20 Burst results for "James Allison"

"james allison" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

06:38 min | 9 months ago

"james allison" Discussed on What It Takes

"Of. Its face if his personal run-ins with cancer weren't enough motivation. He's now had a decade of run INS with people whose lives he has saved a pretty rare and gratifying honor for a research scientist. He recounts the first time it happened in two thousand six. I guess which was well. After the phase phase weather show that it worked. You know that we were on the right. Track can never tumors just melted. You know Complete responses I mean. That's what the stories about the whole. Tumor goes away everywhere in the body. Everything if it's a complete response I mean that's the definition and so we saw out of that. But you know it wasn't there you have to do this. Study's proper ways but his to get registration but just while there was expository step There's one woman that I met She was twenty two years old and Sharon Belvin. She allows me to talk about this actually encourages but anyway she was twenty. Two just finish. College was engaged started feeling tired in turned out. She didn't have the typical kind of melanoma but our brain and lungs but riddled with it. She had thirty two. I think long metastasis centimeter and a half to our brain and You know so. She went to Stone Kettering jedwabne chocolates. Her position there who's part worked with him a lot Anyway she got a miraculous studied just gotten engaged in so they told her. There's nothing you know. We'll try some stuff but said is experimental and so she decided So there would have had gotten married. I mean right when she was starting chemotherapy when she failed. Wise fail this. She failed everything they threw at it and finally said you know we're done hospice. You know we we just got a few months but now you qualify for this child with this new drug. Ap Liberal Man. It took Sharon Belvin three or four months to respond to the drug. She was coming back in for a checkup after this treatment. And Scans the path allergist called him and said. I think there's a mistake because she doesn't have any cancer prepared that compared that with the previous visit and she had thirty one long. Madsen the Brian. It's all gone and So Jed was really happy to call her and she came showed up at his clinic with you know her parents are husband and then the guy that developed its hair you. WanNa meet him and she said Yeah so. He Calls Me. You know he says. Hey Jim Coming Clinton said come on. I'm busy and he's not come on my office though absent. Upper East New York City York City in the outpatient clinic was twenty blocks away or something and so I said okay. I'll go. It's a day and I'll walk you over these people in the room and this woman. She's very big. She's taller. She grabbing picked me out when she worked out. Every show was crush my ribs. It was amazing it but her husband was there and everybody started fine hugging. You start crying. I was mad I encountered I was walking back to that lab thinking. Jesus you know the mice all the time but they bite me pee on me. You know. They don't care of course gave it to him in the first place. So guess what does it feel like to melt away tumors and allow people to live. It's hard to say I mean that's what it's all about. The day she went on. You know I mean. I've kept in touch with her fourteen years now and But she taught me a lot about the other side of it. A lot about this thing about conic is anyway. Her doctor says not a good idea if you'd have children now she's twenty four twenty five. She said what you know. Screw Melanie I'm going to have kids anyway. You know so. She's got two kids now. Wow Jewish actually went to Stockholm in other words. She joined him when he went to receive the Nobel prize which he shared by the way with a Japanese scientist named Taku. Honjo rumors had been swirling for several years. The James Allison would win. His name had even appeared in bedding magazines that give gambling odds for Nobel's who knew when his turned finally came in two thousand eighteen. He was at a hotel and a conferences wife was attending most Nobel call. Stories are pretty similar but this one had a glitch at about seven in the morning the phone rang but it was not the Nobel Committee. It was his son said. Dad Dad won the Nobel Prize. What somehow they didn't have my right number. Alabel Committee but my son got up early to watch the press conference. Oh my gosh so you didn't actually get a call. They even announced on TV. Apparently they're having trouble. Finding man was sick or died or something about an hour later with the help of PR person from the MD. Anderson Center where he works. They reached him. And what did they say? Geyser said was you know we've give it a lot about understanding cancer and all this. It's really good to give a prize for advances in treating cancer for the first time when you hung up the phone went to do well. There are about twelve miles a champagne and another glasses. Champagne does it. Change Your Life to win a big price a lot. I mean mostly mostly good ways but those for a week or two. It was difficult for me to get my office in the morning. There's people everybody wants to sell Nobel Prizes in the age of social media..

Nobel prize Sharon Belvin Nobel Committee research scientist Nobel feeling tired New York City Jim Coming Clinton Stone Kettering Champagne Stockholm Geyser Madsen Jed Alabel Committee Dad Melanie James Allison Anderson Center
"james allison" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

09:24 min | 9 months ago

"james allison" Discussed on What It Takes

"Back. You refused their ops. That our oldest brother who was a rancher jacket Rolla bulldogs with one hand. Not as hard as he paid for the long cancer. But you know he had chemo. I got Saw Him occasionally to in an oxygen tent reduced from his huge full alive cowboy this sacred bones. Anyway I got this so you saw cancer really up close and what. How was eating people killing people and you yourself had cancer three times actually luckily my brushes with cancer. They've been taught early. My eye prostate cancer off. I have two brothers. Middle Brother died of it. All three of us have prostate cancer and Mine was caught pretty early but his was so severe and so rapid that Normally probably would have just waited but time they decided the best thing to do is take it out. Even though they could have probably waited a year or two made a decision. You WanNa take a chance given how fast your brother's progress so so. When did you decide you know? I WANNA BE CANCER. You know the asset a lot. I think that was always seminole or something you know but it's not that I said I'm going to cure cancer. I got into science. I said I WANNA. I really wanted to find something. I was interested in when I was in graduate school. I did a one of my projects. Did doing my page directly on on how to treat cancer but ultimately I decided that wasn't GonNa go that route. I got into the immune system Trained in chemistry biochemistry and took a course algae when I was in cal- undergraduate and heard about this paper. Actually the Max Brand Jacques Miller and these two guys did were but these guys discovered two components the system b cells and t cells. And I said I gotta get into this understand this. This is the coolest thing I've ever heard about all this work. That's come from. There's and they're just now. Getting record is the week before this interview. In fact Max. Cuper and Jacques Miller were awarded the lasker prize the most prestigious science prize. In the United States apprise Jim Allison one in two thousand fifteen aurora. Maximum voter. Can't believe my work. Everybody Springs from yours. Can you explain to the people listening? You Know How. Your cancer cure works. Yeah so it's not that hard people have been you know your immune system of course has the ability particularly T. cells to detect. When there's something wrong and I say that I mean because that kid include infections you know I mean it's just a very good obviously at detecting when you've got a virus infection or you got bacteria and dealing with them and they know how to deal with the bacteria not hurt your cells and that's the fascinating thing about him and they do. This is recognized. Not Self which is it. Sounds like a complicated thing. But basically they know that that immune system as receptors that enables it figure out when there's something going on inside a cell that shouldn't be there they don't need to know what it is but just out to be there at some new And Way that works is pretty fast. They're these receptors generated individually on different T. cells to probably got somewhere around fifty million different ones. And you maybe maybe a hundred. Nobody knows for sure but they each can recognize something different but when they recognize something. That shouldn't be either like a virus infected cell. They'll recognize can recognize things. That virus causes the cell to make. That aren't no you and they respond to that by expanding from a small number two a lot and then killing it so we've got these hunting. Tens of millions of different sow such. You've got a diverse repertoire. Of course then you've got to get hundreds of thousands of one or two or whatever it is that can help you. That's the cool part of the immune system because that's where the critical switches t-cells see something and it's got to quickly generate hundred thousand copies of itself. You know so that you get the army to go and swarm around your body go through all your tissues and look for stuff and hopefully kill it so they could do that to cancer as well. Your innovation was the antibody. Well it was to figure out people understood that process. You know. T-cells recognized expand. They do their function. The contract you know most of them die and then you end up with some that. Are there for the rest of your life. I mean that's the really cool thing about immune system is because once it develops you've got it for the rest of your life these renewing t-cells key. Nobody really understand what starter they thought it was. Just switch you flip it and so nine hundred eighty two we worked out the structure of the Antigen receptor. Which is the molecule like? Ignition switch in the car. That's that thing that there's you know. Tens of millions of difference in your body and people thought well you just flip that and that's it so the people that have been trying for decades to vaccinate people in failed hundreds of failed trials just trying to back because they really didn't appreciate that you can't just there is no single switch is flipped it takes turns out. There's a gas paddle wheelers another signal that it's a way of keeping your safe from. Tc does get back to when they ought to. So for the T. cells to spring into action when they detect something awry in other cells of the body. They need the right signal to get them. Started the ignition. And they need a secondary signal the gas pedal but what was the next step that there was a break. This was the key thing. There's another molecule that nobody had found before really expected impact. There is a molecule that people thought was another gas pedal. But we used to. We showed that it was Nah. It was actually a break. Because when those t cells you it gets the first two signals. Divide not crazy so you go from. I don't know making these numbers up ten to five hundred thousand cells in a week. You can't let that keep going. You know you've got to have a way of stopping that it'll kill you and You know I mean you can't do body can't put all the energy and everything just producing those t cells in probably do. What are they go? You know you. Can't you gotTa Stop That in control? And that's what this molecule does except in cancer kicks in prematurely for you know I can go into the race but but that's basically what we've found but and also told us as it's turned on when the gets those other two signals so when people try to immunize naming is aiming is what we figured out was after about the first you know few times I mean. Is there actually turning on the brakes off the gas pedal? That's why didn't work because the TESOL goes into this. Let's stop now pays anyway. We found out how to stop that just disabled the brakes time. So that's what we do is and and Mice I had to do is just inject this one. Antibody that interferes with that breaking mechanism. That's the main system. Keep going for as long as that drugs around the T. cells could just keep going going and they just keep killing tumors and so in mice. We could have dejected. And of course like about it was the kind of cancer doesn't matter because you're not treating the cancer. The work had nothing to do with cancer. Nothing directly to do with cancer because it was really basic research into how the immune system operates to reiterate. What kicks it into high gear. And what tells it when it's time to shut down you now? I asked you to remember the name of Jim. Allison's band well now's your moment that molecule and the T. cell which signals the body's immune system to step on the breaks. It's called a checkpoint and the medicine that James Allison eventually developed to disable those breaks is called a checkpoint inhibitor. It used to be the kind of cancer out now. Are you burned to cut it out or poisoning right and now? Instead of radiation or chemo or surgery. You're trying to turn the immune system to kill the immune system. Do the job without doing any of that other stuff. Mary Jordan asked. Jim Allison to tell the story of that breakthrough moment when he realized that. Disabling the breaks on the immune system with an antibody.

cancer Jim Allison chemo Jacques Miller United States cal James Allison Max Mary Jordan Cuper
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The other scientists who've been working on therapies and cancer, because this is one thing that I think you know, the Nobel prize does a great job at at acknowledging great work and focusing, you know the public's broader attention on things that are happening in science and medicine in particular. But. Hope you don't mind me saying, but I presume you're not the only person who's had a big impact in this field. No, I'm the way that science and there I work in works. As we, we have students and postdoctoral fellows, and you know, we direct their efforts and as a team, you know, approach things and I, it would be I'd have to give you a long list people that contributed to this, but you know. They mothers work was done to foundation for the stuff was done in the mid nineties, actually massive graduate students in my lab at the university of California, Berkeley at the time, and I have to give them a lot of credit most notably, guiding max krummel, who was the guy that did the cool experiments that showed that seeks for it was the breaks on the immune system. Britain Yuli. I, I mean to that point, there's a lot of their many people out there working on this. There's a labs across the United States and around the world where what do you think is the best thing that the public could do to further support enhance, you know, advance this research. So I think it's incredibly important that the public understand the value of participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials, research working with physician researchers who are trying to advance these new news therapies. All the wonderful discoveries in the laboratory don't don't mean much to human beings unless we can have patience, you know, partner with us to really test them and study them. So that's one way where people can make a tremendous difference in the world in hopefully for themselves. But also even if not for the world and future cancer patients, you know. And then finally, a lot of research is supported by by the by the government and continued public support for the type of research that has led to these breakthroughs that comes out of our public funding is really, really something we'd like to see our our citizens continued to advocate for well, Monica, Burton Yolly president of the American society for Clinical Oncology and chief of the division of surgical oncology at danafarber, Brigham and women's hospital cancer center. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks magnates been great. And Jim Allison, the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize winner in physiology or medicine on a award that he shares with soup Honjo of Kyoto University. Jim Allison is also chair of the department of immunology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Mr. Ellison. Thank you so much for joining us today and congratulations on the Nobel prize and all your research. Thank you so very. Much. Thank you. Thank you so much the chance to do this and by the way folks, if you've been wondering why I've been calling Jamal's and Mistrals Dr Ellison he is Jim Elson PHD but our journalistic standards here at NPR say, MD's get called doctors, PHD's get PHD's, I guess. So that's the quick explanation there, but go to our website on point, radio dot org. If you've got thoughts about cancer treatments today and immuno therapies as well, I'm gonna trucker body. This is on point.

Nobel prize Jim Allison Mr. Ellison MD Anderson Cancer Center Clinical Oncology and chief hospital cancer center postdoctoral United States Berkeley university of California MD NPR Britain Kyoto University max krummel partner Jamal Brigham Monica
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"My died from her chemotherapy treatment. So I just after they're getting chemotherapy. I, I had a belief that I just get really sick and kill me, I think. And I decided to just, you know, take Panthers and like other die from the cancer from the chemotherapy by I left like that. You know, my skateboarding on a greyhound bus and left to live well after receiving nationwide media attention to being a runaway cancer facing. I learn about all different alternative therapies. I ended up doing one that they said it boosts your immune system, say body, can you know cancer the way it's supposed to what? What was that alternative therapy changed? My diet. I drank a tea to help get the right, but the Fathy that I chose was it was called seven for connecting injected into your lymph nodes. And with I was sixteen, I learned how to do these actions, but and where did you get the? Where'd you get the syrupy from. From Canada. Okay. And now and that was in ninety four. And now we're in two thousand eighteen. So you're saying that it it worked for you. Yeah, I won't say that I'm fifty nine forty now too, but but the thing that's going to have to tell me what the hell is, you know, it wasn't approved. It wasn't much like research, but when I learned about it, I believe that it is what my body needed. My sister. Well, right poisoning myself, you know, I think I'll have a better chance Billy. Thank you for your call. I definitely want to turn that back to Monica. Burt newly Jim, Allison and Monica. Let me start with you. I mean, Billy's not the only person who brings us up. We've got stuff coming in online of people wanting to talk about alternative treatments, including vitamin c. or preventative measures, dietary changes, that kind of thing. So I mean, what's your, what's your responsibility about alternative treatments? So I first of all that the we practice our medicine based on the best knowledge we have and the best knowledge we have comes from data comes from studies of patients that where we actually try different therapies in clinical trials in patients and gather data on whether they are going to respond or not, you know any given patient that receives the therapy. We we, there's only the, it's never a sure thing. The other really important. Issue that the alternative therapy approach raises is that as doctors, we absolutely have to practice our medicine in a way that includes an is respectful to the patients interest the patients values and their desires, whether it's to grab your skateboard and you know, be a teenager or whether it's to try some other therapies. You know, we try to guide it in a way that's not going to hurt what we know is the best thing to do, you know. But ultimately it's the patient's, it's the patient's journey were there to support and help in the best way we can. And the last thing we want to do is to turn them off or turn them away because they might have a different idea about something. Yeah, Jim Ellison, David thought on the. Hundred percent with what she said. We do things. You know, I'm a scientist, not a physician, but we all try to do things based on data. I understanding of how things work and what works. Well, we've just got a couple of minutes left here to wrap up the show, and Jim Nelson, since you said your scientists not a physician, I was just wondering if you might talk to us a little bit about all.

Panthers cancer Monica Billy scientist skateboarding Jim Ellison Canada Jim Nelson Burt Jim Allison David Hundred percent
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"With advanced stage three ovarian cancer, which statistically has a terrible survival rate. I'm like, I'll be very, very, very lucky if I'm still alive in five years and yet every day on NPR I hear about these clinics with all this immunotherapy, but there's nothing for me. And so my question to your researchers is for someone like me, how many years do I have to try to stay alive using conventional methods of treatment until someone comes up with therapy that's going to prolong my life? You know what I mean? Lizzy. Hang on. Don't don't hang up the phone here. Let me just turn to Jim Ellison. I Jim for her. One of the one of the excitement about immunotherapy is because there's a lot of cancers that that were uniformly fatal before that are now responding. Unfortunately, they don't all respond. I mean, the clear blessed Toma and pancreatic cancer, for example, that we hear about the news really have not responded much at all yet ovarian, his one which doesn't respond with the frequency we buy. And so what we're involved in here at an immune platform is really studying what goes wrong, not only in patients that have successful therapies, impatience that received combinations that don't work and try to figure out what's missing and then and then in irrational way at the things that are missing and try to, you know, move move it forward movement where it makes it more effective and you know we, we've done that in a few cancers now, but ovarian where he hit. We just have made it very far. Did I hear you correctly when you say that you've been searching for clinical trial to participate in, but you can't find one or one that you quote that will that you qualify for. Yeah, that's correct. I found one, but I don't think it's they're saying it's a vaccine, but it's like which they think is different from you know therapy, but it's also one where there's a fifty percent chance that will get a placebo. Now it's a pack seen same thing as therapy is that different Dr. It's different kinds of immunotherapy. Yeah, Monica avert you only I mean, what? What? What would you what guidance or advice would you have released? Because I imagine that there are many other people like her out there who would like to have access to these treatments even in the clinical trial phase, but for whatever reason cannot. Well, you know, you have two questions to issues first Lizzie. Thank you so much for calling in and for sharing your story with us because this is something that absolutely needs to be raised. Every time we have a discussion about some great breakthrough. There's just always so much more to do, and I hope very much that you are in an environment where you have expert doctors who are doing everything they can for you because you know, there's, there's a lot that can be done, but there's still a lot more to do now the issue of clinical trials. Again, Lizzie, thank you for illustrating that how the importance of that one of the things that one of the. A big problems. We have only three percent of patients adult patients in the United States participate in clinical trials. So ninety seven percent of people out there. We don't have information or even access to them for some of these new potential breakthrough therapies. So one of the big par things that we need to advocate for is more availability of clinical trials, and those trials need to get to every tiny community, not.

Lizzie Toma Jim Ellison Monica United States Lizzy ninety seven percent fifty percent three percent five years
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We're also joined by Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology and a little earlier in the show. Dr Brittany Lee told us that we've never seen an explosion in terms of the number of possible treatments or therapies for cancer. As we are seeing right now, some two thousand different treatments in the pipeline. The. Research or clinical trial pipeline is a very exciting moment in cancer research, but Dr Bernard newly just before the break. We were also talking about how how individualized these therapies can be. So are we talking about, you know, slightly different therapies tailored for from person to person. Oh, perhaps you know. There is a whole emphasis right now on understanding the individual biology of every patient and being able to target that specifically that not only helps us develop treatments that work better. It helps us develop treatments that have fewer side effects. You know, many examples of this in its general direction. I believe we're heading in all of on college. I see. But Jim Nelson? Yeah, nearly was talking about the antigens that t- says, recognize we know now that many of those are generated by mutations that are part of the carcinogenic process itself. And so there's a big effort I'm I'm involved in some, but there's many, many groups trying to develop rapid ways of genome sequencing is that gets faster and cheaper to identify possible antigens, make them synthetically and then give them to patients along with with the I mean checkpoint block. With therapy, perhaps it much much lower doses and focus the response even more tightly on the cancer cells themselves. Well, Jim, Allison, and Monica Bertin newly. We've got a comment here this come in on our website and the person wants us to to make a point that I wanted to ask you about someone says, pla- come and calling themselves. Planes dealers says, I hope that in addition to the brilliant science involved, the show addresses the practical impact. In other words, the prices of these therapies. I mean the Jim, let me start with you. I mean, I'm seeing hundreds of thousands of dollars as a cost for some of these therapies is that is that right? Yes, just that's correct. And it's, it's, it's it's too. It's too high. It really is. I mean, I can understand some of it because in in development, aluminum, for example, it changed all the rules, the standard in points that used clinically for evaluating drugs that targeted cancer cells weren't useful anymore. So there are a lot of failed trials because he used the wrong in points and cetera, et cetera. So developmental costs were amazing as well. Probably the most expensive ever. I'm not sure, but still that's no, that's no reason to keep those prices up for they are now because they certainly don't reflect the cost of making the drug itself. So they've got to come down particularly as we get into combinations. And I all I can hope. I mean, that is outside my area, but I, I gotta hope that they they come down fast so that they can get to more patients newly. I mean, I know that you neither you or Jim or setting prices for drugs that are. That are coming out of clinical trial. I wanna knowledge that and also we've heard frequently over the many years and Jim just pointed to it that the development costs are. These drugs are very high because sometimes we're talking about decades of research, so that point also should be made. But on the other hand, I mean, both of you are in the world of cancer research. Are you concerned that as we have these potentially very game changing therapies coming out of the pipeline, but because their costs are so high, it could further sort of drive a wedge between the haves and have nots when it comes to availability and access to to healthcare in the United States. Well, that wedges there now Magna, you know, and and it's terrible, and it's something that concerns us every day. And you know, I think it's a broader discussion than just the cost of some very expensive Neutra transformative drugs. It's the cost of our entire healthcare system in the United States and how are we going to focus..

Jim Nelson Monica Burton Yolly Dr Brittany Lee United States Clinical Oncology Dr Bernard Magna Monica Bertin Allison
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Only attack tumor cells or by turning T-cells on, are we sort of doomed to have them be, you know, over over active, but even more active throughout the body and every body system, right? You know, it's it's such the the wonderful promise of the immune system is its selectivity. You know, we, we can get a, we know that the immune system can vary precisely identify signals and only t attack cells that contain those particular signals. Signals are known as antigens t. cells can are, are tailored by the body to respond to particular antigens. And fortunately, cancers can develop on the surface of their cells very selective antigens that t cells can recognize. So when you have a situation like that and the signal on the tease on the on the cancer. That I- dentist it as foreign and identifies it as something that the immune system is able to attack. When that signal is only on the cancer cell. We're all set. Unfortunately, when those those proteins can be in other places in the body, and when those signals are shared by other tissues in the body, that's where you see the harmful side effects. So the that's the goal, find the specific signal and use that to our benefit. Right. And with, would that specific signal change from individual to individual? Absolutely. That's the other thing we know every human being is different. Well, we're going to talk more about about that in a second because it's a big part of the story. You're, we're talking with Dr Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. And with Jim Allison, he was awarded the twenty eighteen Nobel prize in medicine for his research on cancer immunotherapy. We'll be right back. I'm gonna Chuck awardee. This is on point. NPR's code switch tackles race in identity in America with humanity and humor, you'll laugh. You'll learn, you'll get uncomfortable. It's worth it fine coats which on the NPR one app or wherever you get your podcasts..

Dr Monica Burton Yolly NPR Jim Allison cancer American society for Clinical Nobel prize I America
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Cancer types of cancer type combination of of the drug developed with with the subsequent jug. Dr hundred developed together has response rate of sixty percent and metastatic melanoma and big clinical trials. It's approved now, for you said, I think there's no reason to think that won't go out for ten years. You know, for other cancers kidney cancer, it's about thirty to fifty percent. You know other gadgets at somewhat lower, but those are with monotherapy and there's the combinations come along. The response rates can go higher. You know, our goal is to get it as close to one hundred percent as we can. But there is there has said of a trade off there. It's not like chemotherapy though where everybody suffers from the same thing you know with with every dividing Salomon body gets challenged by the drug here, it's it's sporadic and it's it's. Largely diarrhea and things like that, which can most of the time be managed with temporary municipal election. But there are a few patients that do develop bona fide autoimmune situations, and you know that that's still working on on what to do about those. But for most of the patients, it's especially in the hands of of a team that has experienced, they're, they're, they're pretty well tolerated actually compared to chemotherapy or even radiation. Another caller who wants to ask about these side effects that's go to Patty, who's calling from Westlake, Ohio, Patty, you're on the air. Thanks for taking my call. My daughter was twenty three when she was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma and treated with combo immuno therapies, and she is a long around them because you she developed once Edina. And so now she's on the drug called round the Cade, and they're trying to get it under control because she can't. She has swelling and fluid in the lungs. So I was wondering, is there any other treatments you know for people that develop, you know, these side effects that possibly could help her out? She's at the clinic. So we were with a good team of doctors should we just celebrated her third year of survival? She's diagnosed yesterday, so yeah. So that that's my question. Yeah, buddy. Thank you for your call. Jamila San. The that sounds like something. Unfortunately, it happens to other people. I think that one of the things that's being done. I mean, I don't know how else can be done to to treat now. But what I thinks that a lot of companies are in positions are trying to your dial the doses down a little bit, particularly in the combinations because I think that we are probably over treating a lot of patients now and you know, especially when you start giving him both drugs. So as I said, there's a lot of invest investigations to decreasing the total amount of the drug or the number of injections, Monica, newly. Let me come back to you here for a second because again, you were saying earlier about the immune system. Of course, there's a body wide system and just again from a lay person's point of view here under help us understand like how targeted these treatments are or are what direction they're heading in Ken, we selectively turn on or awaken certainty cell so that they own..

metastatic melanoma kidney cancer Patty Monica diarrhea Dr hundred Jamila San Westlake Ohio Ken Edina one hundred percent fifty percent sixty percent ten years
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"What is your question for them? Let's go to Scott who's calling from eagle river, Wisconsin, Scott, you're on the air. Hi, I found on my head and Norma. They removed it, took them themselves out at a trace. It went back in nearly five more and they were clean, and I was good until twenty seventeen when they found some lumps in my dodgers in my lung, they remove to three of them in two had, no. So I went on the clinical trial iffy and em-empty. And. They stopped after one because of the Justice system. And I was in the hospital for two weeks and you're not a lot of side effects. This is the first year that some of that I'm out and about doing things attack the muscles and joints, and ended up with permits pseudo gout. What would you think it's clean except three months ago, they found a three millimeter to 'em. I Brian. And kitchen checking in. It's not rolling and it's to to go in to get for biopsies. So now keep an eye on it and they'll say, and the reason why it's not growing at the medicine is still working in my system that that song corrupt Scott, I'm gonna say, thank you so much for your call Monica newly. Let me turn back to you. I mean, so sue Scott saying, I see, I think he he's indicating that even with the challenges that he had with the side effects, he would do. He would do the immunotherapy all over again, but but can we talk a little more specifically about the side effects? I mean, Scott talked about the he was hospitalized because the immunotherapy also ended up attacking his digestive system had musculature effects as well. I mean, there are some serious side of messiah affects might even be too light of of word here for this kind of treat their apy. Fortunately, not everyone has bad side effects, but it's way too common and it's one of the big challenges with use of these therapies. Your immune systems there for a reason it's there to attack abnormal cells. And sometimes when you jazz it up to tackle tube or sell, it's going to start exerting bad effects on normal tissues. And that's the other half of the of the coin of the immune system. And you know this whole condition, we know as auto immunity, which is the opposite side of the of the picture. And we're, we have a lot to do to understand these toxins and to continue to work on making immunotherapy very specific for the tumor and to prevent its attacking. Other tissues. Fortunately still happens far too often. So Jim Ellison, that sounds, I don't want to call it a trade off, but it it's part of the complex decision that that a cancer patient and his or her medical team have to go through because I mean, what is what does the overall effectiveness of these treatments is at twenty percent thirty percent. And for those folks, or they also facing these serious side effects. The effectiveness varies from.

sue Scott eagle river Monica Norma Justice system Jim Ellison Wisconsin thirty percent twenty percent three months two weeks
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So as as she was saying, I think that after time people can quit look over their shoulder every day. I get up and wondering if the is looming for them again and move on. I mean, that's what makes me so happy about the show about Sharon's experience because she was told by physicians don't have any children and after a while five and she said, none cared. I'm gonna have my kids normal life, Monica mcnealy. How I mean, how many immunotherapy is are are out there right now. Well, we have fifteen cancer indication. Fifty indications. So fifteen specific cancer conditions that are now approved have drugs approved by the US FDA for treatment using him, you know therapies. But what's another fascinating thing about our field is there are literally thousands last count about two thousand different new immunotherapy drugs agents approaches that are currently undergoing clinical testing. So the field is just been blown wide open by by the proof of principle that untangling this biology can have a true transformative effect on patients lives, and I just took a single landslide two thousand currently in development or clinical trial, different agents from hitting different tart, different components of the immune system are all undergoing. Nicole testing across the world. And when's the last time cancer research has seen that kind of explosion in potential therapies? Oh, I don't think ever. I mean, this is really this is really a completely new era. And you know, we really have to knowledge that why are we here? We're here because there's been a tremendous investment on the part of our government on the part of of of industry in understanding tumor biology in a very deep level. And that understanding is leading to so many different possibilities for for treatment of cancer. I wonder if I, I, I wanna just inject a little bit of not skepticism, but perhaps a little caution here because and please correct me if I'm wrong because I remember a while ago maybe a generation ago, there was a lot of excitement, for example, around Judah Folkman research and NGO Genesis and cancers thinking like if we, if we sort of figured out a way to block the blood flow to tumors at that would be a way to. To really get rid of any and all cancers in the body. Very exciting line of research perhaps didn't yield the kind of treatments that we're seeing. Now with immunotherapy should we so should we continue to have some some measure of a grain of salt or skepticism, even around this moment of great excitement of jail Magnette couldn't have possibly picked a better example. You know, we didn't plan this, but you know, one of the things I'm sure Dr Alison can will chime in here too, is that that work that Dr Folkman did to look at the blood vessels is now being combined with the drugs that Dr Allison's group has developed with with came out of his work and the combination of targeting the blood vessel together with targeting the tea with activating the taking the brakes off the t. cell is producing even better responses in some tumors. So at that nothing goes wasted. That's that's correct corrected the one of the things that we're realizing that. Is coming coming. True is that does that just immunotherapy can be combined with not only other therapies but with conventional therapies chemotherapy. And as you said end you enter Genesis therapies in virtually anything that kills tumor cells can be used to prime immune response. So that's why they're so many combinations out there. So many that we've, we've got a really, you know, have have data before deciding to do a combination in any kind of scale or else would you know we're going to be going down a lot of false leads. All right. Well, you know, we've had a lot of callers who want to join us because obviously cancer is a huge issue that does have an impact on so many people's lives. You're listening to our to Jim Allison. He was awarded the two, the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for his work in cancer immunotherapy, he shares that a word of the tussock Honjo of Kyoto University, and you're also hearing from Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. Chief of the division of surgical oncology at danafarber, Brigham and women's hospital cancer center. So we've got a couple of the top researchers in cancer with us this hour..

cancer Dr Folkman Monica Burton Yolly Sharon Nicole hospital cancer center Monica mcnealy Jim Allison American society for Clinical US FDA Nobel prize Judah Folkman Brigham NGO Genesis Magnette Dr Allison Dr Alison
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point Meghna trucker. Bharti. We're talking this hour about where we are with cancer research and why they're so much excitement around immunological therapies for treating cancer. And we're joined today by the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize winner in physiology or medicine. He's Jim Allison, and he shares that a word with suco hundreds of Kyoto University. His work in cancer immunotherapy was recognized by the Nobel committee this year. Jim Allison is also chair of the department of immunology at MD cancer center, and I want to bring in another voice into the conversation. Mr. Allison, if I could joining us now is Dr Monica Burton Yolly. She is president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. She's also chief of the division of surgical oncology at Dana Farber Brigham and women's hospital cancer center and a professor of surgery at Harvard Harvard Medical School as well. And she joins us today from Washington after newly welcome to on point high magnetic great to be here. It's great to have. You know, you heard Jim Allison. Described his research and also, you know, meeting the first patient that he had. He had met one on one who'd undergone immunotherapy for her cancer really moving story. But I'm just if you could sort of describe from the point of view of as a fellow researcher. So sort of how revolutionary is it that that we're thinking or focusing so much on using the immune system rather than external chemicals for treating cancer? Well, you know, there is nothing more exciting to biologists researchers in our field than to see something some understanding from human biology finally reveal that we can really use it help patients. And that was an incredibly moving story that you know. Fortunately, we're hearing lots of these stories in, you know back it was it's a couple of decades. Now in the early nineties that there was a first clue that the immune system could do this. There was some work done by Steven Rosenberg at the National Cancer Institute where he. Found that giving natural drugs called cytokines kinds that could really jazz up. The immune system could really re eliminate tumors in patients with melanoma and renal cancers. And and you know, it was. It was just a glimmer that this might be possible, and then it took decades of really careful work in the laboratory and understanding the biology to really make this something that could help patients. And so it's just wonderful to see the Nobel prize awarded in this field and even better to see this brand new tool that we have to fight cancer. No, are we're talking about treatments and fighting cancer here? Is anyone thinking that immunotherapy might lead down to the root of a cure. So we do see some cures from immunotherapy. What is cure mean? You know to to clinicians cure means you have someone who has a tumor and you're somehow something we can do is able to eliminate that tumor and the doesn't come back in their body. That's what we mean by cure. And some of these initial immunotherapy is perhaps the patient that Dr Alison just described. She lives her entire lifetime with this tumor. Never recurring that that's a cure. So clinicians are very cautious in using the cure word. But what really matters to patients is that they live a long long life and never have the burden of cancer in their life. So that's what we're seeing. We're seeing that with immunotherapy. Okay, Jim Allison, let me let me turn back to you here. I mean, what? What do you think about what Dr Brunelli has said is, are we should we be talking about potential cures. For a long time. It's been considered really, you know, impr- inappropriate to use the word catcher in the same sentence. But but I agree with Dr bird nearly melanoma patients that receive if you map just as a single therapy, a single round of treatments, it's for injections, but about delivered twenty percent of them are alive at least ten years after a single treatment..

Jim Allison cancer Dr Monica Burton Yolly Nobel prize MD cancer center National Cancer Institute hospital cancer center cure Bharti Nobel committee Meghna American society for Clinical Dr Brunelli Dr Alison Kyoto University Steven Rosenberg Dr bird Harvard Harvard Medical School
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You just knows it's a cell that's got stuff in on it. That shouldn't be there. And so and the beauty of that is well, two things. One is. You had a chance because you weren't targeting the cancer work against any kind of cancer. And so you know, that was that was, you know, sort of inherent in the model. And the other thing was since the primate starts by tumor cell death, you can give even conventional therapies like radiation and chemotherapy. Some of the benefits of of the immune response. For example, one of one, big lettuce. When you've got T-cells, you've got some for the rest of your life. And if the tumor happens to come back, the sales already, they're ready to go. Well, I wanna talk more about sort of the the the positives and potential drawbacks of immunotherapy in treating cancer, but later in the hour. But let me ask you, Jim Allison, do you remember the first patient that you worked with where you where you actually tried to see if it would make a difference in their lives and their treatment? They're actually to the first I met was woman. I can username because she's gonna be permission woman named Sharon belvin. It's it's, it's it's quite a to me touching story. I mean, I choked up every time I talk about it. I think about it, but she was twenty two years old just gotten out of college, and it was scheduled to be married when she was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma, and she had tumors center, lungs, thirty, one I believe is the cat and and someone scannon than even one in her in her brain. And at the time, if your diagnosis was about night about two thousand four at the time, if you received that kind of diagnosis to median survival was about eleven months. And there had been no drug at it ever. You know improved that. In a cynical trial. So she was told that she was basically they tried a bunch of chemotherapy. And she, you know, nothing more act. And finally, they proved on one of the early trials of this drug. It be Luma ma'am. What it's called, unfortunately, but her tumors went away within a few months and I met her when she was visiting and you know we're getting checked up. I should say in her in colleges Dr l. check said, you know, we tumors gone. We can't find anything, and I just moved there just I just recently anyway, he called her and said, well, the guy who invented this. I mean, he was with her. Sorry. And he said, the guy who invented this is is here you wanna meet him anyway, suggested called me and said, come to the outpatients. Ain't gonna say, well, I don't know. I'm busy and I said, no, no, no, you gotta come down here and so I did. And she hugged me and everybody started crying I cried and that was the first time. It really kind of dawned on me what was what was going on and. I talked with her occasionally after that. But about three years later, three years later she sent me a Votto prefers baby and then took a couple of years after that of her second baby. And so now she's basically fourteen years out because it's the treatment just given one one round. And so she's has beautiful family now. Well, we are talking with Jim Allison. He was awarded the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for his work in cancer immunotherapy. He shares that a word with tusker Honjo Kyoto University, and we're talking about where we are in terms of revolutionary treatments for cancer, their their benefits. You just heard a huge benefit from Jim story about the first trait bed patient treated with his his research, but also we'll talk about the potential drawbacks as well, but why they're so so much excitement around cancer and immunological treatments. We'll be right back. I'm magnet, Tucker. Birdie. This is on. Point..

Jim Allison Sharon belvin cancer Nobel prize Honjo Kyoto University metastatic melanoma Tucker Dr l. Votto three years twenty two years fourteen years eleven months
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I look at it but take it apart. It's actually not all that complicated. But what we do is just is developed a way to take the brakes off the immune system. There's a, it's it's fairly complicated process, but now that the first step is a thing called a t cell antigen receptor. It's a molecule service of of these t. cells that go all over the body, looking for things that shouldn't be there and try to eliminate them. But this antigen receptors wet allows the t. cell the know something you know is wrong. You know. And gives a signal that's kind of just like the ignition switch in a car. You know, every tesol has a different one, but turning it onto, I'd make it go anywhere. There's a nother molecule. Another signal co stimulatory signal that we showed the late eighties is given by molecule CD twenty eight. And this can really only be provided by very specialized cells called in genetic sales that that Ralph Stein Rockefeller University gut the Nobel prize several years ago. And so one of the things that we've found was that tumor cells can't give that signal and so they're kind of invisible to the moon system. But, but it's actually more complex than that because there's another molecule but is very much like CD twenty eight, but it it acts like the brakes. And so because when you turn T-cells on, they start dividing very, very fast reproducing themselves to give you, you know, hundreds of thousands to millions and you've got to do that within about a week or so, you know, deal with virus infections or cancer or whatever, but you've gotta stop that process. And that's seeps like four's job is to stop that before it can cause any harm to normal cells. And since the tumors had a head start because they as it turns out, T-cells against tumors don't don't get primes, don't get get to see twenty eight six until they die for some reason and cause inflammation and immune system and gets alert in starts to process. But, but if they start growing in, I mean, they've been growing for a while. So they've had a head start so secretly. I just reason that maybe know therapies hadn't worked very well reason that maybe the thing was is that if you tumor gets too big for to get enough T-cells cells to eliminate them before seats, four inches off, then that tumor win. So we just disabled the brakes for while figured out a way just disable the break. So if I, if I may just jump in here with a sort of a lay person summary of what you said and tell me telling me from doing this right that essentially, part of the reason why immunotherapy is beforehand perhaps weren't as affective, is that as you were saying, there's something about tumor cells themselves that allowed the immune or in inhibited t. cells in the immune system from from working and you figured out a way to sort of turn on those t cells so that they could help essentially attack the tumors. Is that right? Most sensually. I mean, we figured out how to how to keep them from turning off. Keep them from turning off. Okay. So so so so how I mean, how revolutionary was this? This shift in thinking about what you could do with t. cells did ha- did it has it really opened the door in terms of thinking about using the immune system as as a primary means of of attacking cancers or. Yes, it was. It was quite revolutionary at the time because what it involves trying to target a molecule on the surface of t cells and had nothing to do with cancer, the cancer. So and so when I started talking about this, all we gotta do is unleash the t. cells by blocking. You know this molecule people said, well, how can you treat cancer bag knowing the cancer. And I said, because the immune system doesn't know that it's necessarily can't..

cancer Ralph Stein Rockefeller Univer Nobel prize four inches
"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"University in Japan. And Jim Allison is the chair of the department of immunology at MD cancer center. And Jim Allison, welcome to on point. Grubby here Magna at first of all, hearty congratulations to you. What does it feel like to be now be known worldwide as Nobel prize winning researcher? Jim Allison stood out of seeking in to tell you the truth. It's just been who are wind bacteria since the now's was made over week ago. Yeah, I, I can imagine that it's been a very busy time for you, but but I understand that just sort of anecdotally, you found out that you'd won the Nobel prize, not from the Nobel committee itself. Our our, you informed. Well, I, I got up in the morning really, really early and. Kind of thinking that wasn't going to happen because there'd been a lot of buzz the week before might my wife said, well, look like it's going to be next year and you know, because it had phone run yet in rang it was my son said, dad, dad you on. And then then at my phone said, there's another call from Sweden. So I said, I gotta go. There's another Sweden. Yeah, they had. They had some Trump. I don't know. They didn't have my phone numbers. It's interesting, the state age, the Nobel committee. Sometimes that's trouble reaching out to people who who they have, they've deemed have changed the world here. Now you mentioned your wife. I should mention her as she's, she's a, she's a researcher with you in these cancer. Immunotherapy is right pod Sharma, right? Just we worked together and she's a genital, urinary oncologist hear him to Anderson it together. We went to group called therapy platform where we're trying to really understand the impact of these new jugs on on the immune system and how they interact with each other and trying to optimize the treatments to make more effective for more people. Okay. Well, so let's talk a little bit than about about the actual research itself. When we say cancer immunotherapy, I mean sort of give us the the biology one. Oh, one explanation of that. What are we talking about? Well, there actually several John's of immunotherapy away from growing Kanter specific cells called t. Cells that are actually the soldiers of the system. You know, you can grow them up in large numbers, taken from patient grom up, get the right kind put them back in the what I developed. This was a little bit different. I'm really basic immunologist at hard and have been working on t. cells ever since I found out about him in late sixties and trying to figure out how they work and amazingly complex..

Jim Allison researcher Nobel prize Nobel committee Sweden MD cancer center Japan Trump pod Sharma Kanter John Anderson
Allison's Nobel Prize beckons new era of immunotherapy

CBS Sports Radio

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Allison's Nobel Prize beckons new era of immunotherapy

"Week. One of the more interesting Nobel prizes awarded was for that in medicine or medicine. It went to two people Dr James, Allison and Ta Su Honjo for discoveries that lead to a new way to treat cancer by targeting the body's immune system, rather than the tumors themselves. It's led to a host of new drugs. Immunotherapy is quite expensive. But people are saying that it works pretty well on certain types of lung cancer and melanoma, which is a form of skin cancer. So this story we spoke to Peter Loftus. He's a reporter for the Wall Street Journal. We started off by asking him who were these Nobel prize winners, James Allison and tests Uku Hondo. Both of them have specialized in immunology studying the body's immune system. This turned out to be a critical part of what they discovered and to put it in context, if you think about the mainstays of cancer treatment over the years. Things like chemotherapy and radiation, which were effective an effective in certain situations. But they can also be blunt instruments in the sense that they can destroy healthy cells in the body along with cancer cells. So that causes all sorts of complications going back about fifteen twenty years. There was another advance in cancer treatment. And that was the target genetic mutations in cancer cells now, immune based approaches sort of the newest wave and one of the more significant approaches to treating cancer in a long time these two scientists working separately. But in parallel discovered features about the body's immune system that led them to figure out that if used certain kinds of drugs to target immune system cells in a certain way, it'll basically better equipped the body's own immune system to go after and destroy cancer cells. So exactly how does it work. I was reading a lot about checkpoints. And how a lot of this stuff. Let's T cells, basically. Attack the cancer cells T cells are form of white blood cells. And this is where the magic really comes through in. What's so interesting about what they discovered was that the body's immune system has sort of its own natural checkpoints were break. So that it doesn't go overboard and Batak the healthy parts of the body. Cancer cells have basically figured out how to split that. And so they in some way, they sort of latch onto the brakes of the body's immune system, in a way that helps them escape described destruction. And so these drugs that have come out of the research from both sides, essentially, take the brakes off also the body. John immune

Cancer Peter Loftus James Allison Ta Su Honjo Nobel Prize Wall Street Journal Dr James Uku Hondo John Fifteen Twenty Years
"james allison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mascot is deciding for itself there is a tournament manager which is kind of application which is running on our on bought software in which decides when the instruments are turned on for example, or if the mobility has to be activated. And if I'm right when we're talking mascot has been there for about twelve or thirteen hours. So I guess it's working time is almost over if based on the estimation, which we have from our experience and our test, then we. Expect roughly sixteen hours of operation, but I have to admit that. Although I'm very tired. I would be happy to stay far more hours. Well, he's absolutely brilliant. When you get this arms back. We'll definitely going to talk to you again. Thank you so much for talking to an action. Thank you throw me ho of the German, aerospace centre, finally. That time of year when scientists wonder whether they'll get that call from Stockholm saying that their work has been marked above all others is worthy of a Nobel. Find selection came up this week, including the first woman to get the call from the physics committee in fifty five years before that for the medicine prize, James Allison and Tatsuko hun-jo for their discoveries that lead to immunotherapy for cancer home. People tell me that they have recovered from grave illness and can healthy, thanks to my treatment methods. And that to me that about everything else makes me realize that my research has been truly meaningful, and it makes me this morning when the committee member, call me Nobel, you know, he said, this is the first time we've ever given on award for any kind of cancer therapy. So yeah. Well, good that should give people James Allison on the BBC early this week getting the chance to explain his groundbreaking work. The last thirty years fed figure out how T-cells work, you know, the soldiers immune system, we figured out mid nineties or two signals required to get started one antigen receptor signal just Cadillac ignition. Switch on a car another molecule kind of like the gas pedal, but ten mid-nineties we show them another. You'll actually served as the break stop at immune response before it can damage normal tissues. So I had the idea that, you know, maybe this break was stopping immune responses before they could totally eliminate cancers. And if we just disabled the brakes temporarily we conducted teachers keep going for as long as they needed to completely eliminate tumors two thousand one. Succeeded in getting the first phase one clinical trial. Their objective response is the very first trial. Of course, we didn't notice time, but one of the people in that trial. They got a single treatment is still alive. Eighteen years later, I'm joined by James Gallagher, BBC health and science correspondent James immunotherapy really is a big game changer in cancer treatment. It absolutely is. If you go back near even decade, or so you had surgery you had radiotherapy had drugs that talked to the cancer. Immunotherapy is now the fourth pillar of cancer treatment, and it is being used in hostels all around the world down. Now. What's interesting about this price is you can talk about the applications of it. But it goes back some very pure science. It does it comes down to how the immune system works. And if you think about your immune system, we all think which role in attacking infections virus or bacterium notes in the wrong place. But it also make sure that our own cells are doing what they're supposed to be doing. And if they start going. Rogue then it kills them off. Now, how does it do that? Because he needs to have checks and balances, and it needs to have ways of going with this is a danger. I need to be more aggressive, but also ways of going, whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. Let's calm everything down. Everything's okay here. And James Allison talked a nations about brakes and acceleration and taking off the break was the phrase used exactly. So what Kansas do is they find a way of tapping into those breaks, they find ways of turning off the immune system. Therefore, they become practically invisible and can proliferate and become a foreign Chima. Now, there are a couple of ways they do that. So more than shake my hand on a chemical level role. And that is how immune cells and other cells communicate with each other. They from chemical handshakes one of these chemicals ACT LA four because I know you love getting right? And that's the one Allison discovered. I and what that does is it what's known as immune checkpoint, and it disables the immune Salva t Selva comes along to kill us out. And if the cancer has it, then it's. Visible and continues to grow. What he discovered was. If you broke that with an immune checkpoint inhibitor, then that stops the disabling if he needs system, and it can keep on killing the cancer. So that's the kind of Greece or a blocker to stop the handshake. Exactly. Just imagine that we going Tajik and certainly app producer fi get in the middle of it goes. Fee is a cancer drug, and it can be applied in a whole range of cancers. The big work so far has been on things like melanoma and lung cancer. And the reason it started there is because they're so heavily mutated because they're exposed to things like smoking or UV damage, they they become very visible to the immune system normally. But yet it's being investigated everywhere. Now, what's very interesting for me is the chemistry prize. This year comes in two parts, one of which again is to do with the immune system and cancers. Yes, welcome to the funky world of monoclonal antibodies. The price hasn't been one for monoclonal antibodies. Put a better way of finding the ones that work. So an antibody is something that binds to a protein on the surface of a Sal. And that's how he started drawing the rest of the immune system. Think of them as like missiles fight off by the system, you can make them in the lab, and then they can have a medical role to if you tip them inside patient now, how do you find the right antibody that works, and that's what the prize is being awarded for this way of creating a huge array of antibodies, and then fishing the right ones that hit the target that you want it to hit and then refining that process. So you get a really good match between the antibody and your target James Gallagher vanquished ram, a Christian Krishnan, who's president of the Royal Society, and is himself a Nobel laureate works at the laboratory for molecular. Biology where one of those laureates Greg winter did his research. So you know, him well van key? Yes. I should say I owe him a personal debt because his humanized therapeutic antibodies helped save both my wife's and my brother-in-law's lives because they both had lymphoma and were treated with monoclonal antibodies just brings it home. It's interesting because the loss of the work at your lab is done at the pure end of science. And this is a really interesting example, the work on these monoclonal antibodies really gets into medicine you have to give Greg a lot of credit for that though. Because when he realized the potential of what he was doing. He took active steps to commercialize it. He even set up companies. And of course, now, it's a multibillion dollar business. Six of the top ten selling drugs are monoclonal antibodies against a variety of diseases from arthritis to cancer to all sorts of things, and there it is interesting connection antibodies there the foot soldiers of the immune system, the medicine and physiology prize was about sort of boosting the body's own ability to do this. Yes. But this is one way a sort of Nicole intervention into the sort of supplementing the body's own abilities. If you like. So antibodies are proteins that the immune system naturally makes. And they have the ability to target a molecule and bind to it. And what grade figured out how to make these antibodies and make them in a humanize way. So when you inject them into humans, our body won't think of them as foreign and will accept them. And then he also figured out a way on how to improve the binding of the antibodies to its target, and the Nobel committee makes this important point that this is using eve Lucia Shima lab. Yes, exactly. So you have the target and you produce a whole library these antibodies, and then some of them will bind more tightly to your target. You choose them and then you amplify them. And then you go to the next round and choose the tighter of those. And so after a few rounds, you have an antibody that binds very tightly Tijuana says kind of designer immunity, I wouldn't say it's designer because you didn't assign anything you let the system choose. And that's. In fact, the opposite of design you're letting ever Lucien of selection. Choose what antibody to produce. I challenge the word design because the winner of the other half of the chemistry prize told this program two years ago that eve Lucien is the best designer of all time Francis. Arnold was on science in action actually twice in two thousand sixteen. I when she was the first woman to win the much thought millennium prize for her chemistry using so called directed. Evolution and the second time for experiments using it to incorporate the elephants silicon into living molecules, it's really very simple to direct the evolution of proteins because we can mutate the DNA that encodes a protein we can make thousands of versions of a protein and rapidly search through those to see which ones are better at something that we're interested and this whole idea that evolution can be used rapidly to solve human problems. I think is very. Powerful in especially for inventing, new chemistry. The physics prize like the chemistry. One comes into pass both to do.

James Allison James Gallagher Greg winter BBC eve Lucien Stockholm lung cancer James immunotherapy Salva t Selva LA Nobel committee lymphoma Tatsuko hun-jo Greece Kansas Chima Arnold Cadillac producer
"james allison" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Arrived on scene, we did find several individuals Atta swim club private swim club who had been overcome with fumes from the pool. Chemical is Harare county. Fire captains stands Ziglar says initially seven victims were critical all are now expected to recover a malfunctioning chlorinating system is suspected Asian stocks closed Thursday lower. Dow futures are off more than one hundred points, Fox News, fair and balanced. This is HouseCall for health using the body's own immune system to fight cancer is considered the most promising new treatment James Allison has been working in this field for twenty years. And now he's wanna Nobel for it. Sort of a state of shock Allison's team found that antibodies can be put to work to unleash the buys cancer fighting t cells he did his work at UC, Berkeley and shears the award with Japanese researcher to sequel Honjo, basic scientists to see my work, actually. Three years later, actually, really really helping patients Alison celebrates not just the prize. But knowing that his research has saved lives. Dr just a shout out to all our patients out there. Or suffered from cancer to let them know that there were you're making progress now for more health news gotta foxnewshealth dot com. Housecall for health. I'm Elliot Fox News. South.

James Allison cancer Fox News Harare Elliot Fox Atta Ziglar Alison UC researcher Berkeley twenty years Three years
Two Scientists Earn Nobel for Discovering a New Pillar in Cancer Therapy

Michael Berry

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Two Scientists Earn Nobel for Discovering a New Pillar in Cancer Therapy

"For the first time a Nobel prize in medicine has been awarded for cancer therapy. One of the researchers sharing the prize did his groundbreaking work at UC Berkeley. Here's science editor. Daniel Benton, James Allison says he didn't start out intending to cure cancer. He wanted to know how t cells work T cells are a key part of our immune system. They attacked cancers and other diseases, but they also have a kind of breaking system that slows them down Alison discovered the molecule that serves as the brakes and had an idea here. He is speaking at a press conference this morning. Russia just disable the brakes and see if that will allow them your sister to attack cancer and. Did the therapy has extended the lives of thousands of cancer patients. Alison director the UC Berkeley cancer research laboratory for twenty years he currently works at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in

Cancer Md Anderson Cancer Center Nobel Prize Uc Berkeley James Allison Alison Daniel Benton Russia Editor Director Twenty Years
"james allison" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"james allison" Discussed on KTRH

"Hour traffic center, pretty heavy rains down towards Galveston again today, they're drifting north and some of that action coming into the southern burbs here. This afternoon. Eighty-four degrees. Sixty percent chance of some downpours. Rich high pressure east of Florida continuing to provide a favorable flow off the Gulf and scattered thunderstorms. Just about every day this week for us. I'm Scott Lawrimore Weather, Channel, rain and seventy six on the island eighty one. Now at the top tax defenders twenty four hour weather center three oh, one our top story. A researcher at MD Anderson has won the Nobel prize. Dr James Allison sharing the award with a doctor from Kyoto University in Japan for their advancements in immunotherapy drugs. Dr Alison says he was shocked. I'm still have sort of a state of shock and awe sinking in. So he's really wonderful this boring to wake up, and my my son called me at five thirty and was the first to let me know that I won this prize. Nobel committee said the pairs research, which harnesses the body's immune system to attack cancer cells amounted to a landmark in our fight against cancer. A New Jersey man is dead after contracting a brain eating amoeba from a wave pool at a resort in Waco. According to the Waco, tribune-herald twenty nine old Fabrizio stable, nor died at the rare illness, the Atlantic City medical center officials say he came home from his vacation and was feeling sick had a severe headache that he couldn't shake and when he woke up one day was incoherent after days are being treated at the hospital. He tested positive for the amoeba known as naegleria fowleri the day before he died the SR cable parks surf resort has been shut down as a precaution. As officials test. The water swimmers can contract the infection via contaminated water that gets into. Their mouths or noses. The amoeba causes encephalitis guthman reporting, the boards of memorial Hermann health system, and Baylor Scott and white health of signed a letter of intent to merge into a massive combined system. The health systems would serve more than thirty Texas counties employing more than seventy three thousand across the state that merger expected to be completed next year. US marshals shot and killed a suspect while serving a warrant in the heights this morning. It happened near east twelfth street and studio one as you open the back door.

Nobel prize Waco Dr Alison memorial Hermann health system Galveston Dr James Allison Nobel committee US Baylor Scott Florida Kyoto University MD Anderson researcher Atlantic City medical center New Jersey Japan Texas
Cancer Immunotherapy Conference features latest research on response, resistance, treatment | Science Codex

Here & Now

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Cancer Immunotherapy Conference features latest research on response, resistance, treatment | Science Codex

"We've seen spectacular results, including patients who are surviving for decades as a result of these novel treatments. When we look more specifically at the population said, have been treated by the drug that Jim. Team has developed. We can see the twenty percent of those live for at least three years with many patients living ten years and beyond. These are really unprecedented results for patients who really had no other options. James Allison started his career at MD Anderson in nineteen seventy seven. And then he returned in two thousand twelve to work on the MD Anderson moon shots program, which we've talked about before, basically allowing people to work on things that might pan out and might be game changers or maybe they won't how many examples like this? Have you had of the moon shots

Md Anderson James Allison Anderson JIM Twenty Percent Three Years Ten Years