23 Burst results for "James Joyce"

"james joyce" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:17 min | 8 months ago

"james joyce" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Class on apple podcasts. The iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. We'll see you tomorrow good afternoon. Would you like to try free. Sample of our double fudge brownie. Oh sure that's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep still very good. Some things never change like never being able to take just one free sample and gyco saving folks. Lots of money on their car insurance Macadamia nut i taste. We take one more sir. I thought so fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. Hey i'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because i'm not famous but i did start a men's grooming company called harry's the idea for harry's came out of a frustrating experience i had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over designed. An out of touch. At harry's our approach is simple. here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. Each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy things like by a world class german blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering a one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give us a try with this special offer. Get a harry starter. Set with a five blade. Razor waited handle shave gel and a travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping just go to harrys dot com and enter four four four at checkout. That's harrys dot com code. Four four four enjoy. hello again. it's eaves and you're listening to this day in history class. A podcast at truly believes no day is boring. Today is february. Second twenty twenty. The day was february. Second nineteen twenty two ulysses a novel by irish writer james joyce was first published in its entirety. The book is regarded as one of the most important works in modernist literature and it has a reputation for being long and difficult to read people in ireland. Britain and places often pronounce it ulysses. But i'm going to pronounce it ulysses throughout the rest of the episode. Because i have an unrefined american accent. Throughout the early twentieth century joyce wrote and published prose poetry and play some of his most notable ulysses includes dubliners a short story collection about middle class life around dublin and a portrait of the artist as a young man choices. First novel by the time this novel was published. Joyce had already began working on ulysses poet. Ezra pound sent margaret anderson. And jane editors at greenwich village based literary magazine. The little review parts of ulysses they agree to print the work serially and started doing so in one thousand nine hundred eighteen. But in nineteen twenty. The editors were arrested for publishing obscenity largely due to ulysses but also because of the magazines tone in general the two were convicted in one thousand nine hundred eighty one and they agree to stop publishing ulysses but just a couple of months after their conviction sylvia beach and american who had an english language bookstore in paris called shakespeare and company offered to publish the novel joyce set to work on writing the rest of the book. He finished writing in october of nineteen. Twenty one though revisions continued throughout the rest of the year on february. Second one thousand nine hundred eighty two. The first edition of one thousand copies went on sale. The book was paper bound with a blue cover with white lettering. Seven hundred fifty copies were normal issue. One hundred and fifty numbered copies were printed on a larger format handmade paper and one hundred were signed by choice. Each of its eighteen chapters are named after an episode of homer's epic odyssey. Most of the novel follows leopold bloom the main character around dublin. Over the course of one day leopold is written as a modern counterpart while the other two central characters stephen. Daedalus and molly bloom align with the with the logical telemacus and penelope the book is known for its use of the stream of consciousness technique. It's experimentation with language. Inform its literary. Allusions is robust characterizations. And it's humor. The book was immediately. Successful gertrude stein. Ernest hemingway in wb. Yates were some of the books notable early purchasers within eighteen weeks. The first edition sold out published another edition each year until nineteen thirty five in the us. The book was banned because it was considered pornographic but the ban was lifted in nineteen. Thirty five in random house became the us publisher of us's choice had made a little money from the sterilization of ulysses. The publication of the book was much more lucrative. He settled into a middle class lifestyle and began work on the text that was eventually called. Finnegans wake over. the years. Ulysses has been subject to plenty of analysis by its fans critics and scholars alike. The value of joyce's impact on modern and postmodern fiction has been debated and ulysses has been considered too complex and inaccessible but the book is recognized as a pivotal techs in literary history. I'm each deaf and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you know you already spend too much time on social media spend some time with us at t. The i h c podcast on facebook twitter and instagram email. Steelworks us a note at this day at iheartmedia dot com..

fifteen percent james joyce Ernest hemingway Joyce one thousand copies margaret anderson one hundred fifteen minutes yesterday Britain joyce two dollars october of nineteen harrys dot com early twentieth century harry's ireland tomorrow one hundred percent eighteen chapters
"james joyce" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:46 min | 8 months ago

"james joyce" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Knows my colleagues in the Senate stories kid me for quoting Irish poets. They thought I did because I'm Irish. I didn't do it. For that reason I did it because of the best parts of the world. James Joyce James Joyce was said to have told a friend that when he's come, when comes his time to pass When he dies, he said. Dublin Dublin were written on my heart. Well excuse the emotion, but When I die, Delaware, Britain in my heart of hearts, hearts of all, all of us all the bites way love you all. We've been there for us in the good in the bag. You never walked away. And, uh, I am proud, Proud, proud, proud to be a son of Delaware, and I'm even more proud to be standing here. Doing this from the major beau Biden, Sylvie, Ladies and gentlemen, and we have one regret. He's not here because he should. We should be introducing him as president. But we have great opportunities delivers taught us anything is possible. And then it's possible this country So God bless you all. May God protect our troops. Thank you. Joe Biden, the president elect.

James Joyce James Joyce Delaware Joe Biden beau Biden Dublin Dublin president Senate Britain Sylvie
"james joyce" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:48 min | 8 months ago

"james joyce" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The Chairman, Carper, Senator Carper. Knows my colleagues in the Senate always kid me for quoting Irish poets. They thought I did because I marriage I didn't do it. For that reason I did it because of the best parts of the world. James Joyce James Joyce was said to have told a friend when he's come. When comes his time to pass when he dies, he said Dublin Dublin were written on my heart. Well excuse the emotion, but When I die, Delaware, Britain in my heart of hearts, hearts of all, all of us all the bites. We love you all. You've been there for us in the good in the bag. It never walked away. And I am proud, proud, proud, proud to be a son of Delaware, and I'm even more proud to be standing here. Doing this from the major beau Biden. So ladies and gentlemen, and we have one regret. He's not here because he's sweet should be introducing him as president. But way have great opportunities delivers taught us anything is possible. Anything is possible this country So God bless you all. And may God protect our troops. Thank you. Joe.

Senator Carper James Joyce James Joyce Delaware Dublin Dublin beau Biden Senate Chairman Britain Joe president
Biden gives emotional farewell in Delaware

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Biden gives emotional farewell in Delaware

"Joe Biden has given his home state emotional farewell a day before his inauguration deeply personal hello our next charity to Washington starts here at Delaware's National Guard headquarters which is named after his late son beau Biden said the state gave him and his family a chance man has always backed him and I'll always be a proud son of the state of Delaware he wiped away tears while citing Irish poet James Joyce who is said to have told a friend of that when he died he David doublet written on his heart excuse the motion but when I die Delaware Beretta my heart soccer make ani Washington

National Guard Headquarters Joe Biden Delaware Beau Biden Washington David Doublet James Joyce Soccer Ani Washington
"james joyce" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"Right Oh. Yeah. Redemption. In this book of Essays Roxane Gay tells readers that the only way to support gender equality is by stringing small decorative objects onto necklaces. Okay beating necklace bead. That breaking that. And sort of the general term for women and men who talk about bad bad feminist pizza mayor you got. was hard work to use context clues to get through the. Ask. Here's another one. If you have a gluten allergy, you shouldn't read this well known guide to pregnancy exclusively for bread bakers, which gives new meaning to having a bun in the oven. What to expect when your? Explain how. Either what to expect when you're expecting allergy with two Glued. We Oh we do expect. When you're expecting. Nice. and. I'm glad you knew that book because it'll high five. Okay James Joyce's first novel is a coming of age story about Stephen Daedalus a boy who roars into puberty when he grows hair on his neck like a lion. James Joyce James? Joyce. No No. The other one Oh, the Double Dubliners Dubliners, the other other. Finnegans. Why did he write? So many books well, it would be something about a man because it becomes main portrait of an artist as a young man. Yes. So sorry. That's fun. I,.

James Joyce James Joyce James Roxane Gay Stephen Daedalus
A Walking Tour of Dublin, Ireland

Travel with Rick Steves

07:15 min | 1 year ago

A Walking Tour of Dublin, Ireland

"Start. Today's all Irish. Our with tips for a walking tour of Dublin with nearly two million people in Greater Dublin. Ireland's capital is by far its biggest city and it thrives with Arts Entertainment Food and fun just taking a walk through Ireland's capital. You can see and experience so much of its charm. That can know where to look and if you know where to walk. It's even better. That's why we've invited to Great Irish guides. Joe Darcy and Karen O'hare to join us in our studios for a guided stroll through Dublin. Joe and Karen thanks for being with us. Our pleasure great to be here so if you're going to take somebody on a walk through. Dublin where we just start. I think I'd probably start up. Stephen's Green which is at the south. End of Grafton Street is a pedestrianised shopping street and Stevens. Green is a beautiful manicured Eighteenth Century Park. It reminds me of when you get off the platform and suddenly. You're at hogwarts step out of the middle of this busy packed city into a beautiful manicured park actually reminds me of London. Very much so probably. That's because it was designed in a time when Dublin was actually the second city in the British Empire. Oh without question. In everything. From the the wrought iron fencing around the entire park to the style of landscape architecture inside the park is very very limited those parts in London and Joe when we think of Saint Stephen's Green. Today it has some connections with Ireland's difficult fight for independence Jordan. The nineteen sixteen religion on Easter Monday called eastern evasion and there was one. Contingent of artists rebelled swear in command of Stevens granddaughter. Job was to mind. Stephen Greene barricaded streets on prevent British reinforcements from getting into the city centre and amazingly their only experience of warfare. Because he's not. Soldiers was watching the pathway news from World War One and where everybody was digging trenches all over Belgium France so they dug trenches in Stephen's Green. Hold out but of course British army caught up to four storey buildings all around the Gresham hotel. They had a clear line of fire. Is like they're digging their own tombs. Yeah Yeah So. They retreated from their interface called the Royal College of Surgeons. Which is just when you come out with Stephen Screen through that gate around. He'll after all colleges charges and you can still see bullet marks into whole memorial to mention. Yeah Yeah Yeah let host reminded of the the blood that was last is Ireland one. It's independent that was no easy feat the more understanding of history you bring your visit to. Dublin the more. You'll enjoy your sightseeing today when I go to Saint Stephen Screen it's Of course you've got the history but it's just a festival of of youth and families in life. People are feeding the ducks in the pond. There's a little theater there. And it's and it's the kickoff point for Grafton Street Karen mentioned Grafton Street Joe when he walked down Grafton Street What are you gonNA find? You're gonNA find a multitude of small shops as well as the big retail shops. Actually strangely enough when you come down from Stevens Gray and one of the first big shops you say you left US Disneyland. So there's a store you know. This is the High Rent Street and you have the high rents treated drives out the local businesses and it brings in the what. Are you gonNA see Karen when you walk down Grafton Street well I think the first thing that you notice is the street is seething with life there's wall to wall people coming and going in either direction and you know living in Dublin. You're always if you live there you're gonna run into someone you know in that street. You know when you walk down it you don't see any churches right on the street but hiding a little bit off. The way is a Catholic Church. Why would a Catholic Church be hiding off the main street in Dublin? Well Saint Theresa's Church right off. Grafton Street was One of the first places that it was allowable. I believe for Roman Catholics to openly worship after the period of time in the eighteenth century known as the penal laws when open practice of Roman Catholicism was officially outlawed by British rulers in Ireland so that churches write-offs in Stephen's Green and it's very much an oasis of tranquility in the city as it has been since the eighteenth century Saint Teresa's. It's a beautiful church to depend to end. It is interesting to think that in Ireland. Dublin was sort of London's second city and it was very not Catholic but when Catholicism was allowed you could worship as Catholics in Dublin but keep a low profile exactly so these great churches are tucked away in the back streets although they were allowed to openly practice. That wasn't really opened. That was in inverted commas. The church still had to be kinda hidden away. They weren't allowed to build churches on a main street. That's why it's down outside. So it Joe at the bottom of Grafton street you come to a very important College Beautiful College Trinity College and originally for the elites for the Protestant kids but of course today Everybody's welcome as it traveled. How do enjoy Trinity College? Well the best way to visit is to go into the front main entrance on an area called college dot Grafton Street just continue on straight over to your right hand side and you come into a beautiful Georgian Square. A huge amount of Dobbin was rebuilt. George an and that's like neoclassical screams. British Empire Eighteenth Century he and George W was rebuilt in the eighteenth century in Georgia. So we're one of the best Georgian cities. In Britain colleges SORTA like the elite colleagues for Ireland. Even go to college was founded in one thousand nine hundred hundred nothing left of the original college. It was almost totally rebuilt starting in Sixteen Ninety S and then Roy Eighteenth Century Karen my favorite thing when I step through that Grand. Entrance of Trinity is a little table where our students offering tours? Yeah that's right and I used to live right across from that table when I was in college and Trinity. Right in front square and there are students known as scholars of the college who've passed a competitive examination to have free tuition at the college and they give tours of front square dressed in the academic gowns. That were still common among students until recently and they are really eloquent. Fun-loving students giving you a candid. Look at student life. It's very inexpensive. It's a great way to get a sense of Trinity College absolutely in a great way to get a sense of the tradition of wit in Dublin. It goes back to one of the most famous Students at Trinity Oscar Wilde are guides to Dublin travel with Rick Steves are irish-american Cure. No half he attended. Kennedy College is an expert on the Ellen pipes which he performs with the company trio opened the door for three Joe. Darcy provides custom walking tours of Dublin and was recently on the board of historic Sweeney's pharmacy. Where James Joyce readings are given throughout the week when we go to Trinity College? Of course you've got to go to the library and see the book of Kells and so one of the most important medieval art treasures in Western civilization when you leave trinity when I was really struck by is a bank that used to be the parliament step in there and you get a little dose of British rule of Ireland Joe. Tickets into that the most important building built in Dobbin Jordan rebuilding eighteenth century was a new bike camera. Houses apartment one of the first purpose built house the parliament certainly in Europe. If not the world took about forty years to complete S- between seventeen forty. Seven hundred eighty and housed. Two Chambers House will come in the House of Lords very much along the the British can step into one of those houses to this day. It's open during banking errors free and and you really got sense of that little after the act of union and the first of January eighteen hundred one we became part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and the Bank of Ireland. Arden's forced commercial bank. They took over the building paid for the House of Commons. Hot To be put out of use never to be used as a place of assembly again but they said nothing about the House of Lords so the Bank of art and has maintained. And it's a beautiful room. It's mostly open Jordan banking hours occasionally there's functions and there you'll see a sign outside that it's either open or closed. I stumbled into it just this last year. I never knew about it and it was great

Dublin Ireland Joe Darcy Stephen College Beautiful College Trin Trinity College London Eighteenth Century Park Karen O'hare British Empire Eighteenth Cent Stephen Greene Royal College Of Surgeons Saint Stephen House Of Commons Bank Of Ireland Stevens British Army Roy Eighteenth Stephen Screen
"james joyce" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"james joyce" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Welcome one welcome all welcome you do yours and marchers to the beat of any drum at starbucks. We know that wellness has a lot more to to do with finding your unique journey than following the latest trends. That's why we have something for every taste every craving every mood and every you you like our new coconut milk law Tei an almond milk honey flat white because not journeys are the same and what makes it right is that it's yours hi everyone. I'm Katie couric here to let you know that my podcast next question with me. Katie couric is back for. Its second season. I'll be diving into some big issues. Choose like this country's devastating maternal mortality rate. The rise of astrology and a little thing called the presidential election listened to next question. It comes out every Thursday on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your favorite shows in this day in history class is a production of I heart radio. Hello again it's EAVES and you're listening to this day in history class. A podcast at truly truly believes no day is boring. Today is February. Second Twenty twenty. Uh the day was February. Second Nineteen twenty two ulysses a novel by Irish writer James Joyce was first published in its entirety. The book is regarded as one of the most important works in modernist literature and it has a reputation take for being long and difficult to read people in Ireland and Britain and other places often pronounce it ulysses. But I'm going to pronounce it. Ulysses Melissa is throughout the rest of the episode. Because I have an unrefined American accent throughout the Early Twentieth Century Joyce wrote and published prose poetry and play some of his most notable ulysses work includes Dubliners a short story collection about middle class life around Dublin and a portrait Richard of the artist as a young man choices first novel by the time of this novel was published. Joyce had already began working on ulysses poet. Ezra pound sent Margaret Anderson and Jane Heat Editors at the Greenwich Village Based Literary Magazine. The little review parts of ulysses. They agree to print the work serially and started doing so in one thousand nine hundred eighteen but in one thousand nine hundred eighty the editors were arrested for publishing obscenity eh largely due to UC's but also because of the magazines tone in general the two were convicted in one thousand nine hundred eighty one and they agreed to stop publishing ulysses but just a couple of months after their conviction Sylvia beach an American who had an English language bookstore in Paris called Shakespeare and company you offered to publish the novel Joyce set to work on writing the rest of the book. He finished writing in October of nineteen twenty one though revisions continued ten. You'd throughout the rest of the year on February second nineteen twenty two. The first edition of one thousand copies went on sale. The book was paper bound and with a blue cover with white lettering. Seven hundred and fifty copies were normal issue. One hundred and fifty number copies were printed on a larger format handmade paper and one hundred were signed by choice. Each of his eighteen chapters are named after an episode of Homer's epic Odyssey. Most of the novel level follows Leopold Bloom the main character around Dublin over the course of one day leopold is in as a modern counterpart Odysseus. Wile the other two central characters Stephen Daedalus and molly bloom align with the mythological Attila Mockus an penelope. The book is known for its use of the stream of consciousness technique. It's experimentation with language. Inform its literary allusions is robust characterizations. And it's it's humor. The book was immediately successful Gertrude Stein Ernest Hemingway in WBZ gates. Were some of the books notable early purchasers Earth within eighteen weeks. The first edition had sold out beach published another edition each year until nineteen thirty five and the US. The book was banned because it was considered pornographic but the ban was lifted in nineteen thirty five in Random House became the US publisher of Ulysses. The choice had made a little money. From the sterilization of Ulysses. The publication of the book was much more lucrative. He settled into a middle class lifestyle and began. Dan Work on the text that was eventually called Finnegans. Wake over the years. Ulysses has been subject to plenty of analysis by its fans critics and scholars just like the value of choices. Impact on modern and postmodern fiction has been debated and ulysses has been considered too complex and inaccessible people. But the book is recognized as a pivotal techs in literary history each jeffcoat. And hopefully you know a little more about history today anything you did yesterday. If you know you already spend too much time on social media spend some time with US AT T. The eight podcast cast on facebook twitter and instagram. Email still works. Send us a note at this day at iheartmedia dot com. We're here every day. So Oh you know where to find us. I.

Ulysses Melissa Early Twentieth Century Joyce Katie couric US Twenty twenty starbucks Dublin Leopold Bloom Gertrude Stein Ernest Hemingwa Ezra pound Greenwich Village Based Litera Random House apple UC writer Dan Work Wile facebook
Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

Bookworm

09:37 min | 1 year ago

Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

"I'm Michael Silver Blah this bookworm arm and today I'm very pleased to have as my guest. Adina Hoffman the Dina has written a life of the great almost mind boggling screenwriter Ben. Hecht the book has the Subtitle Fighting Words moving pictures this Ben Hecht had his. Oh would you say finger in so many tries He starts out now having moved with his family to the mid West as soon as he graduates from high school. He realizes this is. The college is not for him and he high tails it to Chicago where he becomes a very well-known newspaper this paper Man Song well known that his adventures in the newspaper business but come perhaps the most is famous play ever to be written about newspapers that he wrote with Charles MacArthur. Yes called the front page. The the front page becomes his girl Friday with cary grant and Rosalind Russell and thereby hangs a tale every the time Ben Hecht turns around. There's a revision of something. He's done a new who've version of it by someone else that he in turn revise right even his own memoirs has multiple versions of what happened to him in his own life life. He's kind of astonishing. This came from the days when face at a writer wrote right. These were people who wrote all the time there's also literary life that Hecht has in Chicago and actually this was one of the fascinating things for me is where his kind of the big city You know newspaper world met the world of the Chicago Renaissance and a lot of the people who were in that newspaper world. People like Carl Sandberg. who was a really good friend of Heck's you know he was also a reporter and they were sort of Newspaperman by day and then by night they were writing their poems in their novels and Hecht was not only hanging around with people like Sherwood Anderson Jason and he was also publishing in the little review which is unbelievable magazine? Push some of the first chapters of James Joyce's ulysses and they felt. What was her name? Margaret Anderson Anderson felt that Ben Heck was every bit as much a member of of the little review says dream straight. And he's there on almost every single issue. He was a kind of a pet of hers. He was sort of in love with her. She was unfortunately Very distracted by high art and she was also a lesbian was not interested in in that way but she loved him and she published him. Ben Has a great fiction writer. I mean he was. He fancied himself self novelist But he was very devoted to that calling but at the same time that he was writing. These very heavy breathing stories for Margaret Anderson. He was also writing he. He was whipping off these commercials stories for Lincoln at the smart set. HMO MINKIN was one of his heroes. Mencken was a cynic cynic and a sophisticated and he had every bit of hostility toward the dumb aspects of American culture. He was trying to make America smart op. He wrote fascinating essays sason books on the American language as opposed to British. We don't get an American writer per se until until Mark Twain who's writing the Mississippi River. Talk that he learned when he was a boatman. Well by the time you've got the middle of the country Chicago you've got gangsters you've got prohibition you've got flappers you've got an American language wood jr that was invented here and Hecht loved. -actly yeah and I think for me. That was one of the wonderful things about spending time with him. I was reading. This book was spending time with his language. I mean whatever you WANNA say about. Whether his books are wonderful books or not so wonderful books he was a wonderful maker of sentences and paragraphs graphs and just terrific wit on top of it and he and Macarthur wrote the front page. which was kind of Valentine to that newspaper World of Chicago? You go where they've both been cub reporters you see. He comes in to the newspaper office. Writing these things. In Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy as as you quote them right they are made of twenty three delight phrases. He's putting them together hurling them together and eventually he's going to have some fame as the newspaper Komo's rining calms every every day made up of just what he heard some Hobo say right or what some very wealthy people were saying in a casino no to be a writer then will start out as journalists. That's where Hemingway starts. He proposed this idea of. But this daily column that you've mentioned which would become known as a thousand and one afternoons in Chicago and they're kind of remarkable pieces they're just little snippets and there's a sense that the news is not just test the news of the grant headline it's also all these sort of marginal lives and people. You know the guy who runs the laundromat and the woman who works as a manicurist and has to fend off her lecherous clients. There's a way in which he's tossing this stuff off in a very casual way reading them daily. They're published on the back page of the newspaper next to the to the comic strips and he's not taking them too seriously or taking himself too seriously and there's so much better than the fiction into which he was pouring his all of his artistic ambition. That just is not the effective whereas these things that he was doing kind of on the fly as you say they're wonderful and they're incredibly generous and sympathetic. You feel him identifying with all of the city of Chicago In a way they kind of anticipate the work of later colonists people like beat Hamill and Jimmy Breslin. Who would become more famous in a way for doing doing that? who may also by now have been forgotten but act. was doing that early on. I'm talking to Adina Hoffman about. Don't her book Ben. Hecht its subtitle fighting. Words moving pictures and it's published in the Jewish writers series series published by Yale University. Press you mention that a lot of these people have been forgotten even people more recent Jonathan head so why Ben Hair. Well IT'S A. It's the question that I get all the time. And it's a good question and I mean basically at some level I feel like I've known Ben Hecht before before I knew Ben Hecht if you grow up watching American movies. He's his words are in your head even if you've never heard his name and so and I used to watch a lot of old movies as a kid but it was only when I became more conscious conscious and started to read about film history I actually worked as a film critic throughout most of the ninety s Then I was very aware of who Ben Hecht was and I I read his wonderful memoir child trial of the century. And I thought wow you know okay the movies he's known as you know. Pauline Kale called him the greatest American screenwriter Gianluca Dard said he invented eighty percent percent. Of what is used in Hollywood movies today called him a genius and all of that is true but the fact is that for heck the movies were really just a piece of it and in some ways they were actually may be one of the smaller pieces pieces of it in that memoir is full of all these other lives that we've just been talking about so I was first of all fascinated by that multiplicity of his the fact that he could contain multitudes dude but I also was drawn to heck in terms of his relationship to Jewish things. And here's a place where he basically an American Jew who claims not to have really paid much attention to the fact of his Jewishness until his consciousness was sort of raised by the Holocaust there. He's been in Chicago. He knows the woman. Editing the little review he knows call Sandberg. He knows Sherwood Anderson he moves to New York becomes friends with Herman Mankiewicz Herman Mankiewicz and also the roundtable tape Dorothy Parker and Benchley and S J Perelman and the Algonquin New Yorker Gang. He he moves to Los Angeles. He does what's so many do he has nothing but contempt damned for the people who started the motion picture industry. You say that you're interested in Hicks. Judaism with those were hits Jews. He didn't like them. There are a lot of Jews in heck's life he was actually born on the lower east side and he spent the first few years of his life. There and I don't actually think that that's Unimportant I mean. He grew up in Racine Wisconsin. which is this pastoral American American place etc but there is a way in which those tenements were in him in a very deep

Ben Hecht Chicago Writer BEN Margaret Anderson Anderson Adina Hoffman Ben Heck Charles Macarthur Cary Grant Sherwood Anderson Michael Silver Herman Mankiewicz Herman Manki James Joyce Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy Rosalind Russell Sherwood Anderson Jason Los Angeles Yale University Mississippi River America
Nancy Walker shares her experience with the Gay Rights Movement

Making Gay History

10:47 min | 1 year ago

Nancy Walker shares her experience with the Gay Rights Movement

"I'm Eric Marcus and this is making a history. Nancy Walker had a type she liked the brainy ones in nineteen sixty two. When Nancy was in her late twenties she met Penny Penny was smart? It is a whip wise beyond her eighteen years and she read James Joyce Nancy was impressed. The two fell in love and became life partners by the time. Nancy and Penny got involved in the gay rights movement in the Early Nineteen Seventy S. They were living in Toronto Canada where he was attending graduate school. That's where they joined the first gay organization in the Mid Seventy S. They moved back to the US to Boston. Massachusetts and Nancy soon volunteer to work at a weekly newspaper called Gay Community News. As you know from our previous episodes the Post stonewall years saw an explosion of new gay rights organizations and along with the new organizations organizations came scores of new publications the Gay Community News or CNN was among the more prominent and influential Gay Liberation Paper with the national readership readership. Nancy was in her forties when she joined she was an outspoken New Yorker and a moderate pragmatist. It's no surprise that Nancy and the younger more radical staff didn't always see eye to eye. So here's the scene. He's the winter of Nineteen eighty-nine and I've just is travel to the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston where Nancy and Penny share a classic Victorian House complete with a turret and peeling paint. They've been a couple for a long time and it shows all Nancy night. Talk Pennies on hand to offer tea chime in and help Nancy when her memory fails her. Nancy is sitting in a comfortable upholstered chair. She's dressing dark slacks and a light colored blouse which is where I clicked my microphone. I press record interview with Nancy Walker Sunday December tenth. Nineteen eighty-nine at the home of Nancy Walker in Jamaica Plains and Massachusetts interviewers. Eric Marcus tape one side one. I had gotten fed up with pretending to be straight. We'd been together nine years and we had no gay gay friends. So that's when we first went to New York and then we went back to Canada. We would just on vacation in New York went back. That must've Vince. Seventy one or seventy two. I'm not sure took us. Even though we thought we were big shots took us a long time. They get the guts to go. Remember kept finding excuses uses not to go. It's always something wrong. Finally we went and we looked around the room and so people like our grandmothers. I said what the Hell is this what we were afraid of. And that was the beginning and then we went to Canada and so I notice a little newspaper that talked about home files what they call the home of Fire Organization should. Hey let's call and see what it's about and we did. That was seventy two. We first got involved. Well he belonged to the community home. Five Association Toronto better known as Chat and what was the group's reason for being. Oh I think it was An umbrella group for everything for for counseling for social purposes. They even I suppose. Did some legal work the law had changed. The law was universally changed to a consenting adult law in Canada so they had legal advantages that we didn't have that they didn't have the socialist. Matt it's it was it. It was still terribly condemned. People were very conservative there. I remember in Canada trying so hard to get any gay gay publications to find out what was going on in the world and there was one little sleazy bookstore that carried gay papers. They had things like that but be willing to go into what was labeled and known to the public as a filthy bookstore and when we moved here there was a little note. You you know little convenience store across the street from the apartment we lived in and I walked in there and LO and behold his gay newspaper the Gay Community News. It was a quarter order so I bought this thing and I said hey look. It's out in the open. It's okay we don't have to do sleazy things to be gay and didn't know at at the time I was GONNA wind up making the newspaper and not having to pay for it. I think the reason I worked there was. I didn't want water for the news did you. Nineteen seventy six in May nineteen seventy six. What was unlikely that? What was the operation like physical kinds of people? It was unbelievable up wrong sleep flight of stairs into a big open space. That was a mess they had to. It worked very hard to get. What little materials they could? They had no money never had any money. And there were some scruffy looking people very radical people any kind of dress you can imagine. They wore a lot of the people. I knew there are now gone because of AIDS was suicide I mean the voice had long hair every kind of hair. Every kind of everything was a real mixed bag was not a luxurious place. But it was home it meant a great deal to all of us. Every view was gone. Maybe what I'm trying to say because that's how I really I felt. was that somebody else in the rest of the world not fully honest that you could be yourself and we. We didn't get along with each other at all. Even the people who had the same political persuasions didn't get along but still we knew we were among our own you know. It's like a Jewish family. You may not get along but you know this is your place in the rest of it out there is the diaspora. It's not your place. So That's how oh I felt. I don't know how other people felt about. I just know they loved it terribly. Paper had to go on no matter what and it went through hell. It went through fire. They burn the place astound once and we just moved over to a place in Cambridge. That let us use their space and we never missed a week. That paper has been continuously we published since it started in two weeks during the year. They have vacations. It's quite a remarkable achievement. It was either the end of the seventies of the beginning of the eighties and it was devastating blow. Yes it was awesome right. I guess they figured they couldn't get us any other way they were going to do. They couldn't get us that way either. What was what was the purpose of purpose? Yeah I think I think the purpose was to get out of the gate National Gay newspaper. It was the only gate national weekly. It's gone on to something. I consider me three. We need contact with each other. You know there was still gay. People who didn't know there was anybody else in the world. It's hard coming from a place like New York. Imagine that but there there are people in Kentucky and Louisiana and places like that. That didn't know there were any of the gay people. I didn't know there were gay. Men I had no idea I was so delighted the first time I met an openly gay male. I can't tell you it's a brother somebody I can love. You know there were no. I don't think about I mean I didn't I grew up in my own. Little head issue. Weiji Museum in DC N. existence. It started before I got this only three years old with a mission that she was there. A awed yes. Oh if anything was holy was G. C. N. it was a tremendous sense of mission and we loved it and protected What it meant to me was finally all my life? I said I've got this great ideas and I would like somebody to know about them so finally I got a place where I could write and other people could read it. Let's go back to the beginning of interview with you beginning questions. What were you born? Nineteen thirty five. I was born on Saint Patrick's Day and I think he's just terrific because I wound up in a city where just in the city of Boston it a holiday day on where we one flower Fifth Avenue Hospital in New York. My mother was born there in thirty. One Yeah you see. I could've been your mother. That's where would you been in one thousand nine hundred five hundred. BJ have any recollection of that on the day itself. I know I wasn't Merrick. That's lived and I was terrified throughout the war because I had a warped perception. Maybe not so walked what was going on with Jews but they were being put an ovens and all I could think about was being put into an oven so I was quite nervous wreck until the war was. She thought they might come to me. I'm sure if we lost the war I was going to get cooked. So that's part of the reason. I love this this country so much that whenever my my my ex colleagues would not the country I think eight roster I am a Jew. There's no way I'm going anywhere and when I met Jewish people in Canada they said you know you are so aggressively Jewish. There's there's nowhere else in the world. But in America Fed Jews are open about being Jewish and proud of it. She said he keeps you mouth shots. I want an awful way to lose his goddamn closets all over the world. I've been closeted about being Jewish. I got enough trouble so I was always all my life of conscious of being Jewish and being thankful that I was here and and being a lesbian also. I'm still thankful I'm here with all due respect to my I walked progressive friends. This country isn't the enemy. UH system works. It may be the newest country in the civilized world. But it's the greatest one in my opinion so you're right place. I can hear how you could be significant odds with your comrades-in-arms because they hadn't lived through the war. Aw they didn't have the really intense feeling that if I hadn't been in this country I probably wouldn't exist at. Aw

James Joyce Nancy Canada Nancy Walker Gay Community News New York Eric Marcus Boston Massachusetts Penny Penny Toronto United States CNN Jamaica Plain Aids Vince Fire Organization Victorian House America
David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

Oh No Ross and Carrie

12:54 min | 2 years ago

David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

"Very happy to have a David Mickelson if you don't recognize that name you will likely recognize the site that he created and runs it's called slopes slopes dot com and I think we all Oh David a great debt of gratitude thank you thank you for being here you're welcome thanks for having me for being on owner Rossen Kerry today's just Ross ended and our friend Spencer and Charles were here at Sei con twenty nine thousand nine you've been to either this conference before similar ones way back when the amazing meeting being used to go to I probably passed in the hallways and they had no idea that you were the one solving all of my online battles actually I used to go with a friend of mine who lived here in Vegas and we thought US kind of Bari Pie be more interesting to go to the other side and go to the UFO convention and the vicar convention what the true believer Oh you're talking my language well that's what I do with the other skeptical crowd rather than the Arthur's or what have you so maybe WanNa join us on a future investigation or something let's tell our audience a bit about slopes in case for some reason they don't know I don't know what working to hide under for the past twenty five years or how to have not heard of snow but you started in the year of the lion king that's how I see nineteen ninety-four IC- yet what got snow going what started this I wish I could claim I had the foresight twenty five years ago to recognize you know the Internet thing fake news going to be a big problem come the twenty first century so I'm going to get a head start on it but no Not really that visionary it was just kind of a hobby that got out of control I worked for a very large computer company so you're kind of hooked in the Internet before most people had heard of the Internet back in the old ninety ninety four that's the very early days people are on netscape navigator for in back in the the usenet newsgroup days and there were no blogs even at that point no search engines no youtube yeah yeah alter Vista Dog pile of the company that made Alta this over really is okay I'm letting people go back K. situate themselves were in nineteen ninety four the Big Bang theory episode whether the doing favorite nonexistent search engine if I'd been involved in newsgroups about urban legends Disney and when the first graphical browser came out from Wola SORTA started writing up little Disney related urban legends okay this is kind of fun because carry my co host her other podcasts is called hit Mickey's and she talks about the deep seedy underbelly of Disney and did very investigation of the rumors around Waltz head it turns out he actually was interested in cryogenics but he didn't have his head frozen or any part of him actually that was one of the first investigations we realtors going out to force lawn and actually photographing the burial site or at least the martyr they are for anyone who wasn't able to access the -Fornia or Glendale at least give them a vision of of his grave and kiddingly trying to round up people on the Internet Tawhid in Forest Lawn overnight off the spot exactly what was this is the deep kind of investigative digging that's nope isn't even before it snaps and so I talked about with you before you know it kind of like figuring out a way to get into club thirty three the big mystery because it wasn't only Internet I just sort of you know the the basketball court in the matter homer and all those sorts I have been in there all the the hidden supposedly hidden risque stuff in Disney movies that's really where snow started a house and then when I ran through all the Disney legends I could think of branched out into different categories and then my wife the time started chipping in intending it to be kind of like a Wikipedia for Urban Legend Yeah not with the wikki part of everyone editing of it just sort of this authoritative Encyclopedia Urban Legends that's why it was originally called the wheel the urban legends reference phages and urban reference or legend Urban Legends Reverend pages right earlier yeah that doesn't roll off the time that does not I'm going to work so hard not to go down the rabbit hole of wanting to talk about Disney civic stopped I worked for Disney to mention working for big companies and love that kind of history so we'll talk about it some other time other podcasts so quickly took a left turn because as we were just discussing this was way back before search engines even yacht who was hand compiled yet just in index directories of websites did you get on that index but notes all word of mouth really kind of quickly became this place where everybody emailed anything questionable they came across on the internet or even in the real world and so it was all dying children trying to collect the the largest number of business cards birthday cards at Christmas cards and lots of computer virus warnings many which were hoaxes and missing dialed appeals many of which were hoax is you know before they were kind of clearing houses for all that stuff right now that was and there was no wikipedia the time so so which came first kind of the website format or the name snow pts well I started using the name snowpacks way back in the pre webbed as okay or yeah once the origin of this term slopes is the name of a family of characters that appear throughout the works of William Faulkner I'll and that has absolutely nothing to do with anything other than just way back when I was familiar with falters work so I doc named my cats nope site had personalized plate that said snowpacks and so my college roommate's called me that and when I started posting on the old newsgroups on the Internet the Stott there's you know whatever twenty million David's out there who's going to remember David I need like uh-huh Dinette so using snow pts and it really just were doubt fortuitously now it's become a verb yeah it's kind of like is Amazon Gogol it's short it's catchy distinguishes us from competitors 'cause everybody else in our spaces fact something or something check or something and we're the ones who are not yet we did a similar thing at least with our podcast is called owner Rawson Kerry because there's no indication from the name itself what the podcast about so slopes itself at least has just become a household name so okay so it wasn't anything to do with snoops the character from the rescuers which is what what my crazy conspiracy believing cousin Catherine calls it she snoops we actually did once getting Anki irate email from someone who threatened to report us to the Faulkner Foundation or so really not realizing that there are a number of people the world who actually have the surname snow he invented it's not like we called ourselves Sherlock Holmes or something as soon as you settle with me those families then you can come after me that's funny it reminds me of I think goes Murray Gelman who named the quirk after a James Joyce Reference yeah three quirks for muster mark so he made that his new particle name anyway will you know what to step back even a little bit farther again let's say somebody at this point is still not familiar with slopes haven't been there what's the basic format so you come to snaps if you've heard an urban legend or someone shares a claim that could be true or false yes and they get to see synopsis telling them either it's true it's false it's mostly falls somewhere in between and then an explanation right yes about we're doing these days unfortunately as political that's what's consuming everyone in the era of fake news and Yeah and Post Truth and all of that as lawyer work is cut out for him yeah so you you know someone's forty you this screed about some company is funding you know genocide eight of gay people in some African country or just something that sounds really horrible are hard to believe or you know Nancy Pelosi is going to become vice president trump resigns or some vaccine question right and so then somebody just has to add on their online debate forum while the to do is go to another tab and just type in snoops and then that key phrase that company and they get a handy article they read it very quickly and then instead of them having to do a ton of re research and share it with their crazy cousin they just copy the link and say please go read this note article so early on how many of the articles were you writing was it all you are did you have writers from the beginning at the very beginning when it started it was just me road all the Disney stuff the first few categories as I said than my wife at the time Barbara started chipping in in writing but said we started this back in nineteen ninety four it wasn't until twenty years later Haute very recently relatively recently back to doing it on my own and one of hired a couple of contract writers and then as the twenty sixteen election proved to be the most contentious in US history roundup with more more writers or editors so maybe you can help me out is it true that the pope endorsed Donald Trump for president. it's not true yes not wanna Vatican City as yeah how how do you differentiate all of this language around fake news versus is hoax or parodies how do you kind of internally classify all these things well one is we we avoid the USA fake news really now just because it's been completely co opted practically meaningless us like urban legend used to be just a a synonym for false or anything that you neal's they don't lie leave just call it fake news and also news doesn't have to be fake to be Eh misleading like you can create a one hundred percent accurate article only tells one side of a story you know it's like imagine a criminal trial where the prosecution put on a case of just stop there and it went to the jury the lies by omission yeah it'd be highly misleading so fake doesn't cover it all so we're still kind of calling it junk news item apparently our president has moved onto corrupt news media yes we're not quite calling it that yet tell me a bit about your process first of all how does an idea become eligible force a bunch of people submitting forms online saying please is a settle this for me or is it something you take interest in now our topic selection methodology is we tackle whatever the most people are asking about her questioning at a given time we do that through a variety of metrics what people are emailing us what the searching for on our site what's trending on Google what people are posting on our facebook pages what's what's on the front page of read it kind of there's a whole lot of inputs that gets synthesized and we don't make any judgments about the stuff is too silly or CBS or unimportant rust cover you let the interest level Kinda dictate house exactly sometimes it's kind of distressing but people are interested in to the exclusion of things are actually more substantial or important subjects to a lot of criticism where people complain you were debunking obvious satire must be there's nothing obvious out there and if we're if we're writing about it it's a whole lot of people had ask about it because they didn't get it will

David Mickelson Rossen Kerry Ross Spencer Charles Twenty Five Years One Hundred Percent Twenty Years
"james joyce" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"How you listen by James Joyce got to the US. And this involves one of our favorite, publishers Bennett CERF. That's right. So Bennett CERF is the publisher who founded Random House we've talked about him a couple of times. He's of course, the guy who bet Dr Seuss that he couldn't write a book with less than fifty words. We've mentioned that before and that the book ended up being green eggs and ham. But actually before we talk about this anymore. Can I tell you my favorite Bennett? Cerf fact, definitely so Bennett CERF loved writers. And he liked to hanging out with them and talking to them about literature, and he actually liked making edits he wants pleaded with Ayn rand to cut the John Galt speech. And I love her response to this. She said would you cut the bible, which is just kind of like peak Ayn rand, but my favorite fact, is that he loved Gertrude Stein, and he would publish her books just to kind of be in her orbit. And surf enjoyed big personalities and challenging authors. And he even admitted in his introduction to her book. The book was called geographical history of America or the relation of human nature to the human mind, quite a long title. But this is how is intro to the book starts, I must admit, frankly, I do not know what MS Stein is talking about. I do not even understand the title. That's ridiculous. Apparently, she was fine with it. And they have this relationship that was pretty playful, and when he asked her to explain the line arose arose as a rose, she just responded Bennett, you're very nice boy. But you're rather stupid. And I just always kind of them used by that quote. But let's talk about the ultimate banned book. Which is of course. Ulysses definitely. So this telling is based on a story I worked on mental floss with my pal Lucas Adams. But I'm going to try to keep it as quick as I can so surf as you listeners probably figured out by now is this charismatic and savvy and really energized character, and he's trying to make a name for his new company Random House and you'll see this has been around for a while. But it again, a reputation for being obscene, a Harvard professor at the time it claimed that the work showed that Joyce was quote in an advanced stage of psychic disintegration and places like quarterly review talked about the book like it was trying to destroy western civilization, and of course, all of this baffled. James Joyce, right? Like. He was a little irritated that he'd written this masterpiece and poured all his effort into this. And he just couldn't make any money off it when it was being serialised in the US the courts bandit on similar obscenity grounds. The the New York society for the suppression of vice at actually set up this court case against it. And it made it so that just owning a copy of the book was this arrestable offence. I mean, this is crazy right for Joyce. It was just this book that he couldn't get anyone to take on anyway in one thousand twenty two the famous Indy bookstore in Paris called the Shakespeare publishing company starts publishing the book in this light blue cover and to be seen with these books was kind of a thing for the literature. So if you want to read the book in the US, you'd have to go there or sneak a copy over, and it was kind of fun in the legal. But if the postal service got their hands on the book there are under strict orders to burn it immediately. And you could actually get arrested for owning a copy if you really wanted it. So it progresses like this for a while. And then about ten years later in nineteen thirty two and. This is went surface really launching Random House. He's hanging out with this brilliant lawyer friend of his named Moore's Ernst and Ernst is talking about how disgusted he is with censorship. And the censorship of this book in particular and surf immediately hatches a plan he really smells opportunity for as little companies. So he thinks what if he can get Ernst Representative in court he'd pay the court fees, and if Ernst wins he gets a cut of the royalties. So he proposes to earn sin earns degrees. And now he just has to get James Joyce forward to writes this letter on why Jewish should take a chance on him..

Bennett CERF James Joyce Gertrude Stein Ernst US publisher Random House Ayn rand Dr Seuss Ernst Representative Harvard America Lucas Adams Ulysses quarterly review John Galt New York Moore Indy bookstore
"james joyce" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"She staying compassion of this story that you mentioned is extrordinary isn't it because I mean, it's it's only it's the expert example of of how to say a huge amount of when she is only sitting in the window in amongst the. Dust isn't she apart from the very final scene where she's at the port visit textbook. So it's not just textbook example. It is as the Greek Saito proto pragmatism is the first thing before everything else of our stories. It's not that. He did it absolutely out of the blue because the similar qualities in George more. I think Joyce's young enough writing these stories to have, you know, some influences, although it is astonishing how few there are. It's a third person narrative, isn't it? But it has all the qualities of first person it is sort of stream of consciousness, but it is remarkable. How careful he is to include all the absolutely essential things. Thanks. Big letters. I'm only allowed because I'm fifty six but. Yeah. It isn't it isn't what we understand the stream of consciousness is it's it's beautiful sentences. How he can speak so vividly is because he had access vividly to us is because he had access all the to the attornal matters of the human heart. So in a way, how he does it is by being an absolute blatant. What we would call genius with with a total understanding of these matters. So he he packs them in in in an incredibly delicate way. I mean, he is the best Packer of the literary suitcase in all of history. You know, you can get it all in and travel lightly as well, which is the essence of the short story. Do you know that there are no themes for Joyce? If you understand when when no when he's a young man writing this story, he is literally trying to give life to or bring back from the cold hand of death, this particular woman, Placer eternally in this room and. You can't you know, he couldn't have done that with themes in mind, such he has to be annoying as he's doing it. So that the thing is permanently knowable donors to sort of wonderful paradox for the rider. I would hope that when Joyce began his first few sentences that he didn't actually quite know where he was going to reach. You will notice that the piffling part of it, which is after the dot dot dot right at the end is written in in quite a different way. It's much more impression precedence, dick. It's much more. Not the atmosphere of the room. You know, there are no compacted points. There are no carefully placed as if as if by sleight of hand essential things. It is his chaos around. Harry's to drown Harry's somewhere quite different hasn't it? And you couldn't imagine the whole story being written in that way. Wouldn't do it all, but it certainly does perfectly for that page is Evelyn was that the one that particularly is particularly heart of fifteen is simply the remembered most vividly. It poses probably the most important question for an Irish person to stay or to go, and it's still a question being asked. Now again of people of her age, you know, nineteen twenty I was tempted to commit in unrig the story from columns the empty family, which in my private mind. I do regard as a book equals Dubliners on probably the finest actual book in fire short stories since Dubliners do think that's columns. Tremendous achievements. Don't write short stories, and I know quite sure how they're made. So they still fascinate me not as a writer, but doesn't really. For more great downloads. Goto guardian dot co don't K food slash audio.

Joyce Dubliners Harry Placer George writer Evelyn
"james joyce" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Saturday nights had begun to wear you are on speak ably. She always gave her entire wages seven shillings, and Harry always sent up what he could. But the trouble was to get any money from her father. He said she used to squander the money that she had no head that he wasn't going to give his hard earned money to throw the streets and much more for you is usually fairly bad on Saturday night in the end would give her the money and asker had she any intention of buying Sundays dinner, then she had to rush out his quickly as she couldn't do her marketing holding her black leather parse tightly in her hand as she elbowed her way through the crowds and returning home late onto her low the provision. She had hard work to keep the house together. And to see that the two young children who had been left to her charge went to school regularly and got their meals regularly. It was hard work the hard life. But now that she was about. Leave it. She did not find it a wholly undesirable life. She was about to explore another life with Frank Frank was very kind Manley open hearted. She was to go away with him by the night boat to be his wife until live with Horan bindis. Ours vary had a home waiting for her. How Welsh you remember the first time she'd seen him he was lodging and a house on the main road where she used to. Visit. It seemed a few weeks ago. He was standing at the gate, his peaked cap push back on his head and his hair tumbled forward over the face of bronze, then they had come to know each other. He used to Measor outside the stores every evening and see our home. He took her to see the bohemian guard, and she felt Alasia as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the theater with him. He was awfully fond of music and sang a little people knew that they were courting. And when do you sang about the last that loves the sailor, she always? Felt pleasantly confused he used to call her Poppins out of fun. First of all it had been an excitement for her to have a fellow. And then she had begun to like he had tales of distant countries. He had started as a deck. Boy, a pound a month on a ship of the line gone out to Canada, you told her the names of the ships. He had been on the names of the different services. He had sailed through the straits of Magellan, and he told her stories of the terrible Patagonian he had fallen on his Fiji in Bina. Sarah's he said come over to the old country. Just for a holiday, of course, her father had found out, the affair, unheard forbidden. Art of anything to say to. I know these sale are chops. He said. One day. He had quarrelled with Franken after that. She had to meet her lover secretly the evening deepened in the Ivanhoe. The white of two letters in her lap grew indistinct was to Harry, the other was to her father artist had being her favourite. But she liked Harry to her father was becoming old lately. She noticed he would miss her. Sometimes he could be very nice not long before when she'd been laid up for a day. He had read her out a ghost story, and may toast for her at the fire another day when their mother was alive, they'd all gone for picnic to the hill. Whole she remembered her father putting on her mother's bonnet to make the children laugh. Our time was running out, but she continued to sit by the window leaning her head against the window carton inhaling. The order of dusty Creighton down far in the avenue. She could hear a street organ playing..

Harry Poppins Frank Frank Manley Franken Canada Measor Horan Magellan Alasia Sarah Bina Ivanhoe Fiji One day
"james joyce" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"She sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue. Her head was leaned against the window cartons in her nostrils was the odor of dusty Creighton. She was tired. Few people passed the man out of the last house passed on his way home. She heard his footsteps clicking along the concrete pavement and afterwards, crunching on the cinder path before the new red houses one time they used to be a fetal there in which they used to play every evening with other people's children. Then the man from Belfast bought the field and build houses in it not like their Little Brown houses, but bright brick houses with shining roofs. The children of the avenue used to play together in that field, the DeVine's the water's the Dunn's little kill the cripple. She and her brothers and sisters Ernest. However, never played he was two grown-up. Her father used often to hunt them in out at the field with his Blackthorn stick, but usually little Kyo used to keep Nixon call out when he saw her father coming. Still they seem to have been rather happy than her father was not so bad then. And besides her mother was alive that was a long time ago. She and her brothers and sisters were all grown up. Her mother was dead tizzy. Don was dead too. And the water's at gun back England, everything changes. Now, she was going to go away like the others to leave her home home. She looked around the room reviewing all familiar objects, which she had dusted once a week for so many years wondering where on earth all the dust came from. Perhaps she would never see again those familiar objects from which she had never dreamed of being divided. And yet during all those years, she had never found out the name at the priest whose yellowing photograph hung on the wall above the broken harmonium beside the colored pinch of the promises made to blessed. Margaret, Mary, Allah cock he had been a school friend of her father whenever he showed the photograph to a visitor her father used deposit with a casual word he is in Melbourne now. She had consented to go away to leave her home. Was that Weiss? She tried to weigh each side of the question in her home. Anyway, she had shelter and food. She had those whom she had known all her life about her. Of course, she had to work hard both in the house and that business. What would they say for in the stores when they found out that she had run away with the fellow say, she was a food perhaps on her place would be filled up by advisement misgovern would be glad she had always had an edge, especially whenever there were people listening, miss hill. Don't you see these ladies are waiting looked liveliness hill, please she would not try many tears leaving the stores, but in her new home into distant unknown country. It would not be like that. Then she would be married she ever line people were treated with respect. Then she would not be treated as our mother had been even now though she was over nineteen she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence. She knew it was that that had given her the power petitions when they were growing up he had never gone for her like you used to go for Harry Ernest because she was a guard, but latterly he had begun to threaten or and save what he would do to her only for her dad mother sake. And now she had nobody to protect her artist was dead, and Harry who was in the church decorating business was nearly always down somewhere in the country. Besides the in variable squabble for money on.

Weiss Harry Ernest Little Brown Dunn Nixon Belfast England Don Margaret Melbourne Mary
"james joyce" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Puns, you need only look to Shakespeare James Joyce, and yes, the bible to see how ubiquitous and exalted Punti once was and what company we at as it happens. Keep these days. However, we apologize for using them. But now one author says we should excuse the pun no longer. James, Gary is the writer and journalist behind the book with end part of which was recently published in the Paris review. We reach Mr. Jerry in Brookline, Massachusetts, James. You are a new national hero released as it happens thinks you are. Defending puns. You know, we we have an audience. Well, some of whom we just hate it. They actually will write us just say, please, please stop those stupid puns. And then another audience that says, oh, we love your puns, listen for the pun. So what why is that why are people so contradictory? And so and they get so angry about puns. Yeah. And I I wish I knew I, but I I should say, I'm deeply honored. I've never been called a national hero for anything but much less funding, and in my own family, and my circle of friends, you know, being puncher is is not occupation. That's rightly valued. So I'm delighted that you have at least some listeners who who see them ports of puns. I've never understood why people look down on so much. I think it might be because I'm maybe they think someone who's making upon isn't taking them seriously or they're being glib or flip into something like that. But for me puns are the height of wits. I know everybody says puns of the lowest form of it. But I think. Puns of the highest form of wit. Because they're excellent example of making like novel surprising combinations from very very different things and bringing them together and producing something fresh and delightful, and and you know, joyful, and even if they elicit a grown, I think some of the worst puns are some of the best puns because the typically people are groaning. Because the comparison or the association between the two words so strange, but that just shows a really nimble imagination at work, which I think is part of the essence of human creativity article in order to prove that in fact, it is a high form of art. You went back and looked to history and you find some real punts tres that went might surprise people like well, William Shakespeare, like the bible works. It's you Egyptian mythology where did you find historically at the place of the pundits start start with the bible? When the key puns you find there. Well, we all talk about the garden of Eden, and how eve ate the apple and gave it to Adam. But before I think it was fourteen hundreds or somewhere in the early middle ages. No one really knew what fruits Adam and eve ate in that MS logical story of garden of Eden because in previous translations of the bible that tree had only been described not as an apple tree. But as the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and Saint Jerome translated the bible into a simpler form of Latin in in the early middle ages, and in that form of Latin the word Malam, which means evil also happens to to mean apple so he put the word Malam in there. And suddenly it became an apple tree and suddenly eve after all these millennia had eaten an apple. And it was really he was just putting on on the similarity between those two words which sounded like, but have but have different meanings. And I think, you know, Shakespeare used puns because it it's. It's not only like to make a joke, but it's actually a poetic device, and that's why they puns really are a testament to Uman creativity imagination because when you make a pun you're making a really sophisticated comparison between two things that are not alike. It really is just the kind of commonplace example, of of human intelligence than in creativity at work that goes back to in my view, you know, the beginning of of literature and the beginning of human original human thought playing on words Shakespeare often he used punditry in order to say things that he couldn't get away with especially about royalty. I was thinking that now is the winter of our discontent make Laureus summer by the son of York, and you mentioned about crowns..

apple William Shakespeare James Joyce Adam Uman Massachusetts Brookline Saint Jerome Laureus Mr. Jerry writer Paris York Gary
Hailey Baldwin's Bridesmaids revealed by Aunt Kim Basinger

Lori and Julia

04:55 min | 3 years ago

Hailey Baldwin's Bridesmaids revealed by Aunt Kim Basinger

"Say that maybe and of course I mean there's nobody else it, could be we're. All not no I guess, it's not, it's not shocking no these kinds of allegations surprised in music there haven't been more stories about people, and some of the shenanigans and metoo nasty and Weinstein type of Yes I mean we've had Russell Simmons, I mean, he he you know I know. He's not in. The, music business anymore but. That's really the. Only. One that we've kind of heard about. Right I mean there there have been a few other ones and we know the there's always been scummy Manager's. Taking advantage of music people for money yes in their contracts and stuff like that right yeah I don't know and I suppose I for. Sure that there would be like more stuff coming out about music industry and, of course, Dr Louis, yeah I was. Gonna. Say I, was gonna say exactly. The only, big hyper, that we've, had so far and look at how geisha has, not been believed and look at how that's gotten dragged you gotta. Believe. That that's gotta be intimidating to other people because record company I mean you, know I don't know You know it might be interesting to think about in the context of musicians. And? Big major, music, stars, are signed under these big multi record contracts with record companies in a, way that movie stars aren't they may have some contracts with movie. Studios and other things like these seven year five year three year. X., number of albums old school yeah because. Prince. Was, always trying to, break apart from exactly and actors are more like independent contract unless they have production maybe you're right maybe that's why, that. Doesn't. Come, out there still under, contract and again they look. Over at cash and see the hell that she's been put through right you know okay Kim Basinger vol people have spoken responded in her. Own words to us weekly she and lease and Priscilla Presley were over in, Korea protesting, dogmeat they, had like a Animal rights thing and so she was there and us weekly had somebody, there and she was asked about Hailey Baldwin and Justin Bieber because. Of course he is Haley's on her daughter's cousins with a right You know, so I, would. Still consider myself the anti you. Know absolutely they make they see each other so She said they already have their groomsmen and bridesmaids maids picked out according to Kim Basinger. And she's of course the acts of Alec Baldwin, and the. Mother of his cousin Ireland or it'll be. Fun she's tells us weekly. Of, that coming. Up shows Haley, sister I Li. In Ireland there in the. Wedding. So believe me it's cool oh damn Dez and. She says I get sweet it's a, very sweet thing happiness we're living in some really dire times right now he. Doesn't know, Bieber all that. Well but she told us weekly. That Ireland has given him her seal of approval I'm very. Very happy freely. I think, it's a good thing I think. Justin's Quogue I don't really. Know him at all. But Ireland does you. Know I come through. A rough. Road he's a really. Cool kid I, pray for them I. Hope, they're cool. I hope they're happy it's wild I think, it's wild, so. Anti cam- Tokyo about this marriage. Yeah No to. To Dish more. I know it. I know. It, so anyways no. It's coming together so, who knows, in, you know supposedly he's had a break up with this pastor from that church all from the hill song church because he was approaching Australia and he didn't even know that they were engaged, and, he said sure About officiating or something are you happy, for All I had no. Idea no idea engage That close Britney Spears boyfriend Sam should Gary he's been kind of a. Blank slate to the public up until now he's just that hot Muslim guy that Britney. Spears. Works out with in her Instagram stories yes he's been with her since late twenty sixteen, when he was cast in her slumber video and. He's now been a constant inner social media this last year, he kind, of gives off the hot himbal oh vibe totally one. Hundred percent because he's, gorgeous, and. Unsee gets that's her vibe to. Oh completely you watch them and their videos you're not looking for review. James Joyce's Ulysses Instagram from these to listen to this. Okay he though he lost a hundred pounds before he met her wow he was eating..

Justin Bieber Ireland Kim Basinger Russell Simmons SAM Haley Britney Spears Instagram Alec Baldwin Weinstein Gary He Priscilla Presley James Joyce Unsee Dr Louis Tokyo Hailey Baldwin Korea
"james joyce" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"My theory of ant man is that it is somewhat reminiscent not entirely but somewhat reminiscent of james joyce's ulysses in the sense that james joyce's ulysses is the story of the odyssey but it is translated into a kind of humorous and ironical and deeply referential everyday life story that takes place over like a much smaller scale right and it's supposed to be the day that this guy meets his wife is the day that the whole sort of whole odyssey happens and so my theory and we can talk about substantiating it is that ant man if it felt like it milwaukee wasn't really a complete movie on its own i would say that it probably isn't but what it instead is is the central question facing infinity war to the going from infinity war one into infinity ward to baked into a small scale humorous movie that takes place over the course of a couple of days and there's tons of symbolism and discussion that is related to infinity war part partout that happens during at man and the wasp now maybe this is just because i haven't finished he worked on the brain maybe it's actually in there i kind of think it's actually in there and i want to float this idea out there as a way of interpreting and understanding the story burly because once i started seeing the references come up i couldn't think of anything else and you know for example right the most obvious one the most obvious one that jumps out the clearest and i'll say this i've got many many examples but i'm not going to hash them all out just in a monologue but the most obvious one is referred this characterised goliath the old man goliath buddy pair play by the words fishburne goliath is talking to ghost and ghosts says that she is going to go kill or kidnap ant man's daughter to hold his daughter hostage to get his compliance and goliath says no you know that's over the line you can't do that you're not allowed to do that i'm not going to allow it this whole time i've been good and i've been helping you but this is over the line and it's not acceptable and then she says hey you're not the one about to fade out of existence into nothing right i i'm the one who this is going to happen to i have to go do this now of course when you hear that line your i thought should be actually he probably is the one who's going to fade out into existence because we know the one thing that we know about this movie going into it is that between the end of the movie during the credits the thanos is going to snap his fingers and after the credits of the movie we're going to see the affect that the snap has had on all these characters that we've got known this movie that should i think that should be the big assumption going into the movie that like the move is going to happen and then the snaps going to happen during the credits and in the after credits are going to tie us back in to the main ventures storyline which is what indeed happened and in fact like we said i think in a previous podcast man ended up surviving the snap because he was small during it and got large after it which was teased in the commercial when the car get small and the car and lewis is like we're gonna we're gonna we're gonna die and it gets big and he says well we didn't die right which we talked about was like another sort of connection and for shadowing related plot but but basically this idea that like you're not the one who's gonna fade from existence to me is a big nod that the story is very highly concerned with the events of infinity work and and that i think if you start looking you start finding a lot of other stuff that's related to events anymore since all jokes it's all it played for jokes it's played for laughs and it's all fits into the sort of goofy superhero story so it's almost like a secret code and in that sense i was curious whether you liked you issues because it's kind of a tricky book to decode and.

ulysses james joyce
"james joyce" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Kickass News

"And then he went on to say went on to say everybody above decks you know the more senior folks the question i hear from them more often again remember this not binary but the question i'm hearing more often than i've heard in the past is this matter does what i do make a difference no one of the aspects of the relationship between the president and the intelligence community is the president's daily brief and specifically the impersonal briefing in the interaction that the president has with some representative of the intelligence community every morning what is that like under donald trump from what you've heard so it's from what i've heard i've not been in the room and i and i admitted in the book that most of what i've learned tracks to earlier rather than later in the administration so one hopes you know is everyone kinda hits stride it gets better that it's been described as hopping around okay that you don't stay on topic a lot you go from the intel point to somebody talking about the news to somebody talking about policy somebody going to the news to getting back to the intel brief i had i had one one person who had actually been in the room said if you had recorded this end transcribed it would read it would read like a james joyce and i think that you said in the book that the common refrain in the icy is quote do you think he got that.

president representative donald trump james joyce intel
"james joyce" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Okay and it's really great to just have a simple idea of what this particular practices so mindfulness has just two very simple ideas one is to bring the attention to one point right attention is usually like when we were walking through the cafe here you know the restaurant it's like there's this person that your mind is jumping around now when we're sitting still are mind keeps jumping around which people call monkey mind frog mind spaghetti i call it spaghetti mind james joyce mind you know it's the that's actually the most accurate one that is it there's no periods you know it's just it's just what you were just doing portraying your own state of mind it was it was it was joys ian blah blah then israel no punctuation no paragraphs no in dense no nothing right streamofconsciousness right now so don't make war with that you're going to lose if you set up the meditation is i'm going to kill the monkey you're going to lose the monkeys going to kill you a video game you you lost yeah so instead just you take a very open attitude towards the whole current state of your mind but you introduce the idea of a focal point okay could be anything it could be a picture or lamp but we use the breath okay breath is always there you don't need to forgot to bring it you know and it's also connected to you sort of present kind of physical situation so it brings to mind and body together right so you simply bring you attention to the breath.

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"james joyce" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Bigmouth

"An individual as as it would sense of this disconnect between you to what's happening on state or whatever the media he didn't and it because front lease music was you know he did s didn't have that kind of mass appeal we know what he's doing is actually very upset and very easy terry can is drawing on a voters and james joyce in wisconsin diligently and crowd rocketing a neyts it's it's you know what it is and extreme thing but some but serbia yossi wants to be kind it in him very very kind of precleaned dayton meaning nothing osce that kind of appreciative sort of middle class you know so ostensibly middle class embraced it gets immunity something that you can kind of nicely easily kind of firm kick you guys what we think of the cod have they are the argument that the sort of the national treasure version of marqui smith you know pissed going broken paul keetch fire in the band he so funny it's hilarious that he can of played ops he was he saw on himself schulz you know because as an artist he's a lot more than that cartoon alsumait i think he just did me faulk india communist slavery they i think yeah he there was an element of that but then it became nina in the music press it was like look at the funding the man second his band and a aided play out to that and i think in a way he believed design press a little tiny baked yes i am and you know ages thought well that's what i think meazza i'm going to do i think it was that of our thank you it was a progression he was like that and he was told he was like that he played up to it and then he saw i believe in it but also harmony you know if we have done that if he kept that first bands and then they witnessed bestow bestow together is rigby of niver um you know for abounds equipped to be together and forever output for this amount for this killing a three decades whatever no what we are decade won't go did was absolutely right for the fall as any guys match that theory that the fall was a.

wisconsin james joyce serbia schulz three decades
"james joyce" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"I would likely to answer the way james bond woods or if i sing about the author of finnegans wake you will answer joyce james joyce the at the person correct you will get the chance for a bonus point by identifying the bond theme what are we one step closer to moving onto the final round at the end of the show you ready maddie okay here we go when he was young adult without a occurred the actually played mixed up young man no it did he starred in asia he is still dan he drove march two dad in a crime stephanie james dean i meant yes but you would answer dean dean dean that's career and for the bonus point movie is there from liver let die the judge on this what are we going to allow it yeah i think so it's conjunction parliament's live and let die i've seen zero james bond movies yes you've got the bonus point new only live one that's why misguided observe it acting directing going to school this spring breakers star even hosted the oscars one the only time he didn't look julia franco james franco's threat do you know the name of the moving you only died twice i have also not seen very many who could i don't think we can now wendy you get one chance to clarify that that's not quite correct you only live twice one or the other hear these guys.

asia dean dean dean oscars julia franco james bond joyce james joyce stephanie james dean james franco wendy
"james joyce" Discussed on The Incomparable

The Incomparable

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on The Incomparable

"Not not winkle loan code vehicle pronounce vinko arrow is bad it names as he really is badly lots of things he's not not really a good hero but and he questions dr michael winkle about the many inconsistencies in the story and dr thing called says i did not have an opinion and it's is it is my favorite little bit also we noticed that the barron's little yapi dog is at dr ankles knows the one little detail that holly is not even not not even dim enough to overlook so now it's the law conservation of dog characters in there's no there's only on your dog some other stuff happens and it all looks gorgeous it does and it really the shadows and allied news great at some point a holly is on the run and he is grabbed by of a serious man and driven off and it turns out it's too that lecturer he was supposed to give to the society and as as jason suggest it's a disaster because they don't want they want to real author there they don't want mr cowboy boxing talking about house even gray isn't influence they want someone who talks about mr james joyce where would you rank him among writers of western specifically yes very very poorly james joyce fares among western eight this whole thing is great because for his of he obviously has prepared because he's been doing i mean it's like ivory nightmare i've had about presenting at a conference right he's like oh god they're they've taken me here and a half prepared but.

dr michael winkle barron dr ankles lecturer jason allied news gray mr james joyce james joyce
"james joyce" Discussed on Very Bad Words

Very Bad Words

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"james joyce" Discussed on Very Bad Words

"And i i met fiddler in this is very bad words the podcast about swearing on this episode we're not focusing on specific bad word so much but on reactions to perceived bad words in that reaction to these written words is something i think is very bad you what i'm talking about is the banning of books and i started thinking about this topic during a moment when i was recording this one interview for my podcast about censorship in broadcast anyways i was interviewing public radio producer ceremony q about the supreme court decision around pacifica radio airing george garlands seven words you can never see on television now it's interesting that everybody focuses on that pacific a story you know that the other thing they did was they read all of you listening his live on the air because you listen is as you know was the landmark case in print publishing when sarah said this i thought to myself man i've never red james joyce's masterpiece recover to cover and i'm probably not going to do with this year but jill our producer here very bad words said she would do it because he's just that dedicated to the show i decided to just kinda take one for the team and go out and buy james sources ulysses for this episode and when i went there and i bought them and i i went to the guy and i the book on the top but he looks at me and his sad oh you're a brave saul if i want to put it simply it is beautifully written it is very difficult i don't know exactly what i'm reading all of the worlds are in than my native tongue his english by when you pull of these together sometimes it just complete gibberish and off the time the gibberish is just him describing a steady it's wide bloom sees is it's very disruptive and i mean this guy is.

sarah producer saul pacifica james joyce