have happened in recent times I guess Russia China North Korea are the ones that, probably come to mind in the latest one has been the alleged Russian meddling with US presidential elections we also have the, China's, interference with upcoming Cambodian, elections so I guess those are the big three blade knees I guess in recent times Yeah A wealthy city state prides itself on stability. Security embarrassing is for the. Government To say I think it was quite. Surprising generally because they've actually, worked very. Very hard to ramp up defense systems they also pasta new cybersecurity active February so I think Singapore is actually generally known to be, one of. The country's at the forefront. Of the building up cyber cyber security a defensive so it's, actually quite surprising and I think one of the blow was speaking to set, maybe that's actually one of the reasons why the attacker attackers actually targeted Singapore especially. Precisely because it's always taken as an. Example of the best defenses against, cybercrime Stephanie many thanks for joining us today that was too, funny a poem a correspondent for the financial times. Speaking to us from Singapore.

Singapore China Singaporean Government Raymond Joe Prime Minister Paul Stefania Palmer BBC Newshour Beijing James Menendez Steven Mcdonnell United States Russia North Korea
James Menendez, Bbc and Two Percent discussed on BBC Newshour

BBC Newshour

04:01 min | 3 years ago

James Menendez, Bbc and Two Percent discussed on BBC Newshour

"Hello and welcome to newshour from the bbc world service i'm james menendez coming up diplomacy trump style the us president needs the nato summit saying he's happy that fellow members of agreed to spend billions more on defense this was a fantastic two days this was really fantastic it all came together at the end and yes it was a little tough we'll find out what tough means and whether this old alliances stronger or weaker now we'll see today president trump has just arrived in the uk on his first official visit the british government's be sitting at its detailed plans for brexit plus a gripping and terrifying account of the thai cave rescued from one of the divers involved a turnaround after about fifty meters when i got soak and then we both agreed this is madness we're gonna kill ourselves there's no need for more people to dine escapes all of that more after the knees this is the bbc news hello i'm jonathan is art president trump has said he's now very happy with his nato allies for committing an extra thirty three billion dollars to military spending he told a news conference in brussels that nato was much stronger earlier mr trump shamed germany spain and belgium for falling well short of the collective pledge to spend two percent of gdp on defense our defense and diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus he is like t to extract some significant additional defense expenditure but how quickly people reach this two percent target is unclear the likelihood of people going much beyond that i think is a fantasy so many more questions than answers and still a fundamental uncertainty about how mr trump really regards nato is it merely a set of transactional relationships or is it the fundamental bedrock of a transatlantic alliance that up to now at least it's been seen a securing as much america's defenses as it does the europeans russia has hit back at president trump's complaints about new gas pipeline being constructed between russia and germany the kremlin spokesman said mr trump was trying to force european customers to buy more expensive american energy and in the past few minutes president trump has landed in the uk for a two day working visit during his trip he will meet queen elizabeth and the prime minister britain's new brexit secretary dominic robb has outlined in parliament detailed plans for future trading relations with the european union after the uk leaves the block in march robertson reports after two years of indecision theresa may governments have finally opted for what might be called a softer brexit which envisages continuing close economic ties between britain and the eu of the heart of the plan is the idea of a free trade area and a common rulebook so we'll disruption to business and the need for a border between northern ireland and the irish republic but it's already meeting opposition from both brexit enthusiasts in the governing conservative party and from brussels so the government's may at last have a plan but the real drama over brexit is likely only just beginning members of pakistan's former governing party the pm l n say hundreds of their members have been detained by police in the city of lahore before general election later this month they say it's an attempt to prevent them holding rallies in support of their leader the former prime minister now i sharif more from joanna jolly pm l n members say police have raided the homes of party councillors in the whole and detained activists here in charge of organizing street protests they say the crackdown will make it harder for them to stage rallies when their leader now as chief returns to the city on friday mr sharieff who is currently in london was sentenced in absentia by a pakistani corruption court to ten years in prison he says he will return to challenge the sentencing which he described as politically motivated you're listening to the world news from the bbc this.

James Menendez BBC Two Percent Thirty Three Billion Dollars Fifty Meters Ten Years Two Years Two Days Two Day
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome to news from the bbc world service hello i'm james menendez coming up shop divisions at today's nato summit president trump's accused germany of not spending enough on defense while buying billions of dollars of russian oil and gas chancellor merkel's hit back what does it mean for the transatlantic alliance trump doesn't do win wins for him it's win lose he thinks we lose with nato and he's he's wrong about that but he's set in his ways in his views also today the cult leader and tv preach in turkey arrested on suspicion of extortion and child sex abuse and how did the us state of nevada get hold of a drug for executions when it's maker bandits use in lethal injections states will change their execution protocols and they will find drugs before they announced the change in the protocol so states will be able to buy drugs that went controlled all of that and more after the knees hello i'm julie candle with the bbc news a nato summit is getting underway in brussels under the slogan we are allies with two of the biggest united states and germany at loggerheads at breakfast president trump castigated berlin for spending billions on marshall oil and gas yet falling far short of the spending target nato had said to help defend europe from russia the german defence minister ursula von the lion told the bbc germany was well on its way to reaching the target of spending two percent of its gdp on defense as agreed by nato members at a summit in wales in twenty fourteen the way of summit with president obama we were down to one point one percent by now if we look at the next budget for two thousand seventeen five years from raise we've raised the budget then by thirty percent already which is quite a lot of money in real terms and if you look at the projected increase in two thousand twenty four a decade after wales we will have a d increase in defense budget by eight percent stock markets across asia have closed sharply down as the trade war between.

europe russia berlin nevada president bbc asia obama wales germany james menendez nato united states brussels extortion turkey chancellor merkel
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:43 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's coming up at noon today on wnyc you're listening to newshour live from the bbc in london i'm james menendez we're putting out a damn paper the message on social media from a capital gazette reporter after five the maryland papers journalists was shot dead on thursday a man used a shotgun to fire through a glass door into the newsroom jared ramos has been charged with five counts of murder police say he was motivated by a personal vendetta against the newspaper let's talk to terence smith a contributing columnist at the capital gazette terrence many thanks for joining us a festival my condolences everyone must still be in shock absolute shock because you can imagine and expressed in the paper today which has the pictures of the five of course cross page one and in a very striking decision they're left the opinion page the aditorial page blank with only with a sentence that begins today we are speechless and concludes it they'll be back with a steady flow of opinion and news tomorrow on the editorial page the paper did come out a remarkable performance given the fact that they were they were all evacuated from their facility and not able to get in for several hours some some of the some of the journalists are working in a in a parking lot wherever they could i happen to be speaking with rick hustle the very good editor the paper who was three hours away at a conference and driving rapidly back minutes after the shooting he told me they were gone somehow and they have done so interesting paper you know james it dates back to seventeen twenty seven and i have to tell you it was a major editorial opinion against the stamp act in seventeen sixty five when you brits were trying to taxes and we've got very cranking out but it's it's an interesting paper to local paper circulation thirty forty thousand saturation in this area it's quite a prosperous area on the paper believe it or not in this day and age makes money wow you must have known those who've died just tell us a little bit about them well i knew two of the five particularly well gerald fishman they deputy editor and editorial writer was wonderful work with i worked with him on every call and he was had a great chance of irony on a turn of phrase was a pleasure to work with is really sorely sorely missed also rob hi assume who is was an associate editor and columnist himself very engaging funny columnist who liked to write about the foibles of life and whose brother incidentally carl hiaasen is a very well known novelist in florida i wondered if they were were related just just one final thought from you turns says been much talk on social media today and in the wake of what happened yesterday about the abuse that's been leveled at the socalled mainstream media do you see that as a factor it's impossible to know if it was a factor in the twisted mind of jared rama's the shooter but it certainly has influenced the atmosphere around donald trump's rallies were his supporters frequently turn on the press shouting epithets at them it's certainly created a fractious angry atmosphere the constant accusations of fake news and suggestions of line so the atmosphere is foul i'm sure it's been foul before i can think of watergate and other times when it was very tense but it's an ugly atmosphere did that encourage or you know the the shooter obviously i can't say because i can't get into his mind is incidentally not talking to the police and so he has been arraigned and is in jail terms we'll have to leave it there but many thanks for joining us at a difficult time those turned smith contributing columnist at the capital in annapolis maryland now mexicans going to the polls on sunday these elections have the potential for wholesale political change not least because the presidency congress governorships in hundreds of merrill seats are up for grabs but they take place against a backdrop of extreme and rising violence twenty thousand is looking even worse than last year when a record number we're recorded twenty six thousand murders from mexico shaima highly the road to the cultural area via suarez is quite an eerie their vast tomato farms on both sides of the road some surrounded by barbedwire others more fortified with metal gates this is one of the.

bbc james menendez three hours
"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Possible rights violation they'll be also undocumented and that can result in impunity don't have to say given the election result and the result of previous elections it seems that people in hungary don't care in fact they rather support this approach this might be something that you can say however i believe that in a democracy it's not only the majority whose opinion should define the government's actions so the government when it's elected to power should support the rights of the minority as well and its role is to include all the different voices into its decision making and what we see is a clear silencing move founder capron safe from the hungarian civil liberties union speaking to james menendez south sudan gained independence in twenty eleven off to a long and brutal will with sudan but in recent years the country has been torn apart by civil war of its own which is effected millions of people now the two rival leaders in south sudan president salva kiir and rebel leader riak macho our neighbor boring if yo pierre for proposed peace talks emmanuel egan's reports from addis ababa the last time the two bitter rivals met face to face was in july two thousand sixteen in a meeting that ended in renewed fighting between their troops rebel leader rick michelle fled to south africa where he's been an house arrest until this week this fresh talks will focus on doing failed peace deal they signed in august of two thousand fifteen regional leaders have proposed a way ford a coalition government that will see my shirt take up his old position of vice president while civil society women and religious groups will be included in government and parliament bus rounds of negotiations have all collapsed wasn't in a civil war that has claimed tens of thousands of lives and displaced millions more the touring sides however and intense pressure to end the conflict and the suffering of millions of their citizens under this month the un security council threatened them with sanctions and an arms embargo on south sudanese government it the fighting continue and civil war broke out in the country in december two thousand eighteen and us led to one of the biggest refugee crisis in the continent aid agencies have won that famine looms yet again insults dan emmanuel agains are in addis ababa just days before saudi arabia is you to lift a ban on female drivers authorities that are reported to have arrested two more women's rights activists saudi officials have not commented on the latest detentions have confirmed that early this month seventeen people were arrested for what was described as undermining the kingdom security more from the middle east analysts sebastian asha one of women knuth abdelaziz the other meyer as ronnie both essentially had expressed this port for those who have already been detained now amongst those who have been detained us and very prominent women activists also men have been arrested too but the ones most attention worldwide the women and they were absolutely instrumental in the campaign to win women the right to drive without them this probably wouldn't have happened yet as you say would just days way on sunday i believe it is when women in saudi arabia will be getting into that 'cause and driving themselves legally for the first time in saudi arabian history do we know who the people are that have been arrested in the past few weeks yes the names have come out they include lou jana half lou several others who were absolutely the figureheads of the move to win women the right to drive a not just not luigino how flu for example was a huge hit on social media in saudi arabia one of the first sa visa people who appeal across all sorts of groups in saudi arabia outside these these are not small names so it does seem extraordinary that they should be arrested just to saudi arabia abia is about to busk in the worldwide support that they'll received for having overturned the span for so long on the crown prince mohammad bin salman you would have thought would not have wanted to study that will darken that with these arrests the explain one can think of is one that it's to satisfy the conservatives who are not pleased about these changes we saw just yesterday that the head of entertainment authority was sacked after pictures of a russian circus performer an elite todd were went viral and our complaints about that by.

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That examines the rise of antisemitism in present day france starts friday at quad cinema you're listening to newshour from the bbc world service on wnyc on the next brian lehrer show queens congresswoman grace meng talks about the latest news on immigration and explains her objections to the proposed changes to new york city's specialized high schools admissions policies plus a roundup of new york congressional primary races ahead of next week's election that's coming up this morning at ten on wnyc seventy two degrees fair skies over new york city going up to the lower eighties clouds roll in we could see some rain tonight this is james menendez with newshour now how does the human body adapt to living at high altitude while one way that's been identified in indigenous populations living in mountainous areas is a barrel chest to allow for greater lung capacity and compensate for the lack of oxygen but there's another change that often occurs according to a study published today in the journal royal society opened science nepalese people living in the himalayas a more likely to have short forearms compared to people of similar ancestry living in lowland areas the lead author is stephanie pain who's a biological anthropologist at cambridge university refound that people living at high altitudes in the himalayas tend to have shorter for arms than those living in lowland regions of the himalayas i why don't you think that is one hundred percent certain but based on the fact that at high altitudes that are lower levels of oxygen and in order for us to grow property we need to key ingredients one of them is oxygen and the other is food and so if we're lacking in oxygen than we might not be able to grow orleans as long as we would at low altitude regions and what's really interesting about this pattern that we found is it indicates that the body might be prioritizing which parts of the limb to grow so for example the hand because it's really important for manipulation so the body is maybe prioritizing growing the hand ivette forum to the arm as a whole isn't shrinking it's just the forum and not the hand of what about the upper arm does that does that carry on as normal.

france new york city barrel chest himalayas cambridge university refound bbc brian lehrer grace meng new york james menendez stephanie one hundred percent seventy two degrees
Maduro favored as Venezuelans vote amid crisis

BBC World Service

01:55 min | 3 years ago

Maduro favored as Venezuelans vote amid crisis

"Hello it's five six gmt welcome to weekend from the bbc world service on paul henley first up today presidential elections are taking place in venezuela later president nicolas maduro is hoping for another six years in office the opposition is largely boycotting the vote bbc's james menendez is in the capital here in caracas there are many signs that a presidential election is about to get underway is there are some banners and posters draped across the streets but it's hardly the stuff of a vigorous heart full campaign now concluding with a vote and there's a couple of reasons i that most people have got more important things on their mind like where their next meal is coming from hyperinflation rendered prices way out of the reach of most people the second is that few doubt that nicolas madura will win a second term in office some people fear that if they don't vote for the government they weren't qualify for subsidized food many likely to stay home the main opposition figures have either been jailed or banned from running the others decided to boycott the election i've been speaking to one opposition leader maria corina machado and i asked her why the opposition wasn't taking part because it's not an election and it has been denounced as fraudulent process from the ba beginning by minnesota and society and over fifty countries around the world it is not an election if you boycott the election you're just handing another six years to the government on a plane turn on the country the results are already settled doesn't matter how many people participate there's no doubt in your mind that nicolas madura will be president on the twentyfirst absolutely not nobody doubts it we're facing at tally tarian and criminal regime actually.

Nicolas Maduro James Menendez Caracas Maria Corina Machado Minnesota President Trump BBC Venezuela Nicolas Madura Six Years
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From a strict religious community who are reunited reigniting passions that pushed the boundaries of faith and sexuality now in select theaters it's the bbc newshour on wnyc in new york stay tuned coming up in nine minutes on the brian lehrer show former daily show correspondent why it's talks about his new problem areas and how he manages to find humor incites in issues like policing also calls from newark listeners on the mayoral election there that's this morning starting at ten o'clock nine minutes here on wnyc another warm day today highs near eighty eight degrees with mostly sunny skies the slight chance of some showers with thunderstorms after two o'clock this is james menendez with newshour now here's something i didn't get to say very often let's head to the other side of the world and the french south pacific territory of new caledonia where the french president emmanuel macron has been embarking on a highly symbolic visit today the unindo due to vote in a referendum at the end of this year on whether or not to become independent the last step in a three decade long process following violent clashes back in the nineteen eighties president micro is hoping that the vote will tip towards remaining with france well natalie goodrich is an expert in france is pacific territories at aston university here in the uk so first of all what kind of welcome is the president likely to receive he's going to be in the main town of new caledonia they're the majority of the population more conservative and they are in favor of new caledonia remaining french as michael openly declared is saying was for this situation that new caledonia would remain french he's going to get a warm welcome but if he goes in the north of the country that might be slightly trickier visit generally the case that the digital population want to become independent whereas the european settlers or the sentences settlers want to remain part of france a deacon knock the endangered indigenous population they've been struggling for thirty forty years now claiming for.

wnyc emmanuel macron france natalie goodrich aston university uk president bbc new york brian lehrer newark james menendez michael nine minutes eighty eight degrees thirty forty years three decade
"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Gritz of people who are dying because the health sector has been destroyed out a totally inappropriate the government of president aside says it's trying to liberate the area from terrorists but chose civilians the situation is getting more desperate james menendez has been speaking to use if a resident of eastern gouta about what's been happening today it's similar to what's happening on sunday on tuesday they've bombardment is a for intense than yesterday so it's be getting worse today it skipping worse yeah i could you describe it for us what are you hearing what are you seeing at the you and described the situation that it's beyond imagination no one can imagine the intensity or form barred meant unto diversity off we bonds assads using right now in a stone olca borrow bombs which is being fallen by helicopters on war plans and the missiles that i can too determine all sorts of foot we bones but they are all being used in the same time right now i'm what is being held at people's homes is it hospitals what are these bombs falling on on the streets homes of civilians on the hospitals they all were already a falling in the middle of a stem oto like how maurya on the suck but on bliss rubber where there is no frontlines no military residences so they are really civilly unadv list is rival targeting people's homes rather than military targets he say there is no military targeting never but the syrian government says it said targeting islamist militant says targeting those that a trying to shell damascus and have been shelling damascus and killing people that i think there is the give roofs that the the regime targets civilians photos viral owns media telling that the regime.

president james menendez syrian government damascus
"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Gritz of people who are dying because the health sector has been destroyed out a totally inappropriate the government of president aside says it's trying to liberate the area from terrorists but chose civilians the situation is getting more desperate james menendez has been speaking to use if a resident of eastern gouta about what's been happening today it's similar to what's happening on sunday on tuesday they've bombardment is a for intense than yesterday so it's be getting worse today it skipping worse yeah i could you describe it for us what are you hearing what are you seeing at the you and described the situation that it's beyond imagination no one can imagine the intensity or form barred meant unto diversity off we bonds assads using right now in a stone olca borrow bombs which is being fallen by helicopters on war plans and the missiles that i can too determine all sorts of foot we bones but they are all being used in the same time right now i'm what is being held at people's homes is it hospitals what are these bombs falling on on the streets homes of civilians on the hospitals they all were already a falling in the middle of a stem oto like how maurya on the suck but on bliss rubber where there is no frontlines no military residences so they are really civilly unadv list is rival targeting people's homes rather than military targets he say there is no military targeting never but the syrian government says it said targeting islamist militant says targeting those that a trying to shell damascus and have been shelling damascus and killing people that i think there is the give roofs that the the regime targets civilians photos viral owns media telling that the regime.

president james menendez syrian government damascus
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of daughter of the nile from taiwanese director ho xiaoshan starts fighting at quite cinemas does it he's i live from the bbc in london i'm james menendez now we've talked to feb at about china in the past few days there was president she speech to the communist party congress last week and this week the news that the communist party had voted to put xi jinping's name and his ideology in the constitution he clearly has big ambitions both economically and in terms of china and indeed his own standing in the world for the country's record on human rights is still of deep concern for many outside and inside of aging correspondent jones sud worth has been hearing from a human rights lawyer who was detained by the authorities in 2015 and as you'll hear the interview at the home of she a yanyi had to be cut short we end share yankees hartmann block through the face in an attempt to avoid the surveillance with this yet i say to you i am i am nothing with these are sensitive times in china and there are a few occupations more sensitive right now than that of a human rights lawyer daughter acquitted october mingle kissed fought marcy tim take care take care take on tape and he should halloween share yanyi is the first to death his speech got out about his ordeal through brown chiffon i'll take a hyoja fought tyga they didn't gave me through and then he tara gated meet continuously for dozens of hours the room was very small and there were no winged funded i didn't and seal sunlight for half a here it'll all of these methods are torture they're more painful than being beat addicted to them the top what should we be bit how law hieng powerful it speed in a concerted campaign china has been parading its human rights activists and lawyers on state tv handing some of them long prison sentences in total more than three hundred have been brought in for questioning.

ho xiaoshan bbc china president congress communist party human rights marcy tim director james menendez jones sud halloween
"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Now he is in a film festival in south korea at the moments and oliver stone was asked yesterday about the harvey weinstein situation he said at that time that he believed demand shouldn't be condemned by vigilante system however overnight allwise change oliver stone was to be working with harvey weinstein on his first ever tv show the first ever oliver stone tv show guantanamo about the guantanamo bay prison and he is no said the explains been travelling th the last few days wasn't aware of all the accusations against harvey weinstein and is no decided to recuse himself from guantanamo the tv series and will not work on its he was going to be to writing a to our pilots he won't work on its as long as the weinstein companies involved to a big change of use in the last twelve hours from all over stoned the film director colin patterson now are we heading for a world where common antibiotics don't work anymore and previously treatable illnesses become deadly well possibly that's according to the world health organization which has warned of a post antibiotic era and kotra urgent action to change the way we use antibiotics to that end experts and health professionals from around the world are at a conference in berlin including the uk's chief medical officer professor tame sally davies the uk's involved in a new projects together all the available data on drug resistance around the world james menendez asked her first to outline the scale of the problem antibiotic resistance is already killing paint coal we know conservative estimate for european twenty five thousand deaths a year simla in the states but a figure i often use that of india where we know that about sixty thousand newborn babies die drugresistant infections every year.

south korea oliver stone harvey weinstein guantanamo bay prison colin patterson uk professor india guantanamo weinstein director berlin medical officer sally davies james menendez twelve hours
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is news that from the bbc world service i'm james menendez mo now in our main story hurricane alma had this vast storm is now heading north three florida having along the west coast of peninsular it is path cities such as tempus petersburg and sarasota will before communications went down in that lost city aspect meteorolgist mark robinson he's there to monitor as impact is one of a small group known as the storm chases in north america or looking at sort of these bans beginning to cal crew so you get this time where you just have a little bit of rain little bit a win at all when the ban comes through you'll get extremely strong winds and laws lots of rain so right now we're at the moment i'm actually in between bands i can all see bluesky up there it's actually kind of crazy but the clouds moving very very fast and i can see the next banned coming israel so we can get rid of the wind in the background i mean what sort of wind speeds eur you sing at the moment all right now we're looking about fifty or sixty kilometers an hour but we expect as the i get sucked closer and closer towards our expecting as much as two hundred loft hurting our uh depending on whether that i stays together or not we've seen so we thinning with erbas it's been cowering sincerest win here and it's pointless fall apart a bit more than was replaced under what are you hearing from your fellow storm chases a further down the coast i'm independently biggestselling comesa pretty bad all may we'll wait i'm in the florida keys y'all got hit pretty hard with the i wall down there heard from them in a little while actually now we're pretty sure that they're find but anything down there like they've lost power or audie large parts of florida already losing power and that means now cell phones hours begin to go down and and communication begin to be very very difficult what's likely to be the biggest threat to our is below the one your in i mean is it gonna be those whidden's those very very strong winds or is it going to be the water well here's the thing this entire self western side of florida's burger low and with a potential surged.

florida tempus petersburg sarasota north america bbc james menendez israel sixty kilometers
"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"james menendez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At sunni and cuny's schools when the new excelsior scholarship programme is fully implemented applications open for the first time yesterday continued through july twenty i the excelsior scholarship application as online and takes about twenty minutes to complete mostly sunny skies today highs near seventy one degrees clouds tonight lows around fifty five degrees and even warmer tomorrow seventy eight degrees with a slight chance of showers oh hello and welcome to these after the bbc world service we all coming to live from london i'm james menendez just under now the former director of the fbi james kurmi will appear before the senate intelligence committee today what were we learn about his interactions with the man who sacked their president trump also coming up a very rare insight into life under the taliban in afghanistan plus an ecofriendly version of a major ocean pollutants i say let's head straight to washington dc for one of the most hotly anticipated political exchanges for a long time head hit a full morning in washington dc as alive shot there of the capitol this is new day it's also a dramatic day ahead on capitol hill colmey hair to deliver the most anticipated congressional testimony in years the former fbi director confirms president trump has had me is getting today at a senate committee with what the present asshole of loyalty to the country loyalty to make sure that the american people have the justices in that they want gainst always advance james comey sacked as director of the fbi was due to appear before the senate intelligence committee at the top of the next hour that means sworn testimony about his dismissal and his role in the investigation shen into alleged russian interference in lost his election mr karmi's already released his prepared testimony he will also have to answer questions in that though he says the president trump did ask him to drop an investigation into his former national security advisor michael flynn he was then under scrutiny for his ties to moscow so who exactly is james comey more famous the may said president trump wants his on north america editor john circle we will make america great again.

james kurmi america editor north america moscow advisor james comey senate president capitol hill washington afghanistan cuny james menendez bbc john circle michael flynn mr karmi fbi trump taliban senate intelligence committee director seventy eight degrees seventy one degrees fifty five degrees twenty minutes