17 Burst results for "James Ashton"

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

02:54 min | 2 weeks ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"And you know. I don't <Speech_Male> subscribe to this idea <Speech_Male> that that we have <Speech_Male> weekly. In the <Speech_Male> culture sector in <Speech_Male> some of the most <Speech_Male> brilliant and creative <Speech_Male> and innovative <Speech_Male> and entrepreneurial <Speech_Male> individuals <Speech_Male> you ever meet <Speech_Male> our running <Speech_Male> around shoulder as acions <Speech_Male> and we need to make <Speech_Male> sure that we support them <Speech_Male> as well because <Speech_Male> they need to be professionally. <Speech_Male> Develop so if you're <Speech_Male> sitting as a chief <Speech_Male> executive and organization <Speech_Male> sometimes <Speech_Male> it gets lonely <Speech_Male> and so sometimes <Speech_Male> it's quite important for <Speech_Male> us to be able to bring <Speech_Male> people together in one <Speech_Male> of the things as <Speech_Male> a development agency <Speech_Male> outs council <Speech_Male> do <SpeakerChange> is <Speech_Male> have a convening role <Speech_Male> and i think just <Speech_Male> finally we. We started <Speech_Male> off talking about <Speech_Male> coming out of the pandemic <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> english culture moving <Speech_Male> on from acres. You do call it <Speech_Male> culture. I think as a more <Speech_Male> broader net than <Speech_Male> the arts. Don't you more inclusive. <Speech_Male> Probably <Speech_Male> you did say <Speech_Male> you're optimistic. <Speech_Male> I mean i guess you <Speech_Male> would that by saying <Speech_Male> there is a lot of work to be <Speech_Male> done. We can get <Speech_Male> back in his lots of <Speech_Male> creativity of positively <Speech_Male> to <Silence> look <SpeakerChange> forward to <Speech_Male> so we've got <Speech_Male> to be realistic <Speech_Male> about the challenges <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> the journey against. <Speech_Male> Go through and <Speech_Male> some of those unknowns. <Speech_Male> If we've been talking <Speech_Male> eighteen months <Speech_Male> ago we <Speech_Male> would simply not have been <Speech_Male> able to imagine <Speech_Male> how twenty twenty <Speech_Male> and twenty twenty <Speech_Male> one have panned <Speech_Male> out and so <Speech_Male> it will be foolish <Speech_Male> to be one <Speech_Male> hundred percents <Speech_Male> Believing dwelled <Speech_Male> won't change. We won't <Speech_Male> have to do things differently. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> i'm very confident <Speech_Male> in the people <Speech_Male> that we work <Speech_Male> with across <Speech_Male> the arts organizations <Speech_Male> museums <Speech_Male> libraries we <Speech_Male> invested. There's a <Speech_Male> great people <Speech_Male> out there. They <Speech_Male> really creative <Speech_Male> They very inventive. <Speech_Male> Whatever <Speech_Male> life <Speech_Male> throws up them <Speech_Male> they can invent something <Speech_Male> create something <Speech_Male> the copes with that <Speech_Male> so that so <Speech_Male> drives my <Speech_Male> optimism <Speech_Male> forward. And <Speech_Male> you know we've got <Speech_Male> a lot of people whose <Speech_Male> job is about <Speech_Male> being creative <Speech_Male> in about being artists <Speech_Male> in about inventing <Speech_Male> new things and <Speech_Male> one of the things we <Speech_Male> can do. The arts council <Speech_Male> is to make sure <Speech_Male> that we <Speech_Male> just you know <Speech_Male> in in my old days as a <Speech_Male> radio producer. One of the things <Speech_Male> i used to say about being a radio <Speech_Male> producer was <Speech_Male> to create the <Speech_Male> environment for <Speech_Male> the presented to do their <Speech_Male> best work. And depending <Speech_Male> on that presenter <Speech_Male> you'd be a different <Speech_Male> sorts of producer <Speech_Male> for the one presents <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> about helping <Speech_Male> them to write their entire <Speech_Male> script <Speech_Male> for another producer. <Speech_Male> It might be going and <Speech_Male> getting a bacon <Speech_Male> sandwich from the cafe <Speech_Male> next door. Because <Speech_Male> that's what they needed. Offline <Speech_Male> our into that program <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> day for <Speech_Male> others. It might just be <Speech_Male> being somebody to bounce <Speech_Male> ideas off into the <Speech_Male> actual <Speech_Male> preston the rights <Speech_Male> of this show. So that's what <Speech_Male> a producer did. And <Speech_Male> i think in the funniest <Speech_Male> way that's a <Speech_Male> little bit about what the <Speech_Male> council does it creates <Speech_Male> environments <Speech_Male> for people to be able to do <Speech_Male> their best work so <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> as we look into the <Speech_Male> latter half of twenty <Speech_Male> twenty. What i'm very <Speech_Male> hopeful. I am <Speech_Male> optimistic. Because <Speech_Male> i think whatever <Speech_Male> life throws <Speech_Male> out some culture <Speech_Male> sector will respond <Speech_Male> and we'll respond magnificently. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> i'm quite <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> excited. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And still producing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> darren henley. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks so much for the compensation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening to this. Episode of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> leading with james ashton <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> please rate <Speech_Music_Male> and reviews.

james ashton Speech_Music_Male twenty twenty hundred percents twenty half One english eighteen months one henley
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

05:48 min | Last month

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Well it's quite difficult challenging but most of the point you'll dealing with standard bank in south africa and then electric car in shanghai and then supermarket in in sydney and then a government campaign in london. It's just infinite variety ready and so yes. Let's pose a question occasionally thought again my why. I'm an entrepreneur. Not sure they think you could say if i was out of left undone for myself but i had a. I had a pretty good job. So i shouldn't really complain and it served you well. You're you're you're you're the top now so whoever that person was the that was buying you a drink while you you can probably thank them for that advice. I will tom aachen yes. I'm interested in early. A responsibility which. I think that you'll because the the thing is i think you have to take responsibility under the leadership in in this industry. I mean you joined in a salt. She saw she not three. You might have been a barrister. The money wasn't immediate end and obvious so you went down to the appetizing. I think that's a fair appraisal fares. I'm interested in the response from your. You'll father who who was in the army who maybe i don't know might have favored the law over advertising. But your your choices made the. Yes it really. It really was a study loaf three. I wasn't very good at it either. I should add. Add very well at low muscle. my heart is in. It was a sensible choice. I think my parents were very pleased with my sensible choice. Because it meant that i be able to some money. But it's not the only thing he was about. He didn't want to go into the army for whatever reason but but apart from that no no precious either way and saltines..

shanghai sydney london south africa three tom aachen
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

02:49 min | 5 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Drake <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> helping them to <Speech_Male> avoid the mistakes <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> i've made <Speech_Male> As well as <Speech_Male> to find some of <Speech_Male> the <SpeakerChange> opportunities <Speech_Male> and successes <Speech_Male> great and what else <Silence> have. I not <SpeakerChange> asked you both. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> pulled social <Speech_Male> responsibility <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the home <Speech_Male> serve that surround <Speech_Male> apprentice <Speech_Male> ships <Speech_Male> and homegrown <Silence> talent. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> if we look at so the <Speech_Male> brexit <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> we all going to <Speech_Male> be a self <Speech_Male> contained <Speech_Male> islands. So i <Speech_Male> think we need homegrown <Speech_Male> talent <Speech_Male> and i'm really <Speech_Male> worried about the construction <Speech_Male> industry <Speech_Male> of making sure <Speech_Male> but we do <Speech_Male> get more <Speech_Male> youngsters not just <Speech_Male> going to university. <Speech_Male> Take you on apprenticeships. <Speech_Male> Said <Speech_Male> i hope severna <Speech_Male> privileged position <Speech_Male> to be able to <Speech_Male> help with that. <Speech_Male> And <SpeakerChange> we need to <Speech_Male> do those sorts of things. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Male> i've been reflecting <Speech_Male> i've <Speech_Female> got to the end of the radio <Speech_Female> on it yet but <Speech_Female> how we spend <Speech_Female> that time seems <Speech_Female> to me to be quite <Speech_Music_Female> important <Speech_Music_Female> we come out of the <Speech_Female> pandemic. Now <Speech_Male> i've <Speech_Male> been quite lucky because <Speech_Male> off. Charlie <Speech_Male> james i remember seeing <Speech_Male> you and i was scheduled <Speech_Male> run actually. <Speech_Male> Iran's one of the london <Speech_Male> pucks <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> There <Speech_Male> with you. I was there <Speech_Male> with you. Jay nano those <Speech_Male> for some reason. They <Speech_Male> crop mail to the photographs. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> I got him budget <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Male> seven. <Speech_Male> Joined by morning <Speech_Female> runs during the pandemic <Speech_Female> had a bit more time to <Speech_Female> think <SpeakerChange> enough. Listen <Speech_Female> to podcasts. Like <Speech_Female> this one. And <Speech_Female> it's one <Speech_Female> of the things that i <Speech_Male> have realized <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> people like <Speech_Male> richard <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> In many ways not <Speech_Female> least because of the stage <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> we're in but also <Speech_Female> the that <Speech_Female> we have less money worries. <Speech_Female> Perhaps you're not <Speech_Male> often life inside <Speech_Female> sought mas- <Speech_Female> levy in in <Speech_Female> this particular point <Speech_Female> which is of course you go to makes <Speech_Female> you got enough to <Speech_Female> support you but when <Speech_Female> you get to that point <Speech_Female> i think <Speech_Female> being really thoughtful <Speech_Female> about why you spend <Speech_Female> your time is <Speech_Female> really <SpeakerChange> critical <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> reflected <Speech_Female> while been out my <Speech_Male> runs. I think i've spent <Speech_Male> too much time. <Speech_Male> Working <Speech_Female> wacky full by <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> veggie money <Speech_Female> for example for <Speech_Female> that business and <Speech_Female> then you find that <Speech_Male> somebody can come along <Speech_Male> and take it over <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> those years ago in <Speech_Female> you have <Speech_Female> future ahead of you. It's <Speech_Female> not the end <Speech_Female> of the world is not <Speech_Female> the be all and end all <Speech_Female> and making <Speech_Female> sure they have a rich <Speech_Female> varied and <Speech_Female> interesting <Speech_Female> life is important <Speech_Female> and i think we should all <Speech_Female> take the time <Speech_Female> from time <Speech_Female> to time to say. <Speech_Female> I'm <SpeakerChange> spending my time <Speech_Female> where i really <Speech_Female> want to be. Is it <Speech_Female> doing the right thing. Is <Speech_Female> it making <SpeakerChange> me happy. <Speech_Female> And lots of people <Speech_Female> i think. Don't <Speech_Female> look at work <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> and say <Speech_Male> this making me happy. <Speech_Male> Great <Speech_Male> and guardian richard harpin. <Speech_Male> Thanks <SpeakerChange> so much for the conversation. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> james thank <Music> you. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening to <Speech_Male> this. Episode of leading with <Speech_Male> james ashton please <Speech_Music_Male> rate and review is if <Speech_Male> you like what you've heard. <Speech_Male> This episode was supported <Speech_Male> by lockton <Speech_Male> global independent insurance <Speech_Male> broker whose <Speech_Male> people have the freedom <Speech_Male> to think an act

Jay nano Drake Charlie Iran london richard harpin james ashton
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

03:32 min | 5 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Relentless ambition embedded within the institutions bulls management team the exchange the even the regulators and that kind of growth mindset in terms of yet when it takes most as chris roddy says and then i think there's gaps we still have relative to the valley oviously kind of the coach where i was founded in the valley It was very much a boss for action. And i think there's still a little bit too much deliberation in sort of the uk psyche and then there's some specific gaps around you know to get also product managers and product marketed to do that product market fit and scaling up and plan into any kind of product launches globally and stuff like that. You know you care has got our incredible bench of talent. And i think we're still building that in terms of the u. Case of the certain things we look across the pond and say well you know. That's that's best in class in that. Still lavallee we've got away to go. Stephen i want to digress and talk about. Larry ellison since you mentioned him. I'm just curious what you got from him. As a pretty young guy in the valais as you talked about how fast that company was growing. I mean he still laugh. Relentless longstanding and so on was an easy guide to follow was inspiring. He even then did reinvent himself. I think it got to the end of the eighties and there was a recession condom in nineteen ninety-one and actually we had a republic company and we had a profit warning. Everybody did well. Larry did was really small at that. Time is to nicole on the bench and realize you know some of his own relative weaknesses and actually at that time he went out in hot Laid and jeff henley brought them in and pretty much allow them to run the company. It was ready. Jeff ray for the next five years the completely rebuilt orhan and the interesting thing at that point yet at the database market was very crowded. You had you had products that she out there. Were probably as good if not better. Norcal 's information greg. Sybase and just back to chris's point and then there is always one 'cause you know. The battle is intense. The competition intense. The market leader always becomes in a thirty to fifty percent of the market. The number two could make okay money profitability. But they're always looking off the shoulder and then really just crumbs off the table for the other players at oracle in effect to do what else on an acquisition spree and that was up to that point. We'd never done that. Acquisition that we acquired a digital technologies relational database of. Will larry back to him. I think the biggest credit give him is yet. Great leaders need great. Follow as nothing. Hot amazing people used to say how people refused to fail but he had a cadre of outstanding people. When you look at the people i had had the privilege Mall told masebo polly. Some the right lane elise Incredible executives of going off bill. Multibillion dollar companies himselves another thing. The larry deserves credit for he ought brilliant people recognize strengths and in a supplement to those with people around him who really compensated and bill. A really talk colty executives. This episode of leading is supported.

chris roddy jeff henley Jeff ray Larry ellison Stephen uk Norcal nicole Larry Sybase greg chris masebo polly larry oracle
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Hi there and welcome to another episode of leading. This is the podcast featuring to ceo's every time in compensation on exchanging notes on how they approach their work and their career so far. My name is james ashton a financial journalist. Some of the ceos who featured in this series from business.

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

02:10 min | 6 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Ridiculously <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> high particularly <Speech_Female> in this sector <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> then having a sense <Speech_Female> that they're not living up <Speech_Female> to that and i <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> think drives a lot <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of the kind of fear <Speech_Female> of failure. You <Speech_Female> know the worry that they <Speech_Female> could be doing move <Speech_Female> for people with dementia <Speech_Female> and there. Is this enough <Speech_Female> amai enough. <Speech_Female> And i feel <Speech_Female> quite strongly <Speech_Female> about that ability <Speech_Female> for people. <Speech_Female> Just take a <Speech_Female> step back. And say <Speech_Female> am i a good person <Speech_Music_Female> on my trying my <Speech_Music_Female> best and <Speech_Female> what than <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> right now if i got <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to give and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just <SpeakerChange> to let <Speech_Male> yourself sit with that <Speech_Male> great. <Speech_Male> I've asked all i <Speech_Male> need to ask is there. Anything <Speech_Male> is review <Speech_Male> onto out. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Opportunity <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> a follow <Speech_Male> on a kerala <Speech_Male> read to her case <Speech_Male> it's just sad <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wages <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> yellow to remind <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the next generation <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that they are brilliant. <Speech_Male> They are doing <Speech_Male> amazing things. <Speech_Male> They will do it in a very <Speech_Male> different way to <Speech_Male> case myself. <Speech_Music_Male> And so <Speech_Male> you can their <Speech_Male> own furrows. <Speech_Male> What's important because <Speech_Male> if they're trying to be <Speech_Male> oss than <Speech_Male> the todate <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> you just be your <Speech_Male> thank you will do is <Speech_Male> in a different way <Speech_Male> you will. You're <Speech_Male> maybe you <Speech_Male> learn something from <Speech_Male> the knights of ourselves <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> but equally doing <Speech_Male> differently <Speech_Male> is okay to <Speech_Male> and there isn't <Speech_Male> there isn't a model <Speech_Male> remember the days of <Speech_Male> the heroic chief executive <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> of young single <Speech_Male> handedly lead from the <Speech_Male> front. That was <Speech_Male> my mind that was never <Speech_Male> a good idea. <Speech_Female> So don't <SpeakerChange> fall <Speech_Female> for that kind of stuff. <Speech_Female> Yeah i agree. <Speech_Female> The worst piece <Speech_Female> of advice i was <Speech_Female> given was to tell <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you know when i'm struggling. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Imagine <Speech_Female> what someone. I <Speech_Female> really admired in <Speech_Female> this situation. <Speech_Female> And what i've realized <Speech_Female> over the years is that <Speech_Female> just makes you feel like you <Speech_Female> measure up <Speech_Female> and that's not <Speech_Female> true you just say. <Speech_Female> What does the best version <Speech_Female> of you do in this <Speech_Female> situation. <Speech_Female> And i think takes <Speech_Female> you to accept <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> place karen in the united. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Just <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> be yourself <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> look at. You are <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> enough <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> amazingly <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> this coming up in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the sector <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> obsolete flow you white <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> people so i'm <Speech_Music_Female> excited <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the features of the sector. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Actually currently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> secure. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> much for the conversation. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you <Music> very welcome. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> for listening to this. Episode <Speech_Male> of leading with james ashton <Speech_Male> please rate and <Speech_Music_Male> reviews if you like <Speech_Music_Male> what you've heard.

james ashton chief executive
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

04:53 min | 6 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Loomed. Her credits include fourteen years at the british red cross and five years as chief executive of the cancer charity. Clic sargent is a great conversation and a very personal episode of quite emotional connections with organizations. They have run. I began by asking kirin where the his job at the council has got harder given the world as closed in because of populism and corona virus pandemic in the last few years this year has been very difficult for both those reasons the first one just the impact of the pandemic the activities. We do the teaching of english. The invigilation of exams of running events. You just couldn't do in the same way that we have to pivot in the world where everybody of using online and the good news is we managed to that we have the tank we now engaged with millions of people quite literally around the world. Five hundred million and attending webinars and so on. But it's not quite the same because we're supposed to be about building relationships 'gendering trust making connections and at the end of the day. That the human to human thing so that it's been difficult and then there's the world itself the base i'm really worried about is the erosion of values norms behaviors. Whatever you want that kind of confidence. We all had a number of years ago that the world was getting better. That governance was getting better. That education was getting better and much still true. But we we see the bobak as well as if about those raisins and twenty twenty a really really tough year. If i'm honest. And what about that next pivot. Then i know you're handing the baton soon but the role of british council post brexit such an important tool for the uk. It looks like you've scaled up some of the spending in developing markets whether that's about shoring up relations with the european union. We're leaving behind. Well maybe i've imagined that. I don't know i'm interested in your view going forward. I think we have. But that's linked point seven percents official development assistance commitment. The governments made to making sure we do invest in the developing world. However we also need to make sure we balance that by the investment in saudi arabia russia. Where food back from yesterday. Our colleagues across europe now in the recent paths. We have fun to that fails as the surplus. We made out of teaching english invigilation both exams but of course that surplus has gone away and therefore the big conversation going on as part of the overall spending review now of how to rebalance and we're all looking forward to the an outcome a fan of those conversations and the outcome of that financial compensation kind of leads the way for your predecessor. Think about what the size and shape and role of british council going forward. Then yeah right. And i think the principles won't change your will be about using our capability with the english language as an organization but also the other acids like you know to be whoever higher education education. Broadly art and culture. It'd be using those but he will have to be different than digital will. Be a huge part of this. If in forget me one thing now we change in forty seven countries around the world But mostly in the capital cities but digital you can reach every fishy in those countries. Need in fact you can reach every city on the planet so digital has a huge part to play in the future. Never entirely replace human-to-human. Kate let me come onto you on. I'll come onto your very interesting colorful arrival at alzheimer's society shortly..

sargent british council Kate kirin chief executive alzheimer european union europe saudi arabia uk official russia
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

03:59 min | 6 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"And then we have a number of private sector members both but then thousands and thousands of smallman Fates we're membership organization overnight in twenty twenty four. Th of march this year on lockdown came into into false a lot of our members all of a sudden had their ability to were taken away from them so we decided to ask three month price. Freeze all incan freeze or membership but also look authorities. That would focus all of a sudden difference in that public health at safe date. On focusing on as oppose dealing with the virus that was unexpected came to the forefront in addition than rome income streams were obliterated. Pay able to pay overnight our funding walls. You almost extinct vulnerable. So we spent the last six months trying to demonstrate value on suppose a period of explanation as senator elliott amplifying. How important tourism industry is to the wider economy. And it's not that anyone doesn't understand that he said ability to supporters so questions from council latest cabinets would be shouldn't be proportioning alimony to you know supporting fellow all supporting public health and making show that people can get out to a quick whereas tourism perhaps wasn't on everyone's agenda. Perhaps as i mentioned luxury spend was seen as something that could go by wayside. Meanwhile out business members were focusing on paying their own individual bills that were essential to the not necessarily marketing expenditure which is ultimately that membership fee go towards so for the last six months we've been fighting tooth and nail to put our own recovery package together which on behalf of the industries. What we've been doing for them in terms of trying to get a recovered for them when we need our own so in that respect alphonse he's a big yet very delicate monster july august september is similar to class. We have to Coding to put at times. We really struggling to pay our bills. Thankfully a police to say as of today. We're almost over the biggest hurdle of funding gap. Now that works out to repay that faith because the challenges. Well i mean you. You are both still here. Which is for for any organization going into march is is a great success specifically with welcome to yorkshireman you said earlier on is always a fading that tourism will take care of itself and i suppose part of your job is to keep banging the doors down saying well actually. It doesn't have to do this. Not because he's a very very competitive market. Someone who might come to yorkshire but also go to sit. There must also paris. But i guess it's because of the legacy you inherited your was new that you'd have to do a A real job on proving the viability and the importance of the organization. Did you think the pandemic made that harder easier or pretty much. The same how to be zenith meshes. You mentioned class to ten incident Not respects i'm nine months. In on the first year of any chief executives appeared of learning on the standing watson to the bone shown to to look at the organization works. Well wasn't working well. Was there a fat trim. Was there any areas that we were performing in that we could make some quick winds are supposed very quickly thrust into the spotlight both media spotlights and trying to save an organization whereas back in january it was about rebuilding nyse. Ation so that changed. That was a real challenge. James so in that respect. That's been the how but you know fighting tooth and nail full to demonstrate value and validity if that makes sense that's been the real hobby Looking in the review mirror begging pizza to pay pull etc Bolts work that chief executive would be able to do in year two or year three year. Four in the first six months everything sped up. Yeah yeah but the flip side of that..

alphonse chief executive senator elliott paris yorkshire James watson
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

03:49 min | 7 months ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Group he joins the CBI from be the business three year old campaign group funded by business and the government designed to drive up the UK's poor productivity record. I began asking Tony how he felt about making the switch. To It's very sad to leave be the business. I was the first employee in twenty seventeen I built this thing from scratch with a such pioneers. Three years doesn't feel like it's long enough in some respects that nobody stays anywhere forever. So at the moment is be the business I'm feeling very sad about leaving very proud about what we achieved very excited about the CBI at an immensely. Important time for our economy but to be honest I'm feeling just really sad. This has been a labor of love for me for the last three years. So it will be very hard to move on. Do you think about things that legacy or is that for someone else to to decide about I? Think I don't think you can think about legacy when you've started a startup be the business had literally no people know program no partners no budget three years ago, and my job has been to take it from into first gear than in two seconds and the legacy is not instill here is doing well, but it's for somebody else really to help it for this potential. Anthony, my successor is tasked with doing with the team and productivity is being talked to balance. I mean, it's a slightly hard subject, but it is being talked about it's in to do trays for ministers and for Physios unit was mentioned in Boris. Johnson's. Virtual Tory party speech so that must be something of an to you. You've helped to push on and push it up the agenda. I think we have put it on the agenda and we have pushed it up the agenda and I think that but I think we've tried to do is make people feel that it's achievable. When we started this job, the UK's productivity performance had flatlined for a decade. In fact, it was going down not up, which is spectacularly bad news compared to historical standards and it's quite easy to get defeated about that. It's also quite easy to believe that while they're very endemic factors, things that will take decades and billions of dollars to fix it what I think we've tried to do the productivity agendas to no productivity is you can. Touch it feel it. You can change it. You can make progress on it and you can do that right now every firm can do it. You don't have to rely on the Prime Minister of the chancellor. Every firm can be improving productivity. We can improve the productivity of regions of sectors and I. Think we've tried to make people optimistic rather than defeatists and we tried to help people to see. You can do things now rather than believing that you have to change the entire governance of the UK economy because it is always defined I think is output per worker per hour and and the the ingrained position seems to be. A productivity that the UK is thirty percent also behind the US about the same distance behind Germany, and then within the UK London is about forty percent. Ahead of the national average I mean, is that about where it is or is it picking up yet or covert set it all back even further? Well, you've given an accurate description of the mathematics. But what we've learnt a beat the business in the last three or four years is that underlying that is the story of corporate performance and the truth about the economy. When you look the, if you look at the overall performance of all UK firms, you notice two things about. The UK compared to other countries. I united. States..

UK CBI Tony Physios Anthony Johnson Prime Minister London chancellor US Germany
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Think a lot of founder meglomaniac on that flexible actually which they succeed so I think that flexibility is important. I think the I think one of the default style and my default star is definitely. I think to listen to people and to build up from that. As opposed to impose and to do a lot of horizon scanning a lot more horizon scanning I think than I think a lot of big organizations inherently do lift your sights and look around outside outside the gaps and you get the context right for what you're trying to do. I think the danger in a big organization is saying that you just plough on because what is can you give us a health check for Birdlife in the UK? Charity talks about forty million birds being lost in the last three or four decades. But there are bright spots with samples of things that were very very close to extinction the white tailed. Eagles had been lost and have now back inbreeding in numbers in Scotland for example there's gloom but also bright spots. Yes but this question. Lots of gloom is it. Great report comes every three years ago. The State of Nature Report about seventy organizations pool all their data and say what is going on and that shows a trajectory of decline over the last fifty years and that you know when you look just over the last ten years. It's definitely not letting up so once. Common birds like lap wing which is so common that it had a name. A peewit that has dropped drastically in numbers may be stabilizing a bit at the moment went to not quite clear but really low numbers now and same with. Beach Charismatic curlew. Which has that lovely kind of. Lingering call here in a kind of upland area that had a crash numbers as well. Turtle doves right on the edge. So there's a lot of bad news part but there are some spots of where we know if we had habitat management right if we kind of manage things like kind of Predator impacts can be quite big and we can stabilize populations but I think we looked all the data in that report. There are some big drivers that are shaping this overall context and they are things like climate change the impact of climate change on species the impact of agricultural policy. So I wouldn't say farming because there's some pharmacy fantastic work for wildlife. But the overall impact agricultural policy of the last fifty years has really changed Orlando Apes and made them far less inviting to wildlife and policy habitable and things like other factors like pollution for example pesticides. You know they've all had an impact but these big drivers are causing this big overall decline in. That's what we need to turn around and say I'm quite often looking. At one of our reserves where for example we've got a very successful population of lapping. That's doing very well but that is not enough in. It will not be enough to have an arc of a population existing on a lovely little protected nature reserve. We need to see Latin back in our way to countryside. If that population is going to really stabilize and then thrive so a lot of what we do is about trying to achieve recovery furniture on a much wider scale. I listened to sake from birds to tech. The tech environment seems quite healthy. You are breeding grounds. Lots of breeding ground attack. But I'm interested in your view on on tech leadership because quite often the people who are leading the big technip companies. Don't seem to get it if you look at some of the big platforms. There's the move fast and break things mentality and it's not our fault. Gov what would you say to that Hank? Texas is really interesting position at the moment. Where if you look at the very big tech companies. They are suddenly having to respond to and behave like many companies. They were trying to resist becoming. I'm it's largely because of the significance of the impact that having on on the global population. And we've seen this with various elections and I'm sure we don't want to into that now but I think it is interesting because so much of building. The culture around tech startups is about challenging. The status quo is about challenging existing leadership styles and existing leaders and norms. As I think it's really interesting to see the current wave of the Google and facebook than I was having to come to terms with what it means to be leaders. These founders becoming leaders very big culturally important companies and as the companies that we're working with the still relatively small and I think in the early days you have to be in the mindset of a startup where you are constantly John Jones Day Square. You are moving fast and breaking things I think. Unfortunately or fortunately as the as companies grow you do have to change the leadership Stalin and take into account. The you want startup anymore. You're actually part of the status quo and I think that's a reasonably hard shift of founders to to make the shift in style or actually you you change the boss. I written a lot on on academic these university spinouts. I mean quite often. The academic who came up with a brilliant idea at the lab bench is definitely not the CEO material going forward but some of them do insist on giving it a go. Not as something that we are. She came to challenge the thing. Yes the majority of academics Leon founded in the way that the majority of most people probably on founders. I suppose we roll entrepreneur. I is finding the academics who are both academically very brilliant but it also co potential one of Antonio values is that we believe in technologists. We believe that technologists can make amazing founders. You look in the US you know some of the biggest and greatest companies whether it be Microsoft whether it be facebook were created by people with technology backgrounds. I'm I would love to see in the UK as really celebrating those with technology backgrounds celebrating the fact that they can be leaders and founders. So that's something that we a lot of our most successful companies the CEO's do have technical backgrounds abroad to that just to touch on. You worked in the Tony Blair offers for a little. While as an intern I think and this was a period when he was transitioning out of number ten from Prime Minister to whatever else what your observations of that was very much a leader setting his own path. I guess and doing something in a way that maybe previous PM's hadn't done. Yeah I mean again. It was a sort of a stop situation but this summer. The A world leader I think just being having the opportunity to be around A very senior world leader and see how they live their life how they behave and it was. Oh it was a wonderful learning experience and I think as your sort of Growing up if you like in your Building in developing your own skills the more that you can either watch other leaders in action or as as you were saying get thrown into leadership. Positions probably unqualified for is one of the best ways to learn his another interesting leadership. Pairing Jack Buckner is chief executive of British swimming. The elite acquired governing body going for gold at the Olympics and other international competitions. He sat down with me and Simpson. You'll hear from first Patriots Chief Executive of Anglian water the biggest water provider in England Wales by geography which serves more than six million customers. Every day I I think there's a lot of companies now who've kind of got that and there's lots of really good examples of what companies doing doing similar things in terms of that engagement. I one of the really exciting things recently as being all companies committing to public interest commitment but essentially a series of joint goals which we will share and the difference about those those things really is. These goals will collaborate and innovate together on on achieving for the benefit of society and the environment an include really ambitious targets around things like carbon how commitment to achieve your net neutral carbon emissions by twenty thirty which is pretty pretty bold stuff. That's all of us together. Yeah so that's all of us on. That journey is one way of put. And you've put that into that senior company constitution. I I wonder what that means you day to day basis. You know when you're you got to consider the broader stakeholders every day in the office business. That's how we have run our business for many. Many years is the way up Shareholders to think. It's the way the board wants us to think that's how we operate. The most recent thing we did was to enshrine that triple bottom line radiant our articles. I as a way of kind of making sure that whatever happens in terms of changes to ownership and the like in the future that it's really clear what's written on the tin about the organization but it's actually the way we operate. There's still a big debate about who should own our water industry and your job AC- Does it really matter who the shareholders I think it does matter? We're very lucky in England that we've got long-term shelled essentially pension funds who who are not in it for a quick quick buck by there for the long term. They want to invest over long term. They Sakhon equip cave came in with something which is a short term solution. So I think that aspect is quite important touching the nature of the sort of businesses. Means you really want shout. His aren't going to be there commit to the long-term because it's quite easy if you're only popped in for a year or shorter periods of big Joe older than actually. There's a lot of decisions that could be suboptimal whereas you know we have planning in a big infrastructure over quarter of a century. In many cases so please don't nationalize would be the message. Well I I was there. I joined just before dawn. Remember it was like notes. I definitely don't go back there. There's been a huge improvement in the amount of flooding that we see out there. They're River River Wall to call take interruption supply by eating water quality any metric. You want to look at. It's been a step change since privatization and which is so much more efficient than we used to be back then so I definitely wouldn't want to go backwards. An e credit really. See the reason for doing that. Given the cost of being bold with commitments. That the industry's making for the future in terms of this public interest commitments total earlier the level of ambition in the last off. I think is another reason why you'd say well why the headlines recently some criticism from Dustin Lance Black Tom Daley's husband about. I think it really boils down to how close the Family should get to the At the time that they're in they're in the elite competition. How would you respond to that? Yeah it's really interesting. Discussion it probably. We're very much looking ahead to Tokyo. So I'm talking about 'cause actually there's quite a few of our established stars now who were going to be parents and now as well and they're going to be away from home for a period of time so trying to make sure that the family supported the family unit supported but at the same time. There's no compromise in the elite environment. So getting those balances. Roy is something where we're vigilant on expectations to changing all the time about what's appropriate and what isn't a hope we've got about right or we don't want to go too far one way or too far the other because of this is a very big call particular when you've got big names involved and it reminds me of some of the football tournaments do you let the wags. Ainhoa do not let the wags in I think I think I mean we're not once not football. As a general rule most of the Olympics Paralympian worked on have got an astonishing work essay. That actually can put some professional sports a shame but I think often now things happen. I mean if you if you look at people's programs homes in particular. He's got one event at the beginning of the Games. Another later on a big time in the middle you know. All sorts of things can go into trying to create an environment where he can feel supported and he's got access and other all them access to the support they need but at the same time are able to focus rigorously on the performance because when they get on that diving platform. What jump into that? Paul you know nobody at the end says will actually missed a medal and it was nice though he spent a bit Thomas Family. Nobody says did not balanced rights. I love that you should ready. Thanks for listening to this episode of leading with James Ashton. We're supposed to by Saxton. Bam filed the Executive Search Firm and leadership advisor find out more about their services at saks. Dot Com. I hope you've enjoyed our best bit. So far..

facebook CEO football UK Eagles founder Tony Blair James Ashton Scotland Jack Buckner Texas Olympics US Google John Jones Day Square Hank Stalin Anglian water
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"Did you have everything you needed or did you have to. Do you have to learn stepping into the job. I think Jack Butler said this as well. In his twenties to three hundred thirties and forties he changed significantly Hundley. I absolutely changed significantly. I was very Show on patients. Should I say I wanted stuff to happen immediately. I was always always tried. Ought to be you treat people the way you WanNa be treated yourself etc and then of that but I was. I could see what was possible but if other people took a bit longer to take to get that kind of vision a really struck without so I think I've learnt control Latin tempera. Infused should we say since then I think an organization has a responsibility wants ability to invest in the individual but the individual also has a responsibility to go out and get support and recognize where they need to improve. Been Very lucky to network can learn from a number of people within the sector who I've just approached and said can I come and spend some time with you. Martin Phillips who's just resigned as the WWL UC uh-huh spending a bit of time with him Jones. Still who was former chief executive Yuka. Spoke Baroness Sue Campbell. People like that. Who have been successful? How have they been successful and and also finding out sometimes that they've struggled as well and I've wrestled with this stuff? Nothing will actually. That's okay. It's your right to struggle with some of that. Yeah I Chris Greg Ah Mental View. The must've been people who've helped you helped you on the way. Sure a lot and I think that if you can learn from every boss the have that's is pretty good. Even if part of that the flip side what Chris is saying is to say you know what. I'm really not going to do it that way. Because and that I think you can learn a lot just by Washington listening. I think I as an example on the other side somebody like Lloyd. Blankfein was co Goldman for long time. Although yeah he he's criticized by some as a risk manager. What would I do in a crisis? I always play back through my head. What might Lloyd of Dogwood Loyd and and you know for me that's a great learning It's also don't make flip comments at the end of interviews which I think will regret to the end of his days on that comment around. I think it'll work but you know you can learn from that too. I was gonNA vote to later. Create exactly the button my lip exactly. I should say to you. Twenty years golden so you know certain companies organizations. You look back over the last thirty years. Twenty years. Where leaders have sprung from a numbers Mackenzie approaching gamble and Goldman? So what is it. Do you think I think partly it's a matter of time and place so Goldman expanded in UK okay relatively early on and they ended up just hiring a lot of very good people that helped and somehow I flip my way in that and then for for reasons. I've I've never really been able to explain. It became a group of people who were kind of constantly pushing one another to be better and I think that made it a good school for people to learn about some of the stuff we've been talking about in terms of how to manage people but also you know reliance on personal excellence. How do you get better kind of expecting Mike Stanfield self every day and I think you know for some weird reason? I still don't fully understand. Those factors came to play at scale. And as you know people ended up going off have to do is quite interesting thing in all directions and I've tried to try the proctor and gamble theory. The fact that you had companies who industries were liberalizing people needed the the marketing and the salesman skills as a result. A lot of people have moved up and moved into bt and another with Goldman. I suppose it's not quite as selling technique it is quite a hard nosed management management leadership. If you like the people think if you hide from Goldman's I'll get this. Yes I think. I think it's actually talking to one of my ex colleagues there and actually I was thinking but he doesn't isn't fit at a tool so I think maybe somehow the alumni kind of picked up this pattern of having a certain style and as it happens many of them don't but it's worked. Okay okay in terms of getting people into jobs while. I'm not sure you do really as a you know something. I don't know Goldman has a certain image. You know obviously people do high Goldman but as you say it it takes axel sorts. It does and and always. Did you know that was probably more. I hesitate were diversity in this context but you know plenty of different people and and some of them. Well what I think they all did learn. Somebody was using this word earlier today to talk about people. Almost everybody who did well in that place had some degree of age and how it manifested itself actually brought a new thing but you definitely needed a beverage to edge. Yeah it does edge work in the in the world of athletics you think yes. I mean traditional. You'd you'd think of edge through a kind of performance lens worries about you know. How did you find that that extra margin to be better? We challenge each other visiting. But we're all very very different and I think you know the way in which obviously we have values and behaviors that we subscribe to his organization as an executive team but we're very different frontier personality and approach. And I think that is that is really important because I guess if you'd have asked me the question when I was eighteen. Nineteen you think the a leader has to fill a certain prototype. You know the loudest voice and really commanding and controlling. And I've learned that that is not the case. People leading different ways with different styles and balanced to a team is really really important and I I try to surround myself with people who bring different skills who are more intelligent intelligent. The main different ways because I never quite understood why people would Surround themselves with people will say yes because it makes no sense whatsoever did. Did you ever think identity how it got away with that. I it certainly from early days when I've talked to people go into leadership positions then there's a recognition that suddenly there and that the buck stops with them. I don't know if that carries on Tom down the years if you like I. I can't think of an example where I've thought that but there have been several occasions where I thought I could have done that better. And `and I've learned from it and I think where you get things wrong or even way you could have done it better you need to hold you recognize that you could have done it better. Apologize is and don't do it again. And I think openness and transparency in that respect is really important from the leader because people will mirror behavior as well if they look and they say well that's acceptable. People will mirror behavior and it will affect the culture. And I think that's really important. Is it low nick Greg again. I think you can overstate their come back to what I said before in other words I don't think you can wander around and expect everybody to tell you the full story. Exactly what they fill because they will always have in their mind their judgments involved about their careers. But I don't think per se it's not much not come down the pub with me You just have to recognize nice that it's a slightly different relationship and most of the people I've talked to in these sorts of jobs do find some sort of way of kind of balancing bad par with with other people in their lives French switching mentorship group again that's the Goldman Sachs or whatever it is or just a you know. Friends are in completely different in industries or are at the same level or a completely different thing so they do need something where you can. You know the metaphor equivalent a guy kicking the cat deny spend enough to be the cat for kids might even take off a drink now at yeah they. Do you know what it was when my son actually took me out for drinks. Note that I'm paying thing that I think it was a big moment for him. was a surprising moment for me. Heal said that you know that was that was a neat thing as as your children get older. They have different perspectives tips. Yeah good for him and Chris Jones what would you. What might you have done differently? What would you is less than two youngest self if you like? Calm down into the message for union down. I was is playing a lot of rugby at that time. So maybe that to do with it. Kinda had enthusiasm among have you reflect. Take some time. Don't make it quick decisions. It's okay to take it but a time just to digest information. Don't come to conclusions too quickly because some decisions that you might particularly the in these roles affect people's livelihoods the integrity the organization is financial integrity. And so on and so forth so yeah just take some time. Take a breath and seek counsel. If you're not quite sure see seek a second third fourth opinion because His amazing how your thought process this can evolve through that. Do you agree with that creek. Yes no because I think all of that's exactly right and yet there are other times when you just Kinda know what the right decision is and you look back. I just equivocated and I kind of didn't really really want to take the decision particularly. It's tough decision particularly if it's about people so so you kind of kid yourself that just one more opinion might be useful. And that's actually when I've found when I've looked back I could and should have made that decision really are coined a new And I found a variety of ways of equivocating for slightly longer than I think that can be. That sometimes seems to be the habit if you if you're running say a partnership shipped lead firm whether actually are seven hundred people will think they have a have a view and then you you kind of feel you need to go around them and then sometimes you need to trust your gut. I suppose. Yeah I think it. But it'll we abounds because there are other times when you look and you just to that decision without usually of one of my colleagues always used to say you know. Take the decision the first day you think have enough enough information and don't forget if you don't take a decision on day one on day two. You have two decisions to make go do the math softer week and a half. It's got quite trike strike a balance a wise person. Yeah Great Chris Greg and Chris Jones thanks so much for the conversation. Thank you and Thanks for listening to this. Episode of leading with James Ashton we all supported by Saxton Banff L. The executive search firm and leadership advisor. Find out more about this services at SAKS OBAMA DOT com. You can also find more leader sharing their stories in previous episodes of leading wherever you get your podcasts. A new series is coming in two thousand twenty.

Goldman Chris Jones Goldman Sachs Chris Greg executive Martin Phillips Baroness Sue Campbell Hundley Jack Butler Lloyd Chris bt chief executive UK Washington James Ashton risk manager Mike Stanfield Blankfein SAKS OBAMA
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"I mean I can't come in obviously for the top-end stuff stuff No but it was always about grassroots Selena. Getting people out and you came in you AC- Almost the moment of Olympic the Olympic. Finish yeah well. If look the pure metric solve number of clubs number of people in those clubs than them moving in the right direction the number of volunteers steadily grown. But perhaps we need to grab it quicker to cope with this demand. Particularly when we're talking about coaches and officials athlete performances age group level across most of the events are generally in really good. We have a real challenge in transitioning athletes from genius success senior success. Now that I think a number spoils wrestle without particularly around the edges of fifteen sixteen. The seven to the kids. Just get bored. I think it's hard work to be really good as well. I think there are a number of things that are going on around that time in their lives you know you've got GPS's CSE's levels guarantee university etc work social media creates an pressures as well. And I think we as a sport need to look at our core product as well. Are we providing what the young does need particularly in the Charleston field sense when it comes to competition. Is it right to expect youngsters to travel cy. Five six around trip so maybe compete for half an hour or so and then there for the rest of the Diana. Go home when you can go to your local netball court and compete for an our and and you can do something else so those are the kinds of things we need to think. Through as a sport running is probably got it nailed in that respect because of the advent of concepts like Ponkin. Right you can go and do you run into something else for the rest of the day. I'm volunteer. Commitment is smaller in time as well Jones. We would just took him just before Christmas. One of my daughters was a reasonably serious athlete. And I do think a support she received from the club at in Hartford show was just originally and not just in the context of the running career she ended up. You could tell by injury but as a woman the influence of those coaches this was just fantastic and I was always uber impressed. By the amount of time they gave up and didn't see it as give sorties whatever and they were terrifically good for nine years later whenever she's at home shook from see them and so I think some of those things. We underestimate the impact on day. One say brought society in a very positive way because at the end of the day to be a decent athlete. You know you have to live a very clean life. You have to be very focused on your health and things things and that say a terrifically good thing and often the kids he might not otherwise get that guidance and actually Chris one one of the things I've spotted doing this run of podcasts and comparing impairing the the CEO of Appeal See. Everyone's up at the office every day British land. They're all paid. They're all patriot. They want to be there of course and then I contrast that with the administrators traders in the charity bosses and then this real challenge. What leadership can you lend the volunteer? Who is turning up purely? Because they want to be there and that is a challenge. I think yes I think it is and ah you know it does. I'm sure require a different way of leading Because at the end of the day we as as bosses a commercial organization and we do have maybe a slightly larger stick that you can wield in the end having said that. I do think that most of the time if people aren't enjoying their job open the modern world. You know we got full employment if you're not creating an environment which won't come to work. Guess what their fate is just a different format so I think that similarities Dan Different. So what is your style. I mean you. You've never struck me as a stick wilder but your style of managing leading to people to the team need to like you. I think it's one of those really league nuanced conversations. I think first of all I think you can't kid yourself that you're going to be people's friend in the conventional sense because in the end of the day you are responsible for their earning capacity so it is a complicated relationship and imagining that everybody is just going to be. Friends is naive. I think it's easier if people respect you and generally people respect you if they kind of have some regard that you're decent human being having said that I've worked with people who work on a different basis and and they can be effective too so I think as much as anything else for me at least it's about being as you are and having been comfortable with yourself and I'm trying to work into that a leadership style it works. Do you agree with that. Christians I do I think consistency is absolutely imperative. If your later people need to so now what they're going to get and you need to be consistent in that respect whatever your style and whatever your views on things are I think authenticity is really important. And and compelling purpose. You people need to know that you are enthusiastic about what you are trying to do and that you are prepared sometimes. Roll your sleeves up and get stuck in. Because as an organization with limited resource. We can't afford to be too hierarchical in our approach. I regard myself. I came through the classic pathway. If you like I came through the sports pathway whereas number of the people in the central come from the commercial sector into the sports sector so I know what it's like for the coach development managers out on a Wednesday evening evening in stratford-upon-avon in the cold in The rain working with volunteers and I try every month to get out to a to a global to to meet the volunteers. I wanted to kick the air to the ground to find out how we can be a more effective organization because that is really important for us as a membership ball because as you say you know you are as a sports person I before a CEO menu very credible cricket rugby an running. So you've tried a bit of everything. I'm not so sure many people would say I was a great run out but We're reads swelling your CV anywhere. Yes we won't go that I was very very fortunate. My parents on man's my local cricket club at the age of three weeks old. And and then I was playing mini rugby the five or six. I saw firsthand the impact that sport and volunteers make to young people and older people. And I know what a difference it can make to people's lives because I felt it firsthand and so that as always inspired me my dad's been groundsmen at a local cricket club for fifty years now and every clubhouse someone like my dad so every club Heiko too. I recognize that individual or a couple of individuals who live for that club the entity and that is a star reminded to me as someone who's fortunate to work within the sport than the majority of people do volunteers and we are very very fortunate. Schnitt to be in that position and every time I hear a whiff of any kind of disgruntlement at work about conditions say hang on a minute just remember member. There are a number of people who would give everything to be in this position. So you know respect. The jaw respect the sport. And and plough them. I do think that this topic which you touched stone of purpose is if I think back over my career that is something that has gone way. Way Up Agenda for commercial canonisations nations compared with I would say even five years ago but compared with you know ten twenty years ago. It's a very very marked difference and it does does change the ground rules. I think for commercial organizations and in that sense is a really big shift. Chief executives were pretty much paid in order to let to deliver results for their shelves. I don't think many people today would say that. That is broad enough or enough necessary but not sufficient. What if you will and some of those trade offs between different responsibilities have definitely become more nuanced and I think that will only grow? You only have to you. You think about the pressures the society is bringing to bear on business around climate around of factors to see that that's just going to shift and make people's lives more complicated but I suspect therefore we in the commercial cetera going to have to learn stuff from people who've had to balance those things more historically. I think that's really interesting. So it makes the job harder Different identity one. Should it come back to the Chris units that privileged to be doing one of these com on spending time saying allardice. No some people do their crisp yes. They don't often Get loaded for doing it. Tell me about the just looking at your CV and and whereas you see Christians embedded in sport and throwing balls and also you know there was a period when you come in and nine incidentally for the listener replacing Stephen Hester. WHO's off to do national service and run run Royal Bank of Scotland? You the banker doing property yet there was a real. It felt like there was a there was a period of acceptance if you like and there was some people who'd never left never work outside the property industry who Weren't afraid to say well. This guy was he doing here in. So how'd you deal with. I think the best way of dealing with it is to ignore it to honest with you because I think there will always be what whatever aspect of it is and it's part of the job people second guessing what you should or shouldn't do Taylor. Chris was saying they'll always be that ten to twenty percent. Who say you should be going? You should be ziggy not sagging and I think to get bogged down in one piece and people say well. You don't bring enough after this job that that's just probably what I did. Do bring different things and you know that's but at the end of the day it's not that group that I have to answer to so ignoring unless you think. Well that's a fair point. I need to adapt or change a bit learning. And all of those things Costa part of that way of working your way into a job but you must have learned a huge amount regardless eldest of what the critic said. We've talked about this before. I think it was earlier. Nine lots of stuff was going down though is property companies in worship than yours. But you had to sell assets you had to shore up the business in order to take it forward and show you taking a deep breath and now it's very responsible. Legacy is his is historic. No but I think it would probably framed. You're thinking as you go on and many many years yes I think inevitably that was kind of a formative experience and in many ways I I always took the view that if everything had been fine the the chances are I wouldn't have got hired into the people wanted somebody. I'd capital markets expertise. You knew who had big scale management which had done elsewhere so you know. Hey as as I said at the outset it it felt kind of privileged to be in that position and so I had other strengths and it was in some ways. The luck of the draw that Stephen of course they were related. Latest Stephen was off to do something else which was quite a mess. And so you know those things unfold in particular ways. Which sometimes career goes Chris Johns? Tell me about how you stepped up because because you were the Strategy was being a bit down on strategy heads. I don't convince me otherwise. I always think maybe I'm right. that a bit like lawyers. They sat out. All the options wins and then. CEO has to make the decision. Am I being really awful. I was I would in hindsight of cooled my role. I was the head of operations. If you're much better I was was jack-of-all-trades master of then we were kind of organized and somewhat argument would be that now really your generalist really and you can't afford to get get sucked into too much detail like you achieve very little. And why would you when you are the people who are paid in responsible for that. So that's a difficult balance and I guess in that role was very very a similar. We have a situation where we had an executive chair for short period of time following on from the the departure of the previous chief executive and I spent a lot of time supporting pulling him supporting the board because of course he wasn't fulltime and I was really the only one at that time in the national team. We've eighth national team since then to give some specialisms nationalisms across different areas. I'd say I was very fortunate at that time because I got the experience of learning about a whole range of different areas we know from digital to finance to marketing to calms yet range. Different areas of expertise so I was probably in the right place at the right time to benefit right..

CEO Chris Johns rugby Selena Stephen netball Charleston stratford-upon-avon Stephen Hester Royal Bank of Scotland Ponkin Hartford Jones head of operations Heiko executive chief executive ziggy
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

14:39 min | 2 years ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"The world of business charity the arts and beyond in each episode my two guests swap stories about how they learned to lead and the successes and failures at the top I'm James Ashton writer conference speaker every year to improve global health through research and education funded by twenty six billion-pound endowment welcome spent twenty five years unraveling the human genome and also been involved in breakthroughs that tracked the inner workings of the brain diagnosed prostate cancer and tackle Ebola outbreaks before joining welcome six years ago was the director of Oxford University's Clinical Research Unit in Vietnam where his research interests were infectious diseases and Tropical Health Nick Pearson Chief Executive of park run a sporting movement that began life as a free five kilometer time trial in south west London fifteen years ago it still free but now three hundred thousand runners of abilities take part in events across twenty one countries every weekend pace and wasn't elite runner and he has twenty five years experience in the sports industry he used to run sweatshops independent specialist sports retailer in this podcast we talk about risk-taking developing a campaigning voice and the lean organizations of tomorrow I began the ovation asking Jeremy.

Ebola director Oxford University Clinical Research Unit Vietnam Chief Executive London Jeremy James Ashton writer Nick Pearson twenty five years twenty six billion-pound five kilometer fifteen years six years
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

13:12 min | 2 years ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"The arts and and in each episode my two guests swap stories about how they learned to lead and their successes and failures at the top I'm James Ashton Writer Conference Speaker and consultant nine on everyday life the relocation to Kensington three years ago triple space exhibitions that have featured Stanley Kubrick and Ferrari and the design museum was named European Museum of the year in two thousand eighteen black began her career in banking but her experience museums include senior roles at the imperial war museum and the Churchill Museum cabinet war rooms she was appointed deputy director at the design museum in two thousand seven co-director in two thousand sixteen Paulie need is the chief executive of housing charity Delta which last year helped four point seven million people struggling with homelessness and bad housing shelter has successfully campaigned to improve tenants rights and is still pressing for greater of social housing originally journalist Neat joined the charity sector in two thousand and five at action for children later leading women's aid for four years and taking over a shelter two thousand seventeen I began the conversation.

Kensington Stanley Kubrick design museum European Museum imperial war museum deputy director co-director chief executive Neat James Ashton Writer consultant Churchill Museum Paulie three years four years
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

13:35 min | 2 years ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"In the world of business charity the arts and beyond in each episode my guests stories about how they learn to lead and their successes and failures of the top i'm james ashton a writer conference speaker and consultant rounds include patty power that fair and found your the group employs eight thousand people in sixteen offices around the world and the last year handled three billion punters transactions tougher regulation bites at home jackson is pursuing expansion overseas namely trying to build a winning position in the US where sports betting is being legalized earlier in his career he worked in consumer banking at age boss and lloyd's lead foreign exchange company travelex and we'll pay you k- the payment processing firm michael gibney is chief executive the fatter foundation the UK arm of a global movement that fights poverty by promoting better terms of trade for one point seven million farmers around the globe it's blue and green oh go is a familiar sight on supermarket shelves certifying four and a half thousand product lines including bananas coffee flowers and t- in recent years some partners such as saint sprees and chocolate maker mondelez have preferred to develop their own ethical certification forcing fair trade to rethink how it operates kidney joined the staff of fair trade is deputy chief executive in two thousand nine and was made chief executive in twenty twelve i started the conversation by asking peter what he was looking for when he.

jackson US lloyd travelex michael gibney chief executive peter james ashton writer consultant UK deputy chief
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"The arts I'm beyond in each episode my two guests swap stories about how they learn to lead and their successes and failures at the top I'm James Ashton Journalist Conference Speaker and consultant historical sites and monuments including stonehenge Dover Castle and Hadrian's wall she joined in two thousand fifteen when the organization gained charitable status and began the countdown twenty twenty three when his government funding will disappear or maybe watch English heritage now has more than one million members and recorded six and a half million visits to its main sites cheer she was formerly the Chief Executive of the National Trust for Scotland and earlier in her career that a management buyout of the Interpreting Service Language Line John Holland Kaye is the chiefs give Heathrow the UK's largest airport through which more than eighteen million passengers passed last year it's no slouch Chicago either handling about one hundred thirty billion pounds goods annually if all goes according to plan Heathrow's should become significantly large in twenty twenty six when a third runway opens after years of political to and froing and significant and opposition Alan Kay is used to building projects the oversaw development of Heathrow's new terminal two which opened in two thousand fourteen the year he got the top job I began the compensation asking Kate how progress was going towards English heritage's financial freedom in.

stonehenge Dover Castle Chief Executive National Trust Scotland John Holland Kaye chiefs UK Chicago Heathrow Alan Kay Kate James Ashton consultant one hundred thirty billion pou
"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

Leading with James Ashton

14:30 min | 2 years ago

"james ashton" Discussed on Leading with James Ashton

"They learn to lead and their successes and failures at the top I'm James Ashton Journalist Conference Speaker and consultant it's seven hundred members seek to do business better whether that's helping the environment their own staff or society at large they get it right they might even boost levels of public trust in Large Enterprise Mackenzie has over twenty five years of commercial experience including Director Roles British Airways Amal's BT and British Gas and she joined a Vivere as chief marketing officer to change its name from Norwich Union Matt Hyde is chief executive of the scouts the fast growing youth movement with six hundred forty thousand members in the UK while for some the adventure bag grills is the organization's public face as the chief scout I spent the last six years is working on strategies that have developed the scouts from the Campfire heritage million hands has reasserted the scout strengthen.

consultant Large Enterprise Mackenzie British Airways Amal chief marketing officer Matt Hyde chief executive UK James Ashton Director British Gas Norwich chief scout twenty five years million hands six years