24 Burst results for "James Baldwin"

"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

07:59 min | 3 d ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

"What James Baldwin can teach us about dealing with our loneliness. When we come. Back. Was Up to chasing women from Zurich Switzerland listening through line on MPR. This message is brought to you by NPR, sponsor talks base. Your mental health is priceless, but getting support shouldn't cost a fortune at a fraction of the cost of in person therapy. Talk Space connects you to a licensed. You can message with twenty, four, seven from the privacy of your mobile device. So you get the support you need at a price you can afford get one hundred dollars off your first month with Promo Code through line at talks space dot com or when you download the APP. Part three, the elsewhere shares. His Life James Baldwin felt the solitude of being an outsider. He was a nomad spending many years living abroad in France and other parts of Europe, and whether it was because of the color of his skin, his sexuality or his fiercely independent thinking, he could never escape being alone. And the more successful. He became a writer, the more the loneliness. Followed him. Prefers. Thing I would say, is that famous motherfucker? Chose the photo the image. For the cover precisely for this reason it is it comes from sedan for kids. Haunting and beautiful. Short fill. From another place and he's sitting in all teahouse inva- Beck, an instant war. And in the film, he's surrounded by people but his eyes betraying the company. He's looking elsewhere. He's GonNa Fragile place in that moment in his life. Even though he's in the company of others, loneliness is his companion because he has to get his work done. But. I also say that we have to find our elsewhere. There's been we have to retreat to some of the country, but we certainly have to. Find Communities of love. People you know who allow us to laugh full billy laughs. To rage. To Be Quirky. To be ourselves without cost. That people who hold us to account. We have to find the way to create the distance from the status quo so that we can develop resources to say no to the bride as it comes to us over and over again. So. We avoid not necessarily the existential condition of loneliness. Are Per se it is. How can I say this? What I've chosen to do with my life is by definition by definition requires solitude. It requires a kind of loneliness. Especially when people want you to sing in the chorus. And you think what they're singing is wrong. I experienced that over from two thousand, eight to two, thousand, sixteen with the Obama Administration. But that's another story. But finding, tell us more but no in democracy and black hours I was really critical of the Obama administration I wanted him to do more. And people were. Many people were delighted to get invitations to the White House and. They were delighted by the symbolism of a black president ny was more distraught. What was happening to black communities? So I wrote a book. Called him a confidence man in in the line of Melville I'm still I'm still not living that went down along with some other things. But. If you're gonNA speak the truth. If you're going to bear witness and make the suffering real. You'RE GONNA risk loneliness. But in the midst of it, all you have to find the community of love. That will love you to death. No matter your false. Who will give you the space to replenish so that she can join the fight again. You know I love about the way that you're. You're talking about. teams Baldwin is. or or Jimmy you referred to him as Jimmy. A few times is this sense of intimacy I feel listening to you talk about him that that you almost know him. Do you feel that I mean he his his words resonate so much today as your as your repeat them back to us. I, mean, do you feel that he is? His message and his ideas. Apply just as much today as they did then. Oh Yeah. He got to the heart of the matter. I, call him Jimmy his closest friends called him Jimmy even though I never got to know him. I feel like. You know he walks with me. He has been. Constantly President I mean I could. Talk about images flitting by from the side of my when I'm writing or. when someone would show up in the middle of of a lull and give me an interview that would suddenly take a different direction or. A mistake being caught. is like he was editing the book as I was writing and it was it was while. Not all say that that's my personal journey but. because he's the most is like reading Tocqueville American democracy you got. Wow this man really got us when you read Jimmy on American democracy and race is like that cuts even people. Goddess he understands he understands dot contradiction at the heart of the country. But is it you want to reconcile myself to? I was born here almost sixty years ago. GonNa live another sixty s you always told me takes time. My father's my mother's. Mangalsen. Brothers and my sisters. And abused. How much time do you want? For your progress. Did he come. Come out of the civil rights movement. Feeling. Hopeful. Because I I look at the moment that we're in now and. Then, there's a lot of. Potential for change. Is. A lot of potential for a real. Awareness of reckoning. With our history. But there's also a potential for things to continue. As they've been and I guess I wonder. Is is is the ultimate kind of. Takeaway from Baldwin sense of hope. In the country's headed you know that's a great question and in some ways, it's a question that that is part the motivation for writing the book 'cause I focus on the later Jimmy. Baldwin's focus-lens later work, for reason. because. He witnessed the country, turn its back on this instrument. something. They murdered apostle of Lubbe assassinated Dr King. He collapsed. Tried.

James Baldwin Jimmy president NPR Obama Administration MPR Zurich Switzerland France inva- Beck White House Europe writer billy Melville Lubbe ny Dr King
"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:45 min | 3 d ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

"Your role is in this country in which a future isn't it? To my mind he is perhaps the. Most. Insightful critic of American democracy and race we've ever produced. I'm terrified. At the moral, the death of the. which is happening in my country. These people. Themselves Saloth. Talking I'm Ula. Listening, to have become a themselves. Monsters..

"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:32 min | 3 d ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

"Capital One NA member FDIC. On. facebook. There are these three brothers who love guns said guns are over-regulated. Say the NRA is too quick to compromise and they're gaining more followers every day they're very in your face offensive and by God I, love him for it. Listen now to the no compromise podcast from NPR. Part one confronting the LAI. I started reading Baldwin seriously in Graduate School. I fell in love with the sound of his voice the power of his ten. His courage the way he queered politics. How he inhabited his own. misfit. NECE. The way in which he balanced his rage and love. This is Eddie glad on the chair of the Department of Afro American Studies at Princeton. The author of Begin, again James, Baldwin's America, and it's urgent lessons for our own in two thousand eighteen. Any was starting to write that book about Baldwin, but he was struggling. So he went to Heidelberg Germany on a fellowship to try and figure it out. I've been thinking I was gonNA write his intellectual biography of Baldwin. And I was having trouble The archives weren't aren't yielding what I hope they would yield I'm in Heidelberg. I experienced this horrible scene. He just arrived at the train station when he saw something disturbingly familiar. Here's how he describes it in his book. As we entered the station I heard screaming. People in front of stood still and stared at some kind of commotion. followed. There is four policemen were piled on a black man. When officer had his knee in the man's back? Twisted his arms. His pants were halfway down his legs. Bare was exposed. The police pressed his head down into the concrete as if they were trying to leave the imprint of a leash bear. With each attempt to cuffing the man, let out a blood curdling scream. All eyes were on him as the crowd stood by and watched intently. Like spectators at a soccer game without any real attachment to the teens plane. I watched them as they watched the police and the black men. Their faces revealed nothing. It were inscrutable at least to me. I had not been in Heidelberg for two hours and police had a black bands face press down on the concrete with Nina's back. Intensity of that scene snap things into focus for. He wasn't going to write an intellectual history of James Baldwin as he had originally planned he was going to try and write with. Bald. To, try to put him in a deeper more philosophical context and understand what is work offers us. In, our world. He. Went back to his room and the words just started pouring out. and. To do it, he had to call back to when he started reading James Baldwin more than thirty years earlier. And I knew that when I started reading them in graduate school that he was going to happen me deal with my own TRAUMAS, my own wound spy on pains and I didn't have a philosophical language for that. Then he would in effect open me up. And that I would have to deal with the fact. Disturbing fact in some ways that I am in remain vulnerable little boy. But in order for me to say anything substantive about the.

James Baldwin Heidelberg FDIC facebook Graduate School NRA Heidelberg Germany NPR LAI soccer Department of Afro American St officer Eddie TRAUMAS America Princeton Nina
"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:52 min | 3 d ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Throughline

"Seems to cut through time and space. It also shows how ideas reemerge and times when they see most needed and actually that's something we talk about a lot when we develop episodes, historical figures and their ideas. They inspire US challenge assumptions and sometimes push us to ask questions. We might not otherwise have asked. So what we're going to do is bring you with us to the conversations we have with historians and writers about historical figures and their philosophies. It's going to be a new occasional series and experiment what we're going to trip into the history of an idea or a person that's urgent and final to understanding our world. And what better way to start. Then to look at the philosophy of James Baldwin, a writer who used the power of his words to confront in order to connect something, we can relate to today. Baldwin was an insightful commentator on the identity American democracy and racism. He saw something deep and ugly and stubborn in American culture and he never hesitated to call it by its name to bear witness regardless of what it cost him. Baldwin was a black man he was gay and he was active from the nineteen forties to his death in nineteen eighty-seven. He still considered one of the greatest American writers of the Twentieth Century. Historian is amazing but that isn't what we're going to focus on in this episode. We're GonNa meet someone who spent his career diving into the meaning and.

James Baldwin writer US Twentieth Century
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | Last week

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
"james baldwin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:21 min | Last week

"james baldwin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Me about a Christian nation. It means I can't afford to trust most whitefish inserting kind of press the Christian church. I don't know whether the labor unions and their boss is really hate me that doesn't matter but I know I'm not in their unions. I don't know if they're real estate lobbyism black people but I, know the real estate lobbyists keep me in the ghetto. James Baldwin in nineteen sixty nine professor cloud, what do you hear their? Oh, I hear Baldwin's righteous indignation. You want me to trust that. You want. You're going to do something right? You want me to believe just on the on the face of your utterance that you're going to actually live up to what racial justice means. Oh let's not just let's not just pay attention to your words a schedule practices. Oh. Let's look at. Let's look at the society that we've built. Oh. Yes. You say you're committed to freedom. You say you committed to Liberty Justice and equality but let's look at the history of the country. Let's go to the record. Oh Dr King in nineteen, sixty, three and. At the Lincoln Memorial says, we come to what deal with a check that that that has bounced. Remember that. That is. He's trying to deal with the fact that the country has not lived up to its principles. Baldwin in this moment is saying you want me to trust you when everything about this world everything about the country suggests that you don't extend to me basic dignity and standing. What grounds should I trust you s? When we come back I'm going to ask you what the answer to that question ought to be. We're talking about the life and lessons of James. Baldwin we'll be back. This is on point. This on point Meghna. Chakrabarti we are talking about some of the challenges that the country faces regarding the coronavirus pandemic and as always we are looking for solutions as well in terms of how do we get the best to for people in the economy and how do we get communities healthy and safe all around us..

James Baldwin Dr King Christian church Lincoln Memorial Meghna professor
A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

Hysteria

05:29 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

"Representative Presley. First of all, we love you. So you know it's going to be a hard hitting interview. With. We love you. Let's let's get into it. Okay. So president trump has clearly included playing up unrest in cities in part of his reelection strategy. He's even gone as far as to imply Democrats are to blame for escalating violence at protests, how Progressives and Democrats push for police reform in a world where an attempt at pursuing justice is spun as a rush to anarchy by right wing media and used as an excuse to become violent by law enforcement officials. Say It's thrilled to be here with all of you. Thank you. I'm big admirers in the ends of the two of you and glad to be with you today. You know what can I say about Donald? Trump. These already the dog whistles anymore there are just blaring horns you know wrapped up in incendiary soundbites and cruel policy in calcium administration. So it's very predictable. This is an old play in this sort of in movement building work you know we're used to it. How do we advance policy? The way always advanced policy as a nation nestor movements you. Know a lot of people when they reflect back on those grainy images, those black and white images of protests and demonstrations. In the nineteen sixties, they will define the progress came out of that solely as the voting rights act in the civil rights at but honestly that movement was the blueprint for every progressive piece of legislation thereafter. So this is how legislation is moved its through movement building and social transformation. That is why now things like inviting qualified immunity which bill that I introduced representative Justin Amash are now part of public discourse that is from organizing mobilizing. Conversations around reimagining our budgets to actually value black lives that has everything to do with the power of movement building, and so we have to continue to do that. We're in this moment of national reckoning on racial injustice is a culture shift occurring people. Now, a very unapologetically affirm that black lives matter but now that has to translate into power shift that is reflected in who we elect to office the laws that we right in the budgets that right those are the only. Receipts that matter. So if you believe that black lives, matter than black representation matters than black data matters, then black home ownership matters black entrepreneurialism matters in. So that's how I seek to legislate is in a very precise way and I'll in here by saying the disproportion hate heard her that has been foisted onto black Americans for generations was not naturally occurring. It was legislated was precise in codified lawmaking until the path forward must be one where we are also precise reverend. Barber. Poor. People's campaign someone that I look too often and just someone admire tremendously. Grateful for his moral clarity and conviction says for moment of reckoning the demands, a third reconstruction, and so that's what we need to be squarely focused. Dohrn is what does that third construction looked like and how do we enlist everyone from organizers to lawmakers as community builders in that reconstruction of a better word equitable world IANNA and I'm calling you Iona because I've known you since the ninety s and that's just how it's going to be. When you when you were telling me what's what? Let's not forget? This week. Joe Biden gave a speech and he released an ad where he made the point to clarify that contrary to what the trump camp is saying about him. He doesn't actually like property destruction that has occurred were some protests have occurred? By doing this Biden, allowing trump to control the conversation. Let me just say this there is an effort to infiltrate into undermine the impact of the black lives matter movement, and the fact that these motivation efforts have continued, which is constitutional. Right to assemble to peacefully protest descent is the ultimate patriotism. James Baldwin said I extensively paraphrase like I criticized this country America because I, love it just that much. She can and must be better. I think we have to be careful to make sure that our movements are not co-opted the people that I see in community who are the four of these movements bay, our community builders, not destroyers and the people that are doing that are infiltrators who won the black lives matter movement to be aligned to be mischaracterize. The people doing the work of justice seeking our peacekeepers you know and I, also think it's important that we not completely rewrite history and sanitize what these movements have looked like in the past. No. So people will bring up Dr King and they'll bring up John Lewis. Will John Lewis was who practice nonviolent peaceful protests almost died on that bridge in many times thereafter in fact, many advocates have said we don't know how John Lewis made it out alive because they always focused on.

Donald Trump Joe Biden John Lewis Representative Presley Movements Bay Justin Amash Dr King Iona President Trump Representative Dohrn Barber James Baldwin America
"james baldwin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:21 min | Last month

"james baldwin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Baldwin found that space often outside of the country. Sometimes, we got a retreat into our spaces where people love us to death. So they allow us to laughable belly laughs and and to be raged full right and and to not worry about the world at times you know does that make sense? Yes. Yes it does. There's no I. Don't have any other answer to that other than yes it does so. I want to. There are so many listens to for us as a nation and listeners to draw from what you're. What you're pointing to in Baldwin's life and writing. I WanNa, if I could. Narrow our Lens to you professor if I may for a moment because I was reading some some reviews of your book and. Want to get in the wash. There's one in particular in the Washington Post that car. There's a there's a graph there and this takes us back to your view of the Obama. Presidency. Okay. So. So the reviewer says that you currently dismiss. Obama in biting asides sprinkled throughout the book an odd choice given that Baldwin's moral power derived in part from his ability to find common ground between sixties era black figures who sometimes launched vitriolic attacks against one another. So what your responses to that? He's wrong. I just think I just find that to be rather flat-footed reading, and I know rather can't and I went to graduate school together. He was in the history department I was in the religion department. Credit Kia. Yeah. I'm critical of the. Obama Administration I'm clear about that. I. Thought I think and I hold to this view I think that. They could have been bolder once Mitch McConnell announced that the Obama. Administration should just be a one term presidency Once he saw the way in which Republicans were behaving that the idea of bipartisanship. Was An ideal that he could reach four, but you shouldn't bank is bank is all on it that I wanted to go boulder to change the frame to get us out of the frame of Reaganism so that we can imagine the country new. So I, stand by my criticism. Of the Obama Administration in that regard particularly with with what happened to Black America as a result of the great recession we were catching hill and we couldn't, and we're still catching hell and because we were trying to protect his left flank or his right flank from the races that were coming at him, we couldn't really speak to the hell that we were catching. So but I don't really I don't really dismiss Obama that way I just don't I just don't. Adult how can I? I'm not I don't make him an idol if that makes sense. I treat him as a political figure that needs to be assessed in substantive ways and part of what I want us to do is to understand what he represented. He represented his moment in which the country. Could. Could imagine itself otherwise but then he became the basis of this extraordinary response. I, mean, we vomited up Donald Trump as a result I used that verb on purpose by the way. So I, don't I don't agree with this idea that I'm dismissive and the like. But there are moments where I I, I do I do speak my pain right? Because I saw a lot of my friends become enamored with getting invitations to the White House I saw a lot of folk who who had prophetic voices who became court prophets right? It's not enough to walk the corridors of power. We have to change the circumstances of people and Baldwin wrote about this in the evidence of things not seen. This was his worry. As he wrote about the Atlanta child murders MAGNA. He said, what does it mean that these black babies are being murdered in this city run by black people? And in that became the basis for interrogation of what does it mean when we gain the reins of power? And White Supremacist still obtains. Well. I want to return for a moment here Baldwin once again in his own voice. because. This spring to one of the biggest themes and phrases. In fact. That your book addresses. So first of all, this is listen to him. This is this is James Baldwin. In he died in nineteen, eighty seven and this is this is from a pbs documentary that aired in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty nine. But obviously, you'll hear him here late in his life. What is it? You want to meet reconcile myself to I was born almost sixty years ago I'm not gonNA live another sixty years. You always told me takes time is taking my father's my mother's. Uncle side, my brothers and my sisters. My nieces and my nephews. How much time do you want? Paul your progress. James Baldwin in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty. So this brings us to this phrase begin again. Tell us about it. Know his last novel just above my head. Just extrordinary now. There's this moment that struck me. and. You know I'm a paraphrase. Right? He says, you know when when the dream was shattered. People scattered. Somewhat bad some. Were thrown in jail some left the country. Says but we know what we did. And then he says, but responsibility is not lost responsibility has abdicated. And if one refuses abdication in one begins again. and. It's there that I found the title of the book. Right and that is this ongoing commitment. To pushing this damn boulder up the hill. Trying to figure out trying to find the resources. For your children's sake and for your children's children's sake. to hold back despair. and to keep fighting for new Jerusalem. To have faith in the capacity of human beings to love beyond the Shibboleth. To look past the illusions and to keep fighting..

James Baldwin Obama Obama Administration Washington Post Donald Trump Mitch McConnell professor Black America Reaganism White House Jerusalem Atlanta Paul
"james baldwin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:55 min | Last month

"james baldwin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And attempts to recreate himself according to a principle, more humane and more liberated. So. What do you draw from that? History the great force of history is Baldwin says, is that that we carry with us. We are these historical creatures right we are. Are, are carrying around with this all of the wounds, the pains, the Traumas, the lies that and joys and triumphs that make us who we are. and. So it makes sense that when we have moments of crises, moments of challenge reckoning that at the heart of it on these historical choices. That in some ways guide, our is our sheet. and. So when we think about this moment in our own moment right here, we are watching for eight minutes and forty six seconds George Floyd murdered by the officer, the former officer shaven in Minneapolis, and suddenly protesters are tearing down statues. What's the connection? Was the relationship what is public memory have to do with this brutal act? Because Histories, histories, history haunts. It's ghosts right. Shadow us in some ways the ghost of of the nineteen sixties of the ghosts that have in some ways guided our politics for generations are haunting out in the open now, and so Baldwin is is insisting that we have to confront. Ourselves. You have we have to deal with the MESSI -ness of who we are and that's GonNa involve confrontation with our history, the stories that we tell. You. It hunts as it haunts us as individuals. And it's also. Incorporated into our institutions. Right. So I, want to hear a little bit about how Baldwin. Confronted that incorporation of history into American institutions. But this is a moment from nine, hundred, sixty nine when he was on decathletes popular television talk show, and here's what James Baldwin said. I don't know what people in this country feel, but I can only conclude what they feel from the state of their institutions I. Don't know why Christians hate negroes or not. But I know that we have a Christian church which is white and the Christian church is which is Black I. Know Malcolm X. Once put it. It's the most segregated hour in American life is high noon on. Sunday. That's a great deal for me but a Christian nation, it means I can't afford to trust most white visions inserting press the Christian church I, don't know whether the labor unions and their bosses really hate me that doesn't matter but I know I'm not in their unions I don't know if they're real estate lobbyists against black people but I know the real estate lobbies keep me in the ghetto. James Baldwin in one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine, professor. Glad. What do you hear their? Oh I hear Baldwin's righteous indignation. You want me to trust the what you're GonNa do something. Right You want me to believe just on the on the face of your utterance that you're going to actually live up to what racial justice means Oh. Let's not just seem. Let's not just pay attention to yours schedule practices. Let's look at. Let's look at the society that we've built. You say you're committed to freedom say you're committed to Liberty Justice and equality but let's look at the history of the country. Let's go to the record. Oh Dr King in nineteen, sixty three and at the at the Lincoln Memorial says, we come to what deal with a checked it that had. That is balanced. Remember that. That is that he's trying to deal with the fact that the country has not lived up to its principles Baldwin. In this moment is saying you want me to trust you everything about this world everything about the country suggest that you don't extend to me. Basic dignity and standing. On what grounds should I trudged When we come back, I'm going to ask you what the answer to that question ought to be. We're talking about the life lessons of James Baldwin will be back. This is on point. This is on point Meghna Chakrabarti tomorrow on the program we are going to be talking about stimulus again about pandemic stimulus planning because it's very time sensitive, those six hundred dollar unemployment checks from the federal government or going to stop and the Congressional Republicans have put forward a plan. So we'll take a look at that and we'll also talk about the impact that any new stimulus bill might have on us. We want to hear from you how are you? How's your family doing right now? Economically, will you be able to make ends meet if that six hundred dollar check goes away what do you need? In order to get back on your feet, call us at six, one, seven, three, five, three, zero, six, eight, three, that six, one, seven, three, five, three, zero, six, eight, three, we want to hear from you for Tomorrow's program. Today we are looking back at the life and legacy of James Baldwin the writer playwright the SAS the Astute Observer of America and race relations of from the nineteen sixty all the way through his death in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven at cloud joins us he's professor at Princeton University and author of the new. Book. Begin again. James Baldwin's America and it's urgent lessons for our own. So professor glad before the break you had talked about James Baldwin saying. How can what by what evidence? Could America provide that the country was worthy of his trust right as as a black gay man are, and so now I want I do want to ask for the Alaska two questions one did he have ever have an answer to that? I? Mean what would have been his answer to here's is how you can prove that the nation is worthy of our trust hold I mean, in some ways he he calls for those of us who are committed to a more just America a more just world. to fight to to to bring about what he would call new Jerusalem. So at the end of the fire next time he says. Those relatively conscious whites and does relative to conscious blacks who like lovers much dare to risk every to achieve our country, right? So it's in our hands really. So it's nothing that the country could demonstrate. Per Se it's what we must do. in transforming ourselves in transforming the country in the process. So I think his faith was always in us. But.

James Baldwin Baldwin America professor Traumas Christian church I George Floyd Lincoln Memorial Dr King Meghna Chakrabarti Alaska officer Minneapolis Congressional Republicans Jerusalem Princeton University writer
"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"That is James <Speech_Male> Baldwin's <Speech_Male> debate speech <Speech_Female> against William F. Buckley <Speech_Female> in one, thousand, nine hundred. <Speech_Music_Female> I didn't <Speech_Female> even put that in the <Speech_Male> episode. Why didn't <Speech_Female> I don't know <hes> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it's interesting I. <Speech_Male> Don't remember the circumstances <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I know <Speech_Female> I saw that <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> some reason <Silence> when I was a kid. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Because there was <Speech_Male> one line from <Speech_Male> it that <Speech_Male> I misquoted <Speech_Female> slightly <Speech_Female> for years <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Male> and then in two <Speech_Male> thousand fifteen, there <Speech_Male> was a person that transcribed <Speech_Female> the whole thing, <Speech_Female> and it also started <Speech_Male> circulating again <Speech_Male> and I was able to get it right, <Speech_Male> and it was just it's <Speech_Male> it's one of <Speech_Male> dozens <Speech_Female> of really. <Speech_Female> Just <Speech_Female> poignant, straightforward <Speech_Female> commentaries <Speech_Male> on what it is <Speech_Male> to grow up black <Speech_Male> in America, <Speech_Male> but the thing that got me <Speech_Male> and I'm Mary <Speech_Male> not cry trying to say this <Speech_Music_Female> quote <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Talking about <Speech_Male> the realization. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You can love <Speech_Male> the United <SpeakerChange> States and it <Speech_Male> doesn't love you back. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> I won't even do <Speech_Male> the quote. Maybe <Speech_Male> I'll do the quote. <Speech_Female> <hes> I <Silence> will try to do the quote. <Speech_Male> He says it comes <Speech_Male> as a great shock <Speech_Male> around the age of five <Speech_Male> six or seven <Speech_Male> to discover that the <Speech_Male> flag to which you have <Speech_Male> pledged allegiance <Speech_Male> along with everybody <Speech_Male> else has <Speech_Male> not pledged allegiance <Silence> to you. <Speech_Male> and to <Speech_Male> me, that was one of the things that <Silence> when I heard it as a kid <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Female> like a slap <Speech_Female> in the face of like, <Speech_Female> what do you mean <Speech_Female> like we all stand here <Speech_Female> and do this. It's for all <Speech_Female> of us, and it was <Speech_Female> not for all of us, <Speech_Male> and that's the first <Speech_Male> time I. <SpeakerChange> Really Remember <Speech_Male> Thinking about that <Silence> issue, yeah! <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> Yeah, <Speech_Male> so there is <Speech_Female> just a wealth <Speech_Female> of material by <Speech_Female> James. Baldwin. <Speech_Female> If you're are interested <Speech_Female> in learning more, and although <Speech_Female> a wealth of material <Speech_Female> about James Baldwin's <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Female> there are <Speech_Female> multiple biographies <Speech_Female> and articles <Speech_Music_Female> and. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> like I said in the in <Speech_Male> the episode <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> that Morrison's <Speech_Music_Male> tribute to him. <Speech_Music_Male> Is <Speech_Music_Male> Gorgeous <Speech_Music_Male> I mean other other <Speech_Male> things that were <Speech_Male> printed from <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Eulogies in <Speech_Female> addresses at his funeral <Speech_Female> are are really <Speech_Female> beautiful, but that <Speech_Music_Female> wouldn't particular <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> struck me a lot. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <hes> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> so if you'd <Speech_Female> like to send us

James Baldwin William F. Buckley Morrison America Baldwin.
"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And its biographer he reported criticized made beautiful analyzed, cajoled Lira sized, attacked sang made us think made us better made us consciously human, or perhaps more acidly, pre human, and also in the words of Tony Morrison, addressing the late Baldwin is Jimmy quote in your hands language was handsome again and your hands. We saw how it was meant to be neither bloodless, nor bloody and yet alive. It should surprise no one who knows anything about Toni, Morrison. That trip to Baldwin from the funeral is beautiful, and I highly encourage reading it during his lifetime. James Baldwin wrote twenty two books including six novels. He was a member of the national advisory. Board of the Congress on racial equality, as well as being a member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. The Authors League the international pen, the drama `Test Guild the Actors Studio and the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. He also hoped that his home. Home in France would be turned into a writer's colony after his death, but it was eventually sold to developers and torn down, Baldwin had been a bestseller during his career, especially during the prolific nineteen sixties, but by the end of his life he was not as widely read that started to change as we said at the top of show with the rise of the black lives matter movement and the many connections between the movement and Baldwin's ideas and writings decades earlier. In the last few years, there's also been a film adaptation of his novel. If beale street could talk came out in two thousand, eighteen, as well as the Award Winning Twenty Sixteen documentary called not your Negro as we said at the top of the show Baldwin's work is frequently part of anti-racism courses and reading lists, so we thought we end with just a couple of quotes quickly from that work one is from the end of the fire next time quote everything now we must assume as in our hands. We have no right to assume otherwise, if we and now I mean the relatively conscious whites and the relatively conscious blacks. Like lovers insist on or create the consciousness of the others do not falter in our duty. Now we may be able handful that we are to end the racial nightmare. achieve our country and change the history of the world. If we do not now dare everything, the fulfillment of that prophecy recreated from the Bible in a song by a slave is upon us. God gave no other Rainbow Sign. No more water the fire next time. The other quote is from an interview that he gave in nineteen seventy, where he said I'm optimistic about the future, but not about the future of this civilization. I'm optimistic about the civilization which will replace this one. And, that is James Baldwin. I talked to to various friends I was trying to figure out what I needed to work on next. And in every case when I said I, think James Baldwin. The answer was like obviously, yes. So yeah, I I. Hope I have done his life and work justice today. which also like to cover some listener meal? I have a solicitor mail from Jackie. It goes back to our bureau of Home Economics podcast and Jackie says good afternoon Holly and Tracy thank you so much for the wonderful podcast I find the podcast early on last year and was sucked immediately, always excited when episode coincides with something or some place. I've experienced. I'm a school counselor for Private School in Florida, this morning as listened to the podcast about the bureau of Home Economics I. Realized I can finally share something with you at. At my school, we still offer family consumer sciences, one and two I've been in a few a few school districts in Florida, and this is the first school I've been at with this particular program family consumer science one is for incoming freshmen, and throughout the year learn about child development so in cooking, nutrition and meal planning so ing normally coincides with fall in the students learn to so Pajama Bottoms. It is amusing before and after school to see the girls wear their brightly colored Pajama bottoms under their school uniforms to keep warm. I guess the next year they will include facemask patterns family consumer science to Virginia's and seniors, and takes an approach to prepare them for going away to college. One semester is focused on health nutrition, and of course food. The other semester focuses on management of personal finances. These classes are two of the most popular electives that we offer and typically have a wait list. Boys and girls love this course and the faculty enjoys getting to sample. The goodies made. Also thank you for your work on the Rosewood incident and the six impossible episodes as a school counselor, every spring I walk students through the application of the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship a scholarship award for students who decide to attend a higher education institution in the state. One of the questions on the application is. Are you a descendant of a family member that was affected by the Rosewood incident. Incident in Florida during the nineteen twenties so many times students ask what it is and councillors including myself gloss over it up until your episode I knew it was something terrible, but didn't know the details now when asked about it, I tell students and they get a look of disbelief that something like that happened in their state with summit foster great conversations about how little Florida history they know. Jackie goes on to talk about being really delighted to learn that. Frankie Manning was born in Jacksonville and says thank you for your research. I listened to the podcast to in from work or wherever else I'm traveling, you have made the ride more pleasurable and less lonely. Thank you so much Jackie. Wow, I kind of wish I had a class specifically about like the finances part. What I actually had when I went off to college this book there were two of them. One was called. Where's mom? When now that I need her? Where's Dad now? That I need him? which you know is unnecessarily gender away, but the like the mom one talked about basic foodstuffs and basic first aid, and how to tell if you need to go to the doctor now. and the DAD was like basically called maintenance and fixing stuff and that kind of thing. so a class probably would've been helpful anyways. Thank you, Jackie. If you'd like to write to us about this or any other podcast history podcast iheartradio dot com. There were Oliver Social Media in history that three. You'll find our facebook twitter, pinterest and Instagram, and you can subscribe to our show. On Apple, podcast, iheartradio APP and anywhere else get your podcast. Stuff you missed in history classes, the production of iheartradio for more podcasts from iheartradio visit, the iheartradio, APP apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This is Dj Vlad and I want you to check out the Vlad TV podcast since two thousand and eight Vlad TV has been the leader in hard getting no-holds-barred interviews with the world's biggest rappers singers, Hollywood stars professional athletes and former big-time criminals, and now you can catch all of our full length. Interviews availables audio podcasts, so listen to the VLAD TV podcasts on iheartradio APP, apple podcasts, spotify or wherever you get your podcast..

James Baldwin Jackie Baldwin Florida school counselor Vlad American Academy and Institute Tony Morrison Dj Vlad Rosewood incident Toni bureau of Home Economics Apple Pajama Bottoms Frankie Manning Congress Authors League France facebook Oliver Social Media
"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:17 min | 3 months ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"To get a sense of what black-americans needed or what the civil rights movement goals were, or how the government might incorporate those goals. He was more focused on figuring out who among them might serve as sort of a mouthpiece for the government, promoting the government's policies to the black community to improve race relations, and also on outlining what the government had done already so far to the assembled group while basically asking for their patients. This meeting consequently did not go well. Baldwin and the other assembled activists were trying to describe the systemic racism that went well beyond what was encoded in law, while Kennedy was talking about how his own family had been oppressed for being Irish. Kennedy came off as deeply naive, an unwilling to listen eventually Lorraine Hands Berry walked out and several others followed afterward. The F. B. I. Started Monitoring Baldwin placing him on its security index of potentially dangerous people in amassing a file on him. That was more than seventeen hundred pages long list meeting, though while not immediately successful is often credited with starting to shift Robert Kennedy's perspectives, leading him to encourage his brother President John F. Kennedy to address the nation on subject of civil. Civil, rights Kennedy gave his Civil Rights Address on June eleventh, nineteen, sixty three in the early morning hours of June twelfth Medgar Evers was assassinated in his driveway in front of his children. The culprit was Byron de la Beckwith who was found guilty of the crime more than thirty years later, Baldwin continued his writing and work during the nineteen sixties, but the assassination of Medgar Evers was the first of a series of events that sort of shifted his work in his outlook. Others included the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in nineteen, sixty, three, as well as the assassinations of two other men that he had known and worked with Malcolm X in nineteen, sixty, five and Martin Luther. King Junior in nineteen, sixty eight and we're going to get to more on that after we I have a sponsor break. I, he would go this. Dj Vlad now can check out the Vlad TV podcast since two thousand eight Vlad. TV has been giving hard hitting no-holds-barred interviews with some of the biggest rappers, singers, actors, professional athletes, former criminals and everyone in between. We've interviewed celebrities like the baby. Cardi B. me goes little baby doe kept o'meara WWe champion. Mark Henry twenty-one savage war sat. DC on fly fat Joe Danny, trae whole, Charlemagne and many many more where regular guests like rap legend Busey media type Nick Cannon Comedy Legend D.L. Hughley an NBA champion John. South were the only ones brave enough to ask questions that everyone else's too scared to ask. And when we interview someone, it becomes the biggest interview, so listen to the Vlad TV podcast on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcast. As, we noted earlier James. Baldwin never seemed really sure where he fit within the civil rights movement. Although, he participated in the nineteen sixty three march on Washington for jobs and freedom. He wasn't a big part of its public presence or it's planning. There's been some speculation that this was because of his sexual orientation, but as we've noted on earlier episodes of the show, one of the major planners of the march was fired rest in who was also gay. It's more likely. The Baldwin's views were becoming less and less aligned with Martin Luther. King Junior's nonviolent arm of the movement. As time went on, Baldwin became increasingly radical. When the Black Panther Party was established in nineteen, sixty, six, Baldwin supported many of its efforts, including school, breakfast and lunch programs, community, health, care, programmes, schools and armed self defense programs meant to protect black communities from violence, including violence at the hands of police. Baldwin's written work had always been focused on both racism and homophobia, and he had been both critically acclaimed and a bestseller through this work. But in the late sixties and early seventies, reviewers increasingly criticized him for becoming more pessimistic, accusatory and be and to directly focused on civil rights. As included the three act play blues for Mister Charlie which was based on the murder of Emmett till, and it wasn't just white literary reviewers who were criticizing his work, his advocacy for Palestinian liberation was criticized as antisemitic although he also criticised anti-semitism within black activism. Members of the Black Arts Movement criticized his work, because it was intended at least in part for white audiences, rather than being written for other black people. The nonviolent arm of the civil rights movement criticized his more radical and confrontational views while the black power movement criticized his sexual orientation and his integrationist stances. His sexual orientation was also criticized from outside the movement. The Kennedys nicknamed him Martin Luther. Queen the basically was criticized for every conceivable direction. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, Baldwin returned to France where he bought a farmhouse in the Medieval Village of sample devotes although he's still did a lot of traveling. This became his permanent home for the rest of his life. Locals named it shape Baldwin. Baldwin's writing in political views had always been anti-capitalist anti-colonial anti imperialist. Anti Racist Anti Homophobic Pan African Pro Palestinian liberation and against mass incarceration. He also made connections between black liberation in the US and United States foreign policy, noting that a nation that truly supported lack liberation would be supporting black freedom fighters elsewhere in the. And supporting people who were fighting for independence from colonial powers, all this work had also been primarily focused on men in the nineteen seventies and eighties that started to change in part through televised conversations with Poets Nikki, Giovanni, and past podcast subject Audrey Lord both women really pushed Baldwin. On issues of gender, gender roles and sexuality alternate, leading him to criticize the Whiteness of the mainstream feminist movement as well as its homophobia and anti lesbianism, but like by aired rest in James Baldwin never took a leadership role within the gay rights movement, as it became more public and widespread. Widespread in the nineteen seventies and eighties, he also expressed some ambivalence about exactly how to describe himself in his own identity in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty five interview, he said quote, those terms homosexual, bisexual heterosexual, our twentieth century terms, which for me really have very little meaning I've never myself in watching myself and watching other people been able to discern exactly where the barriers were I read one piece as I was working on this that, but noted that this has some similarities to conversations happening today about all of these ideas being socially constructed and what they mean. Baldwin continued to travel and teach and write and work until late in his life, but by the late nineteen eighty s, he was having serious issues with his health. He had developed hepatitis and experienced liver damage back in the nineteen seventies followed by two heart attacks than in one, thousand, nine, hundred seven. He was diagnosed with. Cancer I actually also found references that it was stomach, cancer or pancreatic cancer and I don't know which of those is correct. Regardless though the cancer had progressed, really quickly gave his last interview to journalist Quincy Troupe, just days before his death James Baldwin died on December first nineteen, Eighty, seven at the age of sixty, three Lucienne hampers burger was there with him as well as a household attendant. His funeral was held the Church of Saint John The divine in Manhattan with five thousand people in attendance, Amiri Baraka delivered the eulogy with tributes from others including my Angelou and Toni Morrison. And the words of Amiri Baraka Eulogy Quote, this man traveled the earth like its history.

James Baldwin Robert Kennedy Martin Luther Black Arts Movement Vlad Dj Vlad Medgar Evers President John F. Kennedy Black Panther Party Amiri Baraka Eulogy Cancer Lorraine Hands Berry Byron de la Beckwith WWe Sixteenth Street Baptist Churc liver damage Amiri Baraka Malcolm X Washington
"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Ally to help protect you today's connected world sign up today for Norton, three sixty with lifelock membership, and you'll save twenty five percent or more off your first year. To Norton Dot com slash history. That's Norton Dot Com slash history for twenty five percent off. James Baldwin left for Paris on November eleventh, nineteen, Forty, eight, using the money from a fellowship to for a one way ticket by see. Beyond that he had. No money, virtually no connections and nowhere to stay. He also did not speak French in his words quote. I had no idea what might happen to me in France but I was very clear. What would happen if I remained in New York Baldwin faced some criticism for leaving the US with people arguing that he was abandoning a country that he should have stayed in and tried to help fix, but this first stretch of time in Paris was critically important to his work and identity as a writer. Unlike many of the other writers and artists who left the US for Paris, he didn't think of himself as an expatriate, but more is a commuter. He still felt a deep connection to the United States and he made frequent trips back, and he spent long stretches of time in other parts of the world including Istanbul. After arriving in Paris Baldwin met Swiss artist Lucian Hackers Burger who was white bisexual, and at one point married to a woman when they met Balderas Twenty four and hampers burger was seventeen. They eventually started a relationship that went on for almost forty years Baldwin described Hampers Burger as the love of life, and he became godfather to hampers Burgers, children along with other relationships in his life. Hackers Burger was one of the inspirations for Baldwin's novel genes room while in France Baldwin wrote everybody's protest novel, which argued that political novels like Harriet. Beecher stowe's Tom's cabin and Richard Wright's native son. We're reinforcing stereotypes about black people and in particular dehumanizing black men. Although right had helped Baldwin secure his first writing fellowship, the two men did not see eye to eye on a number of issues, and they frequently criticized one another on December nineteenth, nineteen, forty nine. Baldwin was arrested for being in receipt of stolen property after he borrowed a bed sheet that a friend had stolen from a hotel. This whole experience led him to think about identity and policing in the United States versus in France. The police in France saw him as an American while police in New York would have seen him as an inherently criminal problem, but he also became aware that most of the people who were in jail with him in Paris, where from northern. Africa and that. French colonialism had its own part to play in racism in France this first stretch of time in France. Let Baldwin look back on the US from a distance seeing things from angles that just were not possible for him. While he was living in it, he started coming to terms with. With both his own history, and with his sexuality, while living in France in Switzerland, he finished his semi-autobiographical novel. Go tell it on. The Mountain had actually started writing in high school, as well as a play called the Amen Corner and a series of essays in nineteen, fifty, two Baldwin made a trip back to the US with financial help from Marlon Brando. He was awarded a Guggenheim. Fellowship in June of Nineteen fifty four and other fellowships followed in one, thousand, nine, hundred nine, he was awarded a Ford Foundation grant to work on the novel another country, when this novel included a fictionalized depiction of his friendship, with Eugene worth including worth suicide. Professor and literary critic Fred Stanley later wrote of another country quote. Baldwin has been audacious enough prior to most other artists to grapple candidly with the usually taboo subjects of American society and culture, interracial sexual intercourse homosexuality as a normative mode of experience and bisexuality as a real phenomenon, after similar back and forth travel Baldwin, returned to the US for a longer stretch, starting in July of nineteen, fifty seven, a lot of his written work during this time documents, or reflects on the civil rights movement a movement that he wasn't really sure how he fit into, he had become well known and well established as a writer by this point, and while he. He did not want to describe himself as the movement spokesperson, there were definitely people who thought of him that way as the civil rights movement grew, and evolved Baldwin found himself aligned in some ways with Martin Luther, King Junior's approach through non-violent action, then in other ways with Malcolm X. The Nation of Islam and the Black Power Movement for example. As time went on, Baldwin increasingly favored the black power. Movements focus on immediate radical change instead of nonviolent incremental progress, but he really did not agree with the black power. Movements focus on black separatism. One hallmark of Baldwin's writing during the civil rights movement was that it was accessible to and sometimes. Sometimes written specifically for a white audience, much of this written were carried an implicit or explicit warning, that racism was not just harming black people that it was also destroying white people as well. Some of it has also been described as prophetic for seeing that the movement would become more militant if nonviolent activism did not meet its goals, and foreseeing that white activism would turn away from that militancy, Baldwin's work in the movement was not just about writing. Though he also made speeches, he donated money wrote letters signed petitions organized during the lunch counter. Sit Ins that we talked about on the show earlier this year. James Baldwin traveled to Tallahassee to interview. Interview, student demonstrators and nine hundred sixty one. He became a sponsor for the national. Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy and he also helped sponsor a rally to disband the House UNAMERICAN activities, committee and nine, hundred, sixty three. He took a speaking tour through the south in conjunction with the Congress of racial equality. During this tour, he met and started working with civil rights, activists and WC Fields Secretary Medgar Evers Baldwin's book. The fire next time came out during this tour. As well it contains essays. My Dungeon shook letter to my nephew on the one hundredth anniversary of the emancipation and down at the cross letter from a region of my mind. The latter essay dwells on Baldwin's experiences with religion, including both Christianity and the Nation of Islam relating them to race and racism, and reflecting on his own beliefs. The fire next time spent more than forty weeks in the top five of the New York. Times bestseller list on May seventeenth. Nineteen, sixty three during Martin Luther King Junior's Birmingham campaign, Baldwin, was on the cover of Time magazine under a banner that read Birmingham, and beyond the Negro. Push for equality. A few days before that Time magazine cover Baldwin hit send a telegram to attorney, General Robert F. Kennedy criticizing the United States, lack of response to the civil rights movement, especially in the face of increasing violence and brutality against the people who are participating in that movement. Baldwin framed this inaction in the failure of the nation to make black liberation priority as a moral treason. The result was a Kennedy met with Baldwin for Breakfast on May, twenty third, asking him together writers and activists to meet with him the next day. They met in Kennedy's apartment in New York, where Kennedy was joined by Department of Justice. Lawyer Burke Marshall. Baldwin had brought his brother. David as well as Harry Belafonte Lorraine Hands Berry. Lena Horne and rip torn along with representatives from the Chicago Urban. League Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited. The N. W. ACP and core. Clarence Benjamin Jones who is one of Martin Luther? King Junior's advisors was also there may goal for this meeting was not so much.

Medgar Evers Baldwin Baldwin United States Paris Baldwin New York Baldwin France Baldwin Paris France Martin Luther New York Norton Hampers Burger Time magazine lifelock Black Power Movement Lucian Hackers Burger Africa writer
"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:32 min | 3 months ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"A breaking point. He's through a water pitcher and. and that shattered the mirror behind the bar, he described this moment as revelatory, realizing that he had been angry enough to kill someone, and that his own life was in danger, and his words quote from the hatred. I carried in my own heart. David Baldwin Senior died on July, twenty, ninth, nineteen, forty-three, which was also the day. James's youngest. Sibling Paula Maria was born. Two days later on August I realizing swept through Harlem, it was sparked when a black soldier tried to intervene as a white police officer was trying to arrest a black woman. The officer shot the soldier and rumors spread that he had been killed. This was one of a series of similar riots that took place in cities around the United States. In Nineteen, forty-three in in Harlem six black people were killed as thousands of police were dispatched in response to the violence Baldwin really felt like living in Harlem had become untenable, and he moved to Greenwich Village to try to make a living as a writer well, also waiting tables, and doing other work just to try to make ends meet, and to send what money he could back to his family. He had relationships with men with women and at. At one point became engaged to a woman, but ultimately broke off that engagement. He also became friends with a man named Eugene Worse. Who encouraged Baldwin to join the Young People's Socialist? League, although it's not entirely clear. How long Baldwin was involved or exactly what his involvement even was in the years just after World War Two, he spent at least some time with various political groups that were connected to things like socialism, communism and labor rights, but he didn't become exclusively focused on any of them, or in some cases ever officially become a member. Now. One of the baggers that I read of him. Characterizes period is kind of bouncing around from one group to another getting a sense of what different ideas were, but not really committing to any of them at that point. And nineteen, forty four Baldwin met Richard Wright. Who helped him get harpers Eugene. F Saxton Fellowship, and that fellowship provided some of the funding to help him launch a literary career. He started getting published an established magazines, but then in nineteen forty-six Eugene worth die by suicide that was something that traumatized and haunted for the rest of his life. Two years later Baldwin had begun. Begun certain that he could not live in the United States anymore. It's circled back to what he had realized that last night in Belle meade, he had a clear minded certainty that if he didn't leave the US and it's systematic racism and oppression. He would be killed or he would kill someone. He finally decided to go to France at the age of twenty four. Or get to that after a quick sponsor break. This episode of stuff you missed in history classes brought to you by Norton. Three sixty with lifelock. How you spend your time in what you listen to you is totally within your control, your personal information on the other hand that is another story because when you shop bank or Browse Online, your personal information gets out there, and you can lose control of it exposing you to Cybercrime, but you can get back a sense of control over how to help protect yourself and your personal information. Thankfully, there's Norton Three. Three sixty with lifelock, an all in one membership for your safety that gives you device security, identity, theft, protection, a VPN for online privacy and more, plus if there's an identity theft related problem, they have agents who will work to fix it now. No one can prevent all cybercrime identity theft, but Norton three sixty with lifelock is a powerful.

David Baldwin Senior Harlem Eugene Worse Richard Wright United States lifelock Norton harpers Eugene Paula Maria officer theft James F Saxton Fellowship France Greenwich Village writer Belle meade
"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

06:55 min | 3 months ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Today's episode was June fifth behind the scenes that if you've listened to that, I was clearly having a hard time figuring out what to do next. And when I remembered that I'd had James Baldwin on my list for a while, but my inward response was like yes, obviously James Baldwin. Of course. Why didn't you even think of this before? This description by Juan. Williams and a piece called Baldwin the Witnesses Testament, which was published in The Washington Post the day after Baldwin's death in Nineteen eighty-seven. Illustrates why a had that response quote given the messy nature of racial hatred of the half truths, blasphemies lies that make up American Life Baldwin's accuracy in reproducing that world stands remarkable achievement. His accuracy was key and his works. The reader could resonate to the sounds of the street corner as drawn by Baldwin could feel the anger of black Americans. So long denied a role in American life. As Baldwin wrote about that anger, black people reading Baldwin knew he wrote the truth. White people reading Baldwin sensed his truth about the lives of black people in the sins of a racist nation interest in James. Baldwin's work has just really grown in the United States over the last several years in conjunction with the black lives matter movement, his nineteen sixty three book the fire next. Next time is frequently on anti-racism reading lists. Sometimes it's paired up with Tallahassee coats between the world and me, which was inspired by it or with the fire. This time a new generation speaks about race. That's a book that came out in two thousand sixteen, basically, James Baldwin was a brilliant essayist and one of the chroniclers of the civil rights movement, and a really powerful voice against racism, and that is why we are talking about him today, so we're going to start with his background James. Baldwin was born James Arthur Jones in Harlem New York on August Second Nineteen Twenty Four. His mother was Emma Burgess Jones and she was a domestic worker. When James was born, Emma was not married and she never told him who his biological father was. When James was three, his mother Mary, Baldwin, who was a factory worker and an evangelical minister, and they went on to have eight children together. The family was really poor. They were living in a part of Harlem that Baldwin later called Junkies, hollow and part of James earlier also took place during the Great Depression David Baldwin was strict, unyielding, authoritarian and cruel, including telling James that he was ugly, and reminding him of the circumstances of his birth, and of course that was heavily stigmatized at the time. As an adult Baldwin described the whole household constantly working to appease his stepfather James also said David taught him to fight, because he had to continually fight back with patients and a kind of ruthless determination, because I had to endure it to go under and come back up to wait. James Baldwin attributed stepfather's treatment of him and his mother and siblings as being the product of living the proud man in a racist society, where he just could not make enough money to really support his family, and Baldwin also credited his younger siblings as being a big part of what kept him off the streets, and largely out of trouble in his youth. As the oldest. James was always helping to look after the younger ones and that was something he described doing with a book in one hand, because reading became one of his biggest means of escape. He liked to tell people that he read every volume Harlem's library branches, and that he had to go to the new. York Public Library on forty second street to find any books that he hadn't read yet. He also credited religion with helping to keep him out of trouble. He had a religious conversion experience at the age of fourteen and became a youth minister at fireside Pentecostal Assembly. He was A. A Youth Minister for three years, and during that time he crafted his use of language and his speaking style throughout all this James had been attending New York public schools. I at PS twenty four, here's principal was gertrude airs. That was the first black principal in New York City from there. He moved to Frederick Douglass. Junior High School where Harlem Renaissance Poet County. Cullen was his French teacher and. And the director of the school's Literary Club while at Frederick Douglass Junior High James was editor of the school's newspaper, the Douglas pilot and also tried to make money to help the family by shining shoes and selling shopping bags for high school James was selected to attend dewitt Clinton High School in the Bronx. This is one of New York's more elite schools where they predominantly Jewish student body there. There James Again worked on the school newspaper. The Magpie and he excelled in his English and history courses. He also matte painter Buford Delaney. Who became a friend and something of a mentor as he demonstrated for Baldwin, that a black man could become an artist James. It didn't do nearly as well as other courses as he did. An English history and his high school years were personally very turbulent. In addition to all the stresses of his home life. He had started to question his sexuality. He'd also started questioning the church is he began to learn about the ways that Christianity had been used as a weapon during slavery, and is he heard people within his church and his stepfather make antisemitic comments. The ultimately left the church in thousand, nineteen, forty, one James, Baldwin, graduated from high. High School in Nineteen, forty two six months after the rest of his class, the internal turmoil connected to his faith in his sexuality, contributed to a mental health crisis that derailed his studies. He hoped to go to the City College of New York, but he couldn't afford tuition instead. He got a defense industry job in Belle mead. New Jersey to try to help support his family financially. By this point, James's stepfather was struggling with his own mental health with symptoms that included depression and paranoia. Baldwin's job in Belle meade involved building a new army quartermaster depot, and it was Baldwin's first real experience with overt racism on the job. The US army was still segregated, and Baldwin continued to act the way. He had acted back in Harlem when he was around White. White Southern Service members, and they of course expected him to be totally differential to them, and to stay out of their way of course, racism had existed in Harlem as well, but this was a whole different set of social expectations and consequences. Baldwin described this experience as learning what it meant to be a Negro. He refused to back down in. The face of racism. Racism and harassment on the job and he was fired. A friend helped him get his job back. And when the harassment resumed, he again push back against it, and was once again fired on his last night in Belle Meade Baldwin and some friends were refused service at a diner, because of their race and Baldwin really reached.

James Baldwin James Belle Meade Baldwin Baldwin Harlem Frederick Douglass Junior High New York City High School James Arthur Jones Harlem New York United States City College of New York Frederick Douglass dewitt Clinton High School Juan Junior High School Harlem Renaissance Poet County Tallahassee New Jersey Belle mead
James Baldwin: The 1967 Detroit Riots

LGBTQ&A

06:24 min | 3 months ago

James Baldwin: The 1967 Detroit Riots

"Recently, I've been thinking a lot about the work of James Baldwin and in particular this one speech that he gave about the racial problem in America. We're GONNA. Hear a click. Today is from Horace, vase nine thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine short film called Baldwin's and word, and like so much work. It feels like he's describing this very moment in time, and then the other thing you'll hear I think is his patriotism James. Baldwin wanted to make our country and world the best possible place for everyone that is true of people protesting in one, thousand, nine hundred. Hundred Sixty seven that he describes, and it's also true with people protesting today hearing from Queer figures like James Baldwin it always makes me feel just a little bit more grounded, and I think it also show is why we unfortunately have to continue to say yes. Black lives do matter and I sang. Nut is also just the beginning of the work that we have to do so to that. We've got some links in the show notes. If you're still looking for resources for how involved where to start, he'll check all those out and then without further ado. Here's James Baldwin. School really was the streets of New York City. My frame of Reference was George Washington and John Wayne. And you are formed by what you see choices you'd have to make and later discover what it means to be black in new. York I know how as you grow older, you watch in the richest city in the world the richest. Nation in the world. In the Western World I know how you watch as you grow older. Literally This is not a figure of speech. The cost of your brothers and your sisters pile up around you. Not for anything they have done. They were too young done anything. And the case to help. What one does realize is that? When you try to stand up. And the world in the face like you had a right to be here. When you do that without knowing this the result of it, you have attacked. The entire power structure of the Western, world. And speak plainly. We know. Everybody knows. No matter what recessions in my unhappy country maybe? But we are not. Bothering people out of existence in the name of freedom. Concerned with freedom, boys and girls, not as Istan here, the perishing streets of Harlem. We are concerned with power nothing more than that. In most unluckily for the Western world is consolidated its power. On the backs of people who are now willing to die. Rather than be used. Any longer. In short. The economic range in the Western world. Food to be too expensive for most of the world. And the Western world will change US arrangements. All these arrangements will be changed for them. This is what it's beneath all the rhetoric. And all those ashamed speeches coming from my president. This imposes on us then. Very considerable burden. I for example do have in principle least choice. I can make a living. And well enough known to be an ornament. And Short I could ally myself on the side of what I most seriously considered to be. A criminal nation. But if I can't do that. All the reasons that I can. When is tried? I tried for a long time and I don't person. Things I wrote things I said. That I was alone. I'm using myself as an example. You to my. White and black. Nature of a danger. And where we were going to go if he cannot resolve. The situation cities and then I'll streets now houses. If they come. When you realize that you cannot make yourself heard that people who? You are addressing plea on the previous ever super. One Saying, look at it. Get all the mountains of nonsense that had been written. And everything has been set. What you look at what is happening in this country? What really happening is the brother has murdered brother knowing it was his brother. White men have been negroes to be their son. Why women have had negroes burn knowing to be their love. It is at a ratio problem. Is a problem whether or not you're willing to look at your life and be responsible for it. And then begin to change its. That Great Western House I come from one house. Nine one of the children that house. Somebody on the most despised child that house. And it is because the American people are unable. The face of fact tonight back I'm flesh out their flesh. Bone of your bone. Created by them. My blood! My father's but is in that soil. They can't say that. And that is why. The Detroit another plane. And when has got to decide I think? The actual. And the moral base. which the world we know now rest. Obsolete. And deposit obsolete. They're wicked. As well as their obsolete, they are oppressive. Is simply not conceivable. That's another five hundred years of two hundred years or one hundred years. Should live and die. In the minds. Being, treated like animals to make other people rich. Civilization which is doing this. By doing this doomed itself. And it's not possible. To agree with it. Nor the possible to compromise with it. As much the much overused word. And it may not be as real as slavery. A very concrete thing. But freedom loved ones actor, and as it cannot I suppose beginning. Then obviously must. Take.

James Baldwin United States New York City NUT York America Harlem Istan President Trump George Washington John Wayne Detroit
Billy Porter makes history with Emmy win

The Nicole Sandler Show

01:18 min | 1 year ago

Billy Porter makes history with Emmy win

"Game of thrones is officially over the epoch TV series capped off its run Sunday night I by winning its Fourth Emmy for best drama series over eight seasons game of thrones one fifty nine emmys. There was an upset in the best comedy category gory where the Amazon Series fleabag took the prize for best comedy and its star Phoebe Waller Bridge also took acting and writing honors post are billy porter made history becoming the first openly gay black man to win the lead actor in a drama series. Emmy that I'm so overjoyed to have lived long enough to see this day. James Baldwin said took many years vomiting up all the filth that I have been taught about myself and halfway believed before I could walk around this earth like I had the right to be here. I have the right you have the right. Thanks to the KADEMI for voting for us because we love you for that and speaking of voting and love go and register to Vo go to vote register and all those the show itself suffered from terrible writing there were a few noteworthy acceptance

Emmy Phoebe Waller Bridge Billy Porter James Baldwin Kademi Amazon
Phoebe Waller-Bridge surprised by acting win

Morning Edition

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Phoebe Waller-Bridge surprised by acting win

"Billy Porter became the first openly gay black man to win an Emmy as best lead actor in a drama Sunday any marked the moment by quoting another history making gay black man noted author and activist James Baldwin James Baldwin said took many years of vomiting up all the filth that I have been talked about myself and halfway believed before I could walk around this earth like I had the right to be here Porter speech was a powerful moment and any telecast filled with a few expected wins and lots of surprises in particular Phoebe Waller bridge creator star in writer of Amazon prime videos comedy flea bag stepped on stage three times for wins is best writer in a comedy Best Actress in a comedy and when the show won as best comedy series Waller bridge competed against TV veterans like Julia Louis Dreyfus whose one seven times as best comedy actress seemed a bit stunned herself by the third win this is getting ridiculous. is a one woman show in Edinburgh Festival and the journey he's been absolutely despite a finale season they drew criticism from some fans game of thrones one as best drama series star Peter Dinklage earned a historic fourth Emmy as best Supporting Actor in a drama the only actor from game of thrones to win on Sunday night another expected when was Alex Borstein who earned her second Emmy in a row as best supporting actress in a comedy for her work on Amazon's the marvelous Mrs Maisel she gave it may have been the speech of the night recalling her grandmother who was a Holocaust survivor my grandmother turned to a guard she was in line to be shot into a pit and she said what happens if I step out of line and he said I don't have the heart to shoot you but somebody will and she stepped out of line and for that I am here and for that my children are here so step out of line ladies.

Emmy Writer Waller Bridge Julia Louis Dreyfus Edinburgh Festival Peter Dinklage Alex Borstein Amazon Mrs Maisel Billy Porter James Baldwin Phoebe Waller Bridge
Golden Globes nominations and the Oscars find a host...for now

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Golden Globes nominations and the Oscars find a host...for now

"KCRW sponsors include neon presenting vox, Lux, twenty-first-century portrait of Celeste a pop megastar grappling with a tragic past starring Academy Award winner, Natalie Portman and Academy Award nominee, Jude law academy eligible in all categories opens Friday. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me is Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter, and Matt we have the Golden Globes nominations out today, and I cannot discuss the Golden Globes without once again, noting what the heck are the Golden Globes. I mean, this is a group of foreign press people, and they are not a big group about ninety. I think is how many there are and they have managed, you know, kudos to them to create this gigantic deal around a bunch of reporters, some of them who I think are not even fulltime reporters may not have been published for awhile anywhere that you've even heard of. But whatever they've made it into this huge deal this huge telecast. And even though it has no connection to the academy whatsoever. It is. Deemed to have influence, so I guess we have to talk about. Yeah. And the fact of the matter is the Globes do matter they're an awards body that starts off the season their their nominations are in play during the very important holiday movie going seasons. So they can be influential on box office, and they are an indicator of the Oscar nominations, and I think this year the big winner from the globe. It's gotta be vice the Dick Cheney movie from Adam McKay, which has six nominations to lead the field. Yeah. I mean vices people thought that Christian bale would be nominated for playing Dick Cheney. But I don't think it had been seen in the best picture category. I don't know if it truly influences, but maybe on some unconscious level this attention does influence, so I'll let you have that point. Again. There are some changes. I do think that the Hollywood Foreign Press has tried to do better. There has been a wrap in the past that they snub movies with African American cats that did not happen this year movies that are in the mix. This year are black klansman. From Spike Lee, Black Panther. Of course, the marvel movie, and if Beale street could talk which is based on James Baldwin story. So those movies are in and that's better one thing that has not gotten better. And this was pointed out last year by Natalie Portman and announcing the nominations no women nominees again in the director category. That is unfortunate. I don't think the Academy Awards nominations will likely have any female directors. Either least how it's playing out right now Tamara Jenkins is sort of in the race for the fertility drama private life that she directed for net. Flicks. There is Debra Granik has leave no trace, but that's considered a smaller movie, and Marielle Heller has can you ever forgive me, which is getting more notice for Melissa McCarthy's performance, and she was nominated today as well. Yeah. Of course, there's khloe show with the writer, which just wanna Critics Award in New York. So that I think might be on the academy's potentially. It's a small. Movie, but potentially on the kademi threat. Our TV is where the most controversy happens, you know, things like succession overlooked, which is a very well regarded HBO series, and you know, certain things that don't seem to make sense, but I'm just going to pivot away from that for second to talk briefly about the Academy Awards after a long delay. The academy has come up with a host or ABC for the ABC telecast, Kevin Hart instantly, there are issues on the internet because of homophobic jokes that Kevin Hart had tweeted unfortunate. But it's a very tough job the academy to find a host. And it looks like they may have overlooked something here. Yeah, he certainly popular and has a lot of movies that people love. So we'll see when that they stay with them. Thank you, Matt. Thank you. That's Melanie editorial director of the Hollywood reporter. He joins me this Monday at two o'clock on the business. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown KCRW sponsors include neon presenting vox Lux at twenty-first-century portrait of Celeste. A pop megastar grab. Alling with a tragic past starring Academy Award winner, Natalie Portman and Academy Award nominee, Jude law academy eligible in all categories opens Friday, this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status has a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join.

Academy Awards Natalie Portman Golden Globes Jude Law Academy Kcrw Matt Bellamy Hollywood Dick Cheney Kim Masters Kevin Hart Celeste Hollywood Foreign Press Reporter Tamara Jenkins Marielle Heller Spike Lee Melissa Mccarthy James Baldwin Debra Granik
"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

"And it may refer to in this is casual if they refer to black people as African Americans, and I immediately think, oh, you're uncomfortable. And if somebody casually refers the gay people as homosexuals and I'm like, well, okay, you're uncomfortable with that too. Do you feel that way too or. No, you know, I think that James Baldwin and so interesting and we'll get into this next week, but I love a little teaser talk about it, but I think that like he was before they had a word for it. The word gay is new, and that's why like we talk about other cultures. There might be homosexuality within their culture. We've even talked about this and like ancient Africa. There was homosexuality took place, but they didn't like the word. It did it mean the same thing that it does now in like now it's so tied up in religious persecution as. And so it doesn't mean that same sort of thing that ritual Listrik practice. So for him, growing up, there wasn't a name for it. And so I think it was hard for him to identify with that in that movement that was happening. It was like for him, I believe he missed the boat, but homosexuality was like a thing that he was like, oh, that's what I am. I am a homosexual. That was a word that he could writing grasp onto, which is fascinating. Yeah, and it's kind of been more reclaimed I would say now to the word. Gay. Yeah, absolutely. And also to in some sex, we talked about this too. It's also for some evolving outside of career. Queer is is is coming up in. So it's it's, I think in it's so interesting. It's so fitting that we're talking about this because you said this earlier, James Baldwin was such a word Smith and how anytime homes house you that words, don't matter. They're wrong. Navy manners. You know much. It's a power, it's an energy, it's it's, it's an expression, expose their interests. Thoughts to, oh yeah, at the and it's and it's a symbol for what those inner thoughts are. Okay. Yeah. Oh, okay. All right. Well, we'll continue the talk next week with more with my best friend. Happy birthday. Jimmy, Baldwin. Oh, his birthday was August. Second. I don't think I mentioned that we're celebrating the first part of August as James Baldwin time. James Baldwin, John Jimmy, Baldwin time baby. He's the, he's the fire of the time. Yeah..

James Baldwin John Jimmy religious persecution Africa Smith
"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

"See Ralph Ellison or d Irving how I wanna say a, but I'm also feeling see either a or c, I don't know. I'm going with a. Okay. And what are you going with a rec-. I know it's been a long time since you've taken it. Does. But I don't work like that. Okay. So like I said, air, see, okay. You get half a point if you get one of them. Right, right. Okay. Okay. So you're not, you're a member we won't. We don't know right after you. Click it. We will. We'll know right after you click it. No. So you keep track of your air see, okay. Okay. What high school did James Baldwin attend in the Bronx a Christ, the king high school b.'s central Bronx high school, see Christ, the redeemer high school or d- DeWitt Clinton high school. I have no idea, but using my news, you're James Baldwin. I don't know high school. He went to using my sense. There were two Christ schools, so it has three one of those because look at her. I mean, why would they put variations on China's slip you up? They're like, ooh, you know, it's a Christ something or other. So you're right. Yeah, I'm gonna go with Christ, the redeemer, which one is at sea, and then a was another one way or by the king high school. I'm going to say the king. Why not? Okay. All right. We're splitting the difference there in nineteen forty eight. James Baldwin left the United States and move to which country a England, B, France, c Finland, de Norway France. Look at you. Maybe I don't know if you've got it right. I do. I do know that you got it right. He had a boyfriend by the name of Lucian for the longest time over in France, plus everybody. Albright is go to France. You know what they beloved hands over there. It's true. Black Americans are loved over there, do not black French people literally a say black Africans or French people. France, you've got some we, you need to figure it out. Figure out what was the name of James Baldwin's? First novel published in nineteen Fifty-three a nobody knows my name be the fire next time. See another country or d go Todd on the mountain and go tell it on the mountain. I'm gonna go out on the mountain as well. Number five and nine thousand nine hundred sixty three his essay down at the cross. Okay. Got him on the cover of what magazine dammit, a Newsweek, be life c. time d look, I'm going to say life. I was gonna say life too. Wife was the big thing back then they really liked to kind of they liked a little. They did some diversity stuff on life. They did. I remember that from Dreamgirls. A fictional musical that sometimes sold through it mirrored the truth. It had the riots and then they wrote that song that was like it was the band, the ham band, based off of in Dreamgirls who the supreme good, at least you'd never. I know I know what it's Mirroring, but you know what? It's just Jimmy James Baldwin said. So it's like our entertainment is how we see our reality sometimes like it's distorted. But in Dreamgirls it was not. It was pretty pretty well Khandan. What was the name of his book length essay that discussed the assassination of Medgar Evans, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King junior, I'm not your knee what I'm not your negro, right? A the evidence of things not seen, oh, no name in the street. See just about my head or d the fire next, the fire next time. Ooh, a. Evidence of things not seen. Okay. I'm gonna go with no name on this in the street. Okay. James Baldwin wrote two novels in the nineteen seventies one boys just above my head..

Jimmy James Baldwin Clinton high school king high school France redeemer high school central Bronx high school Ralph Ellison Todd de Norway France Martin Luther King China Medgar Evans Irving Albright Newsweek United States Malcolm X Finland England
"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

"In terms of getting caught on the main stage of the cultural climate involving raise. But it was like, you know him and Lorraine Hans Barry and Richard brightly key was up there in terms of the people that were making an impact in changing the conversation around race. Yeah, to stick way. Yup. Totally end, you know, in honoring, you know his life. I was trying to think about like the best way to go about this. Like I was thinking about maybe doing like a quiz of information on him instead of actually wanted to kind of look at the tail end of his life. Yeah, there are two works that I think are really interesting that talked about like him. He died in nineteen eighty seven. In their two works, I think really hit the nail on the coffin. Really cops topsy late. Is that a word it is now calculates his sort of late in life and that is, I am not your negro the documentary, a homeland, and like talk about that. And then also just reading some expert experts from an interview that he did with the village voice in nineteen believe it was nineteen eighty-seven. So right before he passed away, Josh? Yeah, really close. It was one of the last interviews that he did, and I thought that I am not your negro does such a really great job of capturing the kids sort of life in thought as a black man. And I think the interview does a really good job sort of talking about his life. Like as a homosexual won't say gay because he doesn't really identify himself as gay button. Let's talk about. I not your negro. Oh, but can I just do a quick little plug because I'm super excited about this because this came out the trailer came out like a couple of days ago. Barry Jenkins the director. Of moonlighting. He put out a trailer for if Bill street could talk. So he's doing a movie of the book that James Baldwin wrote. Oh, okay. That's awesome. Let's just like I mean, you just can't get enough of Jimmy Baldwin Jenkins combine like him on team. That's gonna be awesome. In the the trailer looks beautiful. I have to check that out. Thank you for giving me the news and the tidbit. Yeah, you're so I'm not your negro. Just give it a little preference before we jump in and sort of talk about it and also it's on Amazon prime right now for your viewing pleasure. Excellent in. So the premise is that nine hundred seventy nine. James Baldwin wrote a letter to his litter, Egypt describing has next project cold. Remember this house? Yes. And this book was she was going to be a revolutionary book that was a personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends. Medgar Medgar Evers Malcolm X and Martin Luther King junior. And he died before he was able to finish. There's only about thirty completed pages of his manuscript found, and so director filmmaker arou- pack envisions that book that James Baldwin never finish the use actual words from it to create. It feels like you've seen it sounds like he's alive and expert right poem like it is the way that the excerpts and clips they have interviews, they have. Isn't Sam Samuel Jackson, who does his voice? He doesn't excellent job doing the very end. So on point of Jimmy Baldwin on point, you think that Samuel, Jackson display Samuel Jackson when he's like acting, but he can actually act like he did say, good job being James Baldwin like his when you hear different speeches and interviews, James Baldwin has a very distinct voice. So is it really kind of helps. Get you into the the mindset in the frame of everything that was going on. It's I think it's it's well done. Yeah, it's it's so good. And it's also interesting because it really it's so fascinating to hear. First of all I thought was really great about it is that they put a lot of times. It's like an old timey back in time movie. It's all black and white, but I thought was so interesting is then they, I don't know the words for the re colorized..

James Baldwin Sam Samuel Jackson Jimmy Baldwin Jenkins Richard Jimmy Baldwin Medgar Medgar Evers Malcolm Josh Lorraine Hans Barry director Barry Jenkins Amazon Samuel Jackson Egypt Martin Luther King filmmaker arou Jackson
"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"james baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

"Birthday to your happy birthday to your happy. They James Baldwin Baldwin. He I love James Baldwin definite. He doesn't give enough credit that I think you know what I feel like for me, I can't believe I'm not talking about James Baldwin like we've reference them on the show, but I have done not done a full segment about James Baldwin. Oh, he's amazing. Just as a tidbit, you should check out the it's on YouTube, but he's invited to Oxford and he does a debate. Yeah. With the team four -firmative is it affirmative action or the plight of black people? Basically, I think it's the play of, I think it's the plight of black people, and it is amazing his word magic. He gets like a standing ovation at the end of it. He deserved it because he is genius. He's such a, he's such a genius for those of you who don't know who James Baldwin is not known any shaded to you, but welcome to the partee. For those who don't know who she was Baldwin is he's born in nineteen twenty four in New York City. He grew up in Harlem which swear I'm living right now. This new, his middle name. Middle name is Arthur. Oh, wow. Check that out. James Arthur Baldwin or James Arthur Martin were like practically twins. Yeah, I, he published the novel, go Todd on the mountain in nineteen fifty three and he got like you just he was the. He was capturing as the negro voice of the times I, he wrote Giovanni is room with she. Avantis room is huge. It's a landmark book because it was the first time anyone was writing about homosexuality in the way that he did well, like essentially pave the way for just gay literature, engaged stories being out in the mainstream. It was a very dangerous book for him to riot believe you wrote in the lift late fifties. I'm the I, I did a show called waiting for Giovanni. It was my first. It was a new work. We did at new conservatory theatre center. It was the first professional theatre company production I ever got to work on and they just had their east coast premiere out here, New York a week ago and a two weeks ago. And it was kind of a cool for circle moment for me because they're Tissot director from new conservatory theatre center come out, came out. The writer was out like, oh, a passing of the baton. Like I started in San Francisco at the show, and now here I am in New York trading that, yeah, yeah. Yeah. He also wrote essays on works like notes on native son, which Richard Wright wrote about the fire. Next time. He was really good friends with Lorraine hands berry was like in that time period, he was like, you know, a little bit ahead of like martinsville king and Malcolm x..

James Arthur Baldwin James Baldwin Baldwin Giovanni James Arthur Martin New York City New York Richard Wright YouTube Todd Arthur Harlem Oxford San Francisco director Lorraine writer Malcolm two weeks
Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

After Hours with Rick Kogan

01:28 min | 2 years ago

Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

"It would be hard to imagine fuller lies in those led by arch and art paul to giants of the art world who died within hours of each other saturday morning both of them had been ill archie was ninety six art paul was ninety three so they had had very fruitful lives and very influential lives art shay was a photographer who died in his home in deerfield surrounded by some of the two million or more photos he had taken through his life he was there for most of the prominent events of the twentieth century met many of the century's most important people john fitzgerald kennedy merlin brando martin luther king gwendolyn brooks ernest hemingway carl sandberg james baldwin ann landers and roger ebert was roger who once set of arts photography that it quote shakes you up up sets you down gently pats you on the head and then kicks you in the ass art paul was sitting in an office in the loop he was born on the south side raised in rogers park was incredibly talented at sullivan high school and received a scholarship to the art institute he then came back went to the institute of design was freelance illustrator and designer with a little tiny office.

Archie Paul Shay Deerfield Ann Landers Roger Ebert Rogers Park Art Institute John Fitzgerald Kennedy Ernest Hemingway Carl Sandberg Sullivan High School Institute Of Design