13 Burst results for "James Flynn"

"james flynn" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

07:30 min | 4 months ago

"james flynn" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"Mine. I've often said that. I find the misbehavior of other people's children very relaxing and other people's marital tension. Somehow i find very relaxing. Get so this is. This is somewhat reassuring. But it's it's a liberating message that maybe we should expect less from our brains but lean on a set of capacities that are brands have to interact with this extended world. That will we'll get into but another fascinating piece of background is in your wonderful piece. In the new york times. Sunday review about the book he suggested that in the last century we have asked more and more and more of our brains and this has to some degree resulted in an increase. Or maybe part of the story of why average iq scores have been increasing for about a century now but now we see them. Leveling off and in many countries actually dipping hits some evidence that maybe we have maxed out are the capacity of our brands as solitary siloed individual organs. And this is why. A lot of us feel overtaxed stressed out. Yeah i mean. I do think it's such an interesting story for those who've heard of the flynn effect. You know there's the james flynn your local floss for identified this heretofore unnoticed development or trend. That i q. Scores were rising across the twentieth century and at a pretty steady clip and now we see what what scientists called the reverse flint effect which you know Just when we need to be smarter and need to be as smart as we can be to tackle the daunting challenges of our world. That rise in icu seems to have arrested or even started to reverse so we really need the extended mind. We really need to draw on these external resources and we need to become more skilled at employing them. Well that is a perfect segue to your first big idea. Which is that we can take. Some of the pressure offer brands by extending our minds with our bodies. We here in the west are used to thinking of the mind and the body as separate. We're used to thinking of the mind localized in the brain as the place where thinking happens but a burgeoning field called embodied cognition is demonstrating that thinking is actually a full body experience and this is true. In a few different ways i the internal sensations of the body our gut feelings bay guide our perceptions in our reactions when we learn to tune into these inner signals. We can use them to make sounder decisions and even to connect more effectively with other people second than movements. Our bodies make affect the way we think we tend to believe that serious thinking involves sitting still but research shows that moving walking exercising acting things out that enhances mental processes in ways. That don't happen. When we're sitting down there a specific kind of movement the gestures we make with our hands. Extend our thinking by capturing and expressing concepts that we can't put into words research shows that are most advanced ideas are cutting edge ideas. They often show at first in the motions of our hands. And then we use those motions to inform and construct the verbal accounts of what. We're thinking. eddie. I love the story of john coates. Who gets a phd from cambridge. May he goes to work. As a trader at goldman merrill deutsche bank and he finds that when he's hyper rational about his process as you say diligent and reading economic reports and devising a brilliant trade. And i'm quoting you here. Impactful in its logic and unassailable in its reasoning. He would lose money every time so what what was going wrong. Yeah and he noticed. This was the case with his colleagues as well that It was those hot shots from the ivy league who were who were not necessarily making money but then the guy across the hall who went to some undistinguished university. This is coats talking. was just printing money and they couldn't figure it out and Eventually coats came to suspect that the really good traders the one with the with the amazing profit making records were not necessarily those were the most intellectual or the most cerebral but the ones who are best able to tune into their bodily signals. Now that sounds really out there because we think especially of finances being really sort of bringing heavy brain center kind of activity but it makes sense when you understand that there's way too much information in all of our daily lives our daily experienced for the conscious mind to attend to the the patterns and the regularities that we are noting and tagging all the time there too complex for us to hold in our conscious mind which is a good thing because if we did we are metal band with a would be completely consumed with it but we we do store those those patterns memory of those patterns in our non conscious minds which brings up the question of well. Okay so i know this stuff. I know these these patterns that can recognize them when i encounter them again. But if they're non conscious how do. I have access to that and the answer is. That's what our gut feelings are gut. Feelings are like a little nudge or a little tug at our elbow saying. Hey you've seen this before. Pay attention to this. This is what works when you responded this way last or this is what didn't work when you responded that other way last time. And so that is why paying attention to those internal signals which scientists call interception. That is why someone who's more attuned to those internal signals can make better decisions and better choices because they have this other source of wisdom of information. It's not a kind of new agey tune into your body. Kind of thing is actually a source of information that is drawn from your own experience and the body is the way to access that it's so fascinating so it turns out that listening to this feedback from our bodies enables us to make better decisions and really benefit from pattern recognition that were not even aware of unconscious level and this was corroborated that people who are better at identifying their own heart rate right it turns out some people have no idea when their heart is beating for other people totally self evident that people who are better or more tuned into the beating of their own heart and presumably other bodily signals are more effective traders right trade traders who are better at identifying beating of their heart are more successful yes they make more money and they stay in what is notoriously this very volatile profession for longer and interestingly traders as a group are more attuned to the beating of their heart which is a standard test of interception. Then are you know the average people on the street so in a way. They're being self selected for how introspectively attuned they are although this is never when you're looking for someone cv and looking at you know where they went to school and what their previous work experiences. No one's ever asking. Well do you tune into the the signals the internal signals of your body but it turns out.

Sunday ivy league last century new york twentieth century first john coates james flynn eddie deutsche bank about a century flynn merrill flint cambridge
"james flynn" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"james flynn" Discussed on Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor's Journey

"Does not apply to all domains on an issue with deliberate practice. Is that the focus is on repeating the same Type of task over and over again in the proved so deliver practice. The first study on it was on violinists and the second on pianist so it had focused on music but classical musicians so they are trying to perform something perfect. An exact and people have looked at jazz musicians which is very different. You're not trying to recreate a piece. You're trying to create a piece and so when you're looking at creativity doing the same thing over and over again and trying to improve. It is probably not going to be very predictive of how well you can say. Have a jam session or improvise. Because you don't want to get stuck in a routine where you're practicing the same thing over and over again you want to try to experience Other forms that are going to influence that process in ways. That aren't going to get you in a rod So jazz musicians have looked at. This and deliver. Practice is not what's important but more -versity of experiences. This diversity of experiences has also been shown to be an effective path toward success. David epstein is a science and investigative reporter as well as the best selling author of books like range which examines the idea of excellence and improving performance epstein pushes against the idea of specializing in a particular field early and racking up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. It's interesting to note that malcolm glad will read this book. And stated for reasons i cannot explain david epstein manages to make me thoroughly enjoy the experience of being told that everything. I thought about something wrong. I loved range so in this book. He examines the world's most successful athletes. Artists musicians inventors and scientists and he discovered that in most fields especially those that are complex and unpredictable that the generalists not the specialists are the ones most likely to excel. These generalists often find their path late and they juggle many interests rather than just focusing on one. They tend to be more creative more agile and are able to make connections that others can't see and brooks research found this to be true as well and my own work. We looked at primarily looking at sports And we've found bat. The olympic athletes of the very very top world class athletes were more likely to started their main sport later and to have practiced more other sports than their main sports than competitors. That were the national class not the world class and there's some parallels here so we also found that in science. The seems to be the case as well. So in germany there's a what is essentially the national level equivalent of the nobel prize And so we looked at german nobel laureates and then germans who won the national prize so comparing this world class versus national us and the same thing emerged so the nobel laureates started their area later and they had lots more experience than other so if they wanted in a chemistry than they actually had worked in biology they worked in physics and they had all these other experiences and their milestones were bit more delayed than the national awardees. And it seems like this correlates with Certainly are just like myself and teachers have touted the benefits of an arts education in conjunction with the other stem classes. That are out there and literature and that type of things in how arts really makes for a well rounded student that can then improve all test scores. Is that kind of along the same lines. Yeah i believe that's that's using the same philosophy and then that would be a great study to look at comparative students who either had. That's more well rounded education versus those that are more focused and see what outcomes look like between them. That's certainly one thing within the creative arts whether we're doing Plays or musicals were inhabiting characters and so the more that were out in the world whether it's travel whether it's just people watching as you walk through new york streets. You know these different types of outside experiences definitely play into how we can then inhabit those characters on stage. Absolutely yeah when you first reached out to the avs thinking about it. Obscene spoke range and how that would apply to actors because absolutely the more diverse range of experiences. The more different types of people that you'd interacting with the different types of contexts in which you'd been is probably going to be able to influence you're acting within an area so while there are outside influences and experiences that can contribute to our own levels of achievement and success there is also the genetic component or rather the innate abilities and intelligence were born with that also play a part as i was doing my own research on this i discovered the work of new zealand intelligence researcher james flynn who noticed that. Iq scores had risen steadily over nearly a century at an average of about three points every decade and this observed rise in iq scores has come to be known as the flynn effect. I found a ted talk. He gave a few years ago and he is the quintessential college professor shaggy beard glasses. Plaid shirt and a cardigan and in this lecture. He talks about what he discovered about these. Iq tests we just got a few more questions. Right on. i q tests. We got far more questions right on. Iq tests than each succeeding generation. Back to the time that they were invented indeed a few score the people a century ago against modern arms they would have an average iq of seventy if you score us against their narms. We would have an average. I q of one hundred thirty now. This is raised all sorts of questions. We're our immediate ancestors on the verge of mental retardation because seventy is normally the score for mental retardation or are we on the verge of all being gifted because one hundred thirty is the cutting line for giftedness. Now i'm going to try and argue for a third alternative.

David epstein james flynn nobel prize brooks research malcolm avs germany investigative reporter new york ted researcher professor
"james flynn" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"james flynn" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Jason head veto. The ranking news from the NBA is that said Doc Rivers out as Clippers head coach. That's crazy to me, man. Eyes to me, too. I think you know your You got the answer, though. I bet that Kawai said no more. Doc. Doctor needs the league. No more House calls. That's what I think it was Doc a problem this year. The problem is Paul George. No showing in the playoffs, all right. He had the medals. Remember that ball at the medals? He checked out for a while. No playoff P. Paul George, nicknamed himself Playoff Yes, Yeah. N B a Finals start on Wednesday. Lakers heat I think I feel I'm nervous, saying it out loud picking against Jimmy Butler and the heat you want, Mike, You've got a big bet, though. My friends say I should I should wait. He once you think the heat are gonna win heat in sex. Book it. What a hot take. It is on hot tech Monday. I'm sorry, Jason. But you're screwed A Ah, they're big dogs, but a lot of money has already come in on the heat. So I just think it's so what I do know my pandemic senses. Tell me Heat in six. Really LeBron James Flynn Road. Good man. Explain real good. I'm excited for you know the Siri's I am, too, Because Miami's come out of nowhere to me. They really have. Well, they're supposed to be one player short like this was the roster was set up to say Hey, Maybe if we get the honest then will be great. And they're in the N B a finals already. So Yeah, we will see that that starts Wednesday night NBA Finals does have I've been putting off talking about the Cowboys in the Seahawks. Yeah, probably. I guess so. I mean, can I mention one thing about the longboards? I just got a message from one of our Dallas listeners of female who said she thought Chris Ash was goingto teach the Longhorns the rugby style of tackling What happened to that? And also there was there was massive amounts of Oh, you fans doing the reverse? Welcome late in that game, and they're lost to Kansas State. Yes, if you would like to enjoy your Toti is dipped in Bowman's upside down horn sauce. Get any Beatle rocks. We all had impending. We all laughed about. Oh, you losing the case State particularly me who picked them minus 27 a half, But that's bad for Texans, right, Dude, I didn't laugh. I was like, Oh, like I was more nervous going into that tech game because of what happened. Oklahoma And that to me, is what really started to change my opinion on what's going on in college football than the L s u debacle than the M barely get Everybody is just sort of meeting in the middle. Yeah, because because of these, these first the lack of preparation because Tito, I don't know if I could buy that or not. Right now, because it was a perfect storm at the less you game. L s u a new quarterback. They had all those injuries that everybody's a new everything. And here comes Mike Leach from the Great Northwest on this passing offense and his fire Twitter feed and I saw that coming, though you deal is a little hard to But remember. Oh, you lost the case State last year in case they had the same personnel as it did last year. And I think they owe you fans have seen now how important it was to have transfer quarterbacks for leaking Riley Spencer Rattlers, You know, not a transfer a quarterback and he struggled down really, really hard, so I don't know. I know where you're going, because it's a wacky year, but I just think the good team should always beat the mediocre teams. I know you didn't get it done. Nor did LSD. I agree with you. And maybe that is the homer and me trying to make excuses. You know who does who agrees more with you at is our guy Kyle LeBlanc. You follow his Twitter feed during that Texas game. At one point, he was like Atlanta Longhorns. Okay on then he tweeted later Dallas Longhorns because we came back, but yeah, he did. He did put out there. You know that. We sought that game and the big 12 might suck and that he was pretty disappointed. How is the Atlanta coach? Not fired. Oh, yeah. Two weeks in a row, two weeks in a row, they blow 15 point lead 2026 to 10. They were up with the with the what 10 minutes left in the fourth quarter, and they lose that game. Also, I believe they've given the job to Nicole's right. Good. Austin. Yeah, yeah, they did. Has this happened in the history of the league there? Three note. The Bears are three, you know, and have been a cinch their quarterback in that Something has never been the quarterback undefeated and changing quarterbacks. That's that's kind of nuts. Hey, Philadelphia fans. You wish you had Nick Foles back? Yes. Oh, my toaster fires 021021 Biggles, I I wish that that didn't make me nervous as a Cowboys fan, But I just I see the Eagles winning the division. It's 69 and one. My God, I I'm now nervous because they got a tie. So yeah, the Cowboys lose 38 31. They had the lead in the fourth quarter. They did not win. I'm not beat them up too much for it. Because I think the Seahawks might be the best team in the NFC because Russell Wilson is really really good. 14 14 touchdown passes should have 15 decay Met captain fumbled that ball on the back of the end zone. He's on pace to have 75 touchdowns this season. That would be a record. I don't want to play against any Seattle receivers and fantasy or us or dangerous for sure, I I hate to bring this name up because I know it hurt you beat up Tyler Lockett. Do the Cowboys defenders know that Tyler Lockett exists? Because today? Maybe he might. He might as well be invisible to them. Hey, had three touchdowns, two of them. There's nobody within 10 yards of him, so maybe want to cover that guy Seems like maybe he has a superpower. It's to turn himself invisible for moments and again, you know you could talk about last week's Win versus Atlanta. It's still with all due respect, Doc has not led that team back to to a meaningful win. I'm sorry. Yeah, and their 472 yards. Three touchdowns is there um, or less impressive 470 yard effort ever like That was when we got to the end of the game, and I saw that number. I was like that has got to be a typo. Right? That's kind of bee. He had 300 yards right 472 yards. Three touchdowns in the and the Cowboys still lose. Ah, again. Look there. They're the favorite to win the NFC East because the NFC East is just an absolute disaster. But, yeah, I would say problematic, problematic for Dallas there. Who is off to a who is off to a tougher start the NFC East or the Big 12, NFC East. Ah, yeah. Yeah, NFC East. It's It's a historically. I mean, we're only there were only three weeks in, but I think they're giants, right? Cowboys is terrible. And the Giants lost field goal. They lost a half of a team before. Bless that half. Even more of my defense went down that game. I believe the 40 Niners were on ly. They had 40% of their salary cap. Active. Not from the cove is a right, right right engine just from both. I'm back. Who was that quarterback? We're going. Mullins Mullins? Yeah, these look, I would say it's a testament to how non essential Jimmy Garoppolo is or just tow how horrific the Giants are. Yeah, that was I mean, now it's just a miserable effort from them. It was, if they're going to win any game. They should have won that game. It was a home. Good Gosh, Are they bad? And the Jets or even worse to be devoted to go to the tent? That game to Devonta Freeman, did he? I didn't say I didn't see much. I didn't see any of that game didn't want 2836059. If you want to get in 51283605 90 Rob, Hold on. We'll talk.

Cowboys NFC Paul George Giants NBA Jason head Twitter Dallas Atlanta Mike Leach Seahawks Doc Rivers Tyler Lockett Clippers Kawai James Flynn Kansas State Dallas Longhorns Atlanta Longhorns Lakers
Miami Heat, Los Angeles Lakers Start Preparations For NBA Finals

Sports Talk with Jason and Ed

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Miami Heat, Los Angeles Lakers Start Preparations For NBA Finals

"B a Finals start on Wednesday. Lakers heat I think I feel I'm nervous, saying it out loud picking against Jimmy Butler and the heat you want, Mike, You've got a big bet, though. My friends say I should I should wait. He once you think the heat are gonna win heat in sex. Book it. What a hot take. It is on hot tech Monday. I'm sorry, Jason. But you're screwed A Ah, they're big dogs, but a lot of money has already come in on the heat. So I just think it's so what I do know my pandemic senses. Tell me Heat in six. Really LeBron James Flynn Road. Good man. Explain real good. I'm excited for you know the Siri's I am, too, Because Miami's come out of nowhere to me. They really have. Well, they're supposed to be one player short like this was the roster was set up to say Hey, Maybe if we get the honest then will be great. And they're in the N B a finals already. So Yeah, we will see that that starts Wednesday night NBA Finals does

Mike Jimmy Butler Lakers James Flynn Siri NBA Jason Miami
"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Activation and Karen Miller we've been talking about the value of being a generalist even though we seem to live in an age of hyper specialize doctors and engineers and professors and it may seem like being a renaissance man or woman is a thing of the past maybe it worked in the renaissance but author David Epstein argues really living at a time when being a generalist and not honing in on your career path too early thanks a lot of sense the world is changing quite quickly like a lot of the jobs that that a lot of people work and didn't even exist necessarily when when they were thinking about what to study and that's borne out by the evidence data collected a few years ago by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York showed that only twenty seven percent of people who graduated from college we're working in fields related to their major he made a lot of sense to specialize when we were in a more industrial economy were you were facing the same challenge more similar challenger Peter Lee and it made sense for organizations and companies to be more of the upper out structure where can the you know can a person just moving nearly up but as we get into the knowledge economy where you can transfer your skills laterally that that becomes a lot easier to take something you're not just stuck facing the same type of problems if you have these broader problem solving skills or communication skills or whatever the broad skills are you can move them to a lot of different types of challenges concerned well but I've seen the author of the book range argues that being a generalist has yet another advantage an advantage that was discovered by an economist from northwestern who contrasted how early specializes fared in the long run versus only specialized hers the economist offer melamed saw that England and Scotland which have a lot in common differed in how their school systems worked in England students had to start specializing in high school years earlier than they had to narrow their focus in Scotland and what he wanted to see was who wins the trade off the early early specializes in Scotland that the students could keep sampling longer we found was that the students in England who specialized earlier did indeed jump out to an income lead right after college but the students in Scotland picked better match quality of economist terms the degree of fit between your interests and abilities in the work that you do because they had a chance to sample and learn about themselves and about their options and so they had much faster growth rates so they then caught the quickly caught the the earlier specializes in a race that income difference in the earlier specializes started quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers because they have been made to match earlier and so they they basically made worse decisions and so I think one of the things that's going on is the more we we allow people to kind of sample the more signal they get about themselves and the world in the more chance they have to optimize that match quality and so they should they should move around we should discourage that what what would you say to like parent or let's say a college kid who here's what you're saying kind of like the idea but is fearful if you don't take the opportunity to I don't know B. an electrical engineer right now we're to do to do the specialized things that you're going to be out in a sea of a million generalists who you know all say yeah I can communicate well and I can solve problems and what does that really mean and you kind of lose out on the opportunity to get like a job with a stable income yeah I mean for for one they're they're not as many people are great at solving problems as we might think like when James Flynn discover the fun effect I should say that that's the the effective like people having higher IQ scores over the past hundred years right right right that's exactly right what he gave this test of like critical thinking to students at a top American and top British university and found that there was basically zero correlation between what got them good grades in their ability to actually do this critical thinking novel problem solving so that's that's a bad sign but if if you want to know which ones you like go for it I don't think that's a problem at all what I think you should do is stay a tune to your own match quality don't think that that's the track you have to stay on continue getting signal as her many Ibarra studies how people maximize their their match quality says this phrase I love we learn who we are in practice not in theory and what she means is there's all the psychological research that shows actually the commencement speech advice of picture you're gonna be in ten or twenty years in March company toward is not so good because our insight into our own skills and interests is very limited by our roster of previous experiences she accepted try stuff and learn who you are and practices of acting and think nothing can enact so do stuff your flipped on it's called self regulatory learning and then maybe you switch and that electrical engineering experience won't be wasted you can like I was in a tent in the arctic when I decided for sure to be a writer I took my my very ordinary science skills into the motor sports illustrated by some became extraordinary sports science writer right so that that won't be wasted I think the conceptual approach I think of it I'm a new parent is is this approach that I wrote about a little called talent base branching like from the army I'm not saying you should you know parent like the army but they were having a problem has the knowledge economy developed with their most talented officers soon because they could now transfer their knowledge latterly were leaving because they would say are you I want to go to I can take these like leadership skills and things of learning go to like some other company and they wanted to retain them and they had the upper out structures leaders and first they threw money at them and when that didn't work like the people are gonna stay stayed and took the money in the ones are gonna go in anyway and I was a half billion dollars of taxpayer money and but then they started this thing they called talent base branching where instead of saying here's your career path get upper out a pair the officer with a coach and they say here's a bunch of different career paths you know try one dabble in a couple of the coach will then help you reflect on how this fits you wasn't what you thought doesn't interest you doesn't use your talents try a bunch of them we'll see what fits and then you just sort of zigzag your way to better match quality and so that that's sort of the concept I want to keep in my head where my role as a parent would be to be that coach that helps the person reflecting get the maximum amount of learning about himself and the possibilities in the world from each one of those experiences and there's a bunch of people who went on to become incredible successes you write about J. K. Rowling about Vincent van Gogh we did a segment on Dr Seuss these are people who all found the thing they were really good at was not like the first thing a try sometimes it was in the second or third thing they tried yeah I mean right like mango was almost thirty when he picked up a guide to the ABC's of drawing any quickly got recommended to take a class with the ten year olds that's sort of that that's that's kind of the norm I mean we're obsessed with precocity right and so when we hear the Tiger Woods story we extrapolated to everything even though it's even though we never hear the Roger Federer store even though that's the one that's representative of the science when we hear you know mark Zuckerberg at twenty to say young people are just smarter it doesn't make as big of a bang when then you know I am I. T. in northwestern the census bureau put out research that shows actually the average age of a founder of a blockbuster start up on the day of founding now when it becomes a blockbuster is like forty five and a half or something right we don't we just don't turn allies that stuff we just use the dramatic stories and those people usually have to do some zigzagging ahead of time so that's that was kind of the trend to in this this research I discuss how the dark course project at Harvard where these researchers were looking basically people who found fulfillment in their work essentially and what they found was that most of those people came in and said you know don't tell anybody do what I did because I did these other things first I thought I was gonna be this other thing I just sort of accidentally happened in some other opportunity and all this and so they all view themselves as having come out of nowhere that's why the researchers named at the dark course project not all of them but most of them the people that found fulfillment they don't say here's my long term thing I better get started they say they're they're common trait is basically short term planning they say here's what I am today you're my skills and interests here the opportunity in front of me and this is the one I'm gonna try and maybe your finality change because I will learn something about myself so sometimes they make long term goals but not before a period of experimentation so does all this mean to you you know the famous ten thousand hours rule that people took from what Malcolm Gladwell has written does that seem to you like maybe take a pause and doing ten thousand hours of something you know before you really commit to it maybe think a little bit first yeah think first definitely I mean the V. the idea that practice is and lots of practice is really important I think is completely uncontroversial and for people who study you know skill acquisition so soon I've no problem with that but actually Malcolm and I were recently invited we were we were kind of invited some years ago to to kind of debate this and and had a follow up in March and on you tube and you can see where I sort of asked if he feels any differently he said yes he said I think and I now think I conflated two issues the fact that you need a lot of practice to get good with the idea that that means if you want to be good in acts you should do only acts and starting as early as possible and now I think that's wrong and so I I think there was a release to take so you still nobody's downplaying the importance of practice but I think the way to get good access in many cases in the more we can learning environments it's not.

Karen Miller David Epstein
"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome to innovation Karen Miller performing a major experiment on your own children is a bit unconventional but that didn't stop loss low poll gar he studied education and decided that the education system was just for producing what he called the grey average mass and that if he could give his own children a very special and and specialized and intensive type of education a certain skill early on he could turn them into geniuses essentially other David Epstein argues pull cars experiment was not only worth paying attention to but in the years after it launched it became a powerful example of what real unrelenting focus could get you in this was for him about a lot more than his own kids it was about proving that any child could be turned into a genius with his early specialized training so he was just he was just using an example and he decided to pick chess is at the time this was sort of Cold War proxy like they're just been this big US Russia matching it was it was sort of deemed you know check became pop culture basically all the sudden so in the late nineteen sixties when Paul gars first daughter Susan was born it didn't take long before he tried to mold her into a genius I was very fortunate in that the I was very successful in my very first tournaments I won my I had my first victory and that would have passed to elementary school championship but I was just four and a half years old Susan won all ten of the games that you had to play in the elementary school tournament and her dad knew there was some major potential here what's really called me I think is the fairness of the game that I like in real life the inch on the chess board kind of the logic the good versus the bad always prevails he clicks two hundred thousand different game sequences before computer chess yeah out of out of magazines and and organizing a card catalog so she could study and when she was four she went to a a chess club Budapest in with her feet dangling from the chair beat beats a grown man and rose up to become the best female player in the world and the same or similar happen with her sisters her her sister that was Susan Polgar her sister Sophia became international masters she didn't quite make it to grand master status but then Judit Polgar became you know ranked top ten in the world men or women's was the greatest female player to date at that point the story of Laszlo poll gar and his experiment his notion that you can make your child a genius if they just focus early it got a lot of attention it was told and written about over and over again and it seems like proof positive specialization was the way to go if you work hard enough for long enough maybe you too could raise a grand master or be a grand master but says David M. Steen Paul Garcia experiment had a major flaw as dean is the author of the book range Y. generalist triumph any specialized world any argues that parents are education experts seeking to learn from what pull guard did might want to be careful the reason I tell it is actually because chess turns out to be in some ways a uniquely poor example from which to extrapolate to other skills because it is what the psychologist robin Hogarth call the kind of learning environment and what that means is there are clear rules out your next steps and goals are completely clear patterns repeat you get feedback on what's done immediately if it's totally accurate and that's so so you learn just by just by doing the same thing over and over and over the life of course is in is controlled as chess it's generally more chaotic and less kind if you're a teacher for example your students aren't predictable if you're a doctor your patients are predictable and Epstein who has spent years poring over the data on whether it makes sense to specialize early he says we've paid too much attention to a few high profile stories about the awesomeness of quickly narrowing your focus the research actually supports something completely different the power even as an adult of being a generalist if you get a patient in the are you might not even know what happens with them it followed so you have to find you have to find different ways to learn other than instant feedback in fact so these are called wicked learning environments and one of the one of the examples Hogarth uses actually in and that he loves in the medical contacts since you mentioned it of this very famous New York City physician who became renowned and and you know wealthy because again and again he could predict that a patient would develop typhoid before they showed a single symptom like weeks before they shot a single symptom and he would do this by helping their tongue or feeling around their time with his hands and his one of his colleagues later observed he was a more productive carrier of typhoid and even typhoid Mary using just his hands so it turned out that he was the one spreading the typhoid with his hands so his predictions are always correct and so that's a wicked learning environment because the feedback teaches the exact wrong lesson most of us aren't in that we could have a learning environment either but most of us are not in in sort of the the the chest area the spectrum in our work either we didn't realize who is spreading typhoid but he was like learning the wrong lesson again and again about how great he was at predicting what would happen exactly his accurate prediction to reinforce sing exactly the wrong lessons was very different from chess and that way where all the information's clear that feedback is immediate the patterns are just repetitive and they teach you the correct lesson so you just get better with experience in in in this case he was not getting better with experience and that turns out to be a trending in most of the things that we consider like complicated work where there's there's now a long line of scientists kind of starting in the mid twentieth century showing that in many of these jobs with repetitive experience people become more confident but but not actually better you tell another story about specialization that people are gonna recognize pretty quickly it's about a little kid really really little kid who learned the sport very early you open the book with it and you won tell that story yes so this story becomes familiar pretty quickly as a kid whose father gave a potter at not not because he necessarily wanted to be a golfer but just gave it to his Toyota seven months old and he he dragged around everywhere in his little baby Walker and I ten months he was imitating a swing by two years old he was on national television I'm showing off his his swinging from Bob Hope by three is father was media training him and you know fast forward and by twenty one Tiger Woods is the greatest golfer in the world and like the polders this became even more famous in the performance area and literature then the polders probably most famous story of development of all time and again which has been extrapolated to all these other three starting in sports but said look at what tiger did we should push all youth athletes to specialize and then branching out from there to even other domains but again golf is like really the epitome of a kind learning environment where it's it's almost like an industrial task we try to do the same things over and over with his little deviation as possible and again that is that's not even representative of most of the sports world as from a skill acquisition science standpoint never mind the rest of the the wider world so I mean you argue that people should be more generalists then than they are right now that we tend to push this idea of specialization and we think this is a really great thing you should do that but it seems like in this very very complicated world you would want specialists like I think about something like the sewer system I don't know how sewer systems work but hopefully you have people who do know how sewer systems work you hire those people in every distance to city and they help you their engineers whatever they help you to understand how the system works and so it seems like in an incredibly complex world that has only gotten more complex and the last I don't know a few hundred years certainly since the industrial revolution it seems like specialization would be the way to go yes and so for and for sure as I as I mentioned completely throughout range we need specialists no question no question about it I like the way that Freeman Dyson the eminent physicist mathematician framed it ray said we need both birds and frogs frogs are down looking at all the the small details in the birds up above not seen those details but can integrate the knowledge of the frogs and he says the problem is that we're telling everyone to be frogs basically and and that shows up in some of the areas where you would think specialization is the most beneficial service to take medicine for example that that's probably the you know the one of the first things that jumps to mind outside of sports when you think of the need for specialization and in medicine specialization has been both inevitable and beneficial however the the sort of delegitimizing of the generalist practitioners has led to these incredibly perverse outcomes so specialists now are so specialized that they only tend to look at what's called surrogate markers they're no longer looking at the whole organism of a human they're looking at one tiny piece of this this more complex puzzle and so they'll do something like one of the most famous you know blood pressure medications are not famous one of the most widely prescribed blood pressure medications turns out you can prescribe it lowers people's blood pressure but then they just died of heart attack and stroke the exact same rate with better blood pressure numbers and and we're having all sorts of problems like this where specialists are so focused on the market is not the thing you actually care about right when you care about is people if they're dying of heart attack or stroke you don't care that their numbers are just lower all the specials are only looking at these tiny proxies for what you want and assuming that that creates the endpoint you want a complex system and we had some major backfires there which is why one of the studies I cited noted that you're less likely to die if your checked in for a cardiac problem to hospital during the dates of the national cardiology conference when the specials cardiologists are away because you're likely get a procedure that they do over and over and over that that fixes some proxy marker but does not actually make you more likely to live and can have very serious side effects so SO terror credit one of the cardiologists who who wrote the journal editorial but that study said you know my colleagues and I would joke that our conferences are the safest place to to have a heart problem and is totally turns that on its head so you you really also in addition the specialist needs someone who's zoomed out looking at the outcomes the large outcomes you actually care about not just the pieces the reductionist pieces of of the puzzle in isolation let's go back to some of the research that first started scholars thinking maybe specialization even though maybe it does really work great in chess maybe it works fantastic in golf maybe that's not the way to go with everybody and you talk about this really interesting phenomenon which is that over the course of the twentieth century I. Q. scores started to go up and people start to look into this and for you try to figure out like what what's going on here how could people be getting smarter do you want talk about like what that what that yielded with that study old yeah yeah that this is a phenomenon called the Flynn effect named after the guy discovered a James Flynn and and it turns out that I. Q. test the the meaning the average is always a hundred just because that's how the test makers make it but it turned out that they were having to keep changing the the testers of updating the scoring system because people are getting more answers right that that were the equivalent of about three points per decade over the course of the twentieth century which turned out to be a lot when it's over multiple decades so much so that you know are like great grandparents would look like they were like truly impaired because of their scores and in the the rise has been on a very specific parts of the test has been the most abstract parts of the test and less on the stuff that you might learn about you know in school so particularly one of the tests called raven's progressive matrices just gives you a bunch of.

Karen Miller
"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Activation and Karen Miller we've been talking about the value of being a generalist even though we seem to live in an age of hyper specialize doctors and engineers and professors and it may seem like being a renaissance man or woman is a thing of the past maybe it worked in the renaissance but author David Epstein argues really living at a time when being a generalist and not honing in on your career path too early thanks a lot of sense the world is changing quite quickly and like a lot of the jobs that that a lot of people work and didn't even exist necessarily when when they were thinking about what to study and that's borne out by the evidence data collected a few years ago by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York showed that only twenty seven percent of people who graduated from college we're working in fields related to their major he made a lot of sense to specialize when we were in a more industrial economy were you were facing the same challenge more similar challenger Peter Lee and it made sense for organizations and companies to be more of the upper out structure where can you know can a person just moving nearly up but as we get into the knowledge economy where you can transfer your skills laterally that that becomes a lot easier to take something you're not just stuck facing the same type of problems if you have these broader problem solving skills or communication skills or whatever the broad skills are you can move them to a lot of different types of challenges concerned well but abstain the author of the book range argues that being a generalist has yet another advantage an advantage that was discovered by an economist from northwestern who contrasted how early specializes fared in the long run versus only specialized hers the economist offer melamed saw that England and Scotland which have a lot in common differed in how their school systems worked in England students had to start specializing in high school years earlier than they had to narrow their focus in Scotland and what he wanted to see was who wins the trade off the early early specializes in Scotland that the students could keep sampling longer we found was that the students in England who specialized earlier did indeed jump out to an income lead right after college but the students in Scotland picked better match quality of the economist's terms the degree of fit between your interests and abilities in the work that you do because they had a chance to sample and learn about themselves and about their options and so they had much faster growth rates so they then caught the quickly caught the the earlier specializes in a race that income difference in the earlier specializes started quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers because they have been made to match earlier and so they they basically made worse decisions and so I think one of the things that's going on is the more we we allow people to kind of sample the more signal they get about themselves and the world in the more chance they have to optimize that match quality and so they should like they should move around we should discourage that what what would you say to like a parent or let's say a college kid who here's what you're saying kind of like the idea but is fearful if you don't take the opportunity to I don't know B. an electrical engineer right now we're to do to do the specialized things that you're going to be out in a sea of a million generalists who you know all say yeah I can communicate well and I can solve problems and what does that really mean and you kind of lose out on the opportunity to get like a job with a stable income yeah I mean for for one they're they're not as many people are great at solving problems as we might think like when James Flynn new discover the fun effect I should say that that's the the effective like people having higher IQ scores over the past hundred years right right right that's exactly right what he gave this test of like critical thinking to students at a top American and top British university and found that there was basically zero correlation between what got them good grades in their ability to actually do this critical thinking novel problem solving so that's that's a bad sign but if if you want to know which ones you like go for it I don't think that's a problem at all what I think you should do is stay a tune to your own match quality don't think that that's the track you have to stay on continue getting signal as her many Ibarra who studies how people maximize their their match quality says this phrase I love we learn who we are in practice not in theory and what she means is there's all the psychological research that shows actually the commencement speech advice of picture you're gonna be in ten or twenty years in March company toward is not so good because our insight into our own skills and interests is very limited by our roster of previous experiences she accepted try stuff and learn who you are and practices and acting and think not think and then act so do stuff your flipped on it's called self regulatory learning and then maybe you switch and that electrical engineering experience won't be wasted you can like I was in a tent in the arctic when I decided for sure to be a writer I took my my very ordinary science skills into the motor sports illustrated by some became extraordinary sports science writer right so that that won't be wasted I think the conceptual approach I think of it I'm a new parent is is this approach that I wrote about a little called talent base branching like from the army I'm not saying you should you know parent like the army but they were having a problem has the knowledge economy developed with their most talented officers soon because they could now transfer their knowledge latterly were leaving because they would say are you I want to go to I can take these like leadership skills and things of learning go to like some other company okay and they want to retain them and they had the upper out structures leaders and firstly threw money at them and when that didn't work like the people gonna stay stayed and took the money in the ones are gonna go in anyway that was a half billion dollars of taxpayer money M. but then they started this thing they called talent base branching where instead of saying here's your career path get upper out a pair the officer with a coach and they say here's a bunch of different career paths you know try one dabble in a couple of the coach will then help you reflect on how this fits you wasn't what you thought does it interest you doesn't use your talents try a bunch of them we'll see what fits and then you just sort of zigzag your way to better match quality and so that that's sort of the concept I want to keep in my head where my role as a parent would be to be that coach that helps the person reflecting get the maximum amount of learning about himself and the possibilities in the world from each one of those experiences and there's a bunch of people who went on to become incredible successes you write about J. K. Rowling about Vincent van Gogh we did a segment on Dr Seuss these are people who all found the thing they were really good at was not like the first thing I tried sometimes within the second or third thing they tried yeah I mean right like mango was almost thirty when he picked up a guide to the ABC's of drawing in any quickly got recommended to take a class with with ten year old that's sort of that that's that's kind of the norm I mean we're obsessed with precocity right and so when we hear the Tiger Woods story we extrapolated to everything even though it's even though we never hear the Roger Federer store even though that's the one that's representative of the science when we hear you know mark Zuckerberg at twenty to say young people are just smarter it doesn't make as big of a bang when then you know the MIT and northwestern the census bureau put out research that shows actually the average age of a founder of a blockbuster start up on the day of founding now when it becomes a blockbuster is like forty five and a half or something right we don't we just don't internalize that stuff we just use the dramatic stories and those people usually have to do some zigzagging ahead of time so that's that was kind of the trend to in this this research I had discussed all the dark course project at Harvard where these researchers were looking basically people who found fulfillment in their work essentially and what they found was that most of those people came in and said you know don't tell anybody do what I did because I did these other things first I thought I was gonna be this other thing I just sort of accidentally happened in some other opportunity and all this and so they all view themselves as having come out of nowhere that's why the researchers named at the dark course project not all of them but most of them the people that found fulfillment they don't say here's my long term thing I better get started they say they're they're common trait is basically short term planning they say here's what I am today you're my skills and interests here the opportunity in front of me and this is the one I'm gonna try and maybe your finality change because I will learn something about myself so sometimes they make long term goals but not before a period of experimentation so does all this mean to you you know the famous ten thousand hours role that people took from what Malcolm Gladwell has written does that seem to you like maybe take a pause and doing ten thousand hours of something you know before you really commit to it maybe think a little bit first yeah think first definitely I mean the V. the idea that practice is and lots of practice is really important I think it's completely uncontroversial and for people who study you know skill acquisition so soon I've no problem with that but actually Malcolm and I were recently invited we were we were kind of invited some years ago to to kind of debate this and and had a follow up in March and on you tube and you can see where I sort of asked if he feels any differently he said yes he said I think and I now think I conflated two issues the fact that you need a lot of practice to get good with the idea that that means if you want to be good in acts you should do only acts and starting as early as possible and now I think that's wrong and so I I think it was a release to take so you still nobody's downplaying the importance of practice but I think the way to get good access in many cases in the more we can learning environment is not just to.

Karen Miller David Epstein
"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"james flynn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But then they just died of heart attack and stroke the exact same rate with better blood pressure numbers and and we're having all sorts of problem Ms like this where specialists are so focused on the market is not the thing you actually care about right when you care about is people if they're dying of heart attack or stroke you don't care that their numbers are just lower all the specials are only looking at these tiny proxies for what you want and assuming that that creates the endpoint you want a complex system and we had some major backfires there which is why one of the studies I cited noted that you're less likely to die if your checked in for a cardiac problem to hospital during the dates of the national cardiology conference when the specials cardiologists are away because you're likely to get a procedure that they do over and over and over that that fixes some proxy marker but does not actually make you more likely to live and can have very serious side effects so SO terror credit one of the cardiologists who who wrote the journal editorial at that study said you know my colleagues and I would joke that our conferences are the safest place to to have a heart problem and is totally turns that on its head she you really also in addition the specialist needs someone who's zoomed out looking at the outcomes the large outcomes you actually care about not just the pieces the reductionist pieces of of the puzzle in isolation let's go back to some of the research that first started scholars thinking maybe you specialization even though maybe it does really work great in chest maybe it works fantastic in golf maybe that's not the way to go with everybody and you talk about this really interesting phenomenon which is that over the course of the twentieth century I. Q. scores started to go up and people start to look into this and for you try to figure out like what what's going on here how could people be getting smarter do you want talk about like what that what that yielded with that study old yeah yeah this is a phenomenon called the Flynn effect named after the guy discovered a James Flynn and and it turns out that I. Q. test the the meaning the average is always a hundred just because that's how the test makers make it but it turned out that they were having to keep changing the the testers of updating the scoring system because people are getting more answers right that that were the equivalent of about three points per decade over the course of the twentieth century which turns out to be a lot when it's over multiple decades so much so that you know are like great grandparents would look like they were like truly impaired because of their scores and in the the rise has been on a very specific parts of the test has been the most abstract parts of the test and less on the stuff that you might learn about you know in school so particular one of the tests called raven's progressive matrices just gives you a bunch of abstract designs and patterns and one is missing and you have to just deduced rules from looking at them and and fig fill in the one that's missing in this test was created to be what's called culturally reduced meaning nothing you learn in school or life should matter this can just tell you know how smart you are no matter what this if Martians land on earth this is the test we can give them and tell how clever there okay and that turns out to be where there was the most improvement on that abstract stuff in what Flynn realize was that the sort of complexity of modern modern life in the way that we've learned to classify finally causes deformities abstract models of all all of our knowledge you know like you can think of simple things like we don't interact with animals very much but we have a huge amount of knowledge that we can apply between animals because we think of classifications like mammals and and all these other sorts of abstract concepts right it were were not did we take for granted but that we're much we're not so natural people who are more kind of grounded in in concrete daily life and so as we've had become more abstract thinkers and take skills entrance from across jobs or or open laptops with no instructions or video games and just figure out how to play them the self directed trying to figure things out we're trying to figure work out we've gotten better at that sort of abstract thinking which allows us to transfer our knowledge between domains so basically it sounds like we've become generalists like people used to know how to do a specific thing maybe it was like make shoes maybe it was grow wheat and now we there so much being thrown at us we can kind of like toggle back and forth is that you're saying that's right and it's it's not to say that one life you know mode of thinking is better than the other it's just it's by any stretch it's just that one is much more adapted to the kind of modern work where you're often having to take knowledge where it where it's less chance like you're often having to take your knowledge and apply to situations you haven't quite seen before or or learning new technology whether some prep strict principles you know but but it's not exactly what you've done before so you can't just do the same thing over and over so we've become more generous in that way and I think that's that's sort of shows in some of the other research I cite you know with the explosion of the knowledge economy like it is some of the patent research I looked at with you look at the mid twentieth century the people making the biggest technological breakthroughs were indeed specialists as shown by these people who would do all of their work in like one technological class as classified by the U. S. patent office and later in the twentieth century that sort of shifted in the biggest breakthroughs were coming from people who had spread their careers across a larger number of technology classes and would often like bring things together in different combinations right so I think there's so I don't think this this being broader having ranges as I style it wasn't always necessarily the best I think it's been getting more important as as the world is changing and as everyone is being pushed to specialize so we're gonna pause there for a second I'm talking with the abstain author of the book range white generalists triumph in a specialized world and.

"james flynn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

09:34 min | 2 years ago

"james flynn" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"You can yeah those are good chance not from us we're going to hit the ground running everybody this is the Morgan sure rob is behind the Looking Glass as I call it an in studio with me compare one occurs I will beau yes Sir okay ambo sitting closest to me bill is furthest away bill came to my Tuesday show three four days ago and brought his lady and they have a fun time and they won a prize built one of prize any gave it the ball very nice shirt I love the shirt I haven't taken it off since I got the gift it's fantastic one of those our bowling style sure to star in two and a half men are on Charlie Sheen all the time but that's all one color I love the color has our story yeah beautiful right now if you people want to call him specially the family aspect obesity there are cars were part of what I call the family a new here bill Carlin on weekends you the people I want to call in and talk to him ask him questions I will do kind of a capsule latest version of their father in the history within Boston's music world and they're gonna be here two one and I've got Dixie in here and we're gonna talk baseball the trades and he's already as the old say stick a fork in them and that means are together for for the red Sox because he feels they are done like dinner but that's not until later on in the program in the truth I'm going to you're saving about when we give you the trivia right now as if you are home playing a a a a B. B. B. C. C. C. D. D. V. E. R. away through the alphabet it has to be right B. B. B. the better business bureau voltaren EC Ono no that's a no no articles no and no a Nova it's gotta be straight through so if you want to go there okay G. G. G. Hey I've got one there are a number of them from the world of animation and that is tonight's trivia question right off the top not even ten full minutes into the show this is good to give people time to prepare and that's my problem I don't like people having time to prepare but they're whining and can you do the trivia game and tell us what it is earlier sometimes you don't tell us the three o'clock on purpose there have been nice I've told you what it is and I'll tell you again when it gets close to three o'clock in the summer it's as well how can you tell us I told you it twelve ten you had your chance this is the Tuesday mean Morgan that you've heard about fishes mean cruel right and and if big trouble to quote Daffy Duck right let's get back to the beginning of the winter family making music in Boston your father started the whole ball works correct that's correct yeah not not in the radio doesn't help you will not be in your head and I think he was nodding off I was nodding to bow to to expound on that all right Sir talk about your father and your mom because they were both musically inclined and they talked to various instruments and take me back to when when did it start well it started it started with my father he took piano lessons from a classical piano teacher he was living on a farm in miles's my grandfather had a very large poultry farm and my grandfather love classical music so they sent my father is a little boy to the next town mid field to take piano lessons with miss Brennan in my father did very well he was he really had to give for music but he was playing all these beautiful classical pieces but he heard the radio broadcasts of Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington and Count Basie any started going the lessons in improvising and playing jazz in see him this is back in the late thirties she hit him with a ruler smack him right on the knuckles of playing mostly rate see see see the she wanted to hear it just strictly classical music and not my father just heard those great bands and he was hooked and so he got into jazz in in high school he started his own big band just like account Basie banner Duke Ellington but that was the error it was to to have a band yet you know from nineteen thirty five to nineteen forty five that was known as the swing era and that's just one my father was a budding musician in every town every city every state have their own great bands they call them territory bands and my father when he was a junior and senior in high school played in one of those territory bands that would go to six states the play all over New England was of the band was called Harrington's new Englanders and he was so good that he was playing with all these older guys no he wouldn't know in those days they got into a vehicle the largest they could get their hands on to carry the personnel and the equipment he wasn't old enough to drive back though he wasn't driving he was a passenger but okay they would take a few cars and they go all over New England playing these dances and that was in vogue all over the country was sweet swing music was the rock and roll music of the day there was a pop music on the radio so my father was really great the music but he decided to go to college because his parents didn't want to major in music he decided to go to the university of Alabama from Millis Massachusetts majored in biology he was pre med he wanted to be a doctor yes but he got drafted to go there you went there because there was an opening on piano they had a college swing band at the university of Alabama called the Cavaliers Nepean won a contest it was a national contest every summer and the best college swing band got to play for the whole summer at the Hollywood beach hotel in Florida and the judges of of the contest will be people like Count Basie and Woody Herman and Duke Ellington and Harry James Flynn militant different judges every year but right there with the big band leaders they pick the best college band will do university of Alabama Cavaliers one every year the reason they won was the recruited players like they recruit basketball players in our baseball players are football players for college because you know the music was important in those days on the could the big bands were the thing so people would get one degree and they would stay and get another one and that some of the guys in that cavalier been would be there for twelve years they they didn't want to they do one man but they had to be in school right end they didn't just worked that summer gig but they were playing the band was so good it was like like the major big bands they would play sorority dances every weekend all around the cells my father was making money in college playing pool and playing piano I want to hear about the pool but let me take a break if anybody wants to call in you know the phone number no I'm not going to give it you've dialed it often of what's the phone number six one seven two five four ten thirty OR FOR calling long distance to Boston eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty well I was going to give you a chance to say but I wasn't sure if you knew that I don't know the number I apologize but I know it now and if you want to call in and speak to this gentleman and share your members of that era if you go back to that error or right now they Hey brothers four oh seven four oh four four four four Harvard I've seen them now and they they took my heart away they really did that you my opening song that you heard just seventeen minutes ago killer Joe the the version of that they also did one of my favorite temptations songs just my imagination and they're not prepared to do it tonight you didn't bring instrument stand ray was hoping you work so you could serenade him on his way home well we'll bring him next time for sure we will and they will be in next time for sure let me take the commercial break time and temperature here at WBZ twelve seventeen seventy three degrees the.

Morgan twelve seventeen seventy three seventeen minutes three four days twelve years one degree
"james flynn" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"james flynn" Discussed on EconTalk

"That's what that's the quote right thing to do for some reason, maybe it was fear he imagined that it might be good idea to stay home. And it turned out great at that time that one time as you point out, but being aware that he may have come up with that solution, partly out of fear, especially since it was a particularly unknown said of unknowns, probably haunts terribly. I don't think personally, I don't think he was afraid of dying because he had gone on many of those category alpha so-called. Oh, very dangerous situations. Lots of injuries before. I think. I think he was afraid of having to make a second trip back there, basically, if they didn't have enough room for patients. But I think is he said was the worst outcome for him than dying would have been, he would have had to watch if something when really wrong, he would have watched his whole team die and then have to explain that. And I think for those guys that's a fate worse than dying. And I don't of course, I don't think about this particular individuals. I'm really working on the fictional. Our version of the story and implying it for, for educational purposes. Can we shift gears? I wanna talk about something in the book that away. I guess proceeds what we're talking about. Which is about problem solving generally like you to talk about the Flynn effect. And the testing that Manam Alexander Lereah did of premodern in, I q because it eliminated a lot of things for me that relate to step aside of econ talk, and, and questions about think about about the world at love free to, to share them. So in, in short the Flynn effect is the name for this. The, the rising scores IQ tests around the world at in the twentieth century at a steady rate of about three points per decade in basically, the, the whole curve, shifting over. It's not particularly concentrated in a particular part. It's not concentrated in a particular area of the world. It is, however, most extreme in the more abstract sections of tests, or on the more abstract tests, so called ravens progress. Matrices that was created to sort of be the, you know, I don't want to say, like the end all of. Cognitive tests where if it required like wasn't based on anything that you had learned in school or studied in the world? So it was just you get you get these abstract patterns in one is missing. And you just have to do the rules from the patterns and fill in the missing pattern. And so this was supposed to be the tesla should martians alight on earth. That would be able to determine how clever they were because this test wouldn't wouldn't require any sort of cultural background. And what James Flynn found was that not only was that not the case. But in fact, the biggest gains in scores. Over time were specifically on this Raven's. Progressive matrices. So each generation did better than the last to the point where, you know, our great grandparents would look as, if they were mentally handicapped, because they would score the, these tests are always norms that the, the means Gore's, one hundred but in terms of the actual number of questions, they got. Right. They would look like they were. Impaired compared to us today. And my impression is that my great grandparents are no smarter or no stupor than I am in terms of raw ability, bright. But you are much more equipped for that, that kind of like for that Tathan filling. Right. That, that sort of those abstract. And if you look at improve so improvements in scores on, on material, that's more related to what people are in school have like barely budged, if they budged at all. And in cases where they've budged on on vocabulary. It's all it's largely come on abstract words, so things like law or pledge or citizen as opposed to, you know, much more concrete now..

James Flynn Manam Alexander Lereah ravens Gore
"james flynn" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"james flynn" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"People are getting stupider in the US and around the, the other developed nations. How do we know this? Well, one because we have is so we open them, and we can see it happening around us, we can measure it to a certain degree as well. So for much of the twentieth century, I q intelligence quotient, scores were increasing, they were increasing throughout most of the world. And this bewildered a lot of researchers because IQ you would expect would be static IQ is just supposed to be inherited. It's not IQ doesn't measure the facts that you've learned throughout your life. I q measures how smart you are. So we were told that by the age of ten people's IQ is set it static. You inherited from your parents, it actually turns out that environmental factors can play a role in your IQ so over time the IQ of whole populations can increase. It's more than just hereditary. This rise is called the Flynn effect. This was named after James Flynn. Who was the first guy to bring this phenomenon to the attention of a lot of psychologists? So this was going on for much of the twentieth century. Everybody was getting smarter. Now fast forward to the twenty first century, you're seeing the exact reverse phenomenon people are getting stupider. I q scores are decreasing, and you don't need to take my word for it Flynn himself. Admits this James Flynn admits the I q gains of the twentieth century have faltered. So in its by the way, it's not just reversing everywhere uniformly. It's reversing specifically in the most economically advanced nations, the United States being at the top of that heap. So why is I q declining? There have been a few fears proposed some of them more eugenicist and racist than others. One theory that is being proposed is that people are getting stupider on average because stupid people or having more kids. So this is this was Was the the. plot actually, to the two thousand six Mike. Judge comedy film, idiotic recy- the ideas that smart people delay having children. They have fewer children and stupid people. All have a bunch of kids by the time they're eighteen that's one theory, another theory. And this one's even more eugenicist is that because of massive immigration over the last thirty years, you've got a bunch of people from the undeveloped world coming into developed countries, and therefore the average IQ is being reduced..

James Flynn United States Mike thirty years
"james flynn" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"james flynn" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Are facing going out without a paycheck, and that you know, is a big concern for families is about eleven hundred families in this in this area. That are eleven how eleven hundred coast guard members in this area in many more people when you had on their families that depend on these paychecks twice a month in with the fifteenth coming up a hard and fast. It remains to be seen. What's going to happen? Look what the pay that that some members of the coast guard are receiving on a regular basis in a lot of cases. It's not like they've kinda ton stashed away for a rainy day when there's a government shutdown, and the other fact, you have to consider it doesn't get talked about a lot is that a lot of these folks travel and the have to reimburse the garment at the end of the year shut down an OSHA does Saudi led to shell out two three four five thousand dollars in two for travel dishwasher reimbursed. What you're not getting reimbursed with the with the shutdown show. And this story did engendered a great deal of controversy. A heated. People blaming congress for the people in the White House. Bottom line is is eleven hundred Coasties in this area. That are worried about what's going to happen on January fifteenth. And that's why to me the idea that this thing is going to stretch on for months or possibly years is ridiculous. Because the pressure is just going to continue to mount as these people don't get their paychecks. We're talking to Tampa Bay times military reporter Howard Altman one story you dropped during our vacation here on the show had to do with suicides at VA facilities. It was a really important report. Step us through what you found sure. On December, tenth retired marine. Colonel in James Flynn Turner, the fourth put on his full dress marine uniform.

James Flynn Turner Howard Altman Tampa Bay military reporter White House OSHA congress VA two three four five thousand d
"james flynn" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"james flynn" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Well take part of it i and schilling saying going the elegant too yeah i just don't like the proposal she's good in it i guess she's doing her book thing it's a good sandra bullock rahm com while you're sleeping natsuka james flynn meant one five zero veselin sandra bullock rome com is speed i was yeah and we number three and we're gonna to the sandra jaja gory of almost a thousand how many buyers when so he has asked her to metrics that villas the calmly points family style we all going on it's like mas six us number three of the box office is like the if the proposal was a comedy sensation this was the comedy sensation hang thousand is a asked the hangover 80s yeah they're never forget number finalised favorite mmy mom fuck samira movie to i don't know why i'm on my own sleighthome is nazi member who loves then sweet five minutes of the movie came on tv and my mom was laughing so her she had her face covered like it was not real wholesome is my my mom said there was the hershey ever left until girls trip this year from our girls listed band please pitch the prequel to so case of sonia the hangover words prequels called the buzz okay there are all at high schools the save work is and they want wanna who gives locks of the gender closet and is the day a problem and they gotta find him now we i wanna make something very clear okay we have a second on the show sometimes called benny on the record ten tries to predict something.

benny schilling sandra bullock rahm james flynn sandra jaja five minutes