38 Burst results for "Jamaica"

Fresh update on "jamaica" discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

01:08 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamaica" discussed on 27 Club

"Ray Ravi and Surveys the damage at the dinner key auditorium in Miami A. Lot take. The stage was in pieces busted beyond repair. One half of the rookie old seaplane hangar had collapsed in on the other half. There was debris. Beer bottles and wine bottles strewn across the floor bras and wear shirts pants. He could practically smell. The broken promises some kind of fantastical liberation. It hung in the Muggy, still air along with the smell of body odor of red wine of Jack Daniels lambswool. It was the morning after the Miami show and the doors were staring down the cold light of day. They had a bigger problem than a broken stage, and that problem was once again nowhere to be found. Jim Matt Build. He did the Miami thing and then left for the Jamaica thing, the vacation he had promised Pam the calm before the storm of the rest of the store, the band's biggest tour ever. Now the looked like there wouldn't be any tour not now, maybe not ever. Jim fucked it all up high on that living theatre shed. He thought he was leading a bunch of attentive students down the primrose path thought he was giving intimate performance to a higher audience at that didn't happen at all didn't happen the way Jim at imagined. Whole thing was far less romantic and idealistic than Jim Thought. It was. Jim Yelled at berated the he repeated words over and over again like he wasn't able to think of any other words in the English language besides. Are you ready? Are you. Ready for what Mars? Ray Robbie and John wanted to know so. Do the kids the pack the Dinner Key Auditorium? They were ready for a rock and roll show, and instead they got some glorified performance are. And now the next morning the doors were picking up the pieces literally. The dinner key auditorium was originally one of Pan's airplane hangars, a seaplane base exact that was converted into an exhibition hall in an Auditorium. In the Early Nineteen Fifties, the auditorium was host to graduations, parties and political rallies, but despite its aviation routes was known locally as now it was a band, its smell it was decaying double time home to transients in a word replace was a mass. In Jim was a mess the night before he really gave it to the crowd. He told them they're idiots told him they were slaves. Since they did what they were told, he told them they were all going to sheep and the drive the point home the lamb in his arms. He took cheap shots at Florida Sang. The praises of Los, Angeles he big time, and they weren't hip enough or liberated not he waxed poetic. He wasn't the Florida Man. Self Hollywood gutter trash should merely liberated himself from the sunshine state swamp. At one point during the show, while Robbie, was taking guitar, so Jim dropped to his knees, right frontal, stuck out his tongue, pretend to give head Robbie's Qatar. He did unbuckle his belt buckle. He did pull zipper of his pants down. He did ask the crowd if they wanted to see if they wanted to take out the crawling king snake. And now there were reports, the and exposed himself to twelve thousand bands doesn't matter what he thought he was doing or what he thought he was. This was the reality. The show was ridiculously oversold, and there were lots of conflicting reports as to what actually happened. It all happened so fast. The crowd and surged chimps insistence he on just like he always did just again at the singer Bowl. It was hot humid as fuck. It could have been a massive assassination mass hysteria illusion, or maybe it had been real. Maybe he had really done it. Ray Robinson John wouldn't put it past them. Jim Morrison was GonNa whip out his Dick Jim Morrison. Was GonNA without a stick. I people pushed their way onto the stage. Then they were pushing each other on the stage, and then Jim started to push anyone who brushed up against the live between the audience, and the band had been raced full audience participation prelude to Orion. No, how no way! Jim Pushed, more pupil he thought one of them was a call, and then he hoped it had been a cop. Kids ran into him, almost knocked him over. No one gave a ship that he was Jim Morrison US just another body. Just in the way Jim kept shoving Jim Shove the wrong guy and the guy twice Jim size with him head over heels since the audience. It was around that time. The promoter pulled the plugs of the wall. Shut it off down. The music stopped the house lights came on the audience, reeled and screamed and saw the whole scene in a different light. Jim Picked himself up off the floor and he was over. There were reports the gym and tossed cops around on stage before the plug was pulled after he had repeatedly shouted obscenities into the microphone, and as some claimed exposed himself, the Miami Herald called the cops he saw happening and didn't do anything about it, but there had been a sense that night that a real riot could take place at the cops had actually gotten involved. The next morning as the doors saw the future of their tour in the dirty aftermath of its first show Miami, officials question why this has been allowed to happen in the first place, the president of the crime. Commission of Greater Miami insisted that grand jury investigation be launched to look into Jim Saprissa, exposure. A few days later Jim was officially charged in the warm issued for his arrest, he was being charged with one felony, lewd and lascivious behavior and three misdemeanors, indecent exposure, open, profanity and drunkenness. They said he whipped it out, tossed it around shook, grabbed it in his hand to get a couple of quick jerks. The Miami police chief was ready to make an example chores, and even if he was local boy, make good. He may be the Florida man and spirit, but he wasn't Florida's anymore. He was so loud mouth Hollywood big timer, who told the audience that he he got smart when he left Florida and headed west. To good for them like the sun shone on his ass in his ASSALAAM. The chief was about to kind of any breaks. He will personally see to it that Jim Sydney cell in Raeford prison for over seven years. Jim would get fat bitter in jail. They would throw the book at him. Maximum sentence for maximum asshole. Only problem was Jim. Morrison wasn't anywhere near Florida. Ray Robbie John Could told you that they knew it. The morning after Miami and the authorities would all catch on wheel soon. Jim was far, away Jamaica about to embark upon the kind of head trip. That would really make him fear for his life. We'll be right back after this word word word. So it was the fattest joint Jim Morrison it ever seen rolled. It was the joint rolled in a Cuban cigar. Cubans rolled lease struggled to contain the sticky green contents. Before. The joint was even out in the open gym could smell it. He can sense the high coming from a mile away. This joint announced itself. Jim was in Jamaica for that previously scheduled are having quickly left the shit show in Miami far behind. But there had been a slight change in plans Jim and Pam argued so much that Jim decided to go alone, but it wasn't just Pam. Jim Needed a minute. decompress away from the rest of the band. Jim was alone at his rented house on the beach in Jamaica. Not entirely alone as the several housekeepers who were there with him, one of them presented Jim with his stately join held in his hand. A monstrous spliff had ever seen one. Jim Wasn't afraid of a monstrous split has past history provided ample evidence? And so he accepted the housekeepers offer to get super high. Jim took the jumbo giant in between his thumb and forefinger..

Dick Jim Morrison Jim Morrison Miami Jim Thought Jim Matt Build Jim Pushed Jim Picked Dinner Key Auditorium Jim Sydney Jim Saprissa Jim Size Florida Jamaica Jim Shove Ray Robbie Miami Herald Ray Robinson John Ray Ravi Hollywood PAM
Fresh update on "jamaica" discussed on Howie Carr

Howie Carr

00:39 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamaica" discussed on Howie Carr

"From ABC News TECH TRENDS Certain iPhone users could be in for a payday, Apple has agreed to settle a $500 million class action lawsuit 9 to 5. Mac Zack Hall says the case has to do with apples, lack of clarity around how it slows down the performance of older iPhones. There's always been this kind of feeling that software updates slow it down that the phone gets slower with time. On DH. This is the first time there was kind of any evidence of that certain iPhone six and iPhone seven. Owners have until October 6 to submit a claim form where customers that had an iPhone in that period can run their serial number and see if they're eligible for the payout, which ends up being $25 whole, says Thie. Upcoming software updates for other Apple Devices feature clearer battery information, So they've learned this lesson that they were kind of forced to handle on the iPhone. And this fall. They're bringing in that same you know, Use your control to the iPad and the Mac for the first time with tech trends. I'm Bryan Burrough. ABC News No, You don't have to miss your favorite talk show just because the game is on listening. The W P s empowered by Flagship insurance. Oh, my God. I can't live without this. 14 20 W. P. S. M. This is linen. Sonny Las Vegas stand from the moon Back capital of Jamaica Plain. This is Deedee and lemon Stir Massachusetts and this is The car show. 844 542 42 were play These cuts, probably all through the day, but I want the Newsmax audience to hear it. The Joe Biden was with a A local newscast. He's doing these interviews with the anchors for for the local TV stations in the battleground states, So he was with a an anchor. He was from the basement. It's It's the Joe Biden basement tapes. You know Bob Dylan had the basement tapes now Joe Biden has the basement tapes. And so these basement tapes or with a guy from Phoenix and he introduces Jo and well, you'll see why we're planning a cup for We're joined now by former vice president and.

Joe Biden Apple Deedee Bryan Burrough ABC Zack Hall Abc News Bob Dylan Sonny Las Vegas Phoenix Flagship Insurance Vice President Newsmax Jamaica Plain Massachusetts Thie JO
Fresh update on "jamaica" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

00:37 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jamaica" discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Doctor's waiting Matte Virginia comedy. Chair director of the Division of Medical Ethics Nyu School of Medicine. Aren't thanks again? Coming up. Mask, wars are now being waged our local restaurants. I'm telling you Jim. It's knock down drag out. We're going to talk about that next Sunday night seven. W, H., Boston. Public radio. Welcome back to Boston public. Radio Jim Brady and Marjorie. We just have a couple of minutes. Still John Gruber joins us, but Marjorie wants to talk about this great piece by Beth. Restaurants obviously our new battleground for the great mass wars of twenty twenty, this great piece by Beth, I think it was yesterday and the globe details how a small but mighty insurgency is defined governor Baker mass mandate in when you can social distance and giving grief to staffers who are obliged to enforce it for the few people who haven't read best grape piece. Can you give us a yes? Summary of the travails that she describes them laughing, but it's really not fun. It was on my talk funny. On the front page the globe this morning, so she talked about how Michael's Deli in Brooklyn. You've probably been there Jim you. Sure the order says here to start closing on Mondays to give himself and a staff arrest from Feis over wearing masks. You said at least once a day. I'm told to go F- myself. I thought, either I'm going to assault. Somebody or I'm GONNA cause myself such stress that I have to go to the hospital. then. She talks to this Stacey. In Jamaica Plain who manages an ice cream shop for some reasons, ice cream store seemed to be the epicenter of these mask. Wars, Jim and Stacey runaway says the other day I had a GRUB hub driver pick up an order and she didn't have a mask I said he need a mask, but she proceeds to take the order anyway. Peanut Butter Sundae or something, and then on the way out, cause me a stupid expletive deleted now. I WANNA point out in Massachusetts. Massachusetts we haven't had any shootings or any actual beatings. If we've had another parts of the country over mask wars as Beth teitell calls it, but there has been a lot of problems. Heralds ice cream in north. Hampton and then I guess you. You had these two people on your show last night. They were terrific. Jody Adams whose founder of this restaurant advocacy group runs a bunch of great restaurants and this attorney Mas also a co-founder Yup with great cheeseburgers and..

Jim Brady Beth Teitell Stacey Runaway Boston Marjorie Division Of Medical Ethics Nyu Twenty Twenty Massachusetts John Gruber Virginia Director Jody Adams Assault Governor Baker Michael's Deli Jamaica Hampton Feis MAS
Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:58 min | Last week

Vincent Brown discusses his new book, ‘Tacky’s Revolt’

"Vincent Brown welcome to meet the rices. Slavery is war. Tell me what that means. Well. In the book. I tend to think of slavery itself as a state of war, and in that I'm following the enslaved themselves who often discuss slavery as a state of warfare amongst themselves, most famously allowed Equiano who we know as one of the most famous formerly enslaved abolitionists of the late eighteenth century British Atlantic. said in his autobiography that when you make people slaves. Them to live with you in a state of war. Now in that he was echoing the philosopher John Locke. Who said that what is slavery? But the state of war continued between what he thought was a lawful conqueror and the concord now John Locke was trying to legitimate slavery. He was an investor in the Royal African company, and he actually helped to write the constitution for the colony of south. Carolina, which became a slave state. State, but equiano was doing something a little bit different than John Locke. He was actually commenting upon the conditions of slavery, the violence that was required to maintain people in slavery and the kind of response that was bound to come by those people who had been subjected so violently so for him, slavery was a state of war, and there were other enslaved people who echoed. Seeing slavery that way helped me frame the slave revolt in Jamaica. In seventeen, sixty, seven, sixty, one, which was the largest in the eighteenth century, British Empire as a war itself right as one of a series of wars, all around the Atlantic world that then ed up in this conflict in seventeen sixty Jamaica I'd like to look at your own life, and where that intersects with war, because you grew up in San Diego, and in fact, it was very early on that. You became aware of conflicts. I did well. I'm an American citizen. I grew up in the United States. I was born in the late sixties at the height of the Vietnam War and I I'm sorry to say that I can't name a five year period when the US military hasn't been abroad somewhere engaged in conflict with somebody over the course of my entire life, which seems to me like a half century of war having. Having grown up in San Diego I grew up in one of the largest terry garrison towns really in the history of the world the US Navy is as a major base in San Diego. The US Marines just north of San Diego have a major base and so coming through high school. A lot of my friends would join the military because it was the big industry in town, right. And of course, you know, my family had been had served in the army. My father served in the army. My Uncle A. Brother had done three combat tours I. Believe one in Korea and two in Vietnam, so the history of the military, the engagement overseas abroad in military campaigns was very much a part of my thinking growing up, and so when I thought about the history of slavery. It just jumped out at me that this history was itself a history that was embroiled embedded in a world of warfare, especially in the eighteenth century win. You have got Great Britain struggling in a century long campaign against its its greatest global enemy France, and all of those European wars then topped onto. The wars of enslavement that sent people out across the Atlantic into the European colonies in America, and what you have is a world of wars within wars, which looked very familiar to me like the campaigns at the US was fighting within the larger ambit- of the Cold War so by the time I grew to adulthood in the late eighty S. I was seeing these these late cold war campaigns in these post colonial states as as part of the larger Cold War, and then you see these proxy wars between the US and the Soviet Union fought out in places like Afghanistan right, and then of course by two thousand one, you see those kind of proxy campaigns between the US and Soviet Union growing into something else what we now call the terror wars, the war on. On Terror in Afghanistan and elsewhere I didn't see those things as continuous. I didn't see the terror war something uniquely different from most proxy wars of the late. Cold War period and my thinking historically has been to ask the question. How is it that one connects these longer histories of warfare together? And I do think that I was inspired to think that partly by having grown up in San Diego in a military town. And what about your, your family's personal history with war and with slavery? Well an african-american! My parents grew up in Virginia, and so they are descended from people who are enslaved probably as far back as the eighteenth century the Chesapeake Bay area. What's now? Virginia and Maryland was one of the largest importers of slaves in North America now I say north. America because the British empire imported the vast majority of its enslaved peoples into the Caribbean but for North America the territories that became the United States, the Chesapeake and South Carolina with a major importers of enslaved African peoples, and my family is descended from. Those people probably brought to North America in the eighteenth century. History was big in your life obviously, but also the arch. Yeah well. When I was in high school I I became very involved in theater and went to college thinking that I was actually going to do a theater degree. But at some point I thought well, you know I could probably do theater without a theater degree, but maybe I should have a backup plan and my second love in college was history, and that ended up being my career.

United States San Diego John Locke Equiano North America America Vincent Brown Soviet Union Afghanistan Jamaica Atlantic Virginia Carolina Chesapeake South Carolina Chesapeake Bay Caribbean
Oysters, Clambakes and Grilling Run Amok

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

05:16 min | Last week

Oysters, Clambakes and Grilling Run Amok

"Omar welcome to milk street. Thank you, thank you for having me It's great to have you Let's talk about your popup dinners. A called honeysuckle. Could you just describe what you serve and what the pop ups are like? The honeysuckle. It's a concept that uses food as the nucleus to explore various ideas of nuances of blackness in America specifically. And I say America specifically because. Black people in this country have. Quite quite quite the hurdle in our search identity in that many of us can't trace back our heritage. More than two grandparents ago and what a what tends to happen at least in my experience as a bike person, this country is that. People will ask me. Hey, where are you from? What is your nationality? But if I tell them that I'm just a black person, from Philadelphia, and that I'm American. That's kind of where the conversation stops. You know Africans and West Indians have a heritage. They have a flag Michael. tweet talks a lot about having a flag and his book, the cooking teen and having a flag like if you point towards the flag of Jamaica. What do you think of food? Wise? You think of oxtail. You think of rice and peas when you tell someone that you're an African American, most people only ever associate that with pain and then stereotypes. Under the American flag. So honeysuckle to me is. ME. Generating a flag for myself. It's not it's not just pain. Pain is pain as always there, but there were plenty of joys as well. You write poetry and you were to poem. Call folger's which. I of read fifteen times since I. So, could you just read that? Because I I'm not gonNA. Read your poem. You're GonNa have to read your. Sure folders soldiers is is one of my favorite ones I don't write love. poems often, but. Can we have coffee. I mean like really. Can we put down our words and swallow our breasts and hints of Cocoa Cinnamon and clove. Can I stare into your Brown eyes while the do of God washes over your face by our window next to the lips. Disturbs spoons course in our hearts, just black. Don't sugar neither. Only you and silk from Madrid to toews. FRIZZ, baby hairs and a t shirt. That now belongs to us. Can we have it until it's done. Can we fill our empty coffee bean with Greece Double Fryer chicken forever? Fabulous, Really I'm really glad that you like that bomb. Could you just? Explain a little bit about it. Yeah, But I'm not sure if you remember the commercial, the best part of waking up as folger's in your cup. And people who are in a relationship, the person that you love is the best part of Waking Up. When you when you wake up and you, you see that person next to you. and so in this in this poem, the car the coffee the STIMULI IS IS PARTNER You've had a very successful career. You ended up doing these pop ups. Something really believed in now. You're essentially back home. In Philadelphia you say there isn't much in my room, but a mattress leaning Bookshelf Eucalyptus plant that I found in a public flowerpot. It's Blue Gray and brings joy when the days are down so. What happens next you know? I, wrote the and I know soundly somber I think. The the communist comes from everything coming to a screeching halt, it was huge full. Stop at around March fifteenth when when I moved to Philadelphia, but all the. Things that I was doing prior to this pandemic. Was All leading me back to Philadelphia, and so I'm I'm in the place where I'm supposed to be. What's next is what I WANNA do is open. honeysuckle here the art that I do create. Speaks to the African American community and I would like to spread that over several different. Avenues such as a grocer, a coffee space, and still do dinners, but have it be a community center. The idea in the past was to open honeysuckle downtown, but What I want to do now is bring down to hood like that's. I would love to see the economy spread outward into into the pockets of those who need it. If you look forward five or ten years. In take a best case scenario. What would you like to see happen as a result of what we're going through now? What would be the best case for you? In terms of community or the way people think about food and culture. Restaurants were never about food. And I think that people. Don't understand that restaurants were always about people people I that needed food. So if we can. Start looking at that again. Everything else will fall into

Philadelphia Folger America Omar African American Community Greece Double Fryer Toews Jamaica Partner Michael.
Boston fire truck hits SUV, firefighters taken to hospital

WBZ Morning News

00:21 sec | Last week

Boston fire truck hits SUV, firefighters taken to hospital

"News five firefighters suffering minor injuries when a fire truck crashed into an SUV in Jamaica Plain Late yesterday afternoon on South Huntington Avenue. Both vehicles involved standing major damage. A fire truck was responding to a report of a building fire at the time of the crash. Firefighters taken to local hospitals for evaluation. Their injuries said to be

Jamaica
Why we need a Congressionally Created National Health Care Reform Commission

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Why we need a Congressionally Created National Health Care Reform Commission

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. During. This podcast saw discussed with Mr. Randy ostrow, president and CEO Pro-meta and Ohio based nonprofit healthcare system. Efforts to create a congressionally mandated National Health Care Reform Commission. Miss Joe Stra. Welcome to the program. Missed oestrus bio is of course posted on the podcast website. On background. The current public health emergency brings into stark relief, US healthcare's ineffectiveness. I've noted previously with four point, two five percent of the world's population us currently accounts for twenty six percent of worldwide Kobe, nineteen infections and deaths. Black American Cova deaths and hospitalizations are respectively two point five and four times greater than American whites. Concerning our response to date harbor widely cited global health professor. A she's jaw was quoted yesterday stating we may end up being the worst of any country in the world in terms of our response. Despite outspending all other always OECD countries to to one currently at four trillion annually, the effects of the pandemic is having should not altogether unexpected. In, the first major attempt to rank performance in two thousand, the World Health, organization listed US healthcare thirty seven, the world immediately after the Czech Republic and Jamaica. More recently twenty seventeen Commonwealth Fund ranked US healthcare's performance last among eleven, comparatively wealthy countries. With a current projected toll over two hundred thousand by October one. The question begged is what will federal policymakers learn from this experience more specifically. What will they do to reform? How healthcare is defined delivered and financed. With me again to discuss efforts to create a congressionally mandated national health care reform. Commission is chromatic. CEO Randy Oestra. For purposes of full disclosure I've been working with Primerica in advocating before the Congress on this issue. So to begin Randall, let me ask you if you could provide a brief overview of pro-meta. Sure. Was a traditional integrated delivery system regional and an integrated system. We had hospitals. and. Doctors had an insurance company and then so we were several billion dollars in revenue primarily. Ohio sawfish Michigan and then about ten years ago. through. A variety of of interactions became very focused on of the hunger in the health issues, good as security that really less in spending a decade Fox's on the social determinants of health and a lot of experience. A lot of stories could tell as we talked to organizations around the country that have that were forever covering. We were probably the first houses than they ever talk to them. They said you know. What are you doing here? And then the next special as we're in the of bed and really it's been quite a journey of. Over two years ago while we purchase largest for profit, senior companies in the United States cold hr matter. And so today we would call ourselves the health and wellbeing company We're around. You know just in broad terms of seven billion dollars innovation we, we work in twenty eight states, and really the whole idea is about that. How do you integrate? Things, we do clinically with the things that immediately drafts from a social economic standpoint. You ready records some of that code, and then hot that translate into healthy aging, and all the things that go with it, some of the inequities in healthcare from the inequities treatments, and so we set back from an looking for model in healthcare in realize that we're ought to relieve wrong, pat. We Really Kinda Organization. Try to embark. Do APP, and that's his house voting folks. Okay thank you. Let's go specific to of a national commission, so let me begin with the substantive question, and that is in your experience. What would you say are the three or so overriding structural problems or challenges? Confronting Health Care Delivery and financing today. Yeah I think it's actually a a US question while. You know the American healthcare mile was a mess. I. Think you know that's real clear and I think when you look at the statistics have to go too far whether it's you know the back that we're headed toward ninety percent of the gross domestic. Product by twenty twenty five the statistic. Thank you get already cited from the OECD. Ranked in the world

United States World Health National Health Care Reform Co Oecd Ohio President And Ceo David Intra Cosso Mr. Randy Ostrow Joe Stra Ceo Randy Oestra Commonwealth Fund Primerica Kobe Randall Professor Congress
In Boston, rallies continue to protest police brutality, systemic racism

WBZ Midday News

00:49 sec | Last month

In Boston, rallies continue to protest police brutality, systemic racism

"Two last night more demonstrations in Boston calling for racial equity and denouncing police brutality WBZ's James Rowe Haas has more on one of those events in Jamaica plain the intersection of center and south streets was jam packed with people from all around to honor George Floyd first church rang its bell nine times to symbolize the eight minutes and forty six seconds that a Minneapolis police officer had his knee on the neck of Floyd this protester response to riots we've recently seen you know black of city should be doing something because the writing is not helping organizations like the N. double ACP peacefully protesting the systemic bigotry and still here we are today at this time and no sign of a slowdown for these

Boston James Rowe Haas Jamaica Officer George Floyd Minneapolis
"jamaica" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:40 min | Last month

"jamaica" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In the five o'clock hour in Jamaica plain and a call to action a silent vigil outside the civil war statue in J. P. extended for an extra hour as more than a thousand protesters came together and marched to the district eight twelve Boston police headquarters and they peacefully discuss action for the future including voting and getting educated on racism through books every day protesters like this woman said the video in Minneapolis was very sickening there is no way that any human looking at that video by what happened you know I've known about injustices and you know the unity but it's really important now more than ever again since we're not going to stand at the end of the protest in Jamaica plain one woman made the entire crowd take out their cell phones and take down the number for the Boston police community engagement bureau calling on them to engage with local law enforcement meanwhile several communities around the state also held peaceful protests and rallies this week in response to the death of George Florida Minneapolis including balsamic mover in fall river as well as Marlboro she the attorneys for two of the former Minneapolis police officers charged with aiding and abetting second degree murder in the death of George Floyd says they were simply following orders here's more from A. B. C.'s Ryan borrow Thomas lane was on his fourth day as a full time officer Alexander king was only on his third shift when they assisted nineteen year veteran officer Derek shop it interesting George Floyd lane at one point holding Floyd's lace and came holding onto his back while Floyd was handcuffed lane twice asked if Floyd should be turned to his side his attorney calling for the charges to be tossed asked if he was supposed to throw shop at all for Floyd king's attorney made the case that the new officers we're trying to communicate the situation needed to change direction Ribeiro A. B. C. news Minneapolis mayor Marty Walsh is reminding everyone to use extra caution it during protests and demonstrations because of the color nineteen pandemic I'm not as concerned about the re openings I'm more concerned about individuals getting the virus and I I have grave concern about that and I have great concern because most young people at the protest and I just ask them to be careful and in terms of oversight and accountability of the Boston police department the mayor pointed to some changes especially in recent years including the creation of the police agencies body camera program the department also does not treat his officers to use chokehold tactics was of doing a potential suspect he says that reviewing protocol and operations is an evolving process there are now more than a hundred and two thousand confirmed cases of covert nineteen here in Massachusetts we'll delve into more numbers coming out here on WBZ newsradio in just a few minutes stay without it's five oh three back to the highways right now traffic and weather together starting with the super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes good morning sunshine at some point to give you write out your general tire it is raining a lot of spots out there we're dealing with thunder and lightning in areas as well depending on where you are right now and that if you are seeing that rain we do have it in Boston dealing with some wet roadways out there is some problems of visibility when it gets really heavy up there but should not last hopefully but I guess I'll find out when we have the weather things are moving pretty well for so far though no accidents no incidents to tell you about things are looking good on the expressway northbound still just a ten minute ride from Braintree into the city coming in from the north you're doing okay ninety three route three no complaints in and out of New Hampshire in downtown like I said some wet roadways but the lower deck the Tobin and the lever connector all will be well Laurie granny WBZ's traffic on the three thank you Lori five oh four we have some scattered showers lightning and major thunderstorms this morning becoming very hot and humid later today with a mix of sun shining clouds highs near ninety and seventy is down in the south coast and Cape more showers and thunderstorms likely later this afternoon and tonight low of sixty six partly sunny tomorrow with possible showers and more storms going up to about eighty two turning cooler and more comfortable starting tomorrow night partly sunny on Sunday hiking up to sixty eight and beautiful sunshine next Monday highs around seventy right now a pretty rough morning we see a lot of lightning thunderstorms a lot of rain as well downpours in fact coming down in Boston we have seventy degrees here we have sixty nine in Norwood sixty seven a month so when seventy one in Belmont and sixty nine down in Quincy it's five oh five in Andover fire rescue lieutenant has been.

Jamaica
Queens-Based Company Recalls Curry Powder Over Salmonella Concerns in New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | Last month

Queens-Based Company Recalls Curry Powder Over Salmonella Concerns in New York

"Salmonella concerns have prompted a queens company to recall some of its curry powder new Hocken sign that says the four hundred gram bottles of broad Huni curry powder sold to stores in Jamaica and Jackson heights as well as locations in the Bronx no illnesses have been

Jamaica Salmonella Jackson Heights
Andrew DeAngelo on Cannabis Activism

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

07:08 min | 2 months ago

Andrew DeAngelo on Cannabis Activism

"Everybody. This is Jason Wilson with curious about Canvas podcast. Thanks much for tuning in once again So I am beyond delighted today to be able to sit down and talk with Andrew Dangelo at you. Know there's so many ways I could introduce you. Activists you know co founder of Harbourside. You're involved with the last prisoner project now. Which I know you've been bringing lot of tension to but welcome Andrew Dangelo. Thanks so much for being willing to come on the podcast today. Thank you Jason. It's great to be with your community today. Yeah totally. I'm really stoked to see where our conversation goes. I've been following a lot of your press over the past several months. Some of the interviews you've been doing and keeping up with some your work and there's a there are a lot of milestones to go through but then I know there's a lot you've been talking about lately that I don't WanNa make you regurgitate the same stuff that you've been staying over again someone to try to go in some unique directions here but there's all sorts of stuff for us to Go into right now. One of the kind of segue into a lot of things one of the first things I wanted to ask you about. Is you recently took a trip to Barcelona didn't you? I did I was there for. Icbc Barcelona and span of this. Yes yeah and you. You didn't make it out to the hashish and hemp museum. That's out there I did. I had a great time at the museum. That's Ben drunker zones and operates that museum. He also has one in Holland. Amsterdam and Ben's been old friend of the family for decades and so it was great vehicle able to see his newest outposts there in Barcelona. It's a beautiful building. He's done all this wonderful stained glass work and yeah and if you if you haven't been Barcelona the architecture Barcelona's just every single building every single doorway window archway. is just extraordinarily well-crafted. Beautiful beautiful work and the the hemp and Marijuana Museum. There is no exception and they've ban in his team just done a stellar job with that museum. I encourage everyone to make a pilgrimage to check it out. Yeah I saw some of the photos posted on social media and I was fascinated. How beautiful some of you know the way. Everything was presented the design architecture and everything and I wasn't even really familiar with that museum. Can you describe a little bit about what that museum is like? And kind of how things are presented. And what your experience. There was sure. The museum has multiple levels. So it's two or three stories. There's elevators and stairs that you navigate through it and it's part a history lesson of the plant and and specifically Ham You know the two. The two tracks museum really talks. Most about is is as cannabis as medicine and as an intoxicant and ham has a industrial raw material so so that those are the two focuses. I would say of the museum. And Ben's just got an incredible collection of ancient hemp materials and modern hemp wears also that are represented by some of the leading can't cannabis hemp companies of today. Of course UH sense. He seeds is right next door. Okay Marijuana Museum both in Barcelona Amsterdam and and you can purchase CBD products there and genetics and a whole bunch of really cool will art and culture and Swag from both the museum and since he seats and I was just thrilled to be in Barcelona and an experience that you know we we in the United States. We don't we have cannabis with sort of the first cannabis museum or installation in Las Vegas. There we'd maps just did a big installation in Los Angeles. That was a museum. But we don't have permanent cannabis ham. You know that I'm aware of that's that's as large in a serious As bans I'm sure we have lots of small Wonsan and probably millions of small ones in people's homes. I certainly is yeah I got. I got some in mind mile in my altar of course but you know so when it. It's not easy to have a museum. You know museums don't make money. They lose money and they are about building culture and about keeping something alive for future generations to learn about an and that's hard work to do in our movement in our industry is still in the embryonic stages and I look forward to the day and I hope Stephen I get to be a part of it Where there are something like that. The Hemp Museum here in the United States a- every city should have won. Every every community has cannabis story that goes back hundreds of years and and we can all tell our own version of what's happened over the last hundred years so it's part of the cultural work that I think we're moving into sort of a cultural renaissance canvas. We've had you know we had to legalize and that was just brutal. One hundred year war you know and now we have all these little battles to get legalisation right which we have not done and and of course you know. We have a lot of work to do to get legalisation rights. So that's going to be ten thousand battles that we're GONNA have to fight for that. The cultural work is really something that I think our community is going to have a lot more fun within the political work and I I really. Creativity and culture is been one of the strengths of the cannabis movement community for forever. Going back to the jazz age you know going back to the brothels of New Orleans going back to Jamaica going back to India Longtime in this plant has inspired the creativity of men and women all over the world and so we get to come out of the shadows culturally now and into the light and Where are colors loud and proud and and talk about the plant in ways like a museum? There's millions of ways to express cannabis culture but a museum certainly one of them and you know the there's a big wide open cultural world out there that I hope your listeners will will embrace. There's also I know you know. Science on this podcast. There's a big sign this world of cannabis scientists just like just like culture. It's in the embryonic stages in Gosh. I can't I can't I can't think of something more exciting right now. Then to be working with canvas science or cannabis culture.

Cannabis Hemp Museum Hemp And Marijuana Museum Barcelona Marijuana Museum Jason Wilson Ben Drunker Icbc Barcelona Andrew Dangelo United States Co Founder Barcelona Amsterdam Harbourside Holland Wonsan New Orleans Los Angeles Hashish Amsterdam
Dow sinks after Fed Chair Powell's comments rattle Wall Street

Squawk Pod

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Dow sinks after Fed Chair Powell's comments rattle Wall Street

"Fell sharply after the Federal Reserve. Chairman said Moore may be needed to support the economy the Dow falling for the third straight day. This time more than five hundred points. The S&P five hundred and Nasdaq off. More than one and a half percent. Energy and financials were the worst performing sectors in the SNP TODAY. One big reason for the drop perhaps comments from one of the most respected investors in the world. David Tepper was with me today on the halftime report. It's definitely As of yesterday on the markets from yesterday I would say that ninety nine was more overvalued in two thousand but Yeah I would say it's one of the most valued markets maybe the second most valued I've ever seen. The market is pretty high in the feds. Put a lot of money in here. And it's a question. Has there been different? Miss Allocation of capital in the markets? And certainly you're seeing pockets of that now on the stock market And the market is by anybody's standards. Pretty full. I think that you know that the bottom is in. I think probably if the situation remains you know if we're just dealing with a virus and there's no other issues that come up. I was David Tepper for more. Today's big drop Mike Santoli with us once again by good to see. David tepper speaks people. Tend to listen Jamaica comments today. Well I do think it's spoke to a lot of the sentiment that if you're looking at near term fundamentals the aggregate corporate earnings power of this market. You really can't make a great case for being at these levels of for to have this rally continue. That makes a lot of sense clearly. Thirty-five percent Ron off the lows did build in a fair bit of optimism at least in those leading stocks. Do you think difference today though the week stuff that you mentioned like banks like energy like the travel stocks. They've been week for a while. They stayed week today. The difference today was the leading tech stocks. Have taken a breather. They're down three or four percent off their highs and therefore it kind of exposed some of the underlying weakness in the broader market. Because they've been sort of protecting. An insulating index is to a large degree over the last several at

David Tepper Federal Reserve Chairman Mike Santoli Moore Jamaica RON
"jamaica" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:37 min | 2 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Fifty degrees in Jamaica we have forty eight degrees in mid town going down tonight to a low of forty three when the news time is seven fifty one in a bid to help people cope with the isolation of staying at home to Cornell students have created a website called quarantine buddy the B. C. B. S. S. Peter Haskell spoke to co founder Jordan goals why who's from Marlboro New Jersey tell me about quarantine body and how it started yes so basically myself and some other Cornell students were all taking online classes now so I went home and then press the team also went home and we kind of realize how all these people were so I guess it's kind of like lonely and isolated and everyone was kind of going through the same situation so going to the same stresses and things like that yet they had no way of like a reaching out and finding human connection because they obviously are social distancing and no one can leave their houses so we figured like all the people are going through a similar situation like why should they have to go through a lot so what we did was we thought of an idea recording thirty where we can and ask people a few basic questions about their background where they're from their age gender and things like that and if they're looking for like a a person to talk to you to do anything specific so we asked them if they're looking for for example a workout buddy or a study buddy or someone to talk to and things like that and then every week what we do is we send them their quarantine buddy we reach out to them that hate it your quarantine buddy here's the phone number the cell you can reach them you should read that reach out just to kind of make sure that no one is going through this difficult time alone and that people just could still maintain that human connection while still social distancing as the network I would like to put in some preferences whether they have an age or gender preference for their match or if they're looking for something specific like we found people who are looking for really specific things like someone to play minecraft but for someone to do yoga with things like that you've been able to match people like that but it's really interesting that we found is that some of the most successful matches have been the most diverse people so whether it be someone who is older and can't leave their home because everything that's going on with a college student who is just looking for someone to talk to you and like they even though they they don't have that much in common the time is really brought people together make people realize like wow really all going through the same thing we're all in this together needs to realize how much more similar they actually are that's co founder of the website quarantine buddy it's Jordan goals Y. from Marlboro New Jersey difference makers on WCBS eight eighty is supported by New York community bank in the NYCB family of banks serving the needs of.

Jamaica
Boston Police Officer Dies Of Coronavirus

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

Boston Police Officer Dies Of Coronavirus

"Walsh is the front edge was fifty three years old and a resident of the city of Boston is a twenty nine year member of the Boston police department joining the force in nineteen ninety one he served district E. thirteen in Jamaica plain since nineteen ninety six there's still a quarter of a century serving one community Jose Fonte as was married with four children and a

Walsh Boston Jose Fonte Jamaica
New York - Cuomo, de Blasio disagree over school restart amid coronavirus

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:20 min | 3 months ago

New York - Cuomo, de Blasio disagree over school restart amid coronavirus

"There's there's word word from from city city hall hall of of some some new new coronavirus coronavirus test test sites sites that that will will be be going going up up in in the the communities communities that that have have the the greatest greatest needs needs and and those those were were the the merits merits as as the the virus virus is is hitting hitting the the hardest hardest and and here the governor still not seeing eye to eye on when the schools are going to re opens let's get more on that from Glenn Schuck live at city hall this morning Klein and that's a given those sites out right away leave the city to be opening up these in the days ahead in Morrisania in the Bronx Jamaica queens of the Clifton section of Staten Island also in east New York Brooklyn and one in Harlem as well and we'll get you the information about that throughout the morning there's some hope as well as a number of people hospitalized is the lowest new patients at least in a month even as the staggering death toll continues now regarding the opening of those schools here in New York City governor Cuomo feels it's his call but mayor Blasio says nope it's ME transfer crimes and I as I said consulted widely with health care experts with the folks who do the work in our schools about the mayor and the governor do seem to agree about one thing lead that would be about the use of a face protection will also do an executive order today which directs employers to provide essential workers with a cloth of surgical face masks to their employees when they are interacting with the public

City City Hall Hall Glenn Schuck Klein Morrisania Staten Island Brooklyn Harlem New York Governor Cuomo Mayor Blasio Executive
Cruise Ships With Possible COVID-19 Cases Have No Places To Dock

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

Cruise Ships With Possible COVID-19 Cases Have No Places To Dock

"Jamaica carnival is urging officials in Broward county to allowed to cruise ships to dock for humanitarian reasons one of the liners Holland America's sand dam has been at sea since March seventh it has several sick passengers on board vulnerable but healthy passengers from the sand dam were transferred to another ship the Rotterdam

Broward County Holland America Rotterdam Jamaica
Coronavirus Cases Strain New York City Hospitals

Burn Fat Orlando.com

00:13 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus Cases Strain New York City Hospitals

"Images from Jamaica hospital in queens showing already overcrowded emergency room and at Elmhurst hospital in queens which the mayor has called the epicenter of the epicenter the city had to send reinforcements additional clinicians

Jamaica Hospital Queens Elmhurst Hospital
Coronavirus cases continue to rise in New York

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus cases continue to rise in New York

"New York City calls itself the U. S. epicenter of the virus mayor bill de Blasio says they'll know in a few days if they'll be able to adequately fight April fifth is what the mayor here called a decisive day after that Sunday the mayor said he gets very worried about whether hospitals will have what they need to deal with the expected influx of coronavirus patients images from Jamaica hospital in queens show in already overcrowded emergency room at Elmhurst hospital in queens which the mayor has called the epicenter of the epicenter the city had to send reinforcements additional clinicians and nurses A. B. C.'s Erin to Turkey

New York City Jamaica Hospital Elmhurst Hospital Queens A. B. C. Bill De Blasio Erin
The Podcaster's Responsibility

She Podcasts

09:41 min | 3 months ago

The Podcaster's Responsibility

"Sheep. Podcasters and he podcasters. How are you today it is Monday? March twenty third. I am here in quarantine separated from all that we know the beautiful house. Yes Khobar and our favorite producer John Jamaica it looks like Elsie and I are trying to hold a contest as to who can have the most flyaways and yet here. I know it's like it's L. Horrible Horn. You like goat ears coming years. Yes and these little guys like extra years. Look at this. It's like right above my ears. Lake sticks out in this scary. I can't invent who Larry Online from the three stooges trail and then like my hair like I already was growing up. Just a tiny bit of posits gray hair. But I'm not been able to go to. I was due for a re color like we got home. So now it's been. I'm now two or three weeks overdue. You can start to see my silently. Reverse skunk stripe. It's an actual so like one quarter inch of my hair at the top of my head is not graying and the rest of it is so it's like when you pull it back you can see. Wow Yeah interesting. I know I possibly have caused. That's happened but anyway zonked editor or something. Now it'll never grow the rest of me. It'd be white with this one blacks anyway so yeah we are looking fine. We're looking we're looking like we've been indoors for awhile. Yes I'M GONNA get myself a T shirt that says indoorsy right have you? Have you seen all those t shirts though? Have you seen the change in already? Like I'm social distancing or I was born for social distancing there's all of these tee-shirt companies that have all these various specific sayings around what we're all experiencing so I don't know I guess that's the way you make money right. We can't be angry about that. I when I first saw that T. Shirts T. shirts. I was like I want that teacher. Actually what I want is a t shirt that says. Stay away from me in big letters like do not come close in big letters. It's it's funny. How either take it very very seriously or don't take it very seriously and the less amid Omar. There's there's some middle there's there are people who take it seriously and don't think anything about the virus or any kind of t shirt like that'd be funny then there's people who take it seriously but still think everything is funny. I guess that's me then. There are people who take it less seriously but constantly make jokes about it or there are people who don't follow directions and think the whole thing is a joker conspiracy right now all these different levels of like is it okay to joke about it and I wonder like I hate comparing this to the Holocaust but there's an article. I read that said if we continue on the trajectory that we are that within like six months it will have wiped out like one third of the population which is similar to that was like two billion or two billion. I don't know but the point is in today's Day and age. Would we be laughing right? If a dictator from European country was killing all the blanks. Right would we be like is survived? Hitler t shirts and like I don't know if this works out I WANNA get. I survived the boomer remover virus. I mean that's true but there are people that are younger than are dying to Atlanta just watching the CNN in New York this morning. I mean did you guys know. They're turning Javits Center fucking hospital than Jeff sent your. I think I saw a lot of that stuff. Is the biggest convention center. I've ever been in it takes. It's like three miles to go from one end of the javits center to the other. It's so big I mean you to Philadelphia has a huge convention center. Yeah there's a hospital that had shut down not even six months ago here. They're already rampant. Add up there's a prison here that has been shut down for a couple years. They're ramping that up. Ooh That's exciting. Well you know I mean coming back to what you were talking about the whole like I survived Hitler kind of thing. I'm thinking that the beginning of World War Two or not even the beginning of World War Two. You're like when Hitler was coming into power. I think that there was a few people who had a sense of who he was and what he was doing right and there was like this element of pure terror like a complete understanding of what was happening but the majority of the sort of people he ended up affecting and I'm not talking just Jewish people or anybody else that he was focusing in on but like all of the different countries all of the citizens of all of the other countries that were eventually affected. They could have just said like Oh. I heard that. He's a nasty dude or he's a weird guy who's he's never gonNA come in. You know what I mean. You would make these off hand comments but you wouldn't really get it right graphing. It's not like there's a digital graphing system that can show you exactly how many people killed and exactly how many countries like. I saw something on my phone from New York Times. It had it little red dots spreading and spreading right. Yeah Yeah it was era vying. Nothing like that. There's only newspaper and radio. I mean I'm assuming there was radio. Nineteen thirty I think there was radio. Also that was a human being who is that was that was a human versus this thing which has no. It's just a it's a thing but I think the contact what I'm saying is that we don't really know. I think you know the the impact of these horrible things that happen in the world. Don't really hit us until off door right. It's like you don't really get it until after what that impact was about summer this morning because like it's all finding good until it's swimming season right and then well my son's you know the majority of his five year old year is going to be spent not hanging out with friends. Not Doing sports not going to read as not going to the swimming pool not going to the beach. Like what am I gonNa do with him all summer? Keep him in. I mean it's GonNa be Summer D- do we lay out. Do I get a blow up pool? Immunize our like what? What kind of summer is that? Can't go anywhere we can't do anything can't see anyone and yeah summer and then house is going to shape the rest of his. You know he's young enough where he'll remember but not remember it as the biggest tragedy that ever happened. But he'll remember it as yeah. We had to stay inside and it's up. He'll have that definite imprint. I mean because you know when I was growing up in El Salvador and there was a civil war. I still have the imprint of what we had to do like we had. We had to be in like there was a time there. Where the where the government said. Nobody's allowed outside after seven o'clock so because you could not like my would say like everybody needs to be in because if anything happens to you when you're out after seven you die you die like a wealthy and then you would hear sounds and things that were going on outside. That was very very scary. I remember like I remember how scared I was. I remember the sounds and Looking back you realize while there's like all of this extra stuff that happened and yeah it imprinted in my life. It was like I know what that feels like. I know what it feels like when you can't do anything because you're under lockdown. We were under lockdown many times. So I was little you know I was under nine. Yeah it's having it makes me wonder like how many of these kids are. GonNa turn Germaphobe. I mean people true. It's not the new normal everything. It's just temporary but like now the new normal in different ways craze. There's a lot of people who will not send their kids back to school. There are a lot of people who will not go back into the office. Because now they've proven they can work from home and which they knew all along by the way that they could work from home equally and even be more productive. So I don't think that we need to send buildings the way we did two weeks ago. Like we we can have a completely different society now like doing doctor visits via Tele Seminar and I did my first one way before this like this with Isaac like in January. He was sick and they were. You know as a weekend and they have you come up on you know that you log in you type in your problem and then the doctor comes up and take a look you right. I just had somebody. I don't know one of my one of my School Mama's I was texting back and forth mai-mai's best friend and may has been like wanting to have facetime with this little child and I'm like texting her mom like she's GonNa. I can't handle her anymore. Can you get our child to come up late but it but her mom is sick. She's real she's been really really sick and that's she had somebody from iron knit. While she had somebody from Florida her cousins came and they they had fevers when they came like and they both and they didn't tell them and so like anyway so she got very sick. She had fever but I kept touching base with her and she got a diagnosis via the phone. She had a something allard. A it wasn't it wasn't cove it wasn't court cornerback. So it was a sign it. Yes exactly it was a sinus infection. And she had she was just had a fever because of that kind of stuff in them so she had the diagnosis via via. Like just what you're talking about. And they sent her antibiotics. So hopefully he's on the mend. But this I would love

Hitler Fever Javits Center Larry Online New York Times Sinus Infection Producer Atlanta Indoorsy John Jamaica Editor Facetime Government New York CNN Isaac Florida
An insight into Kamala Harris, a potential VP for Biden

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:58 min | 4 months ago

An insight into Kamala Harris, a potential VP for Biden

"I am Jonathan Kaye. Part AND WELCOME TO CAPE UP. Long before people started swooning over Congressman. Val demings of Florida as a possible vice president. Joe Biden folks. We're talking about senator. Kamla Harris California back in January twenty nineteen few weeks before Harris announced her own since disbanded presidential campaign. I sat with her in front of a live audience at George Washington University for the kickoff tour. For her the truth we hold because Harris's book is a memoir. Our conversation was heavy on stories about parents upbringing and her career. There's no better way to get to know this possible vice president than listening right now. Senator Harris thank you very much for for being here for choosing Washington to be the kickoff of your book tour and or actually to be correct books tour and as we see the truths we hold an American journey and then also superheroes are everywhere. I'm going to focus on the truths we hold k. And I'm going to focus on something that happens before even page one and I want to clear it up. Okay for anyone who might have done this or still doing this. Despite hearing it said correctly the first time pronounce your name Carmela so just think of like the punctuation Mark Comma and that Adalah and there you got and so then what does communism mean then. So it's a very traditional classic Indian name and it derives from Sanskrit and it's it means the lotus flower and so it's very prevalent and a lot of Asian cultures and the idea the symbolism. Is that the Lotus flowers sits on water but it never really gets wet. The water beats off of it and so the idea being that one can be in the midst of chaos or be in the midst of something happening and and be there and should be there and it doesn't necessarily need to penetrate you but one should be there and equally important Its roots are in the mud meaning. It is grounded and and one must always know where they come from and can still be this thing now. I need you to pronounce another name for me for the life of me. I just I couldn't do it. And that is the name of your mother Shammala. So the why is silent Shama Sharmila what was really Shamlan? Go Gopala tell us about your mom. Caller Mommy Mommy. We always called her. Mommy I am not embarrassed to say she is mommy and She is in many ways. The reason I wrote the book my sister my is here My Mother's one of her best friends from college is here. Lenore POMERANZ I write about in the book and my mother was a force of nature. A drill force of nature. She is someone who all five feet of her. If you met her after you walked away you would have thought she was seven Tom. My mother was a truth teller. She spoke the truth. She was probably the smartest toughest and most loving person I've ever known. She raised her daughters with a belief that we could do and be anything. She taught us that. Don't let people tell you who you are and you tell them who you are. She was a scientist. Breast cancer researcher should goals in her life to end breast cancer and raise her two daughters and she would take us to the lab with her at go after school on the weekends and being around scientists one of the things that I realize now early in my life I learned was that one should see what can be unburdened by what has been because that is science is about. It's the pursuit of those things that will improve the condition of life. That will solve problems. That will make things better. And that's why I'm naturally attracted to also anything that is about innovation understanding that innovation. We do it not because we're bored with things the way they've been but because we should always be in pursuit of being more efficient more effective more relevant and and that's what she is and was your father. Donald Harris also an immigrant born born in Jamaica. Yeah an economics professor at Stanford. And let's David. Mind comes from some BRAINIAC parents. Your mom got her. He H D. The year you were born does put that out there so now your dad comes to the United States from Jamaica. Yeah my father was equally brilliant. And is he was a national scholar and Jamaica. He earned his way and up in out and came to the United States into Berkeley to study economics and My parents met when they were active in the civil rights movement. And it's an interesting story because as you know my mother graduated college when she was nineteen and did and so she so she said to my grandfather who was one of the freedom fighters in India for India's independence and my mother was the eldest of four children. She was the oldest at at a girl obviously and she said to my grandparents. She wanted to study science and she wanted to go to what was considered to be one of the best schools and that was UC Berkeley and my grandparents looked at her and said okay. We will put you on a plane and you can go to a place. You've never been at nineteen years old. This was in nineteen fifty nine. So this young this girl. This young woman got on a plane encouraged by her parents to go and pursue her dream now. The back story is also that it was fully expected she would get that degree and go back and have a good arranged marriage but of course my mother having been raised and being who she was just naturally she when she got to Berkeley was immediately attracted to the civil rights movement. Why do you defend? That's where she met. My father was and but I want to say she met my father and decided to have a love marriage and a marriage based on love which I believe is the ultimate act of optimism. The the question that I interrupted. You're you're Satan with. Why do you think she was so attracted to the civil rights movement she was raised growing up? Would go back to India like every other year and And so I know the family from that that that raised her because they helped raise us and it was always about fighting for independence was about finding justice. It was about fighting to make sure that all people had a say in their future in their government an equal say and that was that was in her blood and of course that's what the civil rights movement was about and the free speech movement and and there are some funny stories. I was just sharing with something backstage. You know so I witness I right about in the book you know from my strollers. I view and there's a a funny family story about how some mothers marching with the extended family. I talk about like aunt Mary and Uncle Freddie and the book and she would tell the story about. How DO THEY MARTIN? And this is back when strollers didn't really have armrest seatbelts. Martin Away and you know shouting and and all of that and then I think Mongol Freddie a look down in the stroller which was empty followed up. My mother tells funny story like one day. She was fussing and and you know so much cuter when she would tell the story but she'd say so then she would look down at me and come on. What do you want? What do you want and I look back up in a said fleet on so glad that story. I wanted to hear you safe. We how I wanted to talk about your your father economics professor Stanford they meet atmospherically. Had you and my And you love going to the park and your mom would correct me. If I'm wrong would put limits on you in terms of how far you go. Whatever and your dad would say to you. Run RUN COM run. That's right he would say. Do not be afraid. Let her go let her go. Let her run. You run as fast as you. Can you run as far as you want and I believe that his whole purpose was to say. Do not be afraid and be

Senator Harris Vice President India Kamla Harris California United States Stanford Berkeley Professor Jonathan Kaye Joe Biden George Washington University Senator Florida Congressman Val Demings Jamaica Shama Sharmila
Walter Rodney Was Way Ahead of His Time

This Day in History Class

03:35 min | 4 months ago

Walter Rodney Was Way Ahead of His Time

"Day was March twenty third nineteen forty two Guyanese historian and activist. Walter Rodney was born. He's remembered for his scholarship and activism concerning the working class and black people around the world. Rodney was born to Edward in Pauline Rodney in Georgetown British Guyana or Present Day Guyana British. Guyana was a colony that was part of the British West indies after World War. Two there were increasing demands for political independence in Guyana. The People's Progressive Party a left wing political party formed in the early nineteen fifties in the colony. Rodney's perspective developed in the midst of this rising anti colonial sentiment during that decade rotten distributed people's Progressive Party manifestos began attending Queens College. A high school in Guyana. There he edited the school's newspaper and participated in the debate society. He graduated in Nineteen Sixty and won a scholarship to the university. College of the West indies. He graduated with a degree in history in nineteen sixty three. He went on to attend the University of London where he got a doctorate in African history. His thesis was called a history of the Upper Guinea coast. Fifteen forty five to eighteen hundred in England. Rodney continued to recognize how scholarship divorced history from politics brought and he took a job as a lecturer in Tanzania but he left to teach at the University of the West indies in Jamaica there he taught African history highlighting the importance of Africa and Caribbean history and the impact of historical resistance against slavery and colonialism. He advocated for the Working Class and criticized the government's policies he gave lectures to marginalized groups in Jamaica and became a key figure in the black power movement after he went to the black riders conference in Montreal. In nineteen sixty eight Rodney was declared persona non grata by the Jamaican government and banned from returning to the country. People protested his banning but he continued to speak out on the repression of darker. Jamaicans he taught in Tanzania for a few years publishing his best known work. How Europe underdeveloped Africa but in one thousand nine hundred eighty four? He returned to Guyana which had gained independence in nineteen sixty six to take a position as a professor of history at the University of Guyana. Though his appointment to the university was revoked he stayed in Guyana and he became a leader of the working people. A political group formed in the nineteen seventies and opposition to the regime of Prime Minister Forbes Burnham Rodney gave lectures in Jamaica Europe and the US and he continued his vocal resistance to burn them as the government proceeded to sponsor police rates and beatings and July of Nineteen seventy-nine. He and seven other people were arrested after two government offices were burned down. He faced charges of arson but was acquitted though he and his peers faced persecution. He maintained his criticism of the government and the Constitution but on June thirteenth nineteen eighty. Rodney died in a bomb explosion. The bomb was allegedly given to him by someone and the guy in a defense force is suspected that the assassination was orchestrated by Burnham. Rodney was survived by his wife and three children. Some of his works were published

Forbes Burnham Rodney Guyana Jamaican Government West Indies University Of Guyana Jamaica Progressive Party Queens College Tanzania Africa Georgetown Upper Guinea University Of London England Europe University Of Jamaica Europe Caribbean Professor Of History
"jamaica" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

04:11 min | 4 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Stopping at Jamaica station this weekend for signal work other than that double ours on a close also subway service other than some normal planned work no issues or delays alternate side issue pardon rules in effect tomorrow and begin his arrows next report eleven thirty one on ten ten wins the current viruses claimed another victim this time it's the city's restaurant industry where to Blasio has announced that he plans to sign an executive order tomorrow limiting restaurants bars and cafes to food takeout and delivery only on top of that nightclubs movie theaters small theater houses and concert venues must all close that order taking affected nine AM this Tuesday Andrew Reggie of the New York City hospitality alliance says he hopes third party delivery services like uber eats agreed to reconsider their fees or it could put a lot of restaurants out of business currently delivery platforms charge restaurants feed anywhere from fifteen to thirty percent of the total order which is unsustainable for small businesses in a good market and now that we are in a state of emergency and we're just trying to keep our doors open if possible and keep a few people employed we must have the fees there are now five corona virus deaths reported in New York City alone with three hundred and twenty nine confirmed cases statewide seven hundred twenty nine people are now tested positive across the state earlier tonight the mayor announced that classes being canceled at all city schools effective tomorrow when he says it was a very difficult decision to make this is a decision that I have taken with no joy whatsoever with a lot of pain honestly because it's something I could not the million years imagined having to do well we are dealing with a challenge and a crisis that we have never seen in our lifetimes and is only just begun so I regret to have to announce that as of tomorrow our public schools will be closed and he says classes will not resume until April twentieth at the earliest this means more than a million city students will be home from school for weeks all students our schools rather now being closed all over the tri state in fact Connecticut governor governor Ned Lamont has announced a dramatic step ordering all public schools state wide to cancel class beginning this Tuesday through at least the end of the month on Long Island all public and private schools have been ordered to close their doors as well for the next two weeks in both Nassau and Suffolk counties Westchester will soon follow suit according to governor Cuomo new Jersey's governor Murphy meanwhile saying he expects to announce tomorrow that his state will also order all of its public schools to be shut down until further notice and that they are also considering a statewide curfew the city in fact now is watching and waiting hoping that the corona virus does not take a toll on the men and women who keep the five boroughs running they are the life blood of our city we depend on them and uniformed firefighters association president Gerard fitz Gerald says it's essential that when we cast these workers for the corona virus they get the results quickly firefighters the police EMS nurses doctors you know all of us that are that are in this in this fall that that we need to limit the amount of exposure so the faster we know that somebody has contracted the virus the quicker that we can put the protocols in place and that limit the exposure by anybody coming into contact with that person fitzgerald speaking after a second fire fighter tested positive for the virus this one a captain in Brooklyn they say the captain did not of recent contact with patients and is now under self quarantine along with more than thirty colleagues at a sheet metal worker with the Long Island railroad tested positive the MTA saying this worker had no direct contact with the public Roger stern ten ten wins in Manhattan earlier today vice president Mike pence promised the plans have been made to expands testing for the virus for now though tests remain in short supply forcing health officials to ration testing many people saying they haven't been able to get tests even if they have symptoms without widespread testing experts say they can't know how widely the disease has actually spread keep it locked here ten ten wins in ten ten wins dot com for the latest coverage of the corona virus outbreak wins news time eleven twenty five right it's Jamie progressives number one number two employee leave a message at the Hey.

Jamaica station
How Queer Eye Star Karamo Brown Deals With Thirsty DMs

Just The Sip

12:32 min | 4 months ago

How Queer Eye Star Karamo Brown Deals With Thirsty DMs

"Welcome to just SIP. I am Justin Sylvester and today we have one of the FINEST BLACK MEN ON TV. Joining us for this podcast. This conversation was it was jeep. I found out a lot about myself. I found out a lot about the queer eye. Cast I mean there were some nuggets in this interview and I'm just so happy to have one of the most enlightenment join me today. On this podcast. Please welcome Kerama Brown. Thank you for coming. I'm so glad to be here. We are at just a SIP with the one Kerama Brown. Everybody thank you. I'm calling this episode sex drugs and Maury Povich book. If you guys have not gotten this book right now get it and do yourself a favor. Do not. Just get the book the Audio Book because you can hear it in his own words. I am audio book person. I listen to them all the time. Never have I heard so much heart so much love so much pain behind one person telling a story. I appreciate that Boo at all. So all we can you texting me saying. Oh my gosh that part this part and that made me so happy you have no idea because I put a lot of people when they write memoirs they say they're going to be open transparent about everything but then they don't and I was open and transparent about every single thing for sure I was like I'm not hiding anything I don't want you were giving me. Yama for two hours on the treadmill because we're so open and transparent. Who was the one person you were scared to read this manuscript because you? Kinda just laid out there. Yeah nobody to be honest with you because before I started read everyone knows that I live my life. One hundred percent on one hundred percent open. Because that's the only way I feel like other people can grow if I'm an example of the growth and so I let everyone know completely before I was writing this book. I'm writing it and I would like to include your you being a part of my life in this and if you're okay with it let me know right now. If you're not then I'm going to have to figure out a way to still sell your story switching. Yeah and every single person was like we already figured you'd be honest about it so I wasn't worried about anyone to be honest about it and good and there was one subject in there that you decided that you needed to pull back on so I didn't talk about my mother being abused in detail because my father used to hit her because she still healing and so as I was writing. I was noticing that it was bringing up a lot of emotion that she hadn't healed from yet so I was like you know what I'm not trying to trigger my mother. I love my mother's roll back and help her with the you know the tool so that she could support herself and then when my suicide attempt I figured I don't need to go into detail about that because if someone else's reading it I don't them to say Oh this is how I can do it. Yeah I wanted to instead. Stop at a certain point. And then say if you're having these feelings or if you know some of these feelings here our resources you can use. Yeah because a lot of times people don't do that. Yeah and I'm like if you pick up this book here's a way you can get the hell yeah. Was there something that happened while you were writing where you thought you were over something and you had worked through something but then writing this book you almost had to reactivate it and re re confronted you talk about a lot of things in the book about your name and being gay all these things? Sometimes we don't take on you know we don't take it on fully. Yes we kind of brush over it. Yes they we're fine but we're not anything in this book where you were writing so yes but not really because I do the work myself. I mean like career wise. That's I think I'm so good on. Queer is because having a background in psychotherapy social work. I can do the digging and digging on myself. The one thing I would say that kind of triggered me a little bit was when I got to the color. Ism Chapter in 'cause I talked about how my skin tone my grandmother used to say to me. Don't talk it up a family anymore. Which you know. She comes from a certain time. Where you to be lighter meant that you could have attained more success and so when I was writing that it brought up these feelings again because through Social Media. I get these comments because I'm engaged to a white man. Yeah that somehow me being engaged to a white man has somehow diminished my experience as a black man in this world and it bothers me like people say. Oh You Dana White Guy so you all of a sudden have lost part of your blackness and I'm like when I walk out the world people don't see me with a White Man. They see a black man and when the police stopped me they don't say oh you're dating a white guy we'll let you we'll let you go. You're good yeah. Don't have Kiki somewhere and a drink. No they say you still black band. And that's what gets on my nerves and so when I was writing that I realized that there are still issues with my color that it's a different former Colorado but there's parts of it that still bother me because it didn't erase yeah raise yes completely you know. It's funny because when I first came out. I think people had a problem being gate but now that I've come out and in the past dated a white guy when I go home with a guy they now look at me because I'm an interracial relationship you're from Houston Texas. That probably still happens to you. Oh my gosh are you kidding me everywhere? I go like the minute we pop up. This was really gets me people. Somehow he put me on like back up back you up. My man is successful but my had no hand in giving me the career the success the money in my bank account and it bothers me when we go out and people assume my career is somehow because of something. He's that yeah I'm like have lost. Meanwhile he's like a doctor somewhere else talked about this. You know what I'm saying. DoN'T COME FROM MR. Calhoun exactly well. Let's remind people where you started? Yes because rule. Philadelphia was everything. Yeah you were the first black openly gay man on television. What was that experience reality? Reality mother ru father who was the first. Let's let's be very real but in reality television and when that title came out I didn't even know that also people's right in there and I was like what are you talking. About Ruben around forever and then I was like oh reality television got it and what was it like It's it's it's sad and it's also exciting because I was on the real world in two thousand and four two thousand five. Why in the hell has there never been an openly? Gay Black Man cast before me. Yeah that's a problem for sure because we have been around. Let me take some I go to Atlanta. I go to Chicago New York. Texas Tennessee and black gay men are around thriving doing the most amazing setting culture setting trends yet. I was the first so it kind of disappointed me because I was like there should have been twenty before me before me but then on the same rate I was like well. I'm glad that I could kick open the door so that now there could be more people and then I'm going to continue. Kick Open that door and also gonNA continue that every other brother. That is Gay I'm going to say come up with me. Let's let's do together. I let me applaud. You let me celebrate you. Let's let's do this. We don't do that very often was many. Don't but many do you do I do. And I think it's important that we encourage those who on their journey to loving themselves and to love others to know that we support them in that they'll get there. Yeah no in. Two Thousand and four people weren't living that loud. We were still kind of in the closet. You Know Oprah said. We was in the closet. Let me tell you I was out in the club. Run IN THE STREET. Oh do it in. Oversized Shala John Jeans and Timberlands and then each outfit sounds happy. I need you ought to put together like a collage when you go on TV and you live your life like that and then the reality stops and you're back in your real reality. Yes what was the? What was I guess? What was the backlash because you know with my family? It's like you can be gay. You can be you. We support you but the minute you put it out there. It's a little bit harder. Yes that and that's exactly it. I had family members who immediately were turned off from speaking to me my father and I we already had a rocky relationship because he couldn't reconcile our relationship with his religion and so because he he believed his God was teaching him that somehow I was not perfectly designed and not made in his eyes. He figured I can't talk to you but then on top of that me putting it on television embarrassed him and so he didn't WanNa talk to me. We got into physical altercations. It was bad and there was other family members. Come from Jamaica in house so it's like the Black Culture Jamaican Culture Cuban culture which unfortunately there are members subscribed to this sort of ideal of what it is to be a man. Yeah and then me being proud and well-spoken on national television somehow didn't define me as a man because of the fact that I had intimate relationships with other men and your only son and I'm the only son and so you know it was. It was hard but then on the flip side which I tried to do was focus on all the people who love me like I will just showered with so much love beginning letters and letters and letters from people saying Oh my Gosh I love you. You're amazing mice messages. Dmz ENDS. It was good. It was good but I'm not GONNA lie it. I took a dark path quickly because I felt like I lost myself because trying to battle the family and the good of here trying to be something more at Age. Twenty three was a lot. Yeah and so it got it got rough real quick she black Jamaican and Cuban. Sx is good. You better you show up with a PPO per somebody. Did it. Better be an ambulance late nights. I just can't even imagine it would add. Top passed already clear the room you were living your best life. Look my favorite line. In this whole book I found. It is when you said molly you in danger girl. Okay when your I'm not having an explainer people I'm GonNa let you explain it to them because it was one of the most profound things that I've read. What was that moment like for you when I found my drug of choice. Yes Oh my gosh. Tell me you history. Yes so I mean my father being rastafarian Jamaican Us We'd he recreationally and so it was always in my house shot. Okay I loved it. I loved trying. We'd because it made me feel social when I got it first time from him so it was a weird experience of like not having to go to a corner to get we'd just being able to say. Let Me Walk. My Dad's room and get weed and but then I realized I didn't like the feeling of it. I didn't like being lethargic. I didn't like it was down. It was a downer. I didn't like it so then I started trying to know you weren't going in your dad's closet to get some weed. He had a basketball side. Oh yeah he well he did okay he did he did. He had won by his bed but he also had like a basketball in the freezer. This yeah like big of weed in the freezer and so I'll just opened up the bag and I'd be like with my friends be like oh how much we need today and I would just take it out the bag and so it was easy for me to access it but I didn't like the Downer feeling of it and then I stopped that because I never had addictive personality towards that but though I had an addictive personality So then I started molly and ecstasy and that was cute for like the first couple of times I was like yes. I like someone rub up on me and I was like yes. We are living. Ooh And then as I would have to take three pills to have that same feeling. I was a you're sweaty. You're growth cute and then I got introduced to cocaine and that's what I said you in danger girl. And how old were you when you got introduced twenty five? And who was the bitch because at this point? Let's remind people if you read this book. He is now on the. You're in the press tour. You're in the Club appearances. Best Life as Kerama. Oh for real world yes and you start out on this dirty your sixty three you in between one hundred ninety three and two hundred and ten pounds and you get introduced to cocaine yes. What's at first feeling like

Texas Molly Basketball Cocaine Maury Povich Kerama Brown Justin Sylvester Dana White Jamaica BOO Houston Kerama Kiki Mr. Calhoun Ruben Colorado Philadelphia
Cruise lines, passengers scramble to respond to coronavirus

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Cruise lines, passengers scramble to respond to coronavirus

"A royal gritty performance Caribbean with cruise less second ship hero passengers expert bill the oldest in Tampa one ninety nine to board ninety six the brilliance win over the raptors say they at know Scotiabank about the quarantine arena with on two the seconds diamond left princess to tie it at in ninety Japan six and one no day it's Hollis possible Jefferson for them fell to to rebels I'm not here worried away from but the I PJ am prepared Washington I brought extra inbound books attempt and extra zero medication circuit read for the a Carneros eventual game is ready winning to point stay in her awarded cabin slid by if as much illness as seventeen breaks of this out one Bernie as well she as your insists finished he'll be with careful eighteen points about contact to what with degree other of also passengers had eighteen on these in on the hand victory sanitizer Toronto not letting was me led bring by Pascal down the Siakam who had twenty four I don't know the raptors have lost two in straight Jamaica for the first officials time blocked six a ship to from seven docking because join Italian the debate nationals Toronto were on board in Mexico ship was allowed to dock in because a male but passengers were not allowed to get off because a young woman on board was sick I'm Jackie Quinn

Tampa Raptors Scotiabank Japan Jefferson Washington Toronto Pascal Jamaica Jackie Quinn Bernie Mexico
"jamaica" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

11:29 min | 5 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"It there too in late March of seventeen thirty. Nine Governor Governor. Edward for Lonnie commissioned Colonel John Guthrie to negotiate a peace treaty to end the Maroon War Guthrie started with captains cut joe and ACAPA Pong of the leeward. Maroons trelawny himself was eager enough to get this over with that. Instead of just staying in towns await for a treaty to be brought the him he hiked out to vantage point near the negotiation so he could be on hand to sign the treaty as soon as it was finalized. Joe's signed of the fifteen point treaty on March first of Seventeen thirty nine the treaty put an end to hostilities between the British and the LEEWARD. Maroons and that granted them freedom in liberty. Along with fifteen hundred acres of land in northwest Jamaica stretching out from trelawny town the main leeward settlement through what's known as cockpit country the LEEWARD. MAROONS had the right to hunt on the island. As long as it was not within three miles of white settlement they also had the right to plant crops and raise livestock and sell L.. What they grew and raised at the market as long as they had a license to do it? The treaty also offered the Leeward maroons some legal protections and assigned them some obligations. The Marines had the right to petition officers and magistrates for Justice in the event that a white person did them harm the leeward. Maroons could also so handled justice for crimes that their own people committed. As long as there's crimes were not severe enough to warrant the death penalty in which case that was supposed to be handed over to the British court. They had to have an annual meeting with Jamaica's commander in chief. He was British as to white people whose roles were not really defined the treaty where to live with the maroons. Enter Lonnie town. I'm imagining that. These were almost like ambassadors. who were living they did? It didn't really specify what they were supposed to be doing. In this treaty it was also up to the LEEWARD. Maroons to maintain roads between their settlements and the British towns. Some of the treaty's terms instantly earned the leeward. Maroons a lot of enemies. They had to quote take kill suppress or destroy rebels on the island which usually meant other maroons. But more controversial he quote if any negroes shall hereafter run away from their master or owners and fall into captain cudgels hands they shall immediately be sent back to the Chief Magistrate of the next parish where they are taken and those that bring them are to to be satisfied for their trouble as legislature shall appoint in other words following the signing of this treaty if people escaped enslavement and made their way to cut joe in the LEEWARD maroons. MAROONS would send them back. This made Jamaica enslaved population incredibly angry and this was the case for some of his own people to one faction attempted a last minute coup to keep the treaty from going into effect but when Cudgel heard about it here arrested four of the ringleaders and turned them over to the governor especially considering how much Maroon survival. Until this point had evolved loved had involved raiding plantations and liberating people who were enslaved. Their people saw this as a huge betrayal quite understandably and like that continues still today. The governor recognizing that the deep anger stemming from these provisions had the potential to make the situation and on the plantations worse instead of better sent troops to one of the plantations descent had been the loudest severely punished the people in slave there an executed cupid many of them for the most part the windward. MAROONS did not even know that. These negotiations had happened once those treaties were signed but once they learned learned about it they realize that between the British and the Leeward maroons they were vastly outnumbered so under duress they signed their own very similar treaty. Eh on December twenty third the captain from the windward. Maroons who signed this was a man named clough. Things are relatively peaceful between the British. And the MAROONS for more than fifty years. But the British population on Jamaica as before continued to grow including taking over the land. That was supposed to be allotted to the MAROONS Skirmishes started flare up again and the Maroon stopped returning escapees from the plantations and they started rating. Those plantations again then two. MAROONS were convicted of stealing pigs. And they were publicly flogged. This punishment was is carried out by the foreman of the prison in Montego Bay. who was black and it was done in front of some people who had escaped from enslavement? Who the marines had returned and watching from the prison? These returned escapees taunted and jeered the two minutes they were being punished. The maroons anger anger over. This incident was twofold. They felt number one under the terms of the previous treaty. They should have been able to handle doling out their own punishments the way Hey. The punishment had been carried out was also particularly humiliating. This time the conflict was much shorter lasted only about got a year. Governor Alexander Lindsay ordered the Maroons to stand down by August twelfth. Seventeen ninety five but nearly all of them refused. He extended ended the deadline to December twenty first and then to January first of the following year. Finally it took the recruitment of additional forces and a shipment of hunting dogs is brought in from Cuba to finally get maroons to surrender. That previous conflict had been a lot lot lot longer but this one was a a lot more efficient And that surrender finally happened in March of seventeen ninety six. Although many of them ruins didn't actually lay down their arms until a little later even when the fighting was over Governor Lindsay considered the situation way too precarious to allow the Marines to return home. He was particularly worried about the ones from trelawny town. which was the largest Marines settlement in Jamaica so oh he boarded five hundred? Tra- Lonnie town maroons onto to transport vessels that were waiting in the harbour by port. Royal with the plan of of deporting them in this. He.

Maroons Leeward maroons LEEWARD Jamaica MAROONS Governor Alexander Lindsay joe Lonnie trelawny British court Colonel John Guthrie ACAPA Pong Marines Cuba Justice Chief Magistrate Edward Montego Bay. foreman
"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

02:28 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> My name is confederacy <Speech_Female> larger. <Speech_Female> And I'm <Speech_Female> the grants manager <Speech_Female> for the Commonwealth <Speech_Female> Foundation <Speech_Female> at what the Commonwealth <Speech_Female> on Dacian <Speech_Female> for seven years. <Speech_Female> Managing the grants <Speech_Female> program which Tis <Speech_Female> the one million <Speech_Female> pound grants program <Speech_Female> open <Speech_Female> to civil society <Speech_Female> organizations <SpeakerChange> across <Speech_Male> the Commonwealth. <Speech_Male> So I'm imagining <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Music_Male> give out grants <Speech_Music_Male> to organizations sation <Speech_Music_Male> obviously all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> over the Commonwealth <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but you must strike up <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a bit of a relationship <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with those <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> organizations and the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people who are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> actually running them. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> So how is it <SpeakerChange> working <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on this project Russia. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> a matter a couple of times <Speech_Music_Female> during the duration <Speech_Music_Female> of the project. She's <Speech_Music_Female> very passionate about <Speech_Music_Female> the work <SpeakerChange> that she does. <Speech_Music_Female> And that passion <Speech_Music_Female> comes across <Speech_Music_Female> media strongly into talk <Speech_Music_Female> with her and it <Speech_Music_Female> really helps you get a <Speech_Music_Female> real good sense of <Speech_Music_Female> how the project is progressing <Speech_Music_Female> when <Speech_Music_Female> you speak in person <Speech_Music_Female> with somebody <Speech_Female> and how <Speech_Music_Female> important those issues <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> are and Susanna. It's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> really good <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at making <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> really understand. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> How imports <Speech_Music_Female> of <SpeakerChange> the press <Music>

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"More than eight so the end of last year. Actually it was. New Year's Eve was actually closed but there was a government of Jamaica press conference. I'm not sure if you heard what the head of the enterprise esteem who is charged with leading the divestment of the robots on dome but he came onto the podium to make an announcement and he announced that the government of Jamaica. Actually you know intense to wind down operations at Robuchon. So they're going to they're essentially going to be moving. The don't so are they. I mean he spoke to things like you know Slowly transitioning away from that site so there was an announcement last year to see. That too tacos will no longer be going to report on. They're going to be going somewhere else. But I think the intention now is to move although materials away from that site so you just find that over time less and less garbage is going to be going to. What's on and I think? The hope is that they'll eventually be able to transition. To rylands is the term he used to uh-huh hold that impacts air quality issues is that of course is me just source of air pollution in that area and it really impacts the public health and environmental communities around. You are really happy to hear that. This is the fact that this action is going to be finally take after decades that the jet has been advocating for this both under this project. And before. You don't really really great to hear that this much-needed action is is GonNa be taken so we were hoping that they're going to fast track that they they gave End of one thousand nine hundred ninety deadline we we would love to see it happen even more because of course an announcement those fixed the air quality issues. That's our experience area right. The citizens are still being impacted by poor air quality associated. Let's see did with the dumper though we want to see that hop on but it's really really good news especially to start off two thousand nineteen so we're happy AH.

Jamaica Robuchon
"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"So after a two year campaign and grow from the cover with foundation. What were the outcomes so where we had this greater publication that look at Aaron water quality issues? More broadly that was I really fantastic outcome. You know where really propagation that we did you know I I am I can join Jamaica at least has done a review of that kind. We brought stakeholders together so we brought government officials together with community Z.. Members to air all these issues of the community members were you brought directly to government and industry stakeholders these are. These are people who are immediately being affected by these Erin water quality problems and they're able to air their grievances directly and get contact information for the industry contact attacked information for the government so that they can follow up on on these issues so that was very good. Although we can't say that the public education campaign that we did for for the clean air and water project was directly responsible for some of the announcements. That happened last year. We do think that it went a very long way to kind of Oh placed Added pressure on the government of Jamaica to do something about the air quality issues especially as it relates the rebuttal insisted on we feel very good about the campaign and the the release of that review and the kind of advocacy. That came with that from you. Know both the citizens being able to give testimonials meals has to hold. This is impacting them. This affecting their health and their environment.

Jamaica Aaron
"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

05:24 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"With had two fires we've had burning of this kind of noxious gas? How quickly will you advocacy out? Quickly did the Jamaican government swing into action to address the issues that immediate reaction forces the the final department them going on extinquish something or robots is a longstanding issue. Right it's been a problem for decades. There's no will eat fix the problem. What because we were able to hang Buddhist advocacy because we're able to show these testimony get gained more public awareness around the issue? We also had the Pacific suits will review the report that came out of the National Environmental Finding Agency following the file. The we had the technical expertise. We have a volunteer. Who assisted with the project of former University of West indies lecturer environmental chemistry at A? Hi Gentleman Conduct Anthony. Greenaway assistant us in in looking at the diesel report came onto the via so we were able to review. Were able to send it into NAPA. Were able to say the these are the issues you were able to get the media talking. There were quite a few interview was not only surrounding the file and impacts on that while also Surrounding this report being released on jets review of the report and our interpretation off you know the findings and our concerns not only votes the impact the fire but just in whole estate was monitoring airports in the era. So shut down. That dump was a headline for the article. Revealing the findings from Netflix. Air Quality Report stated that residents in the surrounding areas are being exposed by harmful pollutants. Let's have a chat with Suzanne standing addict. Who is chief executive officer? You make an environment trust good morning so that will be talking about. This riverton dumped far far. Whenever I can remember your suggested? It shouldn't be there. It should be moved moving to where would sorry. We've been talking about this for years. There seems to be no movement in that direction. If it's not moved what's the next move and if you're not gonNA move it when we're looking at the report that was released by the last week and the results of the reports. Were not really very surprising. There was a huge fire at the Dome Books and it negatively impacted air quality but what was concerning. was that in the report that we saw where there are already wanted to issues in the aerial air. That already suffering from poor air following an incident ninety-six actually making one bad situation much worth of so. Let's talk about this study. Marked increases in toxic gases forty six pollutants were detected from the analysis conducted. was that surprising to you. A report that said had some some of those component two and a half times what it should be the benzene. It was frosty times. The annual levels have been set after and this this is really concerning because long exposure to these kind of things can cause cancer. So you say they've been talking about this for years. Suzanne local will uh-huh actually only been needed for a long time timing so some of Jamaica's Challenges with management has never really been a priority in the country. Heavy money jog garbage all ties into where we send our garbage and even sixty percents of the cases did that is the Riverton if it's not moved. Is there anything that the residents of the surrounding residents can do. If it's not move knock apnea fire. We were going to be a house in study you know looking at some some of the impacts on the people have been the area had been hum dot fire and just on the survives on that nature on the poor air quality can era. Is this something that you could do. Independently Suzanne then or. Is it something that you'd have to wait on government to do well the health impact. It's quite an extensive expensive type of that. would be needed colluded investigates when we can try and funding to do something like that. But you know we would need the buy in from the government agents participate facilitate. Yeah right well. I hope we don't have to talk about this anytime soon again. But thank you for weighing in this morning talking about I knew I know chief. Executive Officer of the Jamaica Environment Trust Suzanne Stanley Suzanne. How long did the campaign laughed boo? And how long was the grown before as well. It's it was a two year grant him. We use the first half of the grants to conduct our research for the review that we did on the air on water quality framework the the legal framework government Aaron Quality Standards and then the second half so the second year of the grant After we launched that review that was when we did a public education Geisha campaign in the second year so the public education campaign around from up to over twenty seventy until the end of the grant which was September twenty eighteen.

Suzanne Stanley Suzanne chief executive officer Netflix University of West indies National Environmental Finding Executive Officer NAPA Greenaway Anthony boo Jamaica lecturer
"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

05:52 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"Fire that started yesterday at the Riverton city landfill on Spanish town. Road in Kingston is still raging at this hour if supported the blaze has worsened due to heavy losses of winds fanning across the area. So riverton is being persistent problem in Jamaica and and you decided that something needed to be done. Why did you decide to apply for a grant by the Commonwealth Foundation saw? Someone told us about the that there was a call for proposals from the Commonwealth Foundation. We were aware of the organization we hadn't actually ever applied for a grant from the Commonwealth Foundation before but when we looked at the kind of themes that they were interested in funding the kinds of projects that they were interested in funding especially the whole aspect aspect of citizens voices and promoting you know Community led projects and working with local communities is on various issues You know of course. mean Ariza focus our environmental education and Advocacy Bushido the Commonwealth Foundation. Just seemed to be a really really good fit for what we wanted to do versus what their interests were thick smoke rising from the Riverton city landfill for a second day. In a row the Jamaica Fire Brigade Jamaica Defence Force the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management and deprive contract as I said to have been engaged at different levels trying to contain the fire. The problem of the burning of things I rubber tires and various various other waste issues was quite severe and it got a lot of national press in Jamaica could even sell some the extent of some immediate health issues that people people in Rivets and actually experienced actually became hot topic during our delivery of the project. After six days the fire the Riverton dump has been contained by officials are local agency the Jamaica Environmental Trust jet says there's a lot to be answered for the Jamaica Environment Trophies deeply alarmed at the state of affairs concerning to rip us on so it should not be that every year the country country has been million of the types of bio this morning during devotion the children's started coughing. It was really live very bad. We couldn't even see we have a number of children in here who are asthmatic. Ourself from some bronchial problem there were are just falling down. We didn't even finish devotion to make them go back in the classroom. Got Even worse and we decided okay we would send them home on because they were getting sick now even some of the teachers. Even though we had put on masks they were getting really really don't know communities how far close to Riverton. We ended up partnering with them onto the Garden is peaceful and love seaview gardens because it was my first stole once. There's a burning Riverton. We actually feel the effect of its when the small firm revoked over. The curtain idea hosts host black person's completed they have asthma issues and other respiratory illnesses. Some type of Canada breed especially when night com. Yana Verandah Y- a similar players. So this please is killing us. When you're eighteen minnows? Burn me sometime. It's Smith Born Taya Dead Time Coming Lake at Stoke sometimes luxury and some water are my Wrigley's onto it. Forget Miss Smith off stomach. Local ATMA swallowed Ismael. The government needs to step in and get displays clean up. There's this community that has been established around the dont our own but with this was a Highways was Don't view it that way. And the small the airplanes issues it's illegal burning off titles has become particularly in recent years and got reader towards Seventeen earn between two eighteen. I was was brought to our attention by the community. Representative was tweeting of older than Loeb. Breathe you after blowing. Does the night and having sinus providence. My knee ball has asthma. She's on an elite. Please help us. What can be done in the main shining? Commissioning jets at mentioned in the midst of netball etc.. Saw Bono's this time they've been ongoing air quantity providence in the era. So you got the grant. What did that then allow you guys to do? Immediately with with those funds the far small organization Nice unlike jets. It's difficult for us to outside of Project Honestly on me. It's difficult for us to kind of like respond to issues like beyond maybe off the off so they actually had to do was through the public education campaign. Were able to go into these communities and shoot film so filmed testimonials opole to the air quality issues. Shoes they were experiencing. We're waiting 'til to call Formula Gardens. I'm a jar adjacent. So they are not coming to darnest study right beside the reports on one man radius of adults are able to speak when residents. They were able to tell their stories of they were able to voice their concerns of essentially essentially. You don't tell Jami.

Riverton Commonwealth Foundation Jamaica Fire Brigade Jamaica D Jamaica Jamaica Environmental Trust Jamaica Environment Trophies asthma Miss Smith Kingston Formula Gardens Ariza Office of Disaster Preparednes netball Canada Jami Rivets Bono Wrigley Representative Loeb
"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"So Suzanne was the weather like in Kingston Jamaica today. Seven overcast today actually the second marine and U The C. E. O. of Jamaica Environment. Trust tell us a little bit about the organization. How big is it? And what does let me isn't it. So we are a non-government environmental organization and we were started in one thousand nine hundred one by my predecessor. Holly and I took oversee is January this year. I'm relatively new so so leadership in the organization we have people on staff I'd say about because sometimes we because we have our relationships with some former staff members. I'm still kind of operates at a traffic those from time to time. So a lot of people don't realize how small jets is featured in a lot of the time we have his would relationship with Jimmy often unto us and ask us for our our opinion or position on embarrass environmental math up. And he said it's a non governmental organization. Is there a Jamaican governmental. The department. That you liaise with work with or is this something that you compete contracted out of government services. No actually. There is a state agency with responsibility for the army the National Environment and Planning Agency. So why is the state agency. But they have annual function so they are kind of amalgamation commission off of what was once called the Natural Resources Conservation Authority and the tone at Contra. Planning Authority kind of joined together to create One agencies which in itself causes issues beating couple to an agency that not only responsible for our environmental protection on conservation. This John Copland with an agency that is charged with approving planning and Development Army. So you can see where there is some that arises arises we have been labelled as kind of a watchdog for Nicole and for you know agencies as it relates to environmental decision. If you to help keep and hold the government to account essentially.

National Environment and Plann Jamaica Environment Suzanne Kingston Jamaica Natural Resources Conservation John Copland Development Army Holly Nicole Jimmy
"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

The Skylines Podcast

02:48 min | 6 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on The Skylines Podcast

"Visit men had found a express. Train is grand I'm John Lynch. The year is two thousand twenty eighty and skylines. The symmetric focused actually not the first time that's ally. This isn't going to be an skylines tour as I recall this lunchtime on Friday two January. Sorry I've been back in the office day and a half after Christmas. It's already shaping up to be a pretty busy go lay leadership contest. Liberal Democrat leadership contest tests up teen merit elections this spring and looming threat of war with Iran. So possibly by the time you sit to them to listen to this movie too late human civilization. Anyway the upshot of all this is having a time to to record appropriate episode of Skylines We've got a couple in the pipeline. Renew a new series back on slightly which I go for walks around town with our candidates to be London now. I've already been out with the green candidate Sean Berry Various Liberal Democrats Reform Benita on trying to pin down the others. But we're holding. We're holding off on that until we've got further along with that series so so this week it's one of our occasional ah guest episodes in which we run something from another podcast by friends by friend of the podcast occasion. It's IT's Roy Brown. Who many many of you would have heard before? And who was founding producer. Who runs a number of podcast? That will be an interesting. I'm sure one of which is map corner which which which. We ran an episode from last summer. This is actually from a different series heated Commonwealth voices. Amd It's a story about how the city of Kingston Jamaica is fighting pollution Which is very very symmetric topic? This is an opportunity to kind of get to a part of the world. We don't talk about very very often. Amdo said to kind of give me give me a playoff so anyway the rest of this should just be hearing KOMO forces initiative check out the rest of the series and fully. Roy Sells whose at Roy unto. I'll be back in a week or two with some good old fashioned skylines sees him. The PODCAST is Roy. Fueled Brown production others. The coke is a podcast about citizens coming together to participate in democracy and insurance the institutions nations that sheep..

Roy Brown Amdo Roy Sells John Lynch Sean Berry Democrats Kingston Jamaica Iran producer Amd KOMO
"jamaica" Discussed on Romans Road

Romans Road

16:25 min | 8 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on Romans Road

"Know. I'll try to keep myself tape today. Did but when they reflect with no one to our our my I you know. I'm not sure how did call this time. They did. Act that is non incoming fire for us and by personally. Don't believe that that's that's my personal view is a good ride and if you have a good heart they told you that you have to be a Christian to go to heaven I I don't the thing that okay. So he definitely has had some kind of teaching saying the Lord or the Lord is good Lord and he knows is about the coming judgment. You know he's talking about the Lord coming with fire and talking about Noah's Ark and he is communicating something that a lot of people believe not just in Jamaica but all over America they talk about judgment but if God is good good. He's not going to judge anyone. If God is good he's going to be nice he's going to be sweet. No one's GONNA get hurt. And that is a common belief and I kind of call that the lopsided view of God God has a bunch of different attributes. Love is one of them. But if you focus only on that one an attribute of God you're going to have a lopsided view. God you're going to have a God that is all one attribute and none of the rest. It's it's important to see God as he presents himself so yes God is love but he's also righteous he's also a judge he's also the god of vengeance upon upon his enemies and so God has many different things and so anytime you take one of his attributes and focus only on that you're going to have a a wrong view of God and so some people do it in the opposite way the only focus on God's wrath and so they have a God who they only think is mean and nasty the and these people usually become very critical because they see God is critical. They see God as someone who's just mean and so it's important to study the entire Bible and learn all the attributes of God and not place one over the other not placed the one you like the best in the forefront of all the other attributes tributes of God and so a lot of people do that and it seems right away that that's what this man is doing and so Let's see what happens. There is some kind of judgment that's going to happen and you have to have a good heart is to said pure heart cleaner. Don't lie by then commander if that's the case let's have a clean heart live good to watch. People don't grudge somebody for their own own. That's not yours. You know you work hard. You try to make it in the in some good formal for his every no-man's perfect and it's true knew that when he at manifest as some people say the Lord has manifest themselves into Mary's womb become the flesh on the bone and you walk art and he said No. That's why maybe at said life. I give them far. They don't know what the I've done so he says it's not easy being a human. He knew we weren't perfect. Nobody's perfect so let me let me ask you this my friend so you said that the way that you pass the judgment is by being being being good order being righteous being pure how are you how are you doing with that. Is your heart clean so often people will bring up the fact that you need to be good in order to get to heaven. They'll mention the ten commandments. Once in awhile and that's great for me because my goal in part of the conversation is to get a person to look at the Ten Commandments. It's so when someone brings it up on their own. It's a very easy segway to say Okay Ten Commandments. Let's look at him. How are you doing with that? Is Your heart clean. There's a way you can you can know you mentioned the Ten Commandments K.. By looking at the Ten Commandments. We can see where we're at before a holy God so let me ask you this. Would you consider yourself to be a good person. I think so I think so too 'cause allied on my heart and I because I'm a smoker a drinker. That's the things under that people do even though a lot of Christians tell you that they're separating nufemme dot. Org lied. I mean come on you drive a car window. There was no history back. Today's wasn't driving. Your car. Delight took it took a ride from a donkey to to to stable. That's true no we are getting more comfortably comfortably in Newark. I don't know what the car has to do with his sin but He is saying people say you shouldn't smoke pot. And he's got to join in his hand and he's basically saying it's not really that bad now. Another thing he said was as far as smoking and drinking goes. That's just things on the earth that people do not sin. That's just stuff that people do. Well all sin is stuff people do. They're either doing wing something by breaking God's law or they're thinking something and breaking God's law that way but also Senate stuff that people do mine kind is making so how much little stuff far US human being which they got the knowledge an inspiration from God's worse but they're making it so much you know a checked into human being that it's not easy for you to see those stuff won't do them. You know something that up but you got a lot of people that don't smoke orange and even though you got a lot of Christian they were allowed to save your life is not Senate but yet still you would allow to save your life so no one is that that it does leaves back to that point right here so. I think that there are a lot of Christians that say things that don't make sense but we don't have to worry about what all the Christians say we need to worry about what the Lord says right and by looking at the Ten Commandments. We can kind of see for ourselves. What we're doing slum? Let me ask you this. How many lies do you think you've told? In your whole life listen mcgarity ricotta cheese. Fuel is okay now just for the record. I have no idea what he just said but I did hear the word lies so I'm just going to keep listening and see where this goes lies. Let me tell is not the simple allies overdose forget to excite it rise up to see a midlife are getting me with problems that I would think that would take myself in any problem onto our so. Have you ever ever told lies that you weren't telling to save your life. You just told them off problem or be or because you wanted to get your way with some. I've been I. I've been incarcerated incarcerated before an ad ally to make up a story does not to put other people in problem dot was not snitching. Sure so what do you call someone who tells live who does does lies a liar. You're liar have you ever stole something even even something small a pencil when I was a kid Lighter you know but I I'm not GonNa see me break break into somebody's house and go in there but stealing pens from me weak we can we can. We can still without breaking into someone's house right. So what do you call someone who steals things. Your teeth ever use God's name in vain use God's name as a cuss word no cost or to express discuss or anger like you use when you're in trouble US Gods God's name in a in a bad way a lot of people do but not I personally not I add got angry at one point when I never did that. I just got ignorant I. I was talking to Muslims asking. God Why does that happen to me in blind and you know and undenied relaxed Beg For forgiveness which I think he did you know but you have news. God's name in vain that's called blasphemy right. It's taken the name of the Creator and dragging it through the dirt. Define that for me more. Give me an example. So using God's name in vain would be to use God's name like inappropriate way. Maybe say Jesus Christ but you say it in in a way where you're angry. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. That's that that not only me. I think that a lot of people orna before about yeah. That's true. Yeah okay so that's called blasphemy. So he's starting to squirm a little bit. He started not enjoy the so much. So I'm going to thank him. I'm GONNA thanks income for bearing with me and being patient you know and I understand that it is a easy or fun thing to be confronted with your sin. So I'm going to be as gracious as I can through the whole process that thanks for doing this interview. So have you ever Looked upon a woman with lust. Yeah I think that That's something that even if a married man he married for twenty years you can get an email looks if you think it's even wrong but you're not doing the action you know that's natural for you to see something and think about but not doing it so if you think about it wrong then we are on well. Jesus Christ himself he actually said you know you're not supposed supposed to commit adultery. But I say to you if you look at a woman with less you're committing adultery in your heart see. That's God's standard are our standards are very low but but God standards are very high k.. So if we've looked at a woman with less as far as God's concern we've committed adultery in our heart and then last question. Have you ever hated someone. We've been really angry at someone I've been angry at someone but hatred is not something I keep in my heart. I I personally think that you gotta you leave that part to God. You Know I. I'm not saying our dislike you but not to a point where I hate you eight you you know because you got some certain people you gonNA agree with or whatever but I don't really Aliki Ages in my I'll to let go you know that's good but I won't forget already happened do not. This is true so but you have been angry with someone. Jesus said you know you're not supposed to commit murder but I say to you if you've been angry with your brother you've committed murder already in your heart again. God standards are a lot higher than us. He looks at the heart. He knows. Those are our thoughts. You got murdered your heart murdering your heart. Yeah absolutely so then. You've got another thing about it so much. You know so much Ado n Norman is perfect. That's true fate we all. I think that this is something that people live and feed off the Lard. The fate that we have in him. 'cause I got faith not not because I'm not aggressively. So he's got faith and he's basically saying well as long as you have faith that's what matters and that's a common thought people. We'll say things like well as long as you believe in something and that something works for you. Then that's what matters or maybe there's a thought as long as I believe in in God in some form than God's going to be okay with me because I believe in him now what they're not realizing that if they believe in God auden some form and it's not the god of the scriptures then they're believing in an idol and idolatry is a sin so a lot of people just kind of thing. Yeah well as long as you got faith. That's what matters when in actuality you can have your faith in the wrong thing do you. Do you think that it's important. To have your faith in the right thing or the white right. One for instance. If I had my faith in a police officer that he was GonNa to help me but that police officer turned out to be corrupt mankind if I had my faith in in anything if I had my faith in this chair right here but the chair was old and broke when I sat on it my faith might might be real but it might be placed in the wrong thing. So it's it's important for us to make sure our faith is is breath so let me ask you this my friend. You've been very honest with me and I and I thank you. You've you've committed many sins just like me right. Nobody's perfect like you said said if you're creator was to judge you today if you were. How old are you joining? Three twenty three. If you happen to get hit by a car or or or somehow die beef today before I almost I almost dimes out to be very grateful absolutely but if you were to find yourself dying today and you stood before your Creator he was to judge you and he saw you as a liar and a thief and a blasphemer a murderer heart and adulterer heart do. Do you think he would see you as someone who is innocent or someone who is guilty of breaking his law. I would think you would sell me as somebody loss as what I think in my head because Dan I think I'm lost from the truth as a lot lot of people there. I always ask God for forgiveness that if today if he comes hours in around the nomination I wasn't I was lost and confused all cutting tradition You know confusion. That's going on with the Bible and in the world and not only say because you got so many hundred different uneven nation worshiping the Lord so I think I know I'm GonNa do not thing I know so okay now. This is awesome awesome. This guy just admitted that he thinks he's lost and so even though at the beginning of the conversation he saying well. Maybe it's reincarnation nation maybe God's going to judge me but he's not really going to judge me harshly now the real issue with him coming out he saying I'm lost now in a minute. We're GONNA see that. He's kind of using his loss nervous as an excuse possibly to be lost to basically say I'm lost and because I'm lost God's GonNa be okay with me because he knows I don't know everything kind of thing and I and I'm going to deal with that but but I just love the fact that this guy just admitted that he's lost. You know what my friend. That's actually a very good place to be because you're humble about it you admit that you don't know everything you admit that that you could be wrong and I think it's very important for us to understand that God is bigger than us. He knows more than us. And I really appreciate the fact that you would admit that that you call yourself lost and I think that's a great description of what you've just said so so if God was to judge you based on his law he would find you guilty right he would find you guilty of being a liar and a murderer and a thief and all these things well. I'm yeah I'M GONNA I'm GonNA disagree with you. Know I think all right if those are the truthful ways to go in heaven and yes well. Here's the thing that is. That's God's law so according to his law God will judge all sin now. I'm not now. This isn't the end of the story K.. But but if this was the only thing that got it ever done with this if got it only given his law you haven't kept the law. I haven't kept a law and because of that. No Man no woman can get to heaven simply by keeping God's law because all of us have sinned all of us fall short the glory of God in you know no absolutely barnes so yeah. This guy's definitely been to church at some point. The fact that he said he was born in sin. I mean that's Romans five nineteen for as through the one man's disobedience meaning atom the many were made sinners the Bible says we were made sinners. And it all goes back back to Adam's disobedience so this guy actually knows more than most people I talked to you in order for you to live the right way. I think you gotTa be light job due to the cause in the Bible about this job that got us The Creator took away. His cattles is why he was being sued right. Everybody was that blaspheme against a lot and was like no and then got repaid him in a lot of ways that you could never imagine so I think that that's one of these humbled you know. Absolutely it's good for us to be humble. Let me let me ask you this. Does it concern you at all that if you were to die today and stand before God any was to judge did you. You would be guilty of committing all these sins and that and that you would end up in Hell if God was to judge based on that does that concern you at all it it. It does to be honest because nobody wants to go to add but then in is of being a human being autozone fully that if I personally think that God has a hard of you know something good and pure and you can look into you in your life and seeing that you did wanted to try. But you'll be lost and mankind. Mankind unkind as ruling so much. By God's were bringing

Senate US murder Noah America Jamaica Newark Mary Jesus Dan Norman
"jamaica" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

14:18 min | 8 months ago

"jamaica" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"When he did that he he he defeated death but he also paid the price for your sin? See Our problem. Is that when we were judged by. God we're not GonNa have enough righteousness to enter into the presence of a holy God but when we put our faith in Jesus Christ in in effect we're putting our faith in his righteousness and not in our own basically admitting God the father I don't have enough righteousness but I'm GONNA put my faith in Jesus Christ and what he did for me on the Cross. And so that's why God commands Allman Allman everywhere to repent and. That's the way that a person gets right with God by trying to be good or not by trying to make up for all the bad things you did but right by accepting what Jesus Christ did on the Cross as a free gift from God turned from your sin. Put Your faith in Jesus Christ and you'll be saved saved from the punishment you deserve. You do that by faith and once you're born again God changes your heart. He begins to give to to change your desires. And you go from someone who's been following after the world following after yourself and you begin to be a Christian someone who is a Christ follower someone who follows after Christ what do you what do you think about that. What do you think about that so explaining things to people if I've talked for a while I want to know their thoughts? I want to know what author thinking because whatever they're thinking that's going to determine where I go from here obviously. This guy is heard the Bible. I want him to understand is clear as possible. Well how this can apply to him. So that's why I want to know. What is he thinking? Well that's that's not Something bad 'cause that's actually something great to be a father of Christ yes I would understand only if you understand. Most of what you're doing you know online. Me That is that is that would be a different case for the wanting wanting to yes. I do a Lotta Times I do say you know I want to get closer and closer..

"jamaica" Discussed on Kingpins

Kingpins

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"jamaica" Discussed on Kingpins

"Jamaica had a lot in common with other hustlers. She was ruthless. She was violent went. She had an insatiable appetite for money and power but she had another asset. None of the other big players had she was a woman and as a woman Jamaica was acutely aware that she was expected to do less to be less cunning less aggressive than the men around her at at first Jamaica was resentful of this unfair presumption of inferiority but in the drug slinging business or as insiders call it the Game Jamaica learned that men's underestimation of her was an advantage in fact Jamaica's femininity brought her to the very top of the game and awarded awarded her the prizes she most desired money and control in Nineteen eighty-one Jamaica.

Jamaica
"jamaica" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"jamaica" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"And that's really just about you know, stretching the meat making it flavorful. And and also tend to rising. Yeah. Cookie sheet of time to make it you know to make it accessible and palatable to eat because it was not high quality protein. So when you talk about your legacy and the past you didn't just stop it. You are family like you took it all the way back to the to the sugar plantations. We did a lot of research, which we really wanted to understand the context of the food in the context of a woman like, you know, our great grandmother, like how did how did she exist? I mean what what brought her into being. And the irony of all of that. I think which you know, I don't know if this is a documented truth, but it's the truth we took away from it is that she existed because she was outside of the bone Dreeze of polite society she existed because she was the descendant of generation of women who learn. By farming their own provisioned groans that they could trade that that produce at at markets. And then from that, they could gain some sort of financial independence. They could buy trinkets for themselves. They could support their family, and you know, at the end of the day while I think we've mentioned this yesterday while women didn't even have the right to marriage and couldn't control, you know, their own children are own their own children. They owned what they could produce in your own. I think you put it in stronger terms yesterday said their children could be bought and sold lots and sold. Yeah. And yet, you know, whatever they reaped unsold sold in their provision groans. They owned and they could sell and they could trade and they could buy things with. And so what I think is that if you were of mainstream traditional polite, colonial society, could you have stepped outside of the home and started a business and kept your maiden name and bought houses and traded and fought for your tavern license with you know, in nineteen twenty Jamaica..

Jamaica
"jamaica" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"jamaica" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Radio or my last adventure in jamaica i wanted to do something really special and i went over to good hope and believe it's pronounced chuck a c h u k k a they do all these amazing outdoor kind of high adventure activities but they also have this mix of they're on a plantation in good hope so if you wanna learn about the history of the plantation i did that as well and the views from up there are absolutely breathtaking goto griswold radio dot com i've got pitchers their stunning stunning stunning so you could take the whole multi generational family here do the plantation tour do whitewater will not whitewater but due to being down the river or do zip lining i actually did ziplining and i'm afraid of heights is probably not the best choice for me but i figured i wanted to try something different a little out of my comfort zone and the guides were fun nominal so rocky and dave took me zip lining it was it was absolutely amazing i saw the national bird of jamaica which is humming hummingbird has these amazing kind of black long feathers that come off the back of it in the hummingbird was above my head in the bush while i was applying and one of the platforms in the national tree of jamaica is where the hummingbird was so they pointed that out they pointed out all kinds of plant life and they're like okay now jump off the platform i of couldn't manage to get myself to do that but i did this kind of ridiculous kind of sit down and scoot my way off the platform and i did seven of the different lines so it was really cool and when we got off of the zip line all the families and all the kids were high fiving rocky and dave my two guides on those applying because they had been zip lining with them earlier in the day and they were kind of lounging by the pool or by one on the waterfalls a hanging out and every single group of guests that we walked by or high five and those guys so the families had.

jamaica
"jamaica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"jamaica" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jamaica scott gaps gaps the app got gaps thank what only gosh got gas got got cast from the band called zap mama that is a song called burlesque taken from the first zap mama record released back in ninety two called adventures in afro pia volume one the band led by singer and composer marie don and combining the sounds of congo where she was born and belgium where she grew up and also using you heard at the very beginning of that song not just the five voices but this little one note pipe which is an instrument associated with the central african pygmies especially the baka pygmies of nearby cameroon and we heard before that the band baka beyond this collaboration between musicians from the uk and the baka pygmies of cameroon from an album called journey between we heard a song called nba spellings of all these names by the way or on the playlist for tonight's edition of new sounds which you will find as always on our website at wnyc dot org slash new sounds in a moment more music from zap mama and from sentence sherman also the algierian born french composer actors zoo and a collaboration between the english rockstar damon albarn and the star guitarist of molly awful bocom all of that and more as we continue i'm john shafer and you're listening to new sounds at wnyc we rely on listener support but what exactly does that mean i'm steven nelson i'm a wnyc reporter your contribution isn't just a contribution it's an investment here on wnyc we are very aware that you want a return on your investment in the form of the highest quality radio every single day we want to exceed your expectations with smart interesting radio that engages you show show your support go to wnyc dot org and click on donate next time on the new yorker radio hour trans woman has her face surgically reconstructed so that people see her the way she sees herself my motivations aren't cosmetic one of the ways that the world's chiefly interacts with you is by you face rate is by looking at you that's next time on the new yorker radio hour tonight at seven on ninety three point nine fm wnyc.

marie don belgium cameroon uk sherman damon albarn john shafer reporter Jamaica molly steven nelson