17 Burst results for "James Jamerson"

"james jamerson" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

08:04 min | 2 months ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"We're going to leave that. Saturday! Frightening and Thursday night I believe the president spoke. I think it was Thursday night. Because all I know is all. Hell broke loose in Hawaii, the night that he gave that. HAP Hazard Speech Yeah and Once, she'd done that everything. Everybody's space the whole mood everything changed for everyone families. The the guest people at the hotel. You know prior to that. We were at the pool, everybody sitting around doing thing shaking hands meeting people. You know hugging and everything. And then all hell broke loose and we we wound up getting on a plane and going back, and and from that moment on my son never went back to school. These eleven years old. He goes to school in Frisco and you know He. He goes to public school. We went to like home. Schooling type people you know as I said I work from home, but that's been for about the past seven years we have. Prior to that I worked in Radio Studios. And, production studios and You know we I ended up getting a Gig at home because. I guess they didn't have anywhere to go and work so eventually I guess you know. I'll just work at home and set up a studio and so I did and This is the first time my wife is working from home. They won't let her work. But This is now you know so. The three of us have been used since you returned from vacation, sixteen much thirteenth and You know it's been like that since so. It's been interesting. It has been I know you mentioned. You're singing bass player, so couple of questions one What did you think of Jerry's two solo albums? And where do you rank Gary in as a Bass player? Where do you rank him among the contemporary modern? Classic Rock Bass. Players Well I I like his stop. You know I'm not I can't say that I've listened to all of their solo stop. Stephen Stop Gary Stop Patty stuff. actually paddy actually signed her album for me once. That was yeah, that was an honor And and of course planets stuff as well I'm not that familiar with all gary stuff, but as far as a as a bass player and goes I mean he's. He's probably one of the most underrated bass players in the history of rock music. Unless you're a springsteen fan, and you're in that circle of of of trust where everybody's in my community where we know Gary is, but you know when people are rattling off, names of bass players here from sting to flee. To John and whistle. To Paul McCartney right. Yeah I'm GonNa, even the I mean, but you're not going to hear Gary Gary. Talent and the thing is is That's why he's such an underrated bass player. I mean the guy. Basically is is a rock for the East street ban. He's a he's a melodic bass player. When he needs to be He's a Roussy Sea Bass player when he needs to be. He knows how to hold down the bottom. He doesn't get in the way. There's too many notes. He's a great showman. He's fun to watch on stage. He he's. He's one of those guys. Where well he's one of the. He's probably the this point I would imagine he's the owned it. Let's let's you count Bruce springsteen he's. The longest on, isn't he? The longest tenure? Band member in the East fans this point I would say. So, yeah, he's one of the original. He is the he's rich, and he's even more original than Stephen Gaspar Stephen wasn't really part of the first delay. What do you think they were? Yeah, do you think the reason he is unsung is because he's not flashing he's. There's not been any drama. I mean. I had someone talk the other day. mentioned that it's amazing when you think about. in this is not a springsteen fan. This was just another friend of mine talking about you think about. The East Band had been together all these years and you've had no scandal whatsoever. You do not hear about drug overdoses. You do not hear about trips to Rehab you. Do not hear stories of prison of of of you know scandals. You just have a group of guys and a Gal when you clued. Get susie in Patty that have just made beautiful music together for now it's. Yeah that's a great point it's. It's one of the things You're right. I mean. Gary! Gary, one of those guys like you said he doesn't make any. There's no waves. There's no noise I mean if you if you. Base place in general, I mean I'm a bass player. If I didn't sing and play Bass, you know probably. A. Few people that know who I am. They would even they would know who I was period if Play AIDS because. Bass players are very on song to begin with I. Mean James Jamerson, the greatest bass player in the history of of music. You know you only came into people's. You know into Bass player's ears. When they when they realized who this guy playing, it was only years later. That like guys like Paul McCartney, which is pretty much, how is people will mention people that influenced and sheriff Gary Chase Donald Duck Dunn you. Know Paul McCartney James Jamerson. He likes all the Bass player's I. Like and because of that and that's it. It's funny. It's very interesting. I never really thought about Jesse. Like what makes I never look Gary as a person? He's hardly short. Shrift it. You know what I mean. This is a man who gets to be able to be in one of the greatest American rock bands in the history of of Wok. Music and you know, and he's had a Gig from day one and he was warned like I said he's probably the most original member of Springsteen, and and he's still there, so he's got a dream dream life when you think about it, I mean I. You know. It could be a lot worse I'm I'm not sure if there's if it's even right to sit here and say well. Maybe he's on I. Don't Know How on Sunday is you know springsteen kept him. Your career with the exception of the early nineties when he left the whole band. Experiments. But the thing is on no. Gary's wondering he's he's your basic roots. He's a real rock and roll bass player. You know. Is he flashy kicking his legs up and all that crazy stuff? No, he's holding down. He's holding down the bottom and playing very tasty licks and I can't tell you them out licks that I've heard. Gary do and I and I am not you know. I I've taken from his bag of tricks in my own music when I put based. You know lines together a when I play in cover bands. You know I do. It will have the stuff that he does because it's what I heard in my early unders of studying it in one of those guys that just. How on Sunday is in in the outside world bass players? You know obviously so because nobody remembers those guys because that's the way it is in in the music world now steam is only known because he's standing singing of songs. But the thing is A lot of people don't even remember. Bill Wyman for the loan stones. Unless you unless you're a rolling stone spent as a Democrat ban for like. and. You say though with. But if you say. Other bass players recognize. What he brings to the table. Absolutely. If the God's Sakes, he he, he's one of those..

Gary Gary Bruce springsteen Roussy Sea Bass Paul McCartney Stephen Gaspar Stephen James Jamerson Gary Chase Donald Duck Dunn president Hawaii Bill Wyman Radio Studios Patty Frisco AIDS Jerry John Jesse susie paddy
"james jamerson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:09 min | 2 months ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"You mentioned the funk brothers when we were talking earlier and you know I don't think and this is something we could ask people what they think about this. I don't think that motown is what motown is our means what it means if it isn't for this group of players who were known collectively and it's quite a collection as the funk brothers. They were the backing musicians They were the guys who are providing the Panchen sometimes probably some of the IDEAS. The producer might not have had on their own. These are the guys in the studio with all these amazing artists that we've talking about so far and there's a couple people in there that I thought I wanted to at least mention Most of all one is a guy named Melvin Reagan. Better known to the world as Wah Wah Watson and I never knew the Wa wa Watts know is music I know of him but I never knew that he was a member of the funk. Brothers Ray Parker Junior. Who would go on? Yeah the ghostbusters guy. You gotta go back to the Sixties and seventies defined him there as a other James Jamerson. Who's one of the most famous bass player's ever was there from the beginning until seventy two and I didn't know this either one of your favorites in mind? Marvin Gaye was a member of the funk. Brothers has a piano player. So you got all that stuff going on and these guys were the backbone musically of what was going on there at at at motown central at Hicksville USA another little factoid about these funk brothers that you might want to know what's that they've played on more number one hits than the Beatles Elvis the rolling stones and the beach boys combined. That's what I'm talking about. Do the funk brothers provide the essential secret sauce or does it happen without him? Are they the backbone? Absolutely think about the muscle shoals musicians and the stax musicians for the southern soul and they had big hits but they did not have near the number one power. That motown had motown was a monster. Machine of number one hits just great songs so for any session guy to be considered amongst the funk brothers any session guy the would move there live there because you knew you were going to work because they were doing stuff every day sometimes day and night right around the clock. They were recording and writing and playing. That's what they did. They had so much fun. Oh my goodness well when you got something right if you're a musician and you've done any recording when you get something right that you've been working on especially in the days of four track taping. It's just a special moment and it's Magic. That's what it's all about and the artist. I mean we talked about the writers but the artists are the ones in some of them. You don't know as well as the other. I didn't know the Eisley Brothers did records for Tamla for one. Yeah they're signing like sixty six to Tamla think and There's there's just so much great music in their the child lights the contours on your Walker. And we didn't even talk about that and those guys were stellar in every every record they got on the radio and shotgun still a standard that stands the test time Gladys Knight PEPs. For God's sake she was on Seoul records up at that was part a motel. I mean you know. You don't think of hers a motown artist. The amount of artistry is just ridiculous the talent the voices and they were so gifted. They were so special plus. They had chemistry with each other. Yeah and I think like I said earlier about the bus tours. Maybe that came from being on the road together and plan on tours. Those package tours together absolutely think about all the duets that Marvin Gaye end up with TAMMI. Terrell him west end. Who's the other one that a lot of stuff with an? I'm drawing a blank. But Kim Weston who's from Philadelphia and Tammi Terrell and a few others that he did a lot of duets with over the years. But that's part of where I think it came from. And obviously yeah. Marvin is in the staple there. I'm looking at all the Martha with without the Vandellas and the miracles. Of course it's just there's so much but there's bands that I I never artists. I'd never even heard of. They had both ruffin brothers. David and Jimmy Ruffin. Were both in the family so to speak. I don't know all these people who they are. But they were all part of something amazing and you know as they have aged and sat at home go and look at their one gold record or or maybe not even that. They know that they were part of this. And it's one of those things it's a legacy that I think. Continue in their families for years. That GRANDPA was in this band or Graham Sang. Backups on that record that kind of thing you know absolutely and think about how many great rock and roll bands. The we love that have covered the daylights out of motown. Ccr's I heard it through. The grapevine is powerful but marvins is special because they're two totally different vibes motown tunes the rolling stones of covered over the years. Yes very true. And as much as their blues e guys motown was just as important to those cats as the blues are. I'm looking through in you. Know who I didn't know was part of the motown family even for a short time. Who Duane Eddy? What's veteran rocker series? And the easy beats were on rare earth. Maybe for one record. I don't know I'm looking at all this stuff and it just it continues to blow me away. The full impact of what Berry Gordy started. He had a lot of help. Along the way you could look at the major components with smokey and the Holland does your and the other writers and the Funk Brothers astern Simpson that. We're all my God. Were huge writing Combo long before they were so Do it you know as a as an ad and they stayed together forever. Yeah until he passed away they were together. You've mentioned Norman Whitfield we mentioned with Barrett Strong William Mickey Stevenson Harvey Fuqua Pamela Sawyer and Gloria Jones. Who are a little what less well-known because there are two women who worked together but those songwriting teams were potent and they were very very good at what they did. Here's one that's GonNa make your head spin and I got to look more into this on rare earth records. It says the U. F. O. Recorded an album anyway. We'll check into that one and get back to you on their update and the pointers The pointers were part of things The pointer sisters. A Billy Preston recorded for motown records this is all. In the wheelhouse of their era the sixties they had. Valerie Simpson doing a solo. Act at that point before She iniquity rating against together. But they hadn't done a duet thing yet and there's all these people and then the later years you start to see. The continuity mentioned in voice demand and Erica do or earlier in just the number of artists that kept the motown named going through the decades and the subsidiaries to from a business perspective it became a model for the music business especially for black entrepreneurs who thought that they had what it took you to look at that and see how they did things to figure out how you were going to do things and that's not just related to the black label owners. That's related to everybody. Because they were game changers at motown and for an African American to come into a very white business like this and really knock their socks off. The way he did was very challenging. I'm sure he had a lot of battles but in the end he had the right business plan. Did it the right way and part of that included putting together incredible songs. Anytime you're going to break ground you're going to face resistance and there are points in any businesses life where you have to decide if you're going to push forth when he came up against the accusations are the inferences that he had paid off the get the Tamla records on the radio. He decided okay. I'm going to push forward. I'm GonNa keep going when people told him to stay into. Trey said No. We have a lot of our businesses happening in California in. La WE'LL MOVE TO LA. They didn't completely abandoned. Detroit Lee preserved. What was there? And that's why we have the legacy preserved as much as we do on very gordy and the MOTOWN era and it was great to see him honored the way he was honored by Diana Ross. Last year was it a year before. Now I start to get a little foggy in the last couple years about wind. Shit happened has two years ago and it was just beautiful. It was just beautiful to see that moment at this stage in both of their lives..

motown Marvin Gaye Brothers Berry Gordy Valerie Simpson Tamla James Jamerson Melvin Reagan producer Watts Tammi Terrell stax Gladys Knight Seoul Ray Parker Duane Eddy LA Kim Weston
"james jamerson" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:50 min | 4 months ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Ray all. That stuff won't stop but then there's the folks who were the triple eight people were into the way I see but then for me. I feel like this. Jimmy Lee almost converges the to the field. He comes back in. Two Thousand Appeals. Well when I came out with this advantage I said I'm going to give everybody a sof pill to swallow will ray ray. This is the record. I'm GonNa have some fun just purify. It's a sexy. She's tollways chick like you don't know but the very next album. GonNa let you know what I am and what I the way I see how I've been hearing music as a kid. So let the first record how sweet it is to be loved by you. Pride and joy was a James Jamerson famous baselines and it was motown so the way I see it stayed in two people. This is the way I've always busy. Smith said this play up to be US pay per do both. I mean really love. That.

ray ray Jimmy Lee Thousand Appeals Ray US James Jamerson motown Smith
"james jamerson" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Yeah he saw no good. I couldn't go through the Brian. Don't him in the break? You guys were talking about the groove. That jams Amerson got nowhere to run. What were you saying? Oh I loved it listen. He had boom boom boom boom boom boom boom then another base doing boom boom boom. The James he was so funny he would always take his leg up. Don't dum boom like he's really into you. Know what I mean. Well that's where he played his base. Anyway he was always into just dumping US feet. You Know Me. But he was one of the Greatest Bass. Player's ever matter of fact has been many many bass players trying to immolate. They'll sure James Jamerson right today. The guys told me said Man I hit a James Jamerson man and I I just. Can't he only played with one finger? You know yeah. Isn't that amazing really? Now reach out. I'll be there. That is one dramatic wild song. Prime the drama of that song. How did that come about well? I can speak about the drama but I know that You know just reach out like all the all the it. It's so dramatic thing retail. Okay right I don't know who's in the working on the song in the office and the reach out I'll be there i. I don't maybe explain well I I. I was sitting there but you said once again. That's when creative people. I don't know what happens to all of us. Some you know you get hit by this inspiring situation moment in the moment moment is right. He's not planning it. You know you're not even thinking about it. You know you just like you for it could just boom. You hit it. And that's what Brian did. He hit that court part. You know and it was sunning really really strong to me. It sounded symphonic leg a symphonic type of thing and what happened. Lamar was standing at their by him. And Lamar to push Bryan out of the way. I was insulted. I said this guy crazy creams because the way lamont violently almost as what is this pushed him away and winter. Don't don't you know what I mean. Winter that middle part you know and he got caught up in the feeling of an also and that's why he pushed Bryan out of the way because he had the feeling you know and he just wanted to get it for he lost it you know. And but like I said when he would he said that when he pushed Bryant out of the way they did he shoved him out of the way. And I'm not forgetting. This guy is crazy because I was. I don't know what the heck was going on. So that is what created that thing you know but then all I have to do is right. That would have been easy. I mean so that would be like when it was given to you to write lyrics. 'cause I it's hard for me. Imagine that without the lyrics so it was just like Dutt done. You know what I mean is on the part of the Don Don Don. Oh yeah that was a symphonic part of this if you slow down and played it done. It'd be very symphonic. You know what I mean like August of type of thing you know see you would just would you record a scratch vocal? That was like humming for these songs. You know what I mean. What was what was expressing the melody for the he wrote. You know we'll give him. Yeah I remember. I can relate to see my one talent. I could remember melody got it here and I remember could retain the feeling.

James Jamerson Don Don Don Bryan US Amerson Lamar Brian lamont Dutt Bryant
"james jamerson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Remember they had probably been your show and next thing you know they're rednecks start talking to each other we're going to go over there and cut back guys hair hall and you know Joe was an Xbox three four blocks Golden Gloves in me I could take care of myself but we couldn't really the rooms like eight to one year and so we started to get up to protect John and right to that moment in through the door came big Johnson road manager of the store who was a big black man six five wait a whole lot and he came in Raleigh ran over and jumped right into his office in the meantime though really college kids stood up they were white boys and they said no you gave doing as they just played a great show would range from you guys ain't gonna mess with them and so we got the hell out of there and got on the bus with our Kerio food but that was our first experience they were Dacian and working with the black you know I had to spend four years working with a black saxophone player me York and never seen anything like this so it was the very beginning of all of the twelve city tour and I went from Texas and then in Baltimore one of our stops is in Baltimore and it was fabulous love the Supremes couldn't have been nicer people the band you know the legendary Motown band including James Jamerson the probably one of the most legendary bass players of all time I got to sit in the back of the bus with him and he get out of his face and I get out mining show me these lyrics including server bye honey bunch which I he said I play like a white boy you play that like a white nine one to show me how a black man places if.

Joe John Raleigh Dacian York Texas Baltimore Supremes James Jamerson Johnson Kerio four years one year
"james jamerson" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Them regularly. John Break my original a singer from the lured and fifty nine sixty just a great great man super talent <hes> Greg Raymond the Bass Guitar listened to the base on journey to the center of the mine he was unmatched Bob Babbitt and James Jamerson the Gods of base with the funk brothers would come and watch Greg Raimo plane fifteen wherever the drummer the baseball bass player reader dave the`monsters well you know it's Kinda cool some looking down at this like cat scratch fever which is meg ahead killer song in Law Office nineteen seventy seven most people don't I don't remember the travels gigs the venues the women because they're all high drunk out of their brain. Remember them audience knows even with no sleep that shit eaten grin on my face I channel channel those memories and I just get a spiritual direction like latte. It's kind of that so much fun. I believe I'm still alive well. It's kind of true that a lot of these guys were pretty high when the action went down own and then high after that they don't remember they told me that in I what a shame right because sort of at the end of the day that's what you are. That's what you have. That's what you're for. The music comes from these you know even just a sexual adventure venture and the uninhibited nece and the people that love your music that come and celebrate it with you at night and it's not ego talking. It's shared love of what chuck and bone those guys created that we expressed in our own way. I mean these all these guys are our dear friends of mine everybody from Tom Morello in Steve and Joe and all the guys in every band that I know him all they're all great guys but we'll sit around and talk done show so many shows with all these guys when I get on stage around eight it'll be six thousand seven hundred twenty and I count all the way back to that Pool Party for the University of Detroit and they don't remember any of them right. I never I go shit. I Oh man Dan helped you put down the mind altering bullshit and everybody out to going Newton's a good freedom to shut the I'm for freedom but you WANNA be in the asset column and that might inspires something worth remembering comfortably numb benefits your family. How and who do you want high your kids school bus driver your pilot? I want my comedians high end and call Uber but I I just I just don't get it. I'm seventy one.

Greg Raimo Greg Raymond Bob Babbitt Joe dave the`monsters James Jamerson Tom Morello Law Office John chuck Dan Newton Pool Party University of Detroit Steve
"james jamerson" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

14:28 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"Save with me or even go being where she says I've been waiting for you to, like make a move on me for the last twenty years since we were seven years old, and dislike really like to also have a mouth. Do you also not know how to talk like? What is this? Like, how Mun refer either be sting baps. Take place in a world where like like all the love poetry is disappeared. And she's the only one. Something. On the other the other big question that maybe raises kind of the premise, which I kind of left for us to discuss alas, but like is the idea behind this movie is that if the Beatles songs had not been released from nineteen sixty to nineteen seventy no never heard them before knew they were. And they came out now, basically as is they would still be giant hits. You buy that now. You're very obvious from our discussion, but this premises else drove me nuts because it's just like Heure, boomer masturbation. Right. Like the thing that, like was popular in our youth with transcendent and timeless and everything else with garbage and the implication, that like teenagers today who are really into like at Suren super love. I want to hold your hand. I was like. But the other thing that, like, really Gulf me and the sort of goes back to, like, be a raucous five Chris had mentioned earlier, the Beatles for not to sung writing there were really great singing. There were really great instrumentalists. They were rate at visual iconography, and there's probably like twenty other million things that they were like very good innovating that the movie completely ignored because it's all about the songs man. And so that also really pissed me off because I feel like. That entire whole life marketing in the like machine behind Jack probably would have come up with, like something really interesting, if not as cool of yellow submarine, but they probably would have come up with something really interesting or like a way to like pair like the very old sounding music with a canoe visuals that like actually fee to teenagers today and something like that Sheeran sewn. Yes, I think basically what I want to say is that this movie offended be to my very core. Go from there nowhere, you know, this man, this wave of movies that is hit screen since bohemian, rhapsody. I mean, I guess arguably since straight outta Compton, but really the wave starts with Bahamian rhapsody in the last year that sort of I'll say dumbs down music history to sort of this very thumbnail sketch fortune cookie kind of, you know, back of the envelope reading of how great music is made. I just find continually frustrating. I'm I'm the spoilsport who didn't even like rocket man, all that much, which everybody seems to have given a pass, too, because, you know, it was better than bohemian rhapsody or at least more fantastical than bohemian, rhapsody. But all these movies seem to have this very simplistic view of how things become hits. I mean I co sign what include just said about what the Beatles were great app. Asides just songwriting. I would sum it up agreeing with you that they were great record makers. You know what? I mean the the finished product. I mattered you know, the vibe of the record mattered. And the time it was released mattered. Yes. The fact that the song's called. Hey, Jude and not. Hey, dude matters. Because that worked in nineteen sixty eight and it wouldn't necessarily work in two thousand eighteen or twenty nineteen and you can't just kind of airlift these songs into the current popular culture and expect them to, to connect with people in the same way. But like bohemian rhapsody rocket man, this, this movie seems to have a very simplistic idea of how things become renowned. How songs are written how things connect with the public and I don't know, it seems to provide people with very pleasant pablum sort of idea of, of how popular culture works. But I it leaves me wanting in every case. And even as I was enjoying sort of the little pieces of business in the few ideas and its head that this movie did have. I was continually frustrated at the wild over-simplification, right? I have to rebuttal to the premise of this movie, the first is ninety eight percent of all Beatles. Vers ever, including the karaoke that people were singing outside the theater as I was leaving my screening. I've listened to a lot of them. Almost no Beatles covers are better than the original version precisely like Aretha lady, Madonna Schorr other than that not a lot and those TV's we can work at maybe I mean. Yeah. Like just different. It's not necessarily better, but it's definitely different pickets. Hey jude. Sure. Yeah. But, but it's there are a lot of versions of the songs and very few of them are better at infective versions of this movie in this movie are pretty bad. They're very sort of, you know, sanded down slick kind of coffee shop versions of these songs mostly played on a single oftens finger picked acoustic guitar, and they're quite don't, and I feel like the movie raises in the dismisses. The idea early on that actually Jack is the problem. And and but I think a actually Jack is the problem and he's not a great performer. I think you know Patel who plays the role is very charismatic as an actor. But if these nod and interesting singer, the movies, not giving him certainly like. Interesting arrangements or anything to play office. So these songs. Would not be hits. Now don't deserve to be hits. Now my other about over the premise of this movie is my ten year old daughter. She loves pop music, love listen to the radio taking her to see Taylor swift, and cash, and she loves, you know, Charlie exc- x and not so sure about it. Sure and panic at the disco. But, you know she loves what's on the radio, the kind of the hits that are going on. Now, if I put on the Beatles now she and she's decided, I like pop. So if it put on the Beatles. She goes is this pop, and they just sound old to her, and I'm not gonna explain it to well, actually, these are some of the most popular songs of all time, she doesn't care and the songs, do not speak to her, and that's fine. I'm not gonna like tear myself a maybe she'll, you know, listen to them when she was a teenager like I did, maybe she won't. But I mean, that don't really think there's any basis, they are they are incredible songs, but they are. Also incredible songs that came out of their time and things like Paul McCartney getting the huge based sounds on revolver by, like reverse by turning a speaker cabinet into a microphone because they couldn't figure out how to make his base sound like James Jamerson from the Motown singles like that was they were playing off these other things. And like you were saying at the beginning, Chris, there's a whole context that they were doing. And this is this comes up a lot when people say, like, oh, well this a lot about movies, like, well, that movie would never be hit if they put it out now. And it's like, well because they wouldn't put it out now, because part of what artists do is respond to their time, and if right. You know, Paul McCartney John Lennon were in their twenties, and writing songs in two thousand nineteen they might well be doing with fourteen other people that certainly be using samplers. They might not. They might have replaying Betar's for God's sake, you know. So it's just it's such a weird premise, and there's there does seem to me to be an extreme degree of readily narcissism in it. So this is the story of this movie actually came from a person, named Jack Barth who, then Richard Curtis kind of heard the idea. I like that idea. Let me write the screenplay and it does not surprise me that this idea was so appealing to screenwriter, who is. I mean, one of the very few, maybe if there with Charlie Kaufman is like one of the few sort of actual brand name writers, the last twenty years. That's a pretty uncommon thing. Now we're very much in an era defined by sort of a tourist tour redder directors and he does direct occasionally. But you're right. He's mostly known as a writer. Right. So it does not surprise me that he would be drawn to an idea where it's like you know, what really matters the writer and if anybody saying the song, it would be hit, because the, it's a great, it's a great written song. So that's so it does not surprise me that that would appeal to him. But I think it's wrong. I mean, we we've just all seen this movie at a sneak preview and it has not officially opened yet. Do we think this will be a hit because the other thing that fascinates me about this current wave of populist? You know, pop movies is between rhapsody widely exceeded everybody's expectations. Rocket man has done. All right. Do we think that people will find this version of Beatles history appealing? The answer. It's probably no. That was a smattering of blogs at the end of my screening to, which, then I said move, but. I don't know. I feel like we have a we had like a different Beatles musical like ten years ago called across the universe Yakovenko, t more, I was wondering how you guys felt about that, that terrible. But this isn't much better. And so I don't know why it would be an agreement. I find also I find also to SAM's point that the Beatles, whether it's Julie taymor directing across the universe or this movie really get flattened into this kind of candy colored happy, pop art, Peter max kind of thing, you know, to the point you made earlier in Google about how the songs are made all interchangeable such that. Hey Jude is the same as the long and winding road is the same as I wanna hold your hand is the same as a hard day's night. It's kind of like it all gets flattened into this Beata less Wimsatt calorie, which kind of drives me crazy, because what makes the beetles interesting that development in the way they changed in the way they're nineteen sixty six album, reflected nineteen sixty six and their nineteen sixty eight. Ovum reflect in nineteen sixty eight and all of that is kind of ironed out of this movie. That, that kind of drove me crazy, right? Big sort of like musical leap that we see Jack do is bringing a brass band for all this love. And I mean that doesn't even register as like a blip in terms of all of the textural innovation, like Tomba that the Beatles played around with we'd be able to hold their marching band. And he's got like one guy on a tuba. Come on raise the stakes people are, so I wanna I wanna close by with a little bit of a gimmick here and ask you guys pretend that the all the lights around the world or just going out for twelve seconds and you wake up, and you're the only person who remember the Beatles, which song, do you lay claim to since this is my idea. I'm gonna go first and I've decided on I'm looking.

Beatles Jack Barth Jude Chris writer Mun Paul McCartney Compton Charlie Kaufman Suren Google Julie taymor Beata James Jamerson Taylor swift Patel Sheeran Peter max
"james jamerson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Stevie Wonder songbook begins there in the fall of nineteen sixty five with the tune that would be the first co composition. He got credit on. And it came after a summer of being on tour with the Rolling Stones Stevie wanted to up the ante on. I can't get no satisfaction. And his answer was up tight, which is one of the most exciting records ever made in any category of music, certainly credit due to the driving bass and drums that propel the song James Jamerson. And Benny Benjamin the songbook on WNYC. Here's a relaxed take this is the polar opposite of what we just heard but artists as much in their own element. And having their moment. Louis Armstrong, Jack, tea-garden hoagy Carmichael 's rocking chair. Oh. Rocketship? Gotcha, paul. Cain vets. Doing water you want all the ten. And what Kevin Shokhin fall? Going to wear. Grabbing? Rounded rough rocky. Harry. How you have. Get did chip. Days. Diggers? Rocketship got father Jillette beaten. Came lame by. Pick that up. I got no water far better. Start running. You're going to damn. You can't get from the cabin. But you going. You sit up grab it crabbing. Rocking chair bothers. Ramble, and Harry. In heaven. She. Charito cherry. The time. Get it. Yeah. Rocketship judgment. Does your. Jay. Some time. Happy. Sometimes. My disposition. Deep. Penzone. From lescoe. Sense. Some times. Some times. Twin? Hey. It's calls. That's how. I do. Man, I say. Some time. The. Hey. But. You. It's cold. That's how. She happy win. Lena.

Rocketship Stevie Wonder Harry Charito cherry Benny Benjamin hoagy Carmichael James Jamerson Louis Armstrong WNYC Kevin Shokhin Cain Jillette Jay
"james jamerson" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"James Jamerson is the is the basis of largest note in the Motown stable he's no longer around he's dead now. But there was some people said it was Jamerson who recorded the park. Bob Babbitt is generally given credit for playing that part as well by some others scholars and Babbitt himself is sort of vague on the memory, and then another bass player from those sessions Watkins jumps in and says, no, I I was the guy that played that another Tuesday Motown exactly, but the point is that based bigger is so important to this song, it sets the theme you're basically in the middle of a movie as the song starts, and that's I think the key. This intro is that it creates a movie in your head all these other instruments sort of offering colors around it. It's basically one chord. Vamp out for four amazing minutes that sets the table for this great song by the temptations. It's Papa was a Rolling Stone from nineteen seventy-two opinions. Papa was a Rolling Stone by the temptations men. All right. Tell about hard axed follow wanna greatest tunes of all time. I I chose for migrate starts those starts that. When I hear the song might be like in a far distance speaker at the jewel supermarket. Okay. Could be on somebody else's Spotify playing too loud on their headphones. It is then stuck in my head as an earworm throughout the rest of the day. Right. I am perpetually stuck on start. When I hear these great starts and number one of all time on my list to the point where my beloved Carmel is why are you seeing in that riff again again? Really right rocks off by the Rolling Stones the opening track of the incredible nineteen seventy two double album exile on main street. We did a classic. Album dissection of it not too long ago. It's beginning to end masterpiece. Of course, the stones epic double album of decadence and depravity recorded in the basement of of a villa in the south of France that was once Gestapo headquarters, the stones or self destructing. The seventies are killing off the sixties myth of utopianism. It is just an amazing record. And I don't I can't imagine at this point. It starting any other way you have that killer, Keith Richards guitar riff, and then you have Jagger sort of yowling like a cat whose tail has been stepped on how right, and it's it's the ultimate moment in capsulated. The now what six decade collaboration between Jagger and Richard. What makes that band magical when it's at its best that guitar that sounds really like, no other and Jagger sounding like Jagger and. Then, you know, how do you follow an opening lyrical couplet like this zipping through the days at lightning speed plug in flush out and fight and blank and feed, you know, Greg there are you know, Pru. St. incised novels that have not begun with the sentence that great rocks off by the Rolling Stones on sound opinions..

Jagger James Jamerson Bob Babbitt Papa Motown Spotify Gestapo Watkins Keith Richards France Greg Carmel St. capsulated Richard six decade
"james jamerson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You. Nice to be here. Tom. How are you? I'm good. You open this book by claiming you've always had an obsessive personality stamps. Vinyl collecting, baseball obscure Prague, but it took a long time for you to develop that same obsession with the instrument that kind of gave you your life the bass guitar, just I I've why do you think that was why don't why do you think you weren't an obsessive about the base? I think when you're a working musician, and especially a young one what you can afford is one thing. You really can't afford to have too many instruments. So you try to focus on the instruments that are going to give you the sound. You're trying to develop for yourself your own identity, and the more musicians, I talked to you the more that is sort of a common shared thing. Amongst players, the the instruments are your tools more than you know, your things that you want a horde. Yeah, you're not talked about that just before we turn the microphones on. Yeah. I got two guitars. I know how they sound. And I know when I wanna use each one. And that's that's about it. Yeah. So the first stage is what can what's the best instrument? I can buy I can afford to buy. So you start with that? And you make do like the one you're talking about the world's worst wash. I have this old Washburn Washburn acoustic guitar, which is the worsening instrument in the entire world. Yeah. So we all have that. We're mr. So you make do with that. And then when you've scraped enough money together you buy you first good instruments. So for me, it was sixty eight precision bass that I had saved enough money for and and that became my workhorse. Knight used it all the time. So developing a sound you're focused on only the things that will give you the results you need, and and help you develop your identity, and so I was like that for years and years and years, and so I had there's a picture in the book of me with my original collection from the late seventies, which is five instruments. Now. Big time. Yeah. And then so later in my life when I got turned onto the idea of vintage instruments, and I acquired the first one sort of in twenty twelve or twenty thirteen. A light bulb went on with an I felt agent of the instrument that I had held in my hands for over forty years. Like, why don't I know about the development of this? I don't know about the golden age of those instruments. So I started getting curious, and as I say in the book being curious for me, it's a dangerous word I related to that. So so bad. My partner says to me my family says it TIMMY to say like, you know, he's a lot of Wikipedia articles about Phil spector something like that. Like, oh, yeah. He's he's on EBay a little bit, you know. And right, one by one curiosity leads to eventually, you're just it's all you think about all the curiosity killed the cat, at least gives you a big collection of stuffing, really think you need to kills your Bank account. Why why the base to begin with? I mean, I was thinking about this. When you were starting out. It was sort of the era of the Qatar. God there was you know, there's Claxton. And there is there is Jeff Beck and Jimmy page these big, you know, the the big guitar God age, why the base? Well, no one becomes a bass player willingly. I don't think you'd get voted to be the bass player when the bass player that was chosen originally quits in my case, we're in a little basement band wasn't even a basement, man. It was an apartment bedroom band. And the guy that was supposed to play bass with us his mother really didn't like him associated with us. So he left, and then they all looked at me and said, okay, you're going to be the bass player. I went to my mom, and I begged her to let me lend me like thirty bucks. So I could buy a bass, and that's sort of how it all started. You had to work it off their variety store. Right. Yeah. Every Saturday and go to the store with my mom and work it off. Yeah. Do you still have that one? No. I don't I wish. I did. I wonder where it is. I don't know. But Alex, and I both but similar Japanese imports at the same time, and we both in a fit of insanity. Painted them. There were terrible. They were really good Alex still has and I don't I don't have my hand what happened to if you're listening to this. Because this is this is going across Canada. If you're listening to this in, you know, we're Getty's first instrument is. Yeah, there's a bad auto. There's a bad self portrait near the bridge of me and the word blue. Is written across it. So that's the identifying feature if you know, it is drop us a line. We'll hold it hostage at least for a little while. And when did you first key into the sound of the base in you know, this is a question. You ask him the book? When did you start realizing that the base was a thing? I think it was for me going to work with my mom at an early age. And even before that when my dad was still with us going to work with him. There was always music on in the car. There was always music on in the store. And of course in that period. It was Motown. It was Primo town Motown lot of rhythm and blues and without knowing who the bass parts of James Jamerson, dunk donned later. Okay. And even Brian Wilson beach boys, you know, so. It was insidious in a way because I picked up on the drum parts and the base movement and a member songs like my girl and.

Alex Washburn Washburn Prague Motown Tom Brian Wilson EBay Phil spector James Jamerson Jeff Beck partner Knight Claxton Qatar Getty Canada Jimmy forty years
"james jamerson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"If you go all the way back to June, and July may see support here, July you see support here. So we are we are now sort of in a wait and see pattern a little bit over. So look at this look at the SNP essence, he's going to show you something a little bit similar, so. The S and our see how the blue line of Holy Cross below the red line. That's cold across what that means in technical analysis. That's a moving average. The blue line is a is a is a thirteen day moving average lies a fifteen fifty day moving average, the one that blue line crosses below the red line usually at foretells a bit of a crap bad bad-looking. But that's just the technical imitators must to remember. There's all the other stuff that's going on in the market too. You know i-it's Saudi Arabian Russell, James Jamerson dot com. He's a law. Professor. He's a media analyst. He's a best selling author of the book left coast report in and Hollywood nation. He also is arguing from the supreme court. He was one of the original temptations as a keyboard player. He's a hell of a a hell of a blues harp player. But James, I have to tell you. This thing in Saudi Arabia is starting to start something weird is going on with respect to how we are reacting to this. Because now I'm starting to hear tales of of a body double walking out of the building in this in this journalists clothing. I mean, something is amiss here. Clearly, but that's not the question. The question is going to be. So what's going to happen? What what does that do to relations? We have too much of a business environment with Saudi Arabia to do anything, terribly terribly. Harsh harsh so talk to us. Yeah. Yeah. No, no, you combine the business essential relationship with Saudi Arabia. Geopolitical relationship with Saudi Arabia is the second most important ally in the Middle East with Iran important ally and Saudi Arabia as a bulwark a against Iran because Saudi they work with Jordan, Egypt and the emerets, and we it's critical. It's not we cannot. Harm the relationship with Saudi Arabia. That's why what the Trump administration is trying to do sorta thread and needle and allow the Saudis who claim that they're investigating. They're going to punish the people responsible for this murder. Oh, yeah. And of course, the key individual in all of this is the crown prince who ultimately will lead Saudi Arabia who has been looked upon as a reformer as someone that was going to reform hobby Islam and someone that was really trying to reform the Middle East in a kind of a stealth ally of Israel. And also he's responsible for the reforms took place. Women can drive in Saudi Arabia because of the crown prince and he's been coordinated by people in Silicon Valley and Hollywood here. He had a big deal cooking with the biggest talent agency in the world, which is aria manuals callup agency. He's met with Bob idir. He's met with Morgan Freeman and the rock, and this is a it's it's a very difficult. Situation. But I guess the best analogies to remember that if it weren't for our relationship with one of the most evil dictators in history Joseph Stalin, we wouldn't have been able to beat. People dictator in history it all Hitler. So sometimes you have to preserve alliances for the greater good. So so, and of course, this is going to be this will turn very political in the US here. Right. So the shows are. Imagine that particularly the bridge. All of a sudden the media coverage of this. This story would not have had nearly the kind of prominence in in in newspapers. And and online and on the cable stations as he had accepted. The perception was that they could use this as an attack on President Trump seems to be the filter fi, which they measure every story. But if it works for that, I don't believe it would have had quite the coverage that his hand. And also the approach to it, which is been I mean, almost a warlike chant. From the left. Basically wanting to go to war, which Audie Arabia. Yeah. And and that's a disaster. Cutting off that relationship is a disaster. It is a disaster for economic reasons. But maybe even more importantly, it's a disaster for geopolitical reasons. Well, I guess we'll have to see what happens James you're gonna want to have you back later this week. And of course, of course, jinx James Hurson dot com. Saudi Arabia's got talent..

Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabian Russell media analyst Audie Arabia James Middle East James Jamerson James Hurson Holy Cross Joseph Stalin Iran US Bob idir Professor murder supreme court Hollywood
"james jamerson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"But that's just a technical indicator. Must to remember. There's all the other stuff that's going on in the market too. You know i-it's Saudi Arabian Russell, James Jamerson dot com. He's a law. Professor. He's a media analyst. He's a best selling author of the book left coast report and the Hollywood nation. He also was arguing from the supreme court. He was one of the original temptations as a keyboard player, and he's a hell of a he's a hell of a blues harp player. But James, I have to tell you. This thing in Saudi Arabia is starting to starting something weird is going on with respect to how we are reacting to this. Because now I'm starting to hear tales of of a body double walking out of the building. And in this in this journalists clothing, I mean, something is amiss here. Clearly, but that's not the question. The question is going to be. So what's going to happen? What what does that do to relations? We have too much of a business environment with Saudi Arabia to anything terribly terribly harsh harsh so talk to us shrimps. Yeah. No, no, you combine the business essential relationship with Saudi Arabia. Abo geopolitical relationship with Saudi Arabia is the second most important ally in the Middle East with Iran important ally. And Saudi Arabia phase a bulwark a against Iran because they work with Jordan and Egypt and the emerets, and we it's critical. It's not we cannot. Harm the relationship with Saudi Arabia. That's why what the Trump administration is trying to do is sort of thread and needle and allow the Saudis who claim that they're investigating. They're going to punish the people responsible for this murder. Oh, yeah. And of course, the key individual in all of this is the crown prince who ultimately will lead Saudi Arabia who has been looked upon as a reformer as someone that was going to reform hobby Islam and someone that was really trying to reform the Middle East and a kind of a stealth ally of Israel. And also he's responsible for the reforms took place. Women can drive in Saudi Arabia because of the crown prince, and he's been courted by people in Silicon Valley and Hollywood here. He had a big deal cooking with the biggest talent agency in the world. Which is Ari Emanuel calico agency. He's met with Bob. Yeah. He's met with Morgan Freeman and the rock, and this is clearly it's it's a very difficult. Situation. But I guess the best analogies to remember that if it weren't for our relationship with one of the most evil dictators in history Joseph Stalin, we wouldn't have been able to beat. Folks people dictator in history Adolf Hitler. So sometimes you have to preserve alliances for the greater good. So so, and of course, this is going to be this will turn very political in the US here. Right. So. Imagine that already has been particularly the bridge. All of a sudden the media coverage of this. This story would not have had nearly the kind of prominence in in newspapers. And and online and on cable stations had accepted the perception was that they could use this as an attack on President Trump seems to be the filter by which they measure every story. But if it works for that, I don't believe it would have had quite the coverage that his hand and also the approach to it, which is been I mean, almost a warlike chant. From the left. Basically wanting to go to war, which already Arabia. Yeah. And and that's a disaster. Cutting off that relationship is a disaster. It is a disaster for an economic reasons. But maybe even more importantly, it's a disaster for geopolitical reasons. Well, I guess we'll have to see what happens JJ gonna want to have you back later this week. And of course, of course, James I James hurston dot com. Saudi Arabia's got talent..

Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabian Russell media analyst Arabia Middle East James James Jamerson Bob Iran Ari Emanuel Professor Adolf Hitler Joseph Stalin JJ murder supreme court US Hollywood Egypt
"james jamerson" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Joma was benny benjamin real funk brother james jamerson was a bass player those two guys i remember working with them in a little place up in ida while michigan it was a black i was a black summer resort resort but is back and lloyd lloyd price work up there a lot of acts would come up there and work for the summer mr personality yeah yeah you got person yeah yeah you worked at a lot of strip clubs well i work a lot of i remember one that stands out a lot is two one in detroit is called a brass real and the brass real was like an remember a particular dancer she would work at club a lot is like her club cheating only but she everybody would come there to see her and her name was lodhi the body and she was a lot she's got those little she had a little loose a little friends fringes on the back on the back of oh yeah and when when she's doing the show she turned to the audience and every time everytime she moved the fringes would jump so the drummer with hit hit the the top hat each time she would do that you know see we do one time the left cheek left cheek the left cheek right seek right cheek then both teak great at that good whatever whatever happened a lot of the body i guess you i guess she retired i guess.

Joma james jamerson ida detroit benny benjamin michigan lloyd lloyd
"james jamerson" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"I think there's some real possible changes that could come from washington it's gonna come from the people it always does the change that took place in the presidency came from a movement that was organic can powerful and i think that moving still alive and i think it's going to affect either i think we're due for another surprise results in the midterms because when you hear this hashtag blue wave all the time and it doesn't seem like the wave is blue it seems like the wave is red white and blue yeah james hirsch james are these are these midterms coming up in november going to mean the impeachment for donald trump if the democrats get into power in either the house and the senate absolutely will there's there's enough activism from the base i mean we see the guy tom perez who heads the dnc is is absolutely insane he filed this lawsuit that i mentioned opening up the dnc for discovery for the subpoena of witnesses and documents it's such a bad decision to do the lawsuit that it's united people i mean cory aboard your chief political analyst for cnn called it a stunt for fundraising democrats like claire mccaskill david axelrod jackie spire have all said it's concedes and so i think that you know what we're seeing is just desperation i mean the dnc is broke it's in debt and and they're in their thinking that they're donors really stupid was really stupid james jamerson thurston dot com thanks buddy tells who left coast.

washington donald trump senate tom perez dnc political analyst cnn jackie spire james hirsch cory claire mccaskill david axelrod
"james jamerson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

11:18 min | 2 years ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"You just be in a year seen as the highlyregarded homegoing magazine closed its doors of the creative team behind this have not been sitting on their hands former dining columnist at wong established lifestyle website lose and publishing company matemu media before releasing a three hundred fifty page book called hong kong food and culture from deem some two dries up a looney are hong kong bureau chief james chamber says down with a deal for a chat about the book over some local cafe classics fright exxon which is and peanut butter with milk toast ooh that was at a long in discussion with monaco's james jamerson and thus awful all sedition off the menu for previous episodes of this programme to monaco's website soundcloud or ice unice and remember to subscribe to the show so that he's automatically arrives onto a device every week or so do check out our menu speed food neighborhoods it's a special post costs that takes you to some of the world's most interesting corner districts andy premiers ever to state in the december generous eu of monaco magazine luminaries from the worlds of design hospitality and diplomacy reveal warsaw makes a terrific table and we made a ronald a kiely cereal entrepreneur behind the asian lifestyles pathology brent potato head for a my my me meal interview this broker was edited by kieron banerjee and i am marcos he be you'll be listening to the menu goodbye.

highlyregarded homegoing magaz matemu media james chamber exxon monaco james jamerson eu warsaw kieron banerjee wong hong kong bureau chief monaco magazine milk
"james jamerson" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Sms okay so that was the song for today and then that guy that reminded me is i'm taking you through a were us do less than so get their ready bernadette and then it reminded me of a a record than i have that has just the dis the base oh wow bernadette the centrally both the james jamerson from the actual obviously the actual recording dji the letter people wonder what is the base do that's with the part of the rhythm section you've the group's going in little melody's and stuff the nice of brake parts mm and then mm thank you does mm one boy and traffic go human bailey three thirty especially today poor forty five after the break love it you going to really like this one zero the school jerry the vase player no all right what's happening wls sports cubs and dodgers gittens set for game three this evening first pitch just after 8 o'clock hendricks yu darvish the starters the big news is in the cubs lineup were benz over his will lead off and place second base they'll hobby by as in the light of to the cubs that i astros at lead the yankees two to one in the ailsa asking for going on right now or the bottom of the second end still scoreless nfl players and owners met today to discuss social issues amongst them of course the kneeling during the national anthem of side since the meetings today were productive however colin kaepernick was not invited players at the meeting asked the caffey lotto ten subsequent meetings sounds like that may in the happen catholics open to it further reports from those beatings to say the nfl owners have not voted to change the policy about standing or not having to stand during the national anthem they'll policy exists as of right now although the white sox and the bulls china mcknight wls sports the stock market has hit an alltime high more than thirty five times so far this year what we'll do next and what should.

bernadette james jamerson benz cubs colin kaepernick sox bulls stock market yankees nfl
"james jamerson" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"james jamerson" Discussed on WDRC

"Has an estimated fortune of one point three billion dollars his company mpo communications owns over twenty five thousand copyrights as well as the publishing rights to musicals such as guys and dolls a chorus line and greece and over three thousand songs including all of buddy howley's all 23 songs credited to wings reached the us top forty and he had five consecutive number one albums wings had only one fewer number one on single than the other three beatles combined paul mccartney had twenty nine number one singles in the state's twenty of them with the beatles he's listed in the guinness book of world records as the most successful musician and composer in popular music history sales of over one hundred million singles and sixty 60goal discs paul says motown basis james jamerson and brian wilson are his greatest influences next we're gonna hear their first release for the beatles on apple records became their biggest hit reaching number one in twelve countries selling over five million copies worldwide and nineteen sixty eight eight million total originally it was intended to be the b eastside and over fifty instruments played on this is about john son julian lennon whose parents were divorcing he changed the title from hey jewels after a character from the play oklahoma paul wanted to drop the line the movement unita's on your shoulder but john told them it was the best wine in the song recorded in four takes they use the first since of thirty six peace orchestra played on the kota paul's base park was edited out some members of the orchestra were not thrilled the play on this but they picked up their energy level when paul asked them if they wanted to get paid this was allowed to be over seven minutes long because of the success of macarthur park swirling stones eighth grader song of all time send the grammy hall of fame and john call that a masterpiece then we're going to hear paul's favorite song that he wrote it was inspired by god only knows and it reminded paul of cheektocheek by fred astaire paul road while wound jing a john's pool and he wanted his vocals the sound like marianne faithfull it's a favorite of johns george martin's and art garfunkel calls at his favorite pop song effort to you own property that you need to move like yesterday listen to this.

kota paul johns george martin marianne fred astaire macarthur park oklahoma apple motown greece base park mpo communications john unita julian lennon brian wilson james jamerson beatles paul mccartney buddy howley three billion dollars seven minutes