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"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

08:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"So we will always have this war going on inside us. and. That's why we pay. Attention to our mind wisely and carefully. So that, we know what to do. Luckily we have precepts. We have teachings. We have one another. And we have our own familiarity with our own minds, so we know what it feels like. To be stuck. In our negatively. Are Self Protectiveness, it feels lousy. It feels confining. So. We don't WanNa get stuck on her negatively so when we feel that we know. We're feeling it. We'd let go and when we can't let go and we do get stuck. We know we're stuck. We know. This is what it feels like when I'm stuck not too good. And we're clear. That whatever is going on right now, our commitment not to be stuck. Is the commitment of a lifetime. So, we may feel it. But we don't feed it. We don't believe. All the thoughts of blaming in anger, and so on that will strengthen our bitterness. These thoughts emotions might come. But we recognize them and we stay patient with them. We? Don't feed. The grasping angry. Will we feed the loving open hearted wolf every time we sit? Every time we chant every time we bow. Every time, we're kind. Every time we let go every time we forgive. We are feeding. And strengthening this goodwill, this good human mind just to be kind to ourselves for a moment. We strengthen. Our. Good human mind are Nice Fluffy. Maybe like Alaska and White Wolf. So that we do that as much as we can't. Staying, open with our mind, accepting our mind forgiving ourselves over and over again. We can't help. Being who we are. We can't help being human beings. We were born this way. But we know what in ourselves to encourage and what in ourselves? To, just let be. Quotes James Baldwin Baldwin one of the most eloquent writers we have. WHO SAID FAMOUSLY I imagine one of the reasons why people cling to their hate so stubbornly. These because, because once the hate is gone. They'll be forced to deal with their pain. I'm not sure but I. Probably he was talking about white people. especially white people. He saw what he was growing up. Who really seem to have a strong antipathy? Toward Black People. and. It's funny. That Baldwin. who was a black gay man? Understood, these white people probably much better than they understood themselves. And one of the deepest aspects of racism in America that we're now beginning to feel finally. Is the pain and the guilt. White people have probably always been avoiding. Covering it up with all kinds of hatred arrogance. Thoughtlessness so that they didn't need to feel it. Too have been perpetrators. And beneficiaries of such crimes. Who could bear this? Who could bear the pain? In the Guild And this is true in the widest possible way. All anger. Hatred! And Self Denigration. Is actually a protection. For the EGO. We think it's an attack on the ego, but it's a protection for the EGO. All afflicted emotion is in the end a distraction. From the pain we feel. Because we are vulnerable human beings and we are going to die soon. And the guilt we feel. Because we're all separate from each other. And none of us. Can claim. That we've loved enough. In this separation. Is built into the structure of our consciousness. When you think about it. That's actually the definition of consciousness. Separation. I can't be conscious of something. Unless, I am not that thing. Mind is over here. Object is over there. That's what defines consciousness division. Cutting the cat into a very violent and destructive. In its. Nature. In consciousness is inherently. Critical! Because it is inherently in exile from itself, and so it is straining towards something. And every object. Is Subject to discrimination. And Critique. Every object either meets my approval or disapproval. Rather than just let objects come and go as they naturally will. My. Mind must critique them. Some objects that wants to keep. Hold of because they're good and I liked them others. I want to get rid of because they're bad. They're unpleasant to me. In this way. We're at war. Because we want pleasure. We don't want pain. We want to live. We don't want to die. And we have all sorts of preferences and aversions based on our conditioning and our history. We like this kind of person. We don't like that kind of person. We, tried to realize preferences to get what we prefer and get rid of what we would prefer to get rid of. We want to be with the people were tracked to. We want to avoid the people. We don't think we like who frighten us. In this way. Drop by drop by drop. We build an ocean of suffering. In, a fractured painful world and we never could help it to begin with. Of course. This is what we have done. And when we're willing finally. Really. See how painful all this is. To understand the real source of the pain. Our heart wants to put together. What has been torn apart? We realize. self-defensive nature of all our critique. Really, there's nothing to prefer. How superficial are all our preferences in critiques? Deeper in us. Is the desire for the truth. Of all things. Oneness. In love..

pain EGO James Baldwin Baldwin us. White Wolf Alaska America Baldwin.
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

13:29 min | 7 months ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank you Kelly at I really appreciate that introduction I just want to start by saying how special it is to me to be here in the space with all of you I lived in Pasadena only about three blocks from here for five years when I was in graduate school and I would come the Romans practically every Wednesday with my mom Kathy who sitting right here and my my cousin my late cousin Catherine Martin Ney who go to Laemmle and see a movie and then we come hang out of Romans and it's really special for me to be here with you tonight tonight I am going to talk to you about something that happened in this space February eighteenth nineteen sixty five you hear me alright the back all right February eighteenth nineteen sixty five fifty four years ago this space was filled with over seven hundred people every spot on the benches was taken there were people sitting on the floor it was in the violation of the fire code there were five hundred more people who wanted to get into the space but they couldn't because it was so packed they went to other rooms on the premises this is the Cambridge union the world's oldest debating society they're all these Cambridge students who wanted to get into the space but it was so full they could not why would they all there they were there to see James Baldwin the poet profit of the civil rights revolution Baldwin was at that time one of the most famous writers in the world and the students were excited to see the poet in the flesh but they're also intrigued by the prospect of Baldwin sharing the platform with William F. Buckley junior in nineteen sixty five Buckley was the second most prominent conservative in United States second only to bury Goldwater but he wasn't quite internationally known yet but the students had heard a buzz about Buckley they knew that he was a right wing polemicist they knew that he was a critic of the civil rights revolution and so they were intrigued by the prospect of an intellectual battle before their eyes and so this space filled the got hotter and hotter they were klieg lights the BBC was there to record the event for an international television audience it's a Buckley in Baldwin with these two embodiments of two movements bald when the civil rights revolution in Buckley the American conservative movement this book the fire is upon us is about that debate but it's about more than that the debate constitute as you can see it's a thick book it could be used as a door stop or a weapon you could do some curls with it it's two pounds and it's about the two chapters about the debate are about to turn fifty pages into the book because Buckley involved in almost exacting tempers their Buckley is born in nineteen twenty five Baldwin's born in nineteen twenty four and they live these parallel lives there so radically different they have radically different life experiences and what I do in the book as I weave their biographies against the backdrop of the rise of the civil rights and conservative movements that they respectively did so much to shape I thought I want to do tonight is give you a sense of some of that story leading up to the debate and will probably end with the debate itself we'll see if we get the audio to work if we can't that's alright you can go home and watch it on YouTube later but I want to give you a sense of the book but I want to give you enough to intrigue you but not enough to satisfy you so there's a lot of questions that will have time for some conversation at the end and I look forward to answering your questions let me tell you a little bit about James Baldwin young James Baldwin Baldwin is born in August nineteen twenty four in Harlem he's the oldest of nine children born to his what is this bizarre is mother bird is married men and David Baldwin when Baldwin was just a toddler so David ball that was the only father the the James ever knew Baldwin describes his life in Harlem is being one marked by domination he says that the experience of growing up in Harlem in those days in the twenties and thirties he fell dominated by all sorts of individual people who are trying to limit his opportunities hi he describes in the Cambridge debate what he calls a catalog of disaster the policeman the taxi drivers the waiters the landlady the landlord the banks insurance companies the millions of details of every day which spelled out to me that I was a worthless human being Baldwin also describes the ways in which he felt oppressed and dominated by a kind of kind of forces the did not have a human face the vast merciless bottom mostly cruel structures of power the limited limited his freedom and opportunities as a young man bald and watch this system of domino ation consume his father David Baldwin James says was one of the most sad human beings you ever witnessed he says David Baldwin father of nine children James says he can never remember a single time when any of David Baldwin's nine children were happy to see him come home as a father myself when I read that in Baldwin's autobiographical writings I found it to be heartbreaking is Baldwin grows up with his father who is this devoutly religious man but is very cruel to all the human beings around him Baldwin wonders as he's growing up why is my father this way and as he gets older he realizes his father's this way because he has come to believe what white people say about him and he sees his father eaten alive by despairs fathers of dying in nineteen forty three in a mental institution involvement from as far as he can tell his father is literally dies of despair so Baldwin says his goal from self I am not going to become my father I'm not gonna be consumed by despair how can I fight back against this cruel world and Baldwin finds his lover what causes levers handles something to hang on to in the streets of Harlem and that thing is language is the power of words Baldwin as a very young man is obsessed with books he is he is taken by the power of books to connect human beings across time and space so he reads Charles Dickens and you can feel a sense of connection to those characters the Dickens is describing involving begins to write and write and write and you never stops writing until the day he dies and tries to make sense of his experience through language involved one ends up following his father an important way he becomes a preacher so Balkans fathers late Pentecostal preacher in Harlem storefront churches and James Baldwin at the age of fourteen becomes a young minister and although Baldwin only stayed in the church for three years he remained a preacher till the day he died and you'll see the Cambridge speech is really a sermon more than anything else and Baldwin says there's something about that experience in the church the sense of connection that he fell to his congregation that re really captured a sense of community that was very powerful and never left and there's a sense he said when the church begins to rock and there's nothing quite like that Nicholas book called the fire is upon us when Buckley junior is born in November nineteen twenty five just a little over a year after Baldwin was born and he's born in the same city but he may as well been born on a different planet Buckley is born to immense wealth and privilege of Buckley father women Buckley senior was a real estate and oil man who had made lost and regained fortunes he was a wash in new money we have Buckley junior's mother Alaoui Steiner Buckley was a proud daughter of the confederacy who came from New Orleans old money so you got dad new money mom old money keyword here is money lots and lots of money and with that money the Buckley's did some things you'd expect they purchased a vast to state a forty seven acre estate insuring Connecticut the call great album but they really devote a lot of the resources to the education of their children Buckley as nine siblings were received with in their home in home that sort of in home schooling a very elaborate liberal arts education buckle wanna Buckley sisters describes in this way I will read this whole thing because it gets a little bit absurd but Eloise wanna Buckley sister says that the children received instruction in apologetics art ballroom dancing banjo bird watching building boats and bottles calligraphy canoeing she goes on like that in alphabetical order down to speech the dog free swimming tap dancing tennis typing and wood carving now the sorts of things the buckles were learning in that way are important but what's more important is the world view that they were taught the Buckley's the Buckley family was dominated by two particular systems of thought one was a devout rigid hierarchical brand of Catholicism and the second was a political doctrine that they called individualism individual is was a catch all term for the Barclays there was meant to communicate a hostility to any form of collectivism communism socialism the new deal new deal policies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt the Buckeyes were also taught to be suspicious of democracy the Buckley children were taught there some people in this world fit to rule and there are others fit to be ruled and good news Buckley children you're fit to rule and so this belief and hierarchy was central to Buckley's upbringing and it's important to note that this hierarchy was thoroughly racialized so the Buckley's had many servants working for them many of the servants were people of color and Buckley's parents taught their children that they were biologically naturally superior to these people of color but they had a responsibility as a result of their superiority to treat those under them humanely especially those who were loyal you can see where this is going so Buckley spends his childhood in this setting goes off to Mel Brooks notebook prep school and then search for two years in the US army and after that he in roles in jail as a twenty one year old freshman when he's at Yale he expects to find the professors the lectern will affirm his Christian an individual's beliefs any find some of that there's some intellectual mentors that he finds at Yale but he also finds a lot of professors who are skeptical of maybe even hostile to Christianity and individualism and so Buckley also taken by the power of language to change the world similar to Baldwin in that regard he decides to use his voice and his pen to fight back against the liberals and collectivist who are dominating the faculty at Yale from his perspective and so he he begins at formal he does formal debate at Yale and is is a master at taking on the other side criticizing liberals and socialists in others he also becomes chairman or IT manager and chief of the Yale Daily News any right he uses that role to write editorials about national politics in nineteen forty eight election happens when he's there which is a fascinating election but he also right uses his editorial posed to write I can't imagine this is a professor he writes these damning critique of his professors those professors who are engaged in this task of undermining the values of these young folks at Yale and Buckley does something even bolder than that after he graduates he sits down to write a book length indictment of his alma mater can you imagine this call god and man at Yale and in this book Buckley says that the the Yale and much of higher education the country's marked by this paradox Christian individualist parents send their kids off to college only to have them converted into atheistic socialists also Buckley says that what we need to do is get rid of this hoax called academic freedom what we need to do is have alumni and boards of trustees control the hiring and curriculum on college campuses Buckley then if that's not controversial enough this book annoys a lot of people but it get it certainly gets people's attention this is a guy who's arriving on intellectual scene when he publishes that his next book of that wasn't controversial enough is the defense of Joseph McCarthy mark McCarthy in his enemies is a book the Buckley co authors with his brother in law L. Brent Bozell and in this book Buckley says that Joseph McCarthy has his flaws he's an imperfect instrument but he is playing a vital role in American political culture Buckley in book had been Boselli been taught by one of their yeah professors again and will more Kendall that the idea of an open society is an insane idea any sane society must be a closed society a society that enforces a public orthodoxy there's some things that are okay to believe and there are others that are not clearly communism is not and so that so what candle taught Buckley to believe that com yes of course need to be excluded from public life and suppressed in various ways perhaps more ominously Buckley also came to believe that liberals right so one of the accusations against McCarthy is that while it aren't some people getting caught up in is not that are actually communists well Buckley says if that's the case McCarthy's doing a terrible job liberals are still dominating the media there dominating academia and then he says you know even if it was the case is it really true that liberals don't deserve to be targeted not because they're evil like communist but because they're mistaken in their analysis of political life so there's this kind of ominous thing that Buckley kind of these hanging weather not liberals deserve to be targeted meanwhile.

Kelly Pasadena nineteen sixty five fifty four forty seven acre twenty one year three years five years two pounds two years
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

12:20 min | 8 months ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on The Book Review

"Hello Paul McCartney here. My new picture bouquet ground dude is out now and it's raided by me it's about a grandfather granddad. Grand Dude who uses this is margie compass to whisk his grandchildren away on adventures around the world. A lot of fun writing in the raising it on. I hope you enjoy too. You can download it. Start listening today. Hey Grandma how James Baldwin and William F Buckley end up on a stage together in one thousand nine hundred sixty five at Cambridge University to debate one another on Race Nicholas Koby here to talk about his book. The fire is upon us. What's it like growing up black and gay and the south poet and now L. Memoir Ist Sii Jones will be here to talk about his book? How we fight for our lives Concepcion de Leon will give us an update from the literary world last? We'll talk about what we the and the wider world are reading this book view. PODCAST from the New York Times. I'm Pamela Paul. Nicholas Cola is here in the studio to talk about his new book. The fire is upon us. James Baldwin William F. Buckley junior and the debate over race in America. His two previous books were the essential Douglas and Abraham Lincoln and Liberal Democracy Nicholas. Thanks for being here. Thanks thanks for having me. I'm honored to be here all right. This is a change of subject for you why this book. This book emerged through Baldwin. I was invited to write essay about Baldwin and I devoted voted the few months just reading everything could get my hands on. And then I dug into the Youtube Archives of all these video Baldwin and I found the debate with Buckley and I became transfixed was just such a dramatic moment of these two men who embodied movements in a way and they have them on the international stage clashing. I was just sort of became mildly obsessed with it and so I wrote that essay Using the debate as a framing device in is I worked on the ESA I kept thinking. There's there's a book in here and then that book kind of grew and grew and grew to a joint intellectual biography. They're born about a year apart from each other and so I thought I could sort of weave their intellectual biographies against the backdrop of the the rise of the civil rights and conservative movements. I have to say you know word favor of Youtube. All of these things are on there and you can go online and Google Baldwin Buckley debate and it comes right up up. I just want to play a quick clip from that to be. This is a bit. We have a civil rights bill. Now we had an amendment the Fifteenth Amendment nearly one hundred years ago I hate to see them again like an Old Testament prophets whether the amendment was not honor. Then I don't have any reason to believe in the Civil Rights Bill. We'll we'll be on it now and after all one's been there since before you know. A lot of people got their if one has got to proved once title to the land isn't four hundred years enough one hundred years at least three worlds later on will play play another clip from Buckley. But let's start with something you just mentioned Nicholas. which is that? These two men were born. Only fifteen months. Apart in New York City could not have had more different circumstances in terms of their births and upbringing. Let's start with James Baldwin Baldwin born in August nineteen twenty four in Harlem and he's the oldest of nine children and Baldwin describes his childhood as being one the Chili marked by domination His experience is is one in which he has. There's all sorts of individual people in his life police officers landladies landlords that he's seizes is enforcing kind of boundaries Andres on his his growth as a as a human being and he sees his parents victimized by racial oppression by economic anxiety by a lack of economic opportunity and so Baldwin I'm describes growing up in Harlem and is auto biographical writings and a really powerful way of of really a set of circumstances in which he feels so limited as a human being. I mean he has to try to figure out way to find some modicum of power to fight back against the suppression so Baldwin is somebody who eventually finds his lover. He calls it in language words. He's obsessed with books you know from a very young age reading everything and get his hands on trying to find ways in which to make sense of his experience through books and then he begins writing at a very young age and actually actually devote himself to writing often. He can in the ends up becoming a young minister. His father was a lay pentecostal preacher in Haarlem storefront churches and so Baldwin becomes the young minister at the age of fourteen and has really taken by the power of language to connect him to his congregation and although he leaves the church by seventeen he remains a preacher's entire life including the ninety debates. Buckley it really is sermon. Tell us what was his formal education like so Baldwin. was somebody who you know. He says that he was not the best of students students. But that he you know because he had a hard time staying interested in a lot of the things he was learning in school so within a lot of ways he was not died act but he had the opportunity a couple of really really important teachers in his life and those teachers encouraged him to apply for a program at dewitt Clinton high school and he he went to Clinton which of course is this story. Place it's produced to all sorts of important intellectual and political figures and so that experience was important because Baldwin at dewitt Clinton was able to work for the. The High School Literary magazine had some outlets outlet for his creative abilities but he was somebody who did not have an opportunity to go to college so in many ways. You know you sort of you. All people familiar Baldwin's writings assume that he has some sort of you. You know lead education. But but in fact he didn't he was somebody who was largely self educated and was really just a a student you know from a very early age. You know that that he died all right. That's it's a good moment to just pivot quickly to Buckley because we associate him so much with the institutions that he attended of course God and man at Yale but let's start start with his birth in New York City. Buckley is you know as I say at the beginning of the book He May as well been born in on a different planet. You know the same city but my as miserable been a different planet. Buckley really is somebody who was born into immense wealth so Buckley's father is somebody who made in lost and regained fortunes in the real estate and oil businesses. His mother is a comes from old money proud daughter of the confederacy. So I say that you know that his father had new money. His mother had old money. The keyword there's money and they. I used that money to provide their children with a very rich upbringing in a lot of ways and especially educationally ten children yet there were ten. Attendance goes both came from very large families. They did say one thing they have in common. The Buckley's had an estate in Sharon Connecticut known as Great Elm Forty seven Acre estate and they had a a elaborate homeschooling for their children so every subject under the Sun. They had live in tutors. That were there fulltime. They brought in part time tutors to cover. Every other subject to the Buckley's really devoted voted in and they were especially devoted to teaching their children in particular world view and so the Buckley's were taught a kind of they. Call it individualism. But it was really a kind of elitism. They were taught hot to be very suspicious of any form of collectivism socialism communism and the new deal policies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. But they're also taught to be very suspicious of democracy. I'm they were taught taught that some people are fit to rule others are fit to be ruled and they were among those who were to rule of course and so Buckley really he'd ever really desires to become his father he he doesn't want to follow him into business but he really wants to devote his life to defending the world view that his father taught him on his mother taught him and so in that hierarchy household whether they're todd these values of hierarchy those values thoroughly racial is is one of the key themes the book and so- Buckley's racial politics in many ways you know emerged at a very young age and he sustains those throughout his life so it's interesting that both Buckley and Baldwin for very different reasons are suspicious of certain aspects of American democracy. That's true that's true. And it's it's these moments you know now in the in the book when I say there is kind of surprising there's some surprising overlaps where you know Baldwin and Buckley Ha of crowd the suspicion of liberalism. They have some suspicion of democracy mcreavy they have some suspicion of the capacity of law needs to bring about social change but those moments were there the the there's overlaps very different reasons why they take those positions and so oh I think but in that overlap we can we can learn something about our politics and also in the the reasoning that they you know both of them used to arrive at those conclusions can really help us make sense of our political moment I mean is it in those moments of auto alignment that the tension is greatest in terms of their differences. I think that's true. I mean I think maybe not. There's definitely a lot of tensions just running through The the story but I think that those moments are you know really fascinated me one example. Is that Baldwin and Buckley are both great critics northern hypocrisy on race. You know they they they will often say you know the one line that's uses the Jim Crow has the north simply more sophisticated Baldwin. Say that sort of thing and Buckley would see that sort of thing. Of course Buckley's point point. Was He would say that to get northerners to lay off of the south and Balden would say that to get all of us delay into the north right and so those moments I think are are especially powerful to think about. Okay why is it the Baldwin is looking at somebody you know particular politician that he really does not trust and Buckley's looking at saint politician. It does not trust that person. They have these radically different different reasons for that distrust and I think that's that's really informative for us all right. Let's come from their childhood circumstances right to nineteen sixty five the year in which this debate the subject have your book. The fire is upon US takes place. Where is James Baldwin at this point in his life and career? Nineteen sixty five Baldwin's really at the height of his fame name so Baldwin had published his first novel in Nineteen fifty three and he he'd published by then three novels go tell in the Mountain Giovanni in another country so you establish himself as a fiction writer but also then published several essay collections and in one thousand nine hundred sixty three the next time is published. And that's that's really a book that I mean Baldwin Star was already ascending but that that book sort of sent Baldwin to the height of literary fame I mean so. He's among the most famous writers in the world at that time in Baldwin's connection connection to the civil rights movement was was always a complicated one. I mean he describes himself as a witness in his first interactions with the Jim crow south or as a journalist he goes down to the south to cover. What's happening the black liberation struggle for particular magazines and publications and so Baldwin says my job is to write it all down but he of course feels in this sense of obligation to be go beyond writing it all down of course journalism always has kind of normative dimension to it but he he says you know? He spends a lot of his life if it's what he calls a transatlantic commuter living in Europe and living in the US but he feels a sense of obligation to to engage in the struggle and so by sixty three he's kind of identified as a kind of spokesman when he didn't like that label at all didn't like most labels but he really wants to eat engaged in this that both through his fiction and nonfiction writing. What he's really trying to do is provide his readers years with the sense of what the world looks like through the eyes of of a variety of people in the south and also elsewhere in the country who are in the midst of this struggle to change the country such really I Baldwin? It's up to them so at that moment. Sixty five Cambridge Baldwin's internationally famous. So those students that are packed into that union debating hall. They're really there to see Baldwin. Because Buckley hadn't quite achieved international fame yet all right. Let's talk about William F.. Buckley where is he. Nineteen sixty five in terms of his career. So Buckley by sixty five is second only only to Barry Goldwater in terms of a sort of face of the American conservative movement and Buckley had played really this outsized role in shaping what we now call the conservative movement. So Buckley in Nineteen fifty-five starts at National Review magazine which the idea the magazine was to try to do what progressive magazines had done in the first half of the twentieth century Maksim like the nation and the republic had done so much to shape. The American left and so- Buckley has idea that there's not really anything that we could call it an conservative movement a coherent conservative conservative movement. Fifty five so he has this idea to use a magazine to bring folks together a coalition Together and so he founds national review and very right at the same aim moment. He's founding national review. The civil rights movement the latest phase in the civil rights struggle is occurring the lynching of Emmett till the reaction to that the rest of Rosa parks the Montgomery Montgomery bus boycott..

James Baldwin Baldwin William F Buckley James Baldwin William F. Buckl Baldwin Baldwin Buckley Buckley Ha Cambridge Baldwin New York City Paul McCartney Sii Jones Concepcion de Leon Jim Crow New York Times Pamela Paul Cambridge University dewitt Clinton high school Nicholas Koby Youtube
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

02:02 min | 8 months ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Toure Show

"James Baldwin Baldwin said to be black in America is to be perpetually angry so pissed and I and I I want to share something. My mother said to me. Both my parents were civil rights organizers and when Ronald Reagan was elected president in one thousand nine hundred eighty my mother said to me I am so sorry. Sorry because we really thought that we had changed things in this country. And the idea that Ronald Reagan who remember launched his president just presidential campaign Philadelphia Mississippi. Where Goodman Cheney any and sh- werner were murdered for registering black people to vote? And that was his dog whistle. That was his dog whistle. That that I am with you and so and I say that because it was it was you know when we were all trying to raise is the alarm bells around. Ronald Reagan's racism or his willingness at minimum to use races a wedge but appealing explicitly to racism. No one listened. I mean we listened but you know but you couldn't. Everyone kept saying I'll work on past race than Obama's elected president. Then we're really post race But this is a say what what we're seeing in. I'm pissed but part of it was because my mother doc felt the need to apologize to me in nineteen eighty for Ronald Reagan and for her generation's failure to make different. And when my fifteen year old daughter said to me in November twenty six teen that America is not a safe space. I was apologizing to.

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

12:23 min | 11 months ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"I'm a i'm a big fan. I don't know i don't know about his social. All standing on our know what happened. I'm just talking about his films. Also you have to separate the artists from the man. I also like louis ferdinand celine and he was a nazi sympathizer adviser so you can't like anybody anybody 'cause. All artists are dog shit apparently yeah you can't like bob mukasa. Nobody nothing absolutely so. I like woody allen movies <hes> and i feel i blue jasmine in particular again on the superficial level that takes place in san francisco but what he has always made movies about the places as well famously makes movies about <hes> you know manhattan of course but he's been in spain now he's been in france now has been the italy now and every time the story has something to do with that place i feel like when he made blue jasmine. It had to do with san francisco and it's a very beautiful rendering of san francisco. It's dreamy. It's again a little bit tweet. Woody in particular likes to shoot things very warm and composed and you know so it never really like a harsh sense of reality with him customarily but i could definitely see. I don't know if he's guys are fans of forty allen and general. I can see the kind of intellectual honesty in last black man i could see that i feel like what he is a precursor for that no one was writing intellectual romance movies reading intelligent comedies you know he came out and in with this you know now especially later films they're so visually beautiful and they're so confident and competent in their craftsmanship yeah that i i i imagine they saw blue jasmine and other wonderful city on display right and they went wow. This is a this is a beautiful place because sometimes right in front of you. You don't see us so. I don't just totally guessing but maybe they you know they were bored with it and they wanna leave somewhere. Maybe and they said that filming went away gonna gold mine. He also deals little magical realism. Always yeah always does is yeah blue. Jasmine is is harshly real about real things you know he made a movie called magic in the moonlight and it's totally far you know he he goes there. The blue jasmine is really brutal. Oh you know it's kind of a rehash of a tree carnal desire but with a great woody twist but san francisco is so on display in that film that if they didn't didn't they didn't particularly love that movie for any reason i bet you they were just happy. San francisco was featured on such a beautiful warm way in their city. Yeah i can see things yeah like when something horrible happens in ohio. It happens all the time and you're like oh man what happened in my state the stupid. Why does it happen anywhere. I have no particular killer catastrophe attachment ohio anymore. Just doesn't mean anything to me but for some reason you have those thoughts protective of where you are where you're from anyway and so yeah i i feel like i i mean i sent over the movie yeah and that's the thing that might be subliminal because the guys made a movie every year fifty years and he's in our culture. If you're a film person he's in the cultures church who are and what's funny about where he is that he's so around that i think he's under appreciated as an artist. <hes> people write him off as has like oh. He's just you know what are you doing with. What do you think he's making another woody allen movie and there's a shred of truth to that yesterday's repeat himself but he finds a way to reinvent it in my eyes. I don't i don't wanna be a woody apologised but i'd rather see a bad woody allen movie than most other things right there and so <hes> you know consciously or or not i feel like last black man owes a lot to the more mature nuanced beautiful sentimental movies about town because what he has mastered that absolutely uh-huh blue jasmine in particular but already <hes> member-state ghosts world. I was thinking about that as far as the buddy aspect. I was thinking like that's aww yeah and i'd like to hear what other ways but that was the the the way that i was almost thinking about using it as a puzzle piece because i feel like as far as the friendship is concerned. That's it's kind of closest friendship. I was thinking of the thing is they just adds kind of hard to put into words that they just kind of feel the same like how their shots the music how the light choices the center of characters the buddy aspect of it the kind of dry comedy the layers of surrealism they audits it all fits and then third birch popped up shore holy shit because i was thinking about goes world as i was watching the first time and then she has a cameo and i was like oh yeah this goes world. I mean terry's awad golf is a wonderful filmmaker doesn't make enough movies fan of crime and i watched like once a year with my brother like we have a weird krim thing everyone check out the chrome episode of awesome movie. That just came out gave an opportunity for yeah. There's kind of this like i watched. I've watched goes world a lot. You have a great little story about that. I basically i went to i found out that you can rent movies for free from the library when young loophole yeah because i was spending a lot of my parent's money isn't kid and they would like it was the every day it was like. Can i go to the ball echoed blockbuster hollywood video and sometimes they said yes most of the time they said no and i was really getting tired of it so i found out that you can go to the library and rent movies and so i started renting every move possibly get from the library and got ghost world but it's founded and i rented it and got it and i watched it and i was floored by it but i only experienced it on its surface and there's so much more there yeah the pants on on the road. That's expressionist a funny thing you know he's yeah the seymour the character by steve shamans wearing those jeans yeah they're gone off the sidewalk her out of the bus that's out of a out of commission and the guy sits on the bus. He's always waiting for it and the bus finally come all these big wonderful surrealistic gesture. I gotta watch that again. It's been a while yeah. It's funny because it says the bus says not in service on the bench but the guy sits in the center of it and it just just says notice. It's layered man. It's layered i. It's a really great film and there's something about this. Seeming normality of the movie that i like about ghosts world is kind of like about punks like this punky subculture. We're last black means about this skater culture. Yeah never really about it but just that's who they are running. That's kind of that's who they're that's how they're being represented and so it's about these normal things that you don't necessarily the associated with poetic filmmaking and yet we kind of dig in and find something more abstract more poetic about it yeah and yeah. There's just kind of a a feeling about those movies that are similar friends. Don't end up together and that's another thing. I felt was similar but yeah. I don't know if it's conscious or not but i could definitely definitely a lot of parallels between goes. World messed absolutely almost had it on my list there you go. That's a great film. I love goes and i think there's only one more which is george washington awesome okay. George washington is a great little movie a very low budget one of those lightning in a bottle movies. I think that's part of the reason why hi it's connected to it in my eyes is that you know has every reason not to succeed because as a little budget and not that much fanfare and yet it has a lot of powerful elements to it that make it rise to the top. It's about kind of you know it's again. It's kind of goes back to the terrence. Malick thing i think george washington owes a lot to the terrence malick <hes> floaty ethereal kind of sparse story poetic voice ovary vibe and not that last black has has all of those things but they they just share things about it and it's about <hes> again about more about the people in the place then like a concrete plot <hes> to has a lot to do my kind of a modern vibe with that terry malick approach and i think that lasts black kinda has that feel too so those are all of them. That's all my puzzle pieces awesome well. Let's do the finished puzzle and then we'll get any closing thoughts okay so for the last black man in san francisco. We've got moonlight blind. Spotting the royal tenenbaums uh-huh florida project do the right thing paris texas atlanta killer of sheep to sleep with anger curb your enthusiasm the work of james baldwin baldwin hood movies like friday boys in the hood menace to society woody allen movies like blue jasmine ghost world george washington. What do you got for yeah. <hes> it is a great great. I love all of those things so much. How could i not love the last black man san francisco seriously. I it's so true you know i <music>. I'm gonna actually go first with closing thoughts because when one other thing i wanted to mention you you're kind of touching on a little bit when talking about some of the toxic masculinity themes and stuff like that in the movie movie but one of the things i found so interesting about this movie is how you really don't know for practically the whole run time really is what exactly the relation gene is between these two guys the two main areas whether or not their friends or even lovers possibly or like i mean you know relatives or whatever i thought that was so interesting in <hes> <hes> you know especially in that you know that community you know you don't really see that kind of a friendship displayed and it's like such a such a close close friendship and so it's just so unique in film. I haven't really seen anything like that before and the black artist news an under is an under shown character. We have their hip. Hop artists sure we have that's big but we don't have the james baldwin figure yeah you know we i really don't have that very often and as far as i'm concerned every person no matter what skin color yeah you're allowed to like whatever you wanna like sure sure to have a playwright you know. Have someone play that role. I think and that's the thing is like i've heard another thing not not to harp on my friend tara but he mentioned that like if you got into that stuff not only were you look down upon for x._y._z. reason but it was also because you are assuming the white culture right right and we're becoming you know the uncle tom yeah thing which is such a weird happened. How do you navigate that. I just can't imagine that navigating that kind of like like judgment and i mean like just because you read a book. Even if it's written by a black man then it's like somehow that he sold out to the white may scare me. I can't even imagine how frustrating bizarre are anyhow just back scary. There is yeah but when i look at those characters and last black man i do not see white people i. I did not see why defied black characters. There's that one really subtle but wonderful part when he answers the door and his normal clothing dad's season is what are you doing terrific a white boy. The thing is that's something we didn't even talk about. This movie keeps opening itself up. There's layer after layer after layer of this wonderful movie but like yeah he changes. Here's his outfit on different glasses. Look more black yeah now. I don't know what the filmmakers think. I don't know if skateboarding is considered more white than black. I'm coming from a total place of privilege that i don't have to think about those things that i don't really know the nuance of those things. I don't know what's white and what isn't right. You know i have a very very simplistic view of quote unquote. What's black. I want a new. I want that to be more nuanced and so but as just as totally subjective viewer were when i look at those characters i saw them in the tradition of a baldwin. I saw them in the tradition of langston hughes. These are people that our founders of american art not american white art american black art you know we've white people stole rock and roll right right the black man i and so like this all intertwined the more we try to separate things the more we realize how many connective pieces of tissue there are how many strings are actually attached because it's all been morphed into one yeah but never for a second that i really did it dawn on me and this may be different for african american audience member but when i walked those characters i wasn't like man. They're acting white right now. It only hit me when that data the white dress like a white boy holy shit like i really kind of struck me right because they just throw it away. There's not like a big subplot about about that right and just to kind of touch on what you're saying. This movie is confident enough to not give us all the details yeah. That's the thing is this movie would be challenging..

san francisco woody allen george washington james baldwin louis ferdinand celine terrence malick Jasmine bob mukasa manhattan ohio spain france langston hughes hollywood skateboarding italy terry steve shamans texas tara
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Bookworm

"Is there? Really right moment. I think to be a black writer in America. I mean, I'm my book and my work because I trained as literary critic are always kind of into with what historical legacies have offered us. And so there's a generation right before me. The postal black writers who have made such a huge difference in my own writing practice and interest people like Matt Johnson victim of all and Paul bady Colson Whitehead and who in some ways helped me remember that I can do certain things in my writing the the playfulness their interest in form their interest in structure is kind of a revisiting of what older black writers like Ishmael Reed. Who also seriously influenced me did as well. But right now, they're just so many young debuts. And I feel like we have a cohort again in the same way that those men must have felt that they had a cohort together, you know, like fifteen years ago on Nana Kwami on is writing wonderful stuff his collection. Friday black. Jemele Brinkley also had a collection. Alexia Arthur's had a great sort story collection just for black short fiction alone. It's been an amazing time to come out with a book, and we've all supported each other not just the black writers, but writers of color more. Generally on crystal handed, Kim Reese, Kwan, we've all done as much as we could to promote each other's work. So happy to hear you mentioning Schmil read because there are many Reuters who are angry at him. But when mumbo jumbo came out, John Barth, who was my writing teacher, recommended that we all read it. I think he's great and not only that but he was born in buffalo. So he had a special relevance to those of us who are going to school in buffalo. Now. Impotent cure women were angry at Ishmael Reed. He. Handled law of strong attitudes against black feminism, do you have feelings about him in that regard? I hate to say that I'm a little bit ignorant of his views on black feminism. And I might unfortunately have to revise some of what I'm saying about. I mean, it wouldn't be a revision that his work has heavily influenced mine, it I felt like gave me permission to do certain things with form I haven't dug deeply into the personal and sort of politics behind Ishmael Reed. Personally, I've always liked both read and the people who criticize him held you work through within the writing community the difficulties that people have knowing about kinds of life that they just did not grow up with. Yeah. I think there are multiple ways that that can go, and I have multiple feelings about it. Depending. On the context. I mean, black writers have always clashed with each other just as any other kinds of writers have think about Harlem renaissance writers didn't agree about representation. Oriental hurston Richard Wright had lots of issues with each other's representation to mention James Baldwin Baldwin. Yeah. And so none of that's new. I think we're in a moment of cancel culture, where people say like, oh, we'll that person has cancelled what's to sort of gloss over everything they've ever done in never speak of them again, which doesn't help people change some people are unwilling to change. But if we're talking about my own peers who are black writers who are making perhaps a mistake that I find unethical. I think that's an opportunity to confront discuss figure out a way to move forward. If we're talking about white writers who were sort of writing on ethically about black people have different feelings about what the actionable plan should be then whether or not it's my responsibility to engage that I feel differently about you know, who's doing the writing while. It's very interesting question because so many people when James Baldwin wrote Giovanni is room would say to me. Well, michael. You're a aren't you? What do you think of Giovanni is room? And I thought. I don't think of Giovanni is room as a gay, man. I think of Giovanni is room as reader, and my admiration for it is enormous and deep, and I think it's a profound and unpredictable bulk who would have thought that this book even could be written and published when it was written and published and we all have to be it seems to me grateful every time of barriers broken. Grateful. Yes, I think we can also be highly critical of how we're still breaking barriers twenty nineteen. I think that there should have all been broken by many many years ago. Yeah. I think that you always have to temper that gratitude with how do we keep moving forward? And why has it taken this long problem touching it? I'm speaking to Nafisa Thompson spires of 'bout her book heads of the colored people. It's a book of stories, and I'm curious here. Do you ever feel like you've gone to four I've wondered about going too, far, I'm generally anxious person and having Zaidi disorder. So those two things don't always work. So well with writing knowing what boundaries might look like. Notable. Even just sitting here talking to you. I'm wondering which of these questions, should I not be asking are too personal to me or to you. And I think self editing part of a good writing life and being critically engaged with work means that you're doing that stuff. Mentally all the time for me. I had questions about responsible representation I've been thinking a lot in my teaching and writing about ethical writing. What is it mean to be a responsible literary citizen, and I was concerned about one of my stories that deals with disability? I live with a disability. But it's invisible I live with chronic illness, and as I said anxiety disorder. I don't feel like I can claim the term disability. So instead, I talk about it in terms of chronic illness. And I just did a panel about this at eight p were all of relieving with chronic illness in we felt that we can't claim disability in the same way. So one of my stories has a woman who's fetish ising. These black men who live with amputations called this Todd and Todd is her pejorative term for the men live. With amputations, and I was very concerned that even though it's the typical and you're clearly not supposed to identify with Kim's gays. You're supposed to immediately pushed back against it that some people wouldn't recognize it as satire in that. Even if they recognized it that showing someone doing this harm is still reproducing. The harm was my concern. So I talked to sensitivity reader about the story. I also talked to my editor and agent about it, and whether we should pull it, and then I wrote another story about the fetish and that gays from the perspective of one of the men who had been fetish is one of the men living with amputation. So that he could sort of answer back to Kim and give his own narrative. And I did that as a way of I think trying to make sure that all together the representation is responsible, but I still living Zaidi about whether it went too far or doesn't go far enough. And again reproduces the thing that I'm trying to criticize I'm Michael silver. You're listening to bookworm from the studios of KCRW. I'm talking with the fees attempts inspires about her new book heads of the colored people. It's from atrial books will continue after the short break. This week on Las notes, we'll introduce this is an Chani an avant garde since composer. But you already know her work Coca Cola, pop and pork.

Ishmael Reed writer Kim Reese Giovanni James Baldwin Baldwin Zaidi Michael silver Nana Kwami buffalo Matt Johnson Paul bady Colson Whitehead Reuters John Barth KCRW America Jemele Brinkley Alexia Arthur Harlem Nafisa Thompson Todd
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

14:15 min | 1 year ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on KCRW

"Up a book of stories, quote heads of the colored people, and I started to read it. I just. Flipped. It seemed to me to be so modern so of today so full of things that I don't know that I wanted to interview feces Thompson spires. That's Thompson hyphen spires. We're going to hear the first. Two pages in paragraph of that first story it has an amazing title. Heads of the code people for fancy sketches to chalk out wines. And no apology. Take it away. One Riley were blue contact lenses and his hair which he worked with Joe and blow dryer and a flat iron some mornings into sonic, the hedgehog, spike. So stiff you prick your finger on them and sometimes into a wispy side swooped Bob with long banks, and he was black. But this wasn't any kind of south hatred thing. He'd read the bluest eye an invisible man in school and even picked up disgruntled at a book fair, and yes, they were good. And there was some residents in those books for him. But this story isn't about race or the shame of being alive or any of those things he was not self hating. He was even listening to Drake though, you could make up if his appreciation for music changes something for you because all relevant here is that he wasn't against the music of his people or anything like that. As he walked down Figueroa with his ear buds pushed in just far enough. So as not to feel itchy Riley was wearing the wispy swooped version of his bangs and listening to Drake or. And he was black with blue contacts and bleach blonde hair. And yes, there are black people who have both of those things naturally without the use of artificial accoutrements. So we can move past the whole pheno typically this or biologically that discussion to the meat of things. And if there's something meta in this narrators consciousness and self consciousness, or this overindulgent aside, it isn't meta for the sake of being meta. This narrators consciousness is just letting you know about said consciousness up front like a raised black fist to get the close. Reading out of the way and make space for Riley who is the kind of black man for whom blue eyes, and blond hair were not natural. He was the kind of lack that warranted or invited without solicitation comparisons to drinks from Starbucks or lyrics from lady marmalade or chocolate bars with nuts. You would think with his blue contacts and unnaturally blonde hair set against dark chocolate mocha chocolate, Thai skin. And yes, there's some judgment in the use of you that Riley would date white or Asian women exclusively or perhaps that he liked men. But you'd be wrong on all counts as Riley was straight, and he dated widely among black women, and he was neither in denial nor on the down low nor like John Mayer, equal opportunity and United colors of Benetton in life. But a separate as the fingers of the hand in sex, nor like Frederick Douglass or many others working on black rights in public and going home to a white wife, and there's no judgment against Douglas here just facts for the sake of descriptive clarity. Riley liked black women, both their blackness and woman and the overlap between those contracts, nor was Riley queer phobic or the type of man to utter no homo in uncomfortable situations because Riley was comfortable enough. If enough expresses a sort of educated awareness, there's so much awareness in these two. Paragraphs that I've hardly made space for Riley who in addition to black women liked 'cause play dressing up as characters from his favorite books and movies, and Dr Who and Rony pension and the comic love convention, and especially death note, his favorite manga and anime series. And though that day he was dressed as per his girlfriend's request in a skinny Perry. Winkle suit with a skinny black tie his appearance gave him the flexibility to on other occasions dresses, keesa Utah or Naruto or if he was feeling a specially bold super say. That's. Feces thompson. Spires. Her book is heads of the colored people. I was once a public relations Representative, and I represented a dancer who's dancer name, which do he danced with Madonna and he wore blue contact lenses, and I haven't seen the do forever. I met his wife. Tell me what it means for black man to be wearing contact lenses and have died hair. I think a lot of people would expect that a black man who whereas contact lenses of different color might be worried about some sort of self hatred might want to look whiter, whatever that means might not feel that his pheno. Typically, black features are. Received as attractive enough or might just be perceived as someone who's really flamboyant and perhaps gay because of that. And I was interested in writing character who wasn't any of those things and in these stories. Disappointing expectation seems to be at the heart of you're not going to give us a character. Who? Blue-eyed and black is gay. You're trying to catch the human being at the heart of all the characteristics and finding out what's human about. A character is one of the writers primary instincts and responsibilities. How did you know when you caught it that question? It took a lot of work. This story actually came to me as voice Riley, war, blue context, and his hair was the first line. And that line was sort of haunting me for a long time. When that happens, I feel compelled to write it and just follow it where it will take me. So I mostly wrote the story through free rights just playing around with this character in this line and the repetition, and it kind of becomes the cadence of the story, but I found that what I was most interested in was the larger story about who gets access to certain kinds of storytelling. And the stories quite mad. I it's it's really concerned with the idea that there's no perfect victim, especially when we're talking about police brutality and state-sanctioned violence against black people. And so this whole setup is that Riley is is about as perfect as black man can be and yet this terrible tragic thing happens to him. And I think when I realized that I knew I had captured the humanity empathy. Do you think? The seem to me at any rate to be a ho scale of stories from the first one, which was to my mind. But again, I'm not known. But the character seemed very eccentric to me to the last one with the character, a single mother nurse. Who's had a baby is dealing with the terrors that she faces on her job at home with her own child. She has night terrors. None of the. Lighter than air surprises in the first story are still there in the last story did this book, take you on a particular narrative vector, it did I felt like I knew I wanted to write about police brutality, but in a different way than just sort of direct realism. And that story is actually the only one that I would call direct realism in the whole collection. Most of them are satirical. Most of them are darkly funny, but wash clean the bones. The last one to me seemed like a way of completing everything bringing together all the themes that I was interested in revisiting. The vulnerability of black people in black bodies, but doing so in a way that didn't allow you the kind of a scape or release of pressure. That laughter might have in the first story. I been. Happy on occasion to tell some show that a story made me cry and that funnel story did make me cry this year at the time spoke festival, there's a large number of African American writers. And I decided this year that those are the people that I would interview 'cause I've noticed over these last years that often is not publishers don't send riders on tour. They send us all kinds of writers. But they think that Los Angeles isn't the city to send black riders to. And so I was very excited to read these stories, and when I did I realized how much I don't know, especially your stories, I think because of the off. Thor's coming. Jones and Terrance Hayes. You're probably the youngest of the writers. Tell me for you. What it's like to be a black writer right now in America. Really? Ripe moment. I think to be a black writer in America. I mean, I'm my book and my work because I trained as literary critic are always kind of in tune with what historical legacies have offered us. And so there's a generation right before me. The postal black writers who have made such a huge difference in my own writing practice and interest people like Johnson victims of all and Paul Beatty Colson Whitehead and who in some ways helped me remember that I can do certain things, and I writing the playfulness their interest in form their interest in structure is kind of a revisiting of what older black writers like Ishmael Reed who also seriously influenced me date as well. But right now, they're just so many young debuts. And I feel like we have a cohort again in the same way that those men must have felt that they had a cohort together. You know, fifteen years ago, not a Kwami on is writing wonderful his collection Friday. Black Brinkley also had a collection Alexia Arthur's had a great story collection just for black short fiction alone. It's been an amazing time to come out with a book and we've all supported each other. Not just the black writers, but writers of color more generally on crystal handed, Chem, and Reese Kwan, we've all. Done as much as we could to promote each other's work. I'm so happy to hear you mentioning Schmil read because there are many writers who are angry at him. But when mumbo jumbo came out, John Barth, who was my writing teacher, recommended that we all read it. I think he's great and not only that but he was born in buffalo. So he had a special relevance to those of us who are going to school in buffalo. Now in particular, women were angry at Ishmael Reed. He had alone of strong at itunes against black feminism, do you have feelings about him in that regard. I hate to say that I'm a little bit ignorant of his views on black feminism. And I might unfortunately have to revise some of what I'm saying about. I mean, it wouldn't be a revision that his work has heavily influenced mine, I gave me permission to do certain things with form I haven't dug deeply into the purse. And sort of politics behind Ishmael Reed personally. I've always liked both read and the people who criticize him held you work through within the writing community the difficulties that people have knowing about kinds of life that they just did not grow up with. Yeah. I think there are multiple ways that that can go, and I have no feelings about it. Depending on the context, I mean, black writers have always clashed with each other just as any other kinds of writers have for about Harlem renaissance writers didn't agree about representation. Orono hurston Richard Wright had lots of issues with each other's representation to mention James Baldwin Baldwin. And so none of that new. I think we're at a moment of cancel culture, where people say, oh that person has cancelled what's just sort of gloss over everything they've ever done in never speak of them again, which doesn't help people change some people are unwilling to change. But if we're talking about my own peers who are black writers who are making perhaps a mistake that I find unethical. I think that's an opportunity to confront discuss figure out a way to move forward. We're talking about white writers who were sort of writing on ethically about black people have different feelings about what the actionable plan should be then whether or not it's my responsibility to engage that I feel differently about. You know, who's doing the writing? Well, it's very interesting question because so many people when James Baldwin wrote Giovanni is room would say to me. Well, Michael,.

Riley Ishmael Reed writer Black Brinkley Thompson Dr Who James Baldwin Baldwin Bob Starbucks Frederick Douglass Drake Joe solicitation John Mayer Figueroa Los Angeles John Barth Harlem Perry Winkle
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on Minority Korner

"Birthday to your happy birthday to your happy. They James Baldwin Baldwin. He I love James Baldwin definite. He doesn't give enough credit that I think you know what I feel like for me, I can't believe I'm not talking about James Baldwin like we've reference them on the show, but I have done not done a full segment about James Baldwin. Oh, he's amazing. Just as a tidbit, you should check out the it's on YouTube, but he's invited to Oxford and he does a debate. Yeah. With the team four -firmative is it affirmative action or the plight of black people? Basically, I think it's the play of, I think it's the plight of black people, and it is amazing his word magic. He gets like a standing ovation at the end of it. He deserved it because he is genius. He's such a, he's such a genius for those of you who don't know who James Baldwin is not known any shaded to you, but welcome to the partee. For those who don't know who she was Baldwin is he's born in nineteen twenty four in New York City. He grew up in Harlem which swear I'm living right now. This new, his middle name. Middle name is Arthur. Oh, wow. Check that out. James Arthur Baldwin or James Arthur Martin were like practically twins. Yeah, I, he published the novel, go Todd on the mountain in nineteen fifty three and he got like you just he was the. He was capturing as the negro voice of the times I, he wrote Giovanni is room with she. Avantis room is huge. It's a landmark book because it was the first time anyone was writing about homosexuality in the way that he did well, like essentially pave the way for just gay literature, engaged stories being out in the mainstream. It was a very dangerous book for him to riot believe you wrote in the lift late fifties. I'm the I, I did a show called waiting for Giovanni. It was my first. It was a new work. We did at new conservatory theatre center. It was the first professional theatre company production I ever got to work on and they just had their east coast premiere out here, New York a week ago and a two weeks ago. And it was kind of a cool for circle moment for me because they're Tissot director from new conservatory theatre center come out, came out. The writer was out like, oh, a passing of the baton. Like I started in San Francisco at the show, and now here I am in New York trading that, yeah, yeah. Yeah. He also wrote essays on works like notes on native son, which Richard Wright wrote about the fire. Next time. He was really good friends with Lorraine hands berry was like in that time period, he was like, you know, a little bit ahead of like martinsville king and Malcolm x..

James Arthur Baldwin James Baldwin Baldwin Giovanni James Arthur Martin New York City New York Richard Wright YouTube Todd Arthur Harlem Oxford San Francisco director Lorraine writer Malcolm two weeks
"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"james baldwin baldwin" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Over fifty years, right fifty, plus years, Corey Music has. Been my life your life, I've? Never had another job Talk about because you've been able to work with giants and really. You, considered one of the elder statesmen in his bills, lamb elder, well I'm just saying. That from the standpoint of video you mean but you have worked would the great talk about some of the people that you talked about seeing Jackie Wilson is seeing the forerunners to this music that we. Love so much and. Others performers fortunate enough to see the original. I contain internal review the Isaac Hayes. Review the Barry white review In its entirety and, what that does for you You you. Get to understand what performing is really all about you learn that from from playing places And post places like chitlins circuit would would they literally shoot the lights out you know. The gigs over that particular, point and you have to fight out some girl's. Boyfriend thinks you're cute and in. In the in the boyfriend thinks you think you're cute than this she's always gonna find you this, this is, going to it's going to happen and you have. All these different scenarios going on simultaneously but you're you're. Learning how to communicate with an audience You're learning on the job as you go you get better at what you do in fortunately I, was the, next band I was in was was abandoned Head prerequisites like you had to I had to be able to learn to write music right and you had to learn how to plant. Instrument that was making a difference if you saying that you're gonna, have to play because it wasn't like wasn't like a forty five, minute on our show we did, four different sets every night who is like hard work but you do hone your skills when you when. You do that you hung your your people skills you're you community, skills with with with the from from audience. To, to artists and all that you you you learn how to Quilliam fears and, all, that you have to you. Have to really be come somebody else. Become all the view of your alter ego and we all have, one of as you well know. So you have to embrace you all to ego and let that go and let that be an extension of who you are so. The whole process becomes becoming all that. You are turning so then once you do that you, can? Accept all everybody else is in so you don't have a whole lot to be mad about those things talk about it from your perspective because they call the show business in London saying a lot. Of them forgot the business part was integral to it looking back, at it in the early days where the artistry was you had, to play an instrument I heard, Tina Turner given interview for the first time I listen to her talk about I being such a perfectionist. In an instrument he I loved the art of the music sure but a lot. Of people got screwed doing these, particularly when you when you when you do. Something that you would do for free right you just happy to be. Able to do it right you so thrilled to be able to do it, in this such an exciting business. Conceptually when you think of it so. You you're so entrenched by that you forget the business partner you, knew you feel you feel like. You actually compromise anything you ready to compromise already but you don't think of people here's the thing you have to understand about our. Culture We inherently compassionate turn 'em we're that means that we're inheriting hurriedly forgiving as a culture that means. That we're in some portion of of of us is inherently fair so we kind of, expect that of other human beings. Especially those who claim to be superior to us right So so when you think of it from that standpoint. It's it's the same thing as it is today everybody, that says they wrote a song didn't write it right So it's it's it's the same thing that faces have changed Exactly exactly. As I do, that on the show from time to time And, also, if, you, talk, to, people you. Can call them up four four. Eight nine two two seven zero three I did a few months back we were talking about the early days with Little Richard Wright and how the rigid told the story that every time he would. Actually write a song that they will give it. To. Pat. Boone exactly we go back and pull all of those songs Right They were phenomenal hits the dominant. Culture, right, right It's taboo was the man he would demand and but the. Registered lucky I got to come up with south that egg. Is mad still best. At all of these extras Zimbabwe beluga the. Bob now he won't be able to say that so when, you hear past, said you literally bus out laughing Larry's is, hilarious but that's that. Was his way of saying I got it though something in this day that people will say when. They, hear me say it can only be mine well one of the reasons I wanted to get into this band that I got into it was in my hometown is very fortunate that they, were there in that they were already making. Records and then it had some success. In, Europe We had to go to Europe I mean it wasn't just James Baldwin Baldwin in was that they had to go but but here's, a Europe and I the music for them So they had some success had a number one record in, in the UK right and they were, from Greenville South Carolina The most. Famous on famous ban on. The planet the biggest program you could do back then on television was called. The. Midnight special we did it, three times I, mean. We were I mean think about that you talking. About what years this roughly Jesus the sixties sixties Laborde from Greenville's zap jetliner is. Traveling across the pond correct Almost unheard of well here's, the, thing, you got to you have to. Understand something about that I mean it's, it's My boss his. Name is Moses. Moses, Dillard get virtuoso one of full ride state playing flight of the Bumblebee. An open, tuning guitar One of the two geniuses, with a guitar but There's a, song I'm your puppet. James and Bobby You're on the on that record it says that. The guy Don. Schroeder wrote it The show to can't play Mary had a little lamb he didn't write anything Moses wrote that song in that same. Knowing the business thing was is what you're talking about is what that situation. Was wasn't the first time only time he, wrote something that I knew he wrote he wrote it right in somebody else's name ended up on it and his thing that was a. Black white thing at that particular. Point where you know I have to own it Now you write it And I'll and I'll make certain that you're. Taking care right Oh, you never going to get taken care of, first? Of all the record deal is a really bad deal. Right you'd think, about what it is it is you get if you fortunate you get fifteen to twenty percent A record sales but. That's you don't, get penny one until they recouped But they spent certainly before, you? Get first penny, of anything and they get to do the books right Bracket I mean Why even now I. Love these I'm going to take on that because, they say and we ain't going wing on. Do that no more. On own it. Be controlled ownership is everything control the mean of distribution, and everything but they. Should not they should also if you go to, write it you write. It right don't don't be black during the during, the the the. White, crime, nine, four, eight, nine, two, two, seven. Zero three all of the Lonzo filling up would for. People Bryson he has a new, joint out I mean is coming out drops, on Friday but you audit now you can audit now don't tell you how you can get the album wants you to go out sixty. Seven years strong brother is still going. Going strong and Oh. I go tell somebody told me you'd new I'm Of my little. Boy Got. A brand new baby y'all It's too bad what. A blessing, it's a great blessing and yeah that's.

Moses Europe James Baldwin Baldwin Barry white Isaac Hayes Corey Music Bobby You Jackie Wilson Tina Turner Greenville Lonzo Zimbabwe partner Bob Bryson London Richard Wright Boone Pat Don