17 Burst results for "James Lovelock"

"james lovelock" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on Today in Focus

"The Solutions Armour often likely to be small solutions that either aggregate over time or that cascade and actually do produce something something transformative and on one level this concerned like accommodation assists and You know too much compromise at a time when big changes are needed. Did I get how that comes across. But when you think about even the most transformational visions being articulated today for example in American politics. Let's say you like like Elizabeth Warren's vision and you believe it's transformative in terms of health care for all in terms of the environment still gotta find a way to get Elizabeth Elizabeth Warren ten bucks. What I did in government was I took this idea of shrink the change and used it to try to buck up my team because even though we weren't yet of course the trump era or brexit era we were in an era where we were seeing freedom on the wane around the world today in two thousand nineteen? We're thirteen years into the freedom. Recession of net declines in freedom every year and instead of getting demoralized. I just sat down with my team and I said okay. What can we do about the large problem of the human rights recession? What's within our power to do? We settled on this very modest idea which was to launch a campaign called Hashtag. Free the twenty where we would aim to secure the release of twenty female political prisoners around the world. In countries that the United States had traditionally adversarial Israel relationship with them as well and Syria but also in countries like Egypt Ethiopia China and every day for twenty days. I hung the portrait of one of these women in the lobby of the US mission to the UN which overlooked be when offers right there on first avenue and accompanied that with a lot of social media and profiles to the women's stories fundamentally rooted in the details of what these women had attempted to do in their countries and then even managed to generate support from twenty female US senators on a bipartisan basis. And we remained in constant touch with the families of these women with the lawyers who represent had been representing these women for years in some cases and overtime sixteen of the twenty women were freed and on one level. Will you know I'm I'm scoreboard. Focused enough to note the tens of thousands hundreds of thousands of political prisoners Aw that remained jailed. Even as these sixteen women were freed on the other hand when you think about each of those women and their families and their communities these and the prospect of them reinvigorated and going back to campaign on behalf of the causes that had caused them to be arrested in the first place. It was a reminder that this is how it will work right is that it won't be that you fight an abstraction it'll be that you remain conscious conscious of the individuals at the heart of what you're trying to do that was Samantha. The power who's memoir the education of an idealist is out now. That's it for today. A huge thanks. To James Lovelock and Samantha Power. This episode was produced by Rachel. Humphries and Courtney user sound design was by Axel Kukuchi I the executive producers on Jackson and Phil may not. We'll be back out tomorrow..

Elizabeth Elizabeth Warren Samantha Power United States James Lovelock UN Rachel Axel Kukuchi Humphries Egypt executive Syria Israel Ethiopia Jackson Courtney Phil China
"james lovelock" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"The Apollo program is designed to show that America can Marshall its economy and its technology to do great things the fact that the great thing that was hit upon was going to the moon was not entirely coincidental but was certainly not central and so America does something that no one else has done before that many people have not even been capable of imagining and changes something fundamental in showing people a human footprint on an inhuman celestial body until you're coming down the ladder now okay. I just checked the backup is at first glance but as one small step for man art so why haven't we gone back because the mission was accomplished because showing people that America could do this was the point doing it was less the point going on doing it was hardly the point at all and so many people so I had this idea that now humans would quote colonize the rest of the solar system and but using the resources of the moon would take up the rest of the century and then the people would move on to Mars into the moons of Jupiter but this was all fantasy and so that's why we haven't gone back. That's why no one has gone back because no one has wanted to signal to the world what America wanted to signal to the world in the nineteen sixties it seems. It's like today. That's changing that there are people who wanna do such signaling. Do you think there'll be a new space race. I'm not even sure there was a first base race. Russians were nothing like a serious about getting to the moon as the Americans were so it was declared a race <hes> because as the Americans were fairly confident of winning it if you saw the space race in terms of who actually kept people in orbit longer than the Russians were of the Soviet Union was doing very well so your question about going back to the moon yes the people are undoubtedly going back to the moon but it's not for the same sort of signaling because going to the moon with the technology of twenty nine thousand nine is a significantly easier task than going to the moon with the technology of nineteen sixty nine and although NASA is hobbled by the strange political constraints finds itself in about what hardware it can use. It's still only GonNa take about a tenth of what it spent to go to the moon the first time to go to the moon second time the Chinese who clearly would quite like to go to the moon we'll go there by building out a human spaceflight program slowly and surely which is what they've been doing for the past fifteen years so yes people will go back to the moon and people will try for their own reasons to present it as a space race yes but I don't think that it's really a race so other than the Chinese what other nations are going to vie to get there the Chinese I interested in going so the Americans feel some Americans feel that they need to go back so that they can you know so I refuse to trade in moon talks with Chinese when they arrive. I think other nations are unlikely to go in the near term. I'm sure India would in the longer term be quite interested in going. The other thing of course is the private individuals and private companies might go and SPACEX has already sold a provisional tip to the moon to go round the moon not to actually land on the moon to <hes> a Japanese billionaire Yusaku Missouri and I think the might well be more of that. There's a U._B._S.. report that suggests that there might be a significant amount of moon toryism by the end of this decade on the other hand. There's more deeper concerns on the territory itself such as who owns it property rights resources and law. How's that GONNA get decided probably by force measure <hes> but I really <hes> <hes> by negotiation? There is already a body of law which says that no <hes> in the outerspace treat of nineteen sixty seven says that no nation can make territorial claim on another celestial body <hes> but it is somewhere between silence ambiguous on the question of whether private industry can cause normally private industry can make property rights on the basis that the ability to do so is granted it by sovereign government the American government and the government of Luxembourg of both sign that not saying that companies from America or Luxembourg can keep and use and profit from resources that they get in space. It's not clear that that really sits within the spirit of the Outer Space Treaty and it's not clear that it's a desirable outcome and what about the rivalry a little bit closer to Earth that is in the Earth's orbit and the proliferation of satellites. How is that going to affect space? There's no rivalry in low-earth orbit. The problem in low-earth orbit is if you put too much stuff into it in some of that stuff hits other stuff then you get too much debris and one of the people who thinks a lot about this is an American goal Brian Weeden and Brian points out that space debris is a problem a little bit like climate change by the time you realize it is really a problem. It's too late to do stuff about it. It's a significant concern that a build up of I bere- in especially in some parts of low earth orbit but maybe also geostationary orbit where the Satellite T._V. satellite set that could be an issue and of course if people start waging war in space and destroying each other satellites that creates more debris normally and how could make the problem was now Oliver. We've talked about humans in space. We've talked about satellites. What about humans venturing beyond the moon to other places in the galaxy as well while the galaxy is asking a little bit much and getting to the next planet in the solar system would be a hard? Enough reach that's what you know. Mosque wants to mosque is quite clear about the idea that his next generation spacecraft meant to take people to Mars <hes> again. This is an area where the law is extremely unclear about what Callan can't be done and and there are people who have significant worries about the degree to which the Martian environment would be degraded by heedless settlement to which a lot of backers of missing masculine say Hellier says the point. We want to go out there where the regulations don't matter but scientific concerns. There's much to be learned about MAS. The could be interesting whether I don't think it would justify the really extremely high cost of going to Muslim and going to Mars now would be a bit like going to the moon in the nineteen sixties to do a proper mas mission Asian would be to stretch welby on the con- capacities of the people have in space. James Lovelock thinks that we're alone in the universe. What do you think I think there's an interesting point made by off the clock that the question of whether humans are alone in the universe is.

America James Lovelock Soviet Union India SPACEX American government NASA Brian Weeden Yusaku Missouri Oliver Callan Hellier fifteen years
"james lovelock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up on Australian student reemerges more than a week after going missing in North Korea apparently after being detained thoughts on top stories today good to hear from one of his friends and also from a former ambassador to South Korea that's in just a moment and also British marine commandos of boarded an oil tanker off Gibraltar suspected of carrying Iranian oil to Syria would be in breach of sanctions and the British scientist James Lovelock one of the founders of the modern environmental movement has warned that humanity will be superseded by a hyper intelligent life form plus a report on the new national service in fronts which among them Microsoft hopes will boost patriotism in that country I think that's what Michael string to show to the French public is that there is no consultations for in to be poor European and but here take poor European and to believe in your country the whole European Union and also to to be proud to be French that report coming up in about forty minutes time first the Australian student Alex Szekely studying for a master's degree in north Korean literature at the Kim il sung university in Pyongyang an organizer of toys to North Korea under the slogan unification well he disappeared for more than a week now he's re emerged in China after apparently being released from detention the Australian prime minister Scott Morrison made the announcement in parliament I'm pleased to announce that missed Alex sickly has been to die release from detention in the democratic people's Republic of Korea Alex is site and will Swiss authorities advised destroying government that they met with senior officials from the D. P. R. K. yes to die and rise the issue of Alex disappearance on astride his behalf early this morning we were advised the P. R. kite had released from detention and he is now sites with with the country I can confirm his arrive safely Mr sickly arrived in Beijing and is now heading to Tokyo where his wife lives he was ofsted Beijing airport highway was feeling it didn't say much he is what he did say.

Pyongyang D. P. Alex sickly prime minister Tokyo Beijing P. R. kite Korea Alex Scott Morrison China North Korea Alex Szekely European Union Michael string Microsoft James Lovelock scientist Syria Gibraltar
"james lovelock" Discussed on The Liturgists

The Liturgists

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on The Liturgists

"Lhasa? Voles stop to single. Wow. This is cool. That's from Brian swim memento mine. He's eagerly cosmetologist. He says lava becomes Oprah. I love them. So they're looking at this law becoming opera. Wow, that's cool. And then they see this little blip leaves. All this stuff leaving going round leave the way to the moon, and it's not just the first human beings. It's the first to a knowledge it's the first part of her, right? Yeah. Right. And if you think of human beings as being embedded within this living dynamic biosphere what's function over the plan on that was realization, I had at fifteen gave me my peaks -perience, I just realized. Wow. We haven't been made over here and the planet made of a here in. And then no we've actually grown a self reflective aspects of the biosphere itself. Alawites talks about the. Peopling planet like apple apples. So a weed so of way that astronaut Jim Lovell is in a wits of ways. The is one perspective is the biosphere the planet itself looking back at his right? And for me that was really big moment. That's what happened fifteen. I'm the guy. Not the guy this theory of James Lovelock. And if you guys talk about on the show, but this ID reverse. The planet being with a metal organism that we. The planet has this kind of homies death homies stasis regulates life and the conditions for life itself. And we've always been of the environment or the planet is there humanities here. Suddenly that boundary going and realizing that's non human nature. I'm an aspect of that. Same EV Lucien, we live continuum. But just in this kind of bipedal self reflective form, and so what happened on that day right year off king seven on Christmas Eve when they look out the window. They pitch that two dimensional board game sudden changes, and it becomes this fragile away. One of run Jay Garin has his term for it. And what happens suddenly is we move into a new period of time all civilized nations. Suddenly is completely and utterly out of sync with that reality, and those of us that was people before the, of course, realize this, but we now have an image. Suddenly will whoa. Sink and twenty eight teen next year Christmas Eve next year is the fiftieth anniversary. So what we're doing is bringing together bunch of international astronauts. To talk about unto imagine. What is the next fifty years like? Because we need a new.

Lhasa James Lovelock Jim Lovell Brian Alawites Jay Garin apple Lucien fifty years
"james lovelock" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Yeah. So it's so funny that you ask that because one of the reasons why studied science in grad school. So I went to grad school for creative writing and also organism making evolutionary biology. And I studied with a woman name Lynn Margulis who married to Carl Sagan who discovered that prove that that nucleated cells are symbiosis different kinds of bacteria. She came up with a single guy theory with James Lovelock. What did she prove that cells are that cells with nuclei are symbiosis of other kinds of bacteria? Right. So like if you have a cell the has organized in it, so like, Mike Okon RIA, for example, or chloroplast implant sells those are there because two organisms formed a symbiotic merge. So she really went a long way to proving that there are people that had talked about it before. But she'd put in a lot too popular. And eventually lead to the evidence that showed that that's true. That thing I didn't know she was associated with that. That is one of the most hopeful things in in life to me. I knew that I knew about that. I didn't know that came from her. But to me that's always been the kind of like, I don't know smiley face inscribed into nature, which is this can work. Yeah. And it happens through initial conflict or consumption, right? So like one organism is trying to like swallow the other one, you know, again, and again until eventually the resistance is so strong that they live in harmony with each other. And you can't actually take them apart from one another anymore. So she did that she also came up with a whole new theory of evolution. That's based on symbiosis seen like when a new species emerges because there's been a symbiotic merger between one species and another usually once she's big and one is really. Small so that we don't think of cows a symbiotic beans, but they can't live without all the Symbian in their gut. You know, they just can't live without you take those out in the cow dies. So I went to school, and I studied with her one of the reasons why really interesting citing sciences because people were having these conversations about science all around me. And they're like, well DNA proves his DNA proves that this is like we know this because of our jeans, and I was like, June know, what DNA is do you know, how it's extracted. Do you know what it looks and everybody said, no? And I realized I didn't know either. But I recognize that I wasn't accepting the answers because I didn't know, but a lot of people were accepting the answers, and they didn't know. So I studied it a lot of it. I don't remember because I didn't do lab work. I did mostly like natural history. I studied the scientists themselves. I studied the way they talked about things anything else. Sure. So I'm not a scientist. But I know more about science than most people DNA still to me a little bit of Mr.. Like, you can look up the dictionary definition of DNA, and you can. Everybody knows the double helix thing or whatever how exactly does that work. How genes work how genomes work?.

Lynn Margulis smiley James Lovelock Mike Okon RIA Carl Sagan scientist
"james lovelock" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"So this is where we are, and. I mean, I, you know, you can. The importance of this midterm election is obviously huge, and there is still a path to the Senate. It is, You you know. know. Very difficult, very difficult. But we are a month away from the election. I use Heidi Heitkamp is just an as an example. The people who are motivated to vote for Heidi Heitkamp by this process are going to be just as motivated on November eighth as they were yesterday, the people who are activated in defense of. Brad Kavanagh and against the feminazi who. Would in some way endanger a potentially great man's opportunity to become a great man. They will not be as motivated. And so. It's not just enough to vote, but go out and. Knock on some doors. Tell your friends to vote vote early. Taking the Senate is pretty crucial at this point. It's going to be much harder because a lot of the reason why the house is much easier at this point is because those districts. Where there are basically Republican women in the suburbs who are probably going to stay home, those tend to be the swing districts. And so those are the low hanging fruit. But when you have red states, I think there are ten states where you have democratic senators running or ten democratic senators running in red states. Much harder. So go out organiz. And the, you know, the next step is going to be to talk about reform of the supreme court. And I, you know, people are also talking about reform the Senate. That's long overdue, we should say. The Senate. Originally, I hope people know was not elected by the people in the state was elected by the state legislatures. We've chosen essentially, right. I mean, there was an election, but I have a feeling it probably wasn't terribly contested for those first one hundred years more or less. Do you think statehood would be good for step as far as that goes for DC and Puerto Rico, without a doubt, it's absurd. It's absurd, but that's that is a step one in terms of, you know, reformation of the Senate. Getting rid of the electoral college. More democratic reforms. But I also think that pushing for court packing. I've stayed this before, in my opinion, term limits on the court will be more durable, but push for court packing by all means because if that is a legitimate threat on the table. Then a term limit is a much more likely, and there should also be to that end get a commitment from your representatives to hold hearings on Brad Kavanagh, whether he lied. And certainly breath Cavanaugh should want that to clear his name to get out from under this cloud. To show all of those Clinton nights who ginned up all of these claims against him. That he didn't lie go through the Manny, Miranda stuff when he stole receive stolen information twelve years ago. Go through the questions of his drinking. Go through the documents that the Bush administration has. We're going to see some of those. They're going to be it soon. All of this should be revisited. There's there's no other path. There is no other path folks because we get a report today from the IPC yesterday. There's only twelve years. To keep warming to a maximum of one point, five degrees celsius beyond which even half a degree will significantly Woodley worsened the risks of droughts floods, extreme heat poverty for hundreds of millions of people. I've said this. I haven't talked about it for a while, but. James Lovelock. The guy who found the hole in the ozone layer was asked ten years ago, twelve years ago. What do you think we should do about climate change? And he says, essentially, oh, yeah. Take time machine. It's conversation. We should have thirty years ago. He predicted by the end of this century, the world's population would be eighty percent less than it is now. Go from six billion to one billion. Europe will be sub Saharan by twenty eighty. He walked back after a couple of months when people like you can't say that because people are going to give up. But. We have a problem in this in this country. I mean, obviously we have a problem with China. They've got a dial back significantly. If this is the case, we've got a dial back significantly..

Senate Brad Kavanagh Heidi Heitkamp supreme court Europe James Lovelock Puerto Rico Cavanaugh DC Manny IPC China Clinton Woodley Miranda
"james lovelock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of pulse in the planet here's your program from our archives more that's discovered about the workings of our planet the more we learn about the relationship between ecosystems and lifeforms this study has led to a hypothesis named after the ancient greek goddess of the earth guy i'm jim metzner and this is the pulse of the planet that guy recognizes what the earth surfaces a living system not a single organism living system the chemical composition the acidity alkalinity oxygen concentration and temperature of the surface of the planet are actively regulated by the live organisms on the surface lynn margulis is a professor at the university of massachusetts and along with james lovelock a co the guy hypothesis in the middle of the winter and minnesota when the temperatures minus thirty degrees the temperature in a high with live bees can be plus twenty five degrees centigrade because the beast by constant incessant activity make a difference in temperature of fifty or sixty degrees now keeping the beehive in mind according to the guy at hypothesis many factors including plant and animal life contribute to planetary phenomena such as the regulation of the temperature of the service of the earth thirty million species of organisms interacting in all kinds of ways including flapping their wings and changing their color and moving particles of dust into the atmosphere and all sorts of other a myriad mechanisms are involved in temperature regulation on the surface of the earth and in standard ecology all these organisms are growing independently and not interacting on a guy view it's recognized that no organism is independent and they're all interacting with each other they're interaction leads to these regulatory phenomena archival programs part of our thirtieth anniversary celebration i'm jim that's and this is the pulse of.

jim metzner lynn margulis professor university of massachusetts james lovelock minnesota twenty five degrees thirty degrees sixty degrees
"james lovelock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the reason was the regenerating forests stabilized the banks so that they collapsed less often the rivers became more fixed in their course so the wolves small in number transform not just the ecosystem of the yellowstone national park this huge area of land but also its physical geography in the southern oceans have similarly wide ranging effects one of the many post rational excuses made by the japanese government for killing whales is that they said well the number of fish and krill will rise and then there'll be more for people to eat well it's a stupid excuse but sort of kind of makes sense doesn't it because you'd think whales eat huge amounts of fish and krill so obviously take the whales away to be more fishing crew but the opposite happened you take the whales away i'm the number two why would that possibly have happened to sustaining that entire ecosystem and one of the reasons for this they often feed debts and then they come up to the surface and produce what biologists politely called large vehicle plumes huge explosions of poop right across the surface waters in the fatigue zone there's enough light to to allow photosynthesis to take place and that those great plumes of fertilizer stimulate the growth fighter plankton the plant plankton at the bottom of the food chain which stimulate the growth of zoo plankton which feed the fish oil and all the rest of it and when you look at it like that you think here's the wolves changing the physical geography of the yellowstone national park here the whales changing the composition of the atmosphere you begin to see that possibly the evidence supporting james lovelock's guy hypothesis which conceives of the world as a coherent self regulating organism is beginning at the ecosystem level to accumulate and they make in my view a powerful case for the reintroduction of missing species re wilding to me means bringing back some of the missing plants and animals it means taking down the fences it means blocking the drainage ditches it means preventing commercial fishing and some large areas of c but otherwise stepping back it lets nature decide and nature by and large is pretty good at deciding.

yellowstone national park japanese government james lovelock
"james lovelock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of fish and krill will rise and then there'll be more people tweets well it's a stupid excuse but sort of kind of makes sense doesn't it because you'd think wales huge amounts of fish and krill so obviously take the whales away there'd be more efficient crew but the opposite happened you take the whales away and the number two why would that possibly of happening to sustaining that entire ecosystem and one of the reasons for this is that they often feed debts and then they come up to the surface and produced what biologists politely called large fecal plumes huge explosions of rides across the surface waters up in the zone where there's enough light to to allow photosynthesis to take place and that those great plumes of fertilizer stimulate the growth of fighter plankton the plant plankton at the bottom of the food chain which stimulate the growth of zoo plankton which feed the fish and the krill and all the rest of it and when you look at it like here's the wolves changing the physical geography of the yellowstone national park here the whales changing the composition of the atmosphere you begin to see that possibly the evidence supporting james lovelock's guy hypothesis which conceives of the world as a coherent self regulating organism is beginning at the ecosystem level to accumulate and they make in my view a powerful case for the reintroduction of missing species rewinding to me means bringing back some of the missing plants and animals it means taking down the fences it means blocking the drainage ditches it means preventing commercial fishing and some large areas of c but otherwise stepping back it lets nature decide and nature by and large is pretty good at deciding.

wales yellowstone national park james lovelock
"james lovelock" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To sustaining that entire ecosystem and one of the reasons for this is that they often feed debt and then they come up to the surface and produce what biologists politely called large vehicle plumes huge explosions of rides across the surface waters in the zone where there's enough light to to allow photosynthesis to take place and that those great plumes of fertilizer stimulate the growth of fighter plankton the plant plankton at the bottom of the food chain which stimulate the growth of zoo plankton which feed the fish oil and all the rest of it and when you look at it like do you think here the wolves changing the physical geography of the yellowstone national park here the whales changing the composition of the atmosphere you begin to see that possibly the evidence supporting james lovelock's guy hypothesis which conceives of the world as a coherent self regulating organism is beginning at the ecosystem level to accumulate and they make in my view apostle case for the reintroduction of missing species rewinding to me means bringing back some of the missing plants and animals it means taking down the fences it means blocking the drainage ditches it means preventing commercial fishing and some large areas of c but otherwise stepping back it lets nature decide nature by and large is pretty good at deciding.

yellowstone national park james lovelock
"james lovelock" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Maybe they've had disaster i don't know let's flashback back to june two thousand ten green guru james lovelock he's another one room gurun like climate change may not happen as fast as we thought and we may have a thousand years to sorted out in two thousand ted we may have a thousand years to sorted out now see that's some honesty though there is a guy who realized every one of the climate models they had were wrong all of them this is nothing day ever answer forth they never are asked to answer for that 98 climate models '98 were wrong so he was look at that and said well okay it's not happening is fast maybe we've got a thousand years that seems reasonable to me you don't think it a thousand years will find some solution to an energy problem he i think we will if we're around which i would be surprised it's becoming off obvious that only authentic climate tipping point we can rely on is this one in in two thousand seven new zealand scientist a new zealand scientists doesn't name him said this about global warming it's all going to be a joke in five years now that was wrong because it should have been a joke but it's not because they just keep adjusting they just keep moving in every time you pin him down they move somewhere else triple eight nine hundred thirty three 93 more pack ray unleashed coming up.

climate change scientist global warming ray james lovelock thousand years five years
"james lovelock" Discussed on TEDTalks Technology

TEDTalks Technology

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on TEDTalks Technology

"We're happy lee breathing and they're not part of the study this is one of the things that james lovelock has been assisting is basically our knowledge of the oceans especially abortion life is fundamentally vapor says so we're in the process of finding out by inadvertent bad geo engineering of too much co 2 an atmosphere find out what is the ocean doing that or the ocean with the extra heat is swelling up that's most of where we're getting the sea level rise and there's a lot more coming with more global want me we're getting terrible harm to some of the coral reefs like off of australia rate refi there's just no wada bleaching from overheating and uh this is why i am jetty us our previous session on the main stage was saying look geo engineering is worth experimenting with a knock to see that it works to see if we can buy time and the warming aspect of all of this tweak the system with small but you well research in and see if we should do more than tweet so this is what we're going to talk about the last few minutes because it's such an important discussion of fess while just going to shut like this book was just published by yuval harari basically saying the next evolution of humans is become as god's i think he said you talked to him and you've probably finished the book finisher yet or is he come out i mean it's it's it's a police a radical view he he thinks that we will completely remake ourselves using data using bioengineering to become completely new creatures that have kind of superpowers and and that they'll be in a huge inequality and a but we're about to write a very radical brand new chapter of history that that's what that's what he believes this nervous about that i forget he is he is nervous about it but but i think he also likes provoking people and nervous about that i'm nervous about that but i mean i'm.

lee james lovelock australia yuval harari
"james lovelock" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"As an indication goes right back up at some of it is going down into routes and going into the soil and staying there so these couder things are hard for you need to bear in mind and it the deeper story is that thing about and dealing with engineering climate is a perky complex process it's like mattis your aws again tweaking around the system to see what makes an improvement in doing that more that deceit still getting better that's enough back off aperture but when met some people say look no all green is created equal you possibly what we're doing is they're trading off the magnificence of the rain forest and all that diversity for i don't know green pond scum will grassless unlike that this particular study turned out every form of plant is increasing now what's interesting lee left out of this study is what the hell is going on in the oceans primary production in the oceans the bio of the oceans mostly microbial what they're up to is probably the most important thing they're the ones that create the atmosphere that we're happily breathing and they're not part of the study this is one of the things that james lovelock has been assisting is basically our knowledge of the oceans especially abortion life is fundamentally vapor says so we're in the process of finding out by inadvertent bad geo engineering of too much co 2 an atmosphere find out what is the ocean doing that or the ocean with the extra heat is swelling up that's most of where we're getting the sea level rise and there's a lot more coming with mark what will want me we're getting terrible harm to some of the coral reefs like off of australia rate refi there is just known wada bleaching from from overheating and this is why i am jetty hillis our previous session on the main stage was saying look geo engineering is worth experimenting with enough to see that it works to see if we can buy time and the warming aspect of all of this tweak this system with small but you.

aws lee james lovelock australia
"james lovelock" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"In the um this is also uh that the r r r our tendency to frame things up uh from an apart apocalyptic perspective um inhibit the efficacy of fighting against climate change and have to say that it route did it i mean he made a bring that out uh form ame because um you know i i can't help but think of a there was a there's this a british scientists i believe we still have a guy named james lovelock who uh found the hole in the ozone layer and was who you know uh forty fifty years ago i guess now thirty forty years ago and uh they had asked him in the early odds uh about climate change and i said you know this the recycling everything there but he's doing is really nice but um that conversations about twenty or thirty years to old uh by the end of the century a europe will be subsaharan uh you know shortly thereafter that uh eighty percent the world's population will be dead and they said that's very pessimistic outlook they said nama scientists that don't think this necessarily something uh any better about six billion people than 1 billion and um and and i i wonder amid it easy is the idea that i mean in in in what you see as problematic do you see it as an exaggeration of or is it that it is d framing of it makes uh an apocalyptic vision for for climate change makes it hard to deal with.

climate change europe james lovelock thirty forty years forty fifty years eighty percent thirty years
"james lovelock" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

03:21 min | 4 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on KOIL

"My dear friends with robert dhabi welcome welcome wherever you are i've been talking about the godfather of the environmental movement a guy named james lovelock he's the know climate change is it's important he started the green religion and i am the godfather of climate change and the environmental movement and i wanted to tell you that it's it's not remotely scientific a slight one volcano could make more difference the global warming then and the newman cervical who say that the pope of climate change agreement with the pope of the greenwood james lovelock welcome up yes the the godfather of the green movement the green religion modern environmental movement do models unreliable the brennan when i could to more than five the news well the sender the this is the first time but the back on this early climate catastrophe is when flo see something michael never wanted this mistake let me the mistaken my greer brooke ninety seven years old the ascribes the dramatic change in his once fiercely alarmists believes to the fact that he has we'll look lebanon to slim yes the invent the style environmentalist was news spring chicken of eighty seven any any argued in his book the revenge of guy you meant zum we will warning williams worker but way they want to keep bringing up russia we'll guess what let me tell you guys again in the two thousand eight election don't tell anyone because no one will remind you in the media and the two thousand eight election china china broke into the rnc and the dnc see they also did that to win hollywood remember sony that's what they should be playing the tapes that stuff from sony when the headed so he talked funny about george clooney calling insecure and this when calling matlin insecure rock robert john dhabi you know what's interesting about the radio icon some wonderful bits really and when i sing when i do my khan i get the some amazing applause i just i you know i i just have to have some kind of a hollywood type united some kind of affirmation please would you play the of the applause track for me and the bravo's i wanna hear i just want to feel good about myself please hollywood please could of heavy applause rao please.

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"james lovelock" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

04:03 min | 4 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on KOIL

"In the movie industry seamen performed to commute food meriden plumes many world leaders to tune the american left the greatest jobs president god ever created how did everybody was crying and sell upset amongst the nice in verses we will work for us all racial income lines to create one american nation now we're phelan what not having hope he'll play we america and gentleman who the rubber drew an encore presentation friends it's rubber dhabi welcome welcome wherever you are i've been talking about the godfather of the environmental movement a guy named james lovelock he's the clinton is important we started the green religion him for godfather of climate change on the environmental movement and i wanna tell you that it's it's not remotely scientific right one roku could make more difference for global warming then and the newman cervical hussein the pope of climate change of green relate to the pope of religion james lovelock will come up yes the the godfather of the green movement the green religious modern environmental movement we're lenin when i could move within five news the this is the first earlier climate catastrophe flo two we want the this made a mistake mislead could mike rewritten brooke ninety seven years old he ascribed the dramatic change in the once fiercely alarmists beliefs for the fact that he has opener firm yes the invent the month was newsprint chicken of eighty seven any any argued in his book the revenge of guy your men could zoom we will warning williams worker but anyway they want to keep bringing up russia we'll guess what let me tell you guys again in the two thousand eight election don't tell anyone because no one will remind you in the media and the two thousand eight election china china broke into the rnc and the the see they also did that to wear hollywood remember sony that's what they should be playing the tapes the stuff from sony when the headed so he talked funny about george clooney calling insecure in this when calling matlin insecure robert john bobby you know what's interesting about the radio said some wonderful bits really and when i sing when i do my concerts.

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"james lovelock" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

03:12 min | 4 years ago

"james lovelock" Discussed on KOIL

"This the robert though the hill you will this to an encore presentation dear friends with robert dhabi welcome welcome wherever you are i've been talking about the godfather of the environmental movement a guy named james lovelock he's the left no clemens change is is important he started the green religion and i am the godfather of climate change and the environmental movement and i wanted to tell you lead it's it's not remotely scientific a slight one well keno could make more difference the global warming then and the new and cervical who say that the pope of climate change of green related the pope of the religious james lovelock will come up yes the the godfather of the green movement the green religious modern environmental movement do the models run reliable green running when i could be more than five the news center nettie this is the first time but he moved back on as early climate catastrophe when flo see said michael remember what the this mistake and made a mistake could my green written brooke ninety seven years old he ascribed the dramatic change in his once fiercely alarmists beliefs to the fact that he has well look up and i understand this thing is the invent the sign environment those was new spring chicken of eighty seven any any argued in his book the revenge of guy your man whom we warning willians will but anyway they want to keep bringing up russia we'll guess what let me tell you guys again in the two thousand eight election don't tell anyone because no one will remind you in the media in the two thousand eight a lecture china china broke into the rnc and the dnc they also did that to win hollywood remember sony that's what they should be playing the tapes the stuff from sony when the headed so he talked funny about george clooney calling insecure and this when calling not one insecure robert john bobby you know what's interesting about the radio i sometimes i think of some wonderful bits really and and when i sing when i do my concerts i get the some amazing.

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