19 Burst results for "James Audubon"

"james audubon" Discussed on Dirty Bird Podcast

Dirty Bird Podcast

06:44 min | Last month

"james audubon" Discussed on Dirty Bird Podcast

"The reason just pepsi from above and frogs are a big part of their diet. A bitterns seem to love eating frogs In addition to that they also eat fish as i mentioned also leeches snails beatles. The pretty never s and to show you just what specialists these guys are. Thick dense barrage lease spinner having unique ability to compress their body tight squeeze between even the densest marsh growth in almost a weird inverted version of limbo. John james audubon actually tested this out tested. How can they go. He had some least bitterns and he stacked books and unsolved how narrow he could make it between the books and still have the better walk between it. He gradually reduced space between into the books. Were no more than an inch. Apart and least bitterns was still able to squeeze through. I found another coal feeding strategy of the least bitterns This one is reported from bass lake in michigan where observer noticed a lease bitten male and female spreading their wings over the water and stabbing their beaks down into the shadow that their rings made this. Feeding strategy of using shade to attract prey is called canopy feeding and it has been observed in other birds to such as the black hair and in africa. I really liked the description of this guy that they give A certain george sutton of ithaca new york he gives the feeding of the least bitterns and describes it as catlike hunters who peer intently at their prey and flick their tails side to side. Similar to how you see a house cat curl lashes tail so i do really like the description like these birds. Almost catlike as the anticipate pouncing on some fish one more strange thing about the feeding of least bitterns founded account from eighteen seventy six in belmont massachusetts where the stomach of shot mail. These bidder was found to be crammed with nothing but cotton wool. I don't know why was eating cottam wool but it did. And then it got shot so not a good day for that lease bettern the feeding strategy. The american bidder is similar to that of a mini great blue heron. They are often observed waiting slowly through the water searching for food or standing motionless waiting for prey item to swim by and the are pretty opportunistic. Hunters they'll you know almost anything that will fit down there bell. Small fish aquatic invertebrates. Crustaceans and frogs. Make up a big party diet. Bigger vertebrates like lizards and mice have also found their stomach contents similar to the great blue herron when the american bitterns captures particularly large or feisty. Critter bash against the law to weaken it before swallowing it. Whole a lot of these foods contain a lot of bones and shells and american businesses. Actually regurgitate pellets. Backup of indigestible material. Some other way. Owls and falcons do. I did find a study. That measured the ph of american bitterns Infound ahead of around one point six five to one point eight six which is actually lower. Meaning more acidic than that of owls and falcons. The paper really know what to make of it. A i don't know what to make of it but they got some pretty strong acid there. I found an account from harney county oregon where an american veteran was found in a state of distress with a garter snake coiled around its leg inviting its neck now. There's no way a garter snake was trying to eat an american bidder But what probably happened is the american than was a bit too ambitious attack this large garter snake who found the attempt being eaten very obnoxious and proceeded to attack the american bitterns back. Don't worry both animals pried apart. Although the american bidder appeared very exhausted in shaken up by the whole affair next time don't try to eat such a large frequent snake. Stick to some fish. Now let's listen to some bitterns salads As already heard the american bitterns in particularly has some distinctive impressive salads the a classic three syllable song to attract mason defend territory that has been described by many writers over the years as i mentioned. The opener is being compared to everything from a rusty water pomp to a steak being hammered into a bog. in fact it's so reminiscent of a water pump that when a male american bidder is singing. He said to be pumping how it makes this. Incredible sound is a bit of a mystery but certainly involves considerable effort on the bitterns part the male bidder. Rose's head forward in a jerk while opening and closing the bill. He pretty a couple initial soft plunking. Sounds i before finally given the full three part song see if you can pick them out in this recording the motion actually looks kinda fall and is described as resembling a patient with uncontrollable nausea while pumping the net can be observed. Puffing up with air like a bullfrog the american bitterns anatomy lands of few hints to how he produces a song. when breeding season approaches male. Bitterns bodies change to the skin around their throat becomes thickened with muscles gelatinous tissue in the blood supply increases. They also have special tissue. At the back of their mouths that thickens this tissue acts like a cork stopper to keep air from escaping from their mouth or nostrils whether asaf against dilates with retained air. Now that extra muscles and gelatinous tissue and blood supply that arrived. They're kind of helps with this. Dilation where the air comes from though is a bit of a debate some people think that while the american bidders doing kind of all that bills goping he's basically like sucking air down It's a little hard to believe how others think that he's actually blowing against his close to bill to force air from its trachea into a sa- safa gifts. I mean when you think about it. The american bitterns are basically burping to.

george sutton cottam John james audubon bass lake falcons pepsi ithaca belmont herron harney county michigan massachusetts africa Owls bell new york oregon mason nausea Rose
"james audubon" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:06 min | 3 months ago

"james audubon" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"House breaks have been Asian. We're hoping that somebody will see this individual recognize him and they'll give us a call the DEA, adding that it is very unlikely that all five homes would just happened to be Asian families in a diverse city like Newton. There are no firm answers. Yet there is concern, which is why police along with the mayor, they're both holding a community meeting tonight that will be be assumed. Break into Newton happened between June 13th in July. 10th on Walnut Street. Also dead on ST Helene Road, Quinault Beckon Road and Country Club Road. Anyone with information should call Newton police. Six year old Asian boy is slapped in Las Vegas, Nevada, CBS's or Kamanda says authorities have now made a hate crime arrest and allegedly racist rampage caught on camera, a California mother posting this video to Tiktok saying the woman seen here hit her six year old son and yelled anti Asian statements. China they again You can hear the woman say something about China. This all unfolded last week at the shops at crystals on the Las Vegas Strip Metro police arresting 57 year old Shelly Ann Hill days later on hate crime and battery charges. The president of the Las Vegas Asian Chamber of Commerce, says people will always be held accountable for their actions. Audubon Society chapters are now grappling with how exactly to address their namesakes legacy as the nation continues to reckon with his racist past. John James Audubon was a celebrated 19th century naturalist, but he was also a slaveholder publicly opposed to abolition. The Massachusetts chapter of the Conservation group has published an essay on autobahns life and pledged to improve staff diversity. It also wants to open more wildlife sanctuaries and communities of color that move cames comes as a Sierra Club, also the Nature Conservancy and other major green groups. Attempt to atone for the conservation movements, historic racism and continue lack of diversity. Social networks are now struggling to shut down racist messages and posts after England's Euro Cup final loss Here's more from CNN editor at large Ian share for now. Unfortunately, this is just the latest in what is becoming along and never ending string of awful examples about how social media has made the lives of people who touch it worse, and that's not what any of us want again that was seen an editor at large, Ian Sheer reporting. It is 10 38. Time now for Bloomberg business. Here's an Kate's. Do you know how much time do you spend on your phone, texting, talking, browsing or playing video games? A. J. D Power study finds the average U. S Wireless customer spends 110 minutes a day using their mobile device that is up five minutes since the beginning of the year. Fishermen are collecting fewer scallops off the East Coast. The 2019 harvest with £60 million. But last year, the scallop crop was just over £43 million. On Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average off by 16 points the NASDAQ Down 60, the S and P. 500 down 11. I'm Dan Cates Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's news radio. It's 10 39. Millions of parents could see some extra money in their bank.

Shelly Ann Hill John James Audubon Dan Cates Ian Sheer Walnut Street ST Helene Road 16 points June 13th CNN 19th century £60 million U. S Wireless Bloomberg Newton Quinault Beckon Road Nature Conservancy last year July. 10th Sierra Club 2019
"james audubon" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:18 min | 4 months ago

"james audubon" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"That's a tough one. I know that dogs and cats are asking for all portraits of Bob Barker be removed in the world, but very good, sir. I'm going to say bees. No, I'm sorry. Birds are now racist. This a story from National Public radio. Our relationship with nature often begins with a name. It's an introduction that tells us something about the animal like spotted turtle gray tree frog or yellow bellied sap sucker. In many cases, that creature's name is not a window into its natural history. But a remnant of our own. But America is trying to come to terms with its complicated racial past by changing the names of institutions ranging from military bases two baseball teams now efforts are also underway to change the names of some living monuments. Birds. When early naturalists like John James Audubon discovered a new bird, for example, they often named it after a friend or colleague. There's Wilson's warbler, Swanson's warbler in Kirtland warbler. Lists. Ken Kaufman, author of several birding field guides. You've got noodles, woodpecker castles, Vario castles, Auckland and then there's Battery Sparrow and Bachman's Sparrow. Kaufman, like many birders hadn't paid much attention to the people behind the bird names that is Until last year, when he learned more about that last guy on his list. John Bachman was a Lutheran minister in South Carolina. He says he also fancied himself a scientist and part of what he wrote about was suggesting that whites were just naturally superior to member of members of other races. He says Bachmann's theories supported efforts to justify slavery. Once you start realizing that kind of thing about these historical characters, said Kaufman, the bird takes on a more sinister tone. He's saying this with a straight face and national public radio is giving him a national platform. This. The story goes on. This is just too good not to read. It's a tone that birding activists are trying to change. Jordan Rudder. A young birder from Washington, D. C is co founder of Bird Names for Birds. A group trying to make birding more inclusive by removing all economist spurred names that is those named after people runner. In August, 2020 petitioned the American Ornithological Society, the body that determines the names of birds to take up the cause. We call these bird names, verbal statues, Rutter says, because so many of them truly are honoring folks that were involved in Colonial and Confederate times. I am not making this up. Birds are now racist at National Public Radio did a lengthy story about it because two dudes apparently think birds are racist. All right, Andrew, you are doing great. So far. You're one for two. Guess what's racist North America, South America or Central America? South America. Oh, I'm sorry. Sometimes the obvious answer isn't the correct one. Although in a way, you are sort of correct.

John James Audubon Jordan Rudder John Bachman Andrew Bob Barker August, 2020 Ken Kaufman Central America Washington, D. C South Carolina Bachmann Bird Names for Birds South America North America American Ornithological Societ two Rutter National Public Radio Kaufman Auckland
"james audubon" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"You want to register for that. Just go too low at a raider galleries dot com or in from at radar live dot com. I love that Graham, a raider live dot com. And I'm going to give you a telephone number everybody in and I'll repeat it. Later In the interview, 215. 73 thought 88 11 to 15735 88 11 to be able to speak with someone of Graham's organizations registered for that wonderful auction. Congratulations, Graham. As soon as I got the press release and looked at the catalog online, I knew I had to have you back on again. So thank you for coming back just a week. Before the auction that I categorize that right where there's something for everybody here, and it's basically a World history court. About the discovery of you know our globe and how that is ongoing. And so many of these pieces of grief for 100 years old, but you make me feel like we're still a work in progress with discovery. But these are such important talismanic artifacts may be ableto have to be able to concern for a period of time. To be able to own my going in the right direction with that on when you as always have a very fine understanding of what it is. I'm doing what my passion is. And what the focus of the Clements Library is at the University of Michigan. So, Yeah, You're right on part. I'm impressed. Yeah. If I mean you've been involved in this for so long when you were at Yale, you actually I mean, I'm sure you enjoy your studies and sports and all that, but hear squash, winter and And and other things, but you began dealing out of your room in and in natural history and maps. Early on, And so I guess the obvious first question. I know. I asked last time you're on like, what was the spark that diverted you intimate with somebody? Did you grow up with beautiful pieces around you where you introduce her? I know Dr Seymour Schwartz. Was a huge mentor to you. We're going to talk about him because you're often Israeli in homage to Dr Sweets. What was the spark? If you can identify it that has led you on this path that you've never deviated from? Well, the spark that really Became something that was just Irresistible for me was seeing in the Yale exhibition case. The Johan Royce map of the world, um, published in Rome in 15 away. Showing Newfoundland connected to two that I couldn't believe it. They thought that you know that the the new world was the Indians. Of the Spice Trade, You know, Maze closed pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg. Grand, so they thought that Newfoundland was connected to Asia. And I just thought, Wow, that's incredible. And, of course, It was a very happy day for me. When? 40 years ago, the Clemens library sold me their duplicates of the Royce map, which I now have in this sale, so very exciting actually to the emerging Michigan. And I couldn't believe it. There's something so significant and so important. It actually exists so that that's the spark. I think there's something to this that goes beyond academics and just the love of history. I mean, the absolute need, I think to be able to touch The surviving artifacts. And maybe you have a similar viewpoint that I have always had. You know, the more that I get to know these things. The closer the Tottenham seemed to shrink. I mean, I I don't I don't feel as if I lived Stratosphere is away from the period. I feel like it was just yesterday. And we're still learning and that there was still a relevant in this hard charging world to these pieces, and still part and parcel of our makeup of maybe even our subconscious thought. And you deal with them all the time. What a pleasure. I mean, I've had the honor of being able to visit you and your family Your home on Madison Avenue in one of those beautiful town houses in New York City. We've got galleries there on the ground floor. 10, the second floor. But to be able to see the autobahn Prince and I'm looking at some of the great ones in the auction right now. Which you have been able to get pre eminent examples off. It seems from day one. Ah, and the other works that are in this auction. I think the the preview is ongoing. Now, right for the rest of the week and do the the exhibition's on now. Absolutely. And The work of John James Audubon, published between 18 26 18 38. 435 beautiful in grade. And colored copper plating, Grady Is still What We do best with today. The interest in Audubon spans from a Japanese professional baseball player Collectors in India, China, Germany, South Africa, all parts of the United States. Library, schools, institutions. We're building wonderful autobahn collections for many different American universities. To inspire Students. To understand this greatest and most famous 19th century American artist. Who has not heard of autobahn by far the more well known Artists of the United States, really in the 19th century. I still have the book Grand that you gave me. They came out of few years ago on Audubon and basically his frontier Journeys. With his drawings and water colors. And what became the birds of America. That mammoth double Elephant folio collection of 435 from that? From correct fabulous painting, hand colored paintings of the various birds of America. All of them as they were not alone. Then I think spanning from 18 27 18. 38 I mean, talk about a magnum opus. Of early here We are just inside the second generation of an independent America and we're putting out A work like that. Um, I think that showed everybody very signing on December 18th 2019 about seven months ago. I was able to buy.

Graham America United States Newfoundland John James Audubon Yale University of Michigan Clements Library Dr Seymour Schwartz Johan Royce Audubon Dr Sweets Michigan New York City Tottenham Clemens Grady Rome
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"US undergraduate students are parents or guardians of children are at the age of eighteen and Connecticut Audubon society facing up to its mixed legacy. On racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner, John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented. America's Bird Population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut. Audubon society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and in artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side he owned slaves he traded slaves and he told toys and even proudly told the story of having captured. Some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint I'm Suzanne Potter finally are Mary Sherman tells us there is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth states spanning the central us are known as the wind belt with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with the Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called site wind right uses wind land use in. Wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between development and wildlife are likely to be minimal. We've identified low risk areas in that win belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States has today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power a city, the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nation's clinicals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is my clifford and thank you for wrapping up your week with public news service were member listener supported. You can hear, us. Radio stations began small and of course, online at public news service award she total wine and more announces points with a purpose. Now through September Thirteenth Collect Times points on wines and spirits points earned. He was a matching donation to local charities up.

John James Audubon Connecticut Audubon society Illinois Mary Sherman Jeff Walk US Nature Conservancy Connecticut America Suzanne Potter Chicago Patrick
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Notes finding affordable childcare is the most pressing issue among the twenty seven hundred students at her school nationwide nearly four million US undergraduate. Students are parents guardians of children under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut, and society facing up to its mixed legacy racism with an open letter an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut Audubon Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon. Figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side he owned slaves he traded slaves and he told and even probably told the story of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint. Suzanne Potter finally are Mary Sherman tells us there is some encouraging news about. Potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth state spanning the central U. S. are known as the belt with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity in Jeff Walk with Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called wind right uses wind land use in wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between development and wildlife are likely to be. Minimal. We've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of one hundred Gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States. Has Today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power city the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned win development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is my version. Thank you for wrapping up your week with Public News Service. Remember listener supported. You could hear US radio stations began small, and of course, online at public news service DOT ORG. It all comes down to this. District Gaming vs Warriors Gaming Squad the NBA Two K. League title four hundred twenty thousand dollars, and the biggest bragging rights in eastport saw on the line. Gradient. The exclamation point. Return it.

John James Audubon United States Jeff Walk Mary Sherman Connecticut Audubon Society Illinois Connecticut eastport NBA Nature Conservancy Suzanne Potter America Patrick Chicago U. S.
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Issue among the twenty seven hundred students at our school nationwide nearly four million US undergraduate students are parents guardians of children are under. The age of eighteen and the Connecticut Audubon society facing up to its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John. James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's spurred population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut Audubon. Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who? Had a terrible dark side, he owned slaves, he traded slaves and he told plays and even privately told the story of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gun point I'm Suzanne Potter finally are Mary Sherman tells us there is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development. The Seventeenth States Spain the central U. S. are known as the wind built with roughly eighty percent of the nation's. Current planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with the nature. Conservancy in Illinois says groups new mapping tool called site wind right uses wind land use wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between development and wildlife are likely to be minimal. We've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts up energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States has today. Roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says that was built out it could generate enough energy to power a city, the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is Mike Vernon. Thank you for wrapping up your week with Public News Service. Remember listener supported. You can hear US radio stations.

Connecticut Audubon society United States Connecticut Audubon James Audubon Jeff Walk Mary Sherman Illinois Seventeenth States Spain John Suzanne Potter Mike Vernon Chicago Patrick America U. S.
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Nearly four million US undergraduate students or parents or guardians of children are under the age of eighteen and Connecticut on society facing up. To its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut Audubon Society released an hour on Thursday calling audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side. He owned slaves he traded slaves and he told plays and even probably told the story of. The captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint. I'm Suzanne Potter finally are Mary. Sherman tells us there is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth states spanning the central U. S. are known as the wind built with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity in Jeff Walk with the Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called site wind right uses wind land use. And Wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between wind development and wildlife are likely to be minimal. We identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States has today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says that was built out it could generate enough energy to power a city, the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is Mike Clifford and thank you for wrapping up your week with Public News Service. Remember listener supported. You can hear US radio stations, they small and of course, online at Public News Service Dot Org that guy, oh my gosh, he's fine. Rick. tittle brings home the Bacon prize it up in a pan and then he eats it ricky in his official is not Welcome back to the show. We had. Seven Games in major league. That were called off in protest to the. Well overall racial injustices mentality most specifically the shutting of. Unarmed. Black Man, Jacob Blake, and Kenosha Wisconsin. The as were the first to announce it. The, tigers went along with it Minnesota Twins and Detroit Tigers and said phillies national. Red Sox. BLUEJAYS. ROCKIES DIAMONDBACKS Off North Orioles. Tampa Bay. Rays. Marlins and the mets did something different they walked out for forty two seconds of. Silence Jackie Robinson's number. Then, they love. And then left was the black lives matter shirt that was covering home plate. Oakland aides put out a statement. And Talking about uncomfortable conversations and Stations pushing the boundaries and. Now, it's time for them to act market semi-in. is from Berkeley California. He talked about how the city that represent Oakland has always been A. City that has at the forefront of civil rights issues. Black Panthers and beyond and I understand some of you will say what could possibly help all they're doing hurting the fans they're hurting themselves. it's just it's to shine a light is what it is. And you know it's to put a spotlight on. We. Were furious where upset were flabbergasted all all you can say, and we just we just can't play. We just can't. And that's what it is. They don't literally think by not playing they're going to stop police brutality, but they're trying to let everybody know Hey we're not gonNA play because we're sick of this. So it looks like all the Games are back on am I bet US dot com and that one that never came true. So I get another crack tonight I. Did anybody the France, lamb for the first home run in the as game Houston tonight I win come on back. What he wanted dot at all Automo- y'All. Well what does astrodome yesterday? All the dolls say like the same..

John James Audubon United States Black Panthers Mary Sherman Illinois mets Oakland Connecticut Audubon Society Jacob Blake Connecticut Suzanne Potter Mike Clifford Tampa Bay Walk Red Sox Jackie Robinson America ROCKIES
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Seven hundred students at our school nationwide nearly four million. US undergraduate students are parents, guardians of children under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut and society facing up to its mixed love on racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented. America's Bird Population Patrick Cummins who heads. The Connecticut Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side. He owned slaves he traded slaves and he fold plays and even probably told the story of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint I'm Suzanne Potter finally are Mary. Sherman, tells us there is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth states spanning the central U. are known as the wind built with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity in Jeff. Walk, with the Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called. US. Wind land use in wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between development and wildlife are likely to be minimal. We've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power a city, the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of Iraq in transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is Mike Clifford and thank you for wrapping up your week with.

John James Audubon US Mary Sherman Illinois Mike Clifford Connecticut Society Walk Nature Conservancy Connecticut Patrick Cummins America Iraq Chicago Suzanne Potter
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:34 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Four million US undergraduate students, our parents or guardians of children are under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut one of society. Facing up to its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John. James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population patrick. Comments who heads the Connecticut Audubon. Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who nonetheless terrible dark side he owned slaves traded slaves, and he told plays and even proudly told the story. Of having captured, some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint I'm Suzanne Potter finally are Mary Sherman tells us. There is some encouraging news about illegal noise potential for wind energy development. The seventeen states spanning the central us are known as the wind belt with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with the Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called site wind right uses wind. Land use in wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between development and wildlife are likely to be minimal. We've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States has today in Illinois roughly two million acres available for wind development. Walk says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power a city, the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is my third and thank you for wrapping up your week with public news service were member listener supported. You can hear US radio stations began small, and of course, online at public news service DOT ORG. I remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me, but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember the one hundred years we have caught these machines. And after a century of war. I. Remember that which. We are still. MAKE THEM REMEMBER Whatever there's a lot of those. It tends to be. A women that offer the mentality but owns one of my friends. But I. Don't care about politics. Try to stay away from it all the little thing. The people that I surround myself overwhelmingly like whether are trump supporters are not just about freedom like after politicians get out get. I don't know it's a it's a mix up it's there's. Just. Like any other generation, there's a, there's a side, i. Who did philosophy or like eiter in Impo wore shirts and stuff you know and I got you guys got pirate shirts and stuff when you're up at Port Fest in you I did not I was going to by by some. From you at the time you were sleeping in your buzzsaw and we leaving I didn't get a chance to get any. is given to you know whenever I go, we did start a couple of we started at an Arca POCO gorge five minutes or gone. Yeah and then of course, I see him everywhere we go. These people were in private stuff up there now. That's really the point. He'll I, pay your where. T. Shirt thing we'll start pushing that and we'll get some stuff show. I need help man. Fast in the freedom faster, not the the work vest fork fest. But before that we had signed up for something in Washington which was Liberty Liberty Con when you signed up for liberty kind and we were like excited about that and I get him out there he can learn some stuff maybe you know look for something he wants to do in life, and so I set that up, you know made reservations and all this stuff happened in canceled. So it's like Oh. jeeze really. So that really pissed me off and they said, okay well, let's do fork fest. And So we did you. That's what motivated me and then I said, well, you know, I really WanNa go because they see. That Earn is going to be there with the love bus and Vaccine I knew was going to be an issue. So I said I got to do something know I've been listening to radio and I've been a freedom guy for. A long time and it's all been about myself and my family. Now you know I want to try to make a difference so This seems to be the best way to do it get out there with those signs. you know. More people. and. You know that's that's where I'm at and that's that's what motivate you get here. And Telugu understand the signals drop. It's because when I try and search something it's a bandwidth. And also I, I can't touch my computer. I. Want to touch computer anymore you guys go. Hey Man we're up in get you. got. So much signal here. The and that's one of the things we get to. Satellites you know all star Lake or something like that. I keep saying this half the planet's don't have access to the Internet what happens when the other half gets it, and what kind of information how they going to control what they do. That's one thing I really WanNa know about moss can starling what kind permission slip, how far up your up up Uncle Sam's but then I didn't know that. But it doesn't matter because the tech is there. It's going to the future I think that's why they done those are. Are So worried I. Think it's desperation time. It's now or never because I think the people around. The Phoenix Baraza Raza from literal ashes. That was kind of concept that I was waiting for your comes and I always say things I mean if you've been listening to my show a lot you know I'll go it won't happen all at once that will happen overnight and I'll pick it what the hell are you talking about and I'm going you know you see it coming. And then all of a sudden it's Monday. You know. Feel me now. Did and your generation Josh it's. Their get most of their peer pressure how they're going to do. What is it? Is it facebook social media is at their friends is you know some law passed and the governor said I mean, you know, where are they getting their marching orders? Celebrities, Seaport Dash. The celebrities in the indoctrination camps at our universities, I? Mean most of the people I know are went to school with go to universities and have to spend at least half the professors that are doctrines. Kids think a certain way instead of questioning everything and asking the question why? Not Allowed yeah, I. Mean I would always get in not necessarily in trouble but I would always. Around I. Never stayed silent in Class I would always question the teacher in question there th- authority. And the teachers didn't like that necessarily. But some did some did and that was surprising but. A lot of these twitter twitter facebook I mean they're all bunch echo chamber. So I mean if you follow this certain group of people in, that's all you see on your feed. Just an echo chamber. So you just keep getting fed this information whether it's real or not and. So a lot of kids, my age fall into that and then they get angry they get upset and they. Join the black lives matter movement not realizing what it really is and You know the. One thing that we knew it was going to happen when they pull them out of school.

United States Mary Sherman Jeff Walk Illinois Josh it James Audubon Society Connecticut Audubon Nature Conservancy twitter John Suzanne Potter Connecticut Port Fest Arca POCO gorge America Chicago facebook
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Among the twenty seven hundred students at our school nationwide nearly four, million us. Students are parents guardians of children are under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut off and society facing up to its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut Audubon Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side. He owned slaves traded slaves and he told plays and even proudly told the story of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint. I'm. Suzanne Potter finally are Mary, Sherman tells us there is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth state spanning the central U. S. are known as the wind belt with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with the Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called site wind right uses wind land use wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between windows and wildlife are likely to be minimal. We've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential the United States, has today. Roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says that was built out it could generate enough energy to power city the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land. Fully, supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary, Sherman. This is my third and thank you for wrapping up your week with Public News Service. Remember.

John James Audubon Jeff Walk Connecticut Audubon Society Sherman Illinois Connecticut Mary United States Nature Conservancy America Patrick Suzanne Potter Chicago U. S.
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Seven hundred students at our school nationwide nearly four million US undergraduate students, parents, or guardians of children under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut on and society facing up to its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut. Audubon. Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon. Figure in the birding world and in artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side he owned slaves he traded slaves and he told plays and even proudly told the story of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint. Suzanne. Potter finally are Mary Sherman tells us. There is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth states spanning the central U. S. are known as the wind built with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called wind right uses wind land use in wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts. Between Development and wildlife are likely to be minimal we've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to total energy generation potential that the United States has today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power city the size of Chicago. While sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned win development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is my third. Thank you for wrapping up your week with public news service were member listener.

Audubon Illinois John James Audubon Mary Sherman United States Jeff Walk Connecticut Potter Nature Conservancy Suzanne Patrick Society America Chicago U. S.
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Nearly four million US graduate students or parents or guardians of children are under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut often and society facing up. To its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter, an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner. John James. Audubon. was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population Patrick comments who heads the Connecticut on society released an open letter on. Thursday calling to bond a seminal figure in the birding world and artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side. He owns slaves he traded slaves and he told plays an even proudly told the story. Of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint. I'm Suzanne Potter finally are Mary Sherman. Tells us. There is some encouraging news about Illinois's potential for wind energy development seventeen states spanning the central. US are known as the wind built with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with the Nature Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called site wind right uses wind land use. In wildlife data to detect areas where conflicts between development and wildlife are likely to be minimal, we've identified low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts of energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States has today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development. Walk says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power city the size of Chicago. Walk sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nation's clinicals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned wind development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is by Clifford and thank you for wrapping up your week with public.

US Mary Sherman Illinois Connecticut Jeff Walk Nature Conservancy John James Suzanne Potter Clifford Audubon. Chicago America Patrick
"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Seven hundred students at our school nationwide nearly four million US undergraduate students or parents or guardians of children under the age of eighteen and the Connecticut on and society facing up to its mixed legacy on racism with an open letter and an essay acknowledging that its namesake was a slave owner John James Audubon was a nineteenth century ornithologist and painter who extensively documented America's bird population. Patrick comments. Who heads the Connecticut Audubon Society released an open letter on Thursday calling Audubon a seminal figure in the birding world and an artistic genius who nonetheless had a terrible dark side. He owned slaves he traded slaves and he told plays and even proudly told the story of having captured some former escaped slaves and returning them back to their former masters at gunpoint I'm Suzanne Potter finally Mary Sherman tells us there is some encouraging news about Illinois potential for wind energy development. The seventeenth states spanning the central us are known as the wind built with roughly eighty percent of the nation's current and planned wind energy capacity and Jeff Walk with H. Conservancy in Illinois says his group's new mapping tool called. Right uses wind land use in wildlife data to detect. Conflicts between development element and wildlife are likely to be minimal. Low risk areas in that wind belt that could generate something on the order of about one hundred gigawatts energy, which is roughly equivalent to the total energy generation potential that the United States has today in Illinois roughly two million acres are available for wind development lauck says if that was built out, it could generate enough energy to power a city, the size of Chicago. Walk. Sees wind energy development as an integral part of meeting the nations climate goals. However, he notes when it isn't properly planned win development can negatively affect wildlife and ecosystems in part because it requires large areas of land, we need to be fully supportive of a rapid transition to renewable energy sources. I'm Mary Sherman. This is Mike Clifford. Thank you for wrapping up your week.

John James Audubon Illinois Connecticut Audubon Society Mary Sherman United States Mike Clifford Patrick Connecticut Jeff Walk America Chicago H. Conservancy Suzanne Potter
Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

"Let's talk about Mississippi's Gulf coast. I I like to welcome the show Charles. McColl from McCall Travel Dot Com and Charles's come to talk to us about coastal Mississippi Charles. Welcome mm to the show. Hi Chris how are you today. I'm doing well and we're talking about the state of Mississippi. What is your connection with coastal Mississippi? As a travel writer. I have visited the coastal Mississippi a few times over the past two years and after going there three or four times. I decided that I loved that area and other parts of the US Gulf coast. So much that I developed a new brand called. US Golf coast which covers everything from key. West South Padre but we are talking only about coastal Mississippi debut today so as a travel writer I covered it several times. Excellent and why should someone go to coastal Mississippi. We'll we'll talk about many things but it is is unique. The unique destination the United States. It has the longest continuous beach in the United States. Which I think a lot of people don't know I love road road trips? I travel all over the world. Love driving and there's this sense of soul fulfillment I drive on the Mississippi Gulf coast. I where it's just different than anywhere else. You can drive for an hour and not see anything except for the sand in the water is unobstructed by condos and indulge and restaurants. And what have you so this this great peace and calm and different than anywhere else. Excellent and what kind of itinerary tenorio you're going to recommend for us. It's not a singular destination. There are many communities there. So I'm GonNa recommend some things to do in each of the communities go along the coastal Mississippi. It's all still call the Mississippi Gulf coast. So I'M GONNA use both terms interchangeably. I don't want you to drive fifty miles in one day for lunch and then go drive fifty miles back so I will concentrate on the various communities and say all right first day. You're going to be here second day. You're going to be here and so on and we can do a three four five seven ten very well. Let's get into it where you're GONNA start it. Let's start in Pascagoula. So Mississippi is between Alabama and Louisiana China so coastal Mississippi represents the entire Mississippi Gulf coast so over on the east side closest Alabama Alabama. If you're driving from mobile the first thing you're gonna hit is Pascagoula. The city is probably most famous. because it's where Jimmy Buffett was born. Okay I did not I know that. Yeah so that's going to set the expectations for what the coastal Mississippi areas. All about thank Jimmy Buffett was born there so we're already at our five o'clock somewhere attitude. Pascagoula is also a navy base. So there's a lot of military and also industry the street going on there but it's it's a seafaring community. It's laid-back relative to some of the other cities. We'll talk about. Well what are we going GonNa do in Pascagoula one of the things that happened in past the goal of that as I guess lesser known as that one of the biggest UFO abduction stories in in US history happened there. So back in the seventies the couple of people claim that they were abducted by UFO. And so they were never disproven even so. That's one of the most famous things that happened in Pascagoula. Okay but other than being abducted by aliens. What am I going to do in Pascagoula for won a narrow down here to the the oldest house in Mississippi isn't Pascagoula okay? It's called the lapointe Krebs House and museum now so I went. There are a couple of months ago and I was fascinated by Howell. They showed the construction of how house was done in the bleed was the seventeen. Twenty s house was built the How they use the for the the hair from animals as insulation in the house and things like that kind of interesting Seventeen fifty seven. Is there anything specific renovated the Krebs House. We're going to go to the Krebs House. You could probably spend a couple of hours there. It's a nice waterfront setting and you can get some history of the. The natives that lived in the area and then European settlers came in and saw a whole history of Mississippi but the main point there there's to see the the house and the oldest house in the Mississippi Delta region I think between Minnesota and the Gulf of Mexico. It's the oldest house that's still in the American frontier. I'm thinking New Orleans would be older than that but I mean the city might be but I'm not sure if there's a structure that's older than point good point. The city is older but I don't know if there are any of original houses. Okay Fair enough. But another thing that I really loved in Pascagoula. The Motto Bon Center. I believe the official is the best. Gula River Audubon Bond Center captain McCoy Relation on McColl. And there's a captain McCoy and he runs nature trips out of the Pascagoula River River Audubon Center and what I loved about. It is that I learn things. Obviously like you learn on most trips but the Pascagoula River is the longest. And I'm not going to get the the terminology right. It's the longest une damned river in the continental united in a at states. Yeah so I was fascinated by that and I was like well. What about this wherever they were like now? It was dammed at some point. So the Pascagoula River I believe is four four hundred and eighty miles. That is natural the way it's always been so it hasn't been dammed. It hasn't been obstructed by any kind of construction directions so you can see wildlife and nature the way that it was several hundred years ago. Something didn't expect expect to find in coastal Mississippi or anywhere else and you say wildlife. I'm picturing talking marshes birds alligators that sort of thing. Am I in the right right ballpark. You're right and one thing that that's dominant in this area or the Mississippi sandhill cranes which are relatively large bird. I'm sure there are in other parts that states but there is a sandhill crane refuge that none in Pascagoula but on the other side so I tend cuts through through the area so from mobile bill to New Orleans. You would drive high tech Postal Mississippi. I'm talking about everything. South of I ten okay. North of town the Pascagoula River would go up there. And that's where the sandhill crane. Refuges the birds. No birds don't recognize boundaries. They fly all over the place. So you can see that. I was on the riverboat tour. Okay the AUDUBON center is like most centers they want to promote the natural wildlife and the scenery. And that's so forth and it's a really hidden gem. I think that most people don't recognize will in because it has the name Audubon on it. I'm assuming calmly talking about birdlife predominantly. So yes okay. I don't know if everybody knows. I mean Audubon as a as a charity I think is well known but Google Audubon. You'll find what is James Audubon. Is that the a original one who did all the original drawings of birds in the early. US That's really neat. Watercolors this fascinating realistic catches does right. So I mentioned captain McCoy so you could take his crews out of the audubon center also wrench around Kayak and I did did that one time and going at your own pace around the marshes fascinating at least a dozen gainers and as close they would just scatter into the water. So I love love doing that at my own pace to excellent and John James Audubon. I got it almost John James. Okay when I said early. I didn't realize how early he was. He was born in seventeen eighty five and so he was basically drawing birds up until about the Mexican American war. You're in the US. And so as the frontiers were being filled in a he was out there with his sketch pad. MOM IN ESTA goal. There's obviously the Jimmy Buffett stuff to the native son. A I think he this family left when he was three and then he grew up in mobile but he has come back and he recognizes Pascagoula his birthplace so there is a beach and a bridge and his childhood home are all named for Jimmy Buffett. The parrot heads can go and pay pilgrimage to Jimmy Buffett and go visit some of those sites and one of my favorite places the Pascagoula is called bozos grocery. It's a very old school from the nineteen fifties place where you go in you place your order and you wait inside. been there two or three times. The last time I went kayaking at the river Audubon Center. In fact I got a takeout L. Poboy from Bozo's grocery and then took it on the Kayak. But it's this old school place where you go in and you place your order and you order order off the menu. You don't make up stuff and there was some guy in front of me. That was a visitor and he wasn't a local either and so he went on these. ZAC Oh can I make this substitution. Know what's on the bed. Yeah and I was like basically your choices are you. You get what you WANNA shrimp boat boy. You want poboy poboy being sandwich. A sub someplace else or a hoagie or a hero depending on where you're from but a pavilion in this region of the world. Okay and shrimp being the best known. One that I now. They're also known for their Fried Oysters. Poboy so okay. I got a half in half half. It's amazing I had a couple dozen po boys and along the Gulf coast and I it's one of the better ones side totally recommend going to Bozo groceries to get to take out to go kayaking or he.

Mississippi Pascagoula Pascagoula River Mississippi Gulf United States Pascagoula River River Audubon Jimmy Buffett Audubon Center Gula River Audubon Bond Center Gulf Lapointe Krebs House And Museu Audubon James Audubon River Audubon Center Captain Mccoy Mississippi Delta New Orleans Krebs House John James Audubon
"james audubon" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"james audubon" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Who live in the suburbs yeah you Natalie are you guys end up burning do you like your bird feeders your backyard yes what's offered by trying not to I mean the bears usually get the bird feeders but we do like to is the bird watch we always have this red bird that shows up since you're which although arsenal well we always call him Freddie the red bird but he comes like are you there several Freddie and by the way a cart red cardinals I think red cardinals are are they male or female Natalie search the roll band the ones that are brighter right usually the ones with a brighter color using males they're males because that that that's how the attacks yeah that's right so anyway one of the rarest birds is a yellow northern cardinal very hard to see the role of red I always thought so too it here and there's a yellow cardinal and very rare and it was spotted down in Florida in port Saint Lucie yeah well they were there to play the Mets and the cardinals were put in the cardinals are read this is a yellow and birders who rushed down there are very excited because it's are you almost never find a yellow card will get also calls burgers a running down there to see if a greasy spot port Saint Lucie cardinal tweet yeah I'm gonna tweet and that was kind of like a lead joke it was with nothing against back totally alleges let Michael W. O. R. on Twitter I'll try to picture this yellow card because what's fascinating about it it looks exactly like what you the cardinal looks at the cello it is you know it's the craziest looking and cardinals obviously your bread differ in but and its associated with red you know teams are the cardinals and their red yeah see ya what they think does he feel like I can now cast of the cardinal community yeah like the ugly duckling yeah I bet you they know like Rudolph the red nosed reindeer this is Lucy the yellow feathered card in your Hey by the way just tell me when you two guys are done with his in single fact for you yeah okay have you ever heard of James Audubon the Audubon society and what is it what did you do they are preserved birds well Janet Cooke catalog the more exactly do you know the most valuable book in the world the rarest book it's gonna be a bird book from Audubon it is John James Audubon's the birds of America which was published in eighteen twenty seven it is because of the artwork in it yes and the but there are only a hundred twenty known copies of it that are intact because a lot of people would cut it up is the artwork was so beautiful so that cut the art work out there by devaluing the book the book was all one of them was auctioned off a few years ago for twelve million dollars wow now I got your attention now there you go okay I was gonna say the book was for the birds Hey I there's a Berman humor for you now is between I this is this is awful and I'm glad this guy got punched one of these idiot conspiracy theorists and Wisconsin wrote a book his name is James Fetzer name the book is nobody died at sandy hook and his theory was the sandy hook shooting never took place but was instead an event staged by the government as part of the Obama administration's efforts to have tighter gun laws and so this father who lost his six year old son Noah Leonard Posener sued because because the statement said he was the fame by these statements the book claim that he fabricated copies of his son's death certificate fabricated fab fabricated fabricated fabricated copies of his sons a death certificate that's just sick so anyway in this a jury has awarded Mr poster four hundred fifty thousand dollars so screw these India writers and no wasn't Alex Jones thing to just awful human beings also this guy Fenster says the damage amount is absurd he's an appeal know your absurd fencer there you go Hey there's a bar in Tokyo for loners only really not yep so you go to drain well not most people go to the bar by themselves well of this farce called hitori and it does not allow more than one person at a party serve your without either what they can't come inside you have to enter alone and everybody's there by themselves and you said at the bar together and you chat people up and have a good time but it's for loners yeah why not your brothers he would you missing guys all this is this a couple of years in Japan well a couple years ago well he would you know isn't in Japan but it was the part of the war against the Japanese apple years ago it was determine that one of the flag raisers of the famous flag of the marines short putting up the American flag yeah they determine it was PSC Harold Schultz and not navy hospital corpsman John Bradley does a few years ago one now they just determined that another goof they said that the one of the people in the photo is corporal Harold pike Keller and not have si Renee Daniel no I don't know how all these years seventy years later they didn't get the right figures out again for the right person I like with the marine corps said they put out a statement saying regardless of who is in the photograph each and every marine to set foot on the Regina or supported the effort from the sea and air around the island is and always will be part of our cores cherished history little were all heroes excellent very good a little news from the world of the archaeology they discovered twenty intact wooden coffins in Egypt still with the paint on them and painted the coffins I get a pen sure they did they adorn the coffins yeah twenty cough wow wouldn't bother just outside of Luxor which is where the parents are yeah I was gonna say they find with the place yeah they've well not at the pyramids around that area but they found another big burial chamber and their twenty intact because they're small hole because people were smaller back then well the other little bit smaller and then yeah there's just a so not now it does say there any monies of them about Daddies I don't think they've a podcast dot bad joke radio eight all right let's get that it's at nine thirty from Joel Bartlett couple good morning from that humor Michael city council expected to approve a plan to close records island replace with smaller jails around the city mayor de Blasio says it will create more humane conditions critics felt the one prisoners in their community right away one of my neighbors for what I wanted in the neighborhood that's not gonna go to Staten Island under the plan will go in every barrel but Staten Island this is expected to pass today Democrats walked out of a meeting with president trump yesterday over what they were calling a mill town they were supposed to be talking about the situation in Syria Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says trump didn't have a plan and he called speaker Nancy Pelosi a third grade to politician he said that.

"james audubon" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

10:01 min | 2 years ago

"james audubon" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"So we're able to put some pieces of meat in there. And kind of let them. Do their own thing and not have to particular hand feed. It. Was a baby Al shower is a great way for people to sort of see it action. What you do there? This event is on Saturday may eleventh coming up soon games activities the embassador birds. Tell us more it is a great community event for all ages. And we always do it the day before mother's day again to sort of celebrate babies and moms and conservation here in in town. So we do have lots of activities and games and a lot of community partners that come and join us, for example, orange Audubon, our local chapter of the Audubon society will be here. UCF entomology class will be here with bugs. We will have Orange County will be here. Saint Johns water management will be here. So lots of fun community partners as well. And of course, the birds that are here all the time. So you'll get to do some meet and greet with some of our bird embassador as well as if we have any non release baby birds in the clinic, that's the one day a year. We would bring those babies out for people to see and again admission is free, but which are asking. For is that people bring a baby gift donation of the various things that you need to do what you do with the birds give us that list again. So the list is available on our website and on our Facebook page, but some things that we would just use to normally care for the birds there in the clinic so things like hand, soap and toilet paper paper towels roles of God's rubbing alcohol things like laundry detergent, powder, laundry detergent or sheets that we would use for in the clinic, specifically sponges all meet baby food the list is quite large. And again it on our website. Okay. And so people simply go to Audubon center for birds of prey dot org. So I wouldn't ask Laura about that day in terms of what you would like people to walk away with what lessons do you hope they learned I really want people to step away with knowing that wildlife needs our health, especially birds, they are important to our ecosystems, especially birds of prey being the top of the food chain. They kinda help keep the rest of the the lower parts of the food chain in check which is important eating things like cockroaches, and snakes and rats that we don't necessarily want internet neighborhoods. So they are important to have out in the wild. And we as humans can do a lot to make that habitat and the animals in it have a better life to talk for a moment about Audubon. You are the Audubon center for birds of prey, I think we've heard the word Audubon, what is the organization and how does that play into the birds of prey center. Yeah. So Audubon was named after John James Audubon who was a naturalist and document. -ted bird species in the wild as a painter and the organization is named after him since he did such great work is sort of spreading the word for what wildlife there is out there in the habitats that they need. So Audubon general focuses on birds because birds are really important and found no matter wherever you go there is birds there. So they're really acceptable. No matter who you are and the organization here in Florida specifically started here in Maitland back in the year nineteen hundred so we're over one hundred years old spreading the word of wildlife and habitat conservation. Now, I want you to tell us a little bit. Let's call these teasers or commercials. For the baby shower, tell us about some of the birds will see happy, the shower, you will see our some of our permanent embassador birds things like trouble, the bald eagle and maple a barred owl in Sanford, a little screech owl who weighs about three and a half ounce isn't fits in the palm of your hand. Again. I said this earlier, but I was so amazed see the different als and guess the tiny little the little owl. And then really big house. I mean, the size differences amazing. Yeah. Birds of prey come in all different shapes sizes, and colors and a great example. We have our little screech owls in town that again way about as much as bar of soap about three and a half ounce. And then our large great horned. Owls are cute, and there's very strong. They've got five hundred pounds of pressure per square inch in their talents, and they can actually lift more than they themselves way, which would be about nine pounds until total. They could carry off which is pretty impressive to you still have out there the wingspan where people can compare their their arm lengths to the wingspan. We do. It was a great eagle scout project that they helped us and they have here at the center, and it has, you know, tiny little kiss American kestrel wings, which are about a foot, and then are bald eagles which can be up to six to eight feet. Yeah. I found that amazing just thinking about that size and how they lift themselves up. So talk about your trainers to or your volunteers who work with the birds. What what's that like for them? Yeah. So we've got about six full time staff that were cared about eighty volunteers. Help sorta run the center and help us care for the birds. So when volunteer has been at the center for at least a year, then we will start bird training them. And we've got about fifteen bird embassador who are glove trains that are trained to stand on our gloves on our arms and be used for educational purposes to go into schools and festivals and senior centers sort spread the word about the importance of birds. And we they required to take a bird training course, about the equipment that we use with the birds and then slowly individually learn one bird at a time sort of build that relationship with. At that particular bird itself. Learn about their species in the individual, and when they are completed with that one birth, and they get signed off and are able to start with another bird. What is the lifespan of these birds? Like, you mentioned the the one embassador Burgess thirty three years old is that old for a bird or is. Yes. So it depends on the species some of the smaller species like an American kestrel or screech. Owls really only lived to be about eight maybe ten years old in the wild under human care. We can get quite a few extra years in there. And then we do have a bald eagle who is thirty three out in the wild. All eagles are pretty normal. It'd be about twenty five years old, but again under human care, especially here at the center where they get good food. There's no predators. They get free healthcare. They can live a lot longer. So the oldest ever recorded bald eagle was fifty one years old. Now, you mentioned what you would like us to take away if we attend, you know, sort of the lessons, but what's the day today that we should be doing to do our part in protecting these birds. So it starts with really simple things like not littering. There is amazing amount of wildlife birds that try to eat trash or get tangled up in it. So not littering is super easy to start with their picking up trash when you do see it. And then it gets a little bit more complicated from that. But doing things like making sure you're properly disposing of chemical. So they don't end up in a landfill where bird can get it planting native wild plants in your yard native landscaping helps wild birds and things as well. As being careful as you drive, again, car accidents are kind of the number one thing that we see with patients coming into the clinic. So keeping an eye out for what's smear the road is really important to that is so amazing to me that so many birds do get hit by cars. You mentioned though that like if they're on the side of the road eating, you know, carrying her something that it's easy to kind of hit them that way. Is that the most common way they get hit by a car? That's definitely one way being along the side of the road and not just vultures carry-on. Also, bald eagles aren't really picky. They will also. Take after roadkill. The other thing is if they are focused on a on pray, and they're not really paying attention to what's nearby. So if a mouse or rabbit is running across the street, hawk for example, could sweep down trying to get that prey to not so focused that they're not noticing. They're passing by getting hit by a car, and you mentioned detangle. So what are some things that we do that we leave out garbage wise that the birds get tangled up in a big thing with entanglement fishing line? We have species like Osprey bald eagles that are eating fish and getting tangled up in any line that we leave behind. But also some of our wetlands species so barn owls, and our red shouldered hawks love to be near wetlands and any of the fishing line that we either cutting leaving the fish, for example, or gets tangled up in a tree, and we cut that can be easily entangled for those birds. And then as far as making sure we don't have chemicals that are impacting the birds, what are some more common things that are happening. So that we can avoid them. So some other things that would sort of help as far as avoiding with those birds would be again sort properly disposing of those chemicals making sure that you're kind of communicating to future generations and letting them know the importance of birds and the environment making sure that you're keeping trees around birds use those trees for nesting and raising their young, and we need some of those old growth trees, especially for cabinet members like our screech owls. Actual nest inside of trees, we need some of those big oak trees, for example, to stick around, and that's important to have those in your yards neighborhoods. And you mentioned planting the native plants, obviously that means that certain kinds of bugs, we'll find some their food. And then the birds getting them is that how it works. Yes, are native plants and trees do attract native bugs, but that's important because every bird eats bugs, even the ones that may grow up to be a cedar when they're baby each bugs for protein. So it's a great way to sort of help our native wildlife by having those native trees that also is easier for humans because the native plants and trees require less irrigation. They require less pesticides and fertilizer. So it kind of makes your life easier to as well as helping the wildlife. Oh, great information. Laura. Thanks so much for telling us about that. Let's once again, let people know about the baby Al shower baby shower is coming up on Saturday may eleventh from ten AM to two PM at the Audubon center for birds of prey the Greek community event where we invite you to.

Audubon society Audubon center orange Audubon Audubon Laura John James Audubon UCF Facebook eagles Florida Orange County Sanford Burgess Maitland five hundred pounds thirty three years one hundred years twenty five years
Florida man accused of killing pregnant wife, trying to cut up body

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

02:06 min | 3 years ago

Florida man accused of killing pregnant wife, trying to cut up body

"Acknowledge those who donate blood but there's also a message for non donors komo's gregg hersholt reports the recent harris poll found about thirty percent of those who don't donate blood or afraid that the needle will cause pain bloodworks northwest president dr james audubon says would like to make it very clear that the needle that we use in blood collection are specially produced they are examined under a microscope or sterilized and they are coated with a special silicon coating so they slided easily they don't hurt they're not the same as needles that you encounter when you go to your doctor's office to have a blood test he says the summer months present a challenge because donations typically drop into summer vacations and normal routines being disrupted the doctor is hoping that today's world blood donor day will serve as a motivation for people to donate with a particular need right now for platelets gregg hersholt komo news the pierce county health department confirming another case of hepatitis c that could be linked to eight other cases at good samaritan hospital in puyallup health officials say it's still unclear how that virus spread none of the patients have a connection to one another except for receiving an injection from the same nurse in the emergency room the attorney for that nurse corps awebber claims that she does not have hepatitis a mason county man admits to nine one one operators that he beat his wife so severely that she died several days later komo's keith eldridge says the husband is jailed while the tech does look for evidence around his collins lake home the strongest piece of evidence that nine one one call from stuart sullivan where he said about his wife i beat the hell out of her a couple of days ago and i think she just died sullivan went before a judge fact a six year old is accused of first degree murder the prosecutor said it was because of what he called extreme indifference to human life when the nine one one operator asked what sullivan had used to beat his wife he said everything i suppose she got beat up bad this circumstance to me is one of those is an absolute tragedy and depending on investigation plays we'll know more about the time span that time link on that sullivan held in jail and a half million dollars bail into who you keith eldridge.

Gregg Hersholt Good Samaritan Hospital Attorney Keith Eldridge Stuart Sullivan First Degree Murder Prosecutor Harris President Trump Dr James Audubon Pierce County Puyallup Mason County Komo Collins Lake Million Dollars Thirty Percent Six Year
"james audubon" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

Thinking Sideways Podcast

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"james audubon" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

"Through most of his life audubon was a lover of nature and he spent a great deal of time walking around in studying what he saw and shooting it and occasionally shooting it and he said his preference was for birds above all else where he'd always drawn what he saw in nature and he continued to do that when he got to the states though at that time it was a hobby it wasn't as if it was an occupation for him though like some lotta people do with her hobbies he traveled the see different birds in different parts of the country so it was it was really a involve hobby realizes birds me did audubon was a skilled artist he initially did a lot of his work with charcoal and pencils he did later learned to paint uh which was how we get a lot of the images that are in the birds of america they were paintings originally i should we specify that the birds in america is a book the thing the yes and have your guide bits that's further in okay out already have just referred to it a couple of times and i realized know it's okay the brief urgent as judge james audubon he makes a giant folio book which is called the birds of america which is a catalogue of paintings of birds it he did in this country it's also got some other associated tax with it that he did later on other one that i saw that was i'm guessing at least one hundred years old was off five volumes set just writings and renault images not annika if you have a copy version america land around.

america james audubon renault one hundred years