35 Burst results for "Jain"

"jain" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

06:34 min | 3 months ago

"jain" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Find them so optimistic and suzy last week with a nice dash of ambition and willingness to go the extra mile and and achieve great things. Call it maybe a hunger which you do get in europe. But i guess it's a different kind little more entitlement in europe Right you everybody. Points out the young emperor's when they talk about young chinese kids but there's also the side of them wanting to prove to their parents that they are good at doing what they're doing and and and you know shake off they're mollycoddle little emperor image res- I i think most of the european young guys would not really listen to an old guy in the studio. It'd be more competitive. The way did try to show the superiority and the ambition younger chinese designers. They want to learn i. They want to simulate the knowledge when they think they've learned enough. They stopped becoming entitled door challenging a competitive. But then they've it right. They've earned it for sure. And then it's what the chinese industries doing right now where they've realized that we've learned how to make us. We've leapfrogged in terms of technology We've got into electric cars and we have probably better than anyone else before. And we've done it faster than anyone else Way faster than the koreans before them and japanese before them. So you see this confidence. That's just building in just the same way you see it on the country scale and i see it on the personal scale for me. I'm not a coffee fanatic. So when i chinese car i didn't really pay attention to it. Like what are the brands like. There's about five hundred brands. What the about five hundred car brands and all of them are difficult to really know. Many of them belong to a big conglomerate. You'd think it's a different brand. But actionaid's part of dongfang group the the the other groups and every state every region seems to have these big industrial players that big employers and they've got multiple brands and then there's also all these little start ups. I don't know this for a fact that i can imagine somebody up. Top says a look. We manufacture way too many cars but we can't shut those factories down because a lot of people are dependent on those jobs. And that's what we used to bring people out of poverty into the middle classes and now we got to do something else with us. Factories and semi says yeah. We're gonna make delivery drones. All mars exploration veihcles or whatever and the fact that they've got their eyeballs in. The future is just going to propelled this country. Further and further well. Let's pivot back to you. Because i'm sure there are people out there who understand cars more than i do and they're shouting asked him about the car design. So here's what. I'm going to ask you first of all so now you're in this current setup. How many people are in your design studio in. Why don't you talk me through all the different people you work with. So i mean firstly no matter how well you know cars. I don't think anybody appreciates that. A car has over thirty thousand different pieces to go together but it is a really complicated piece of industrial engineering in mass production. I guess when you compare with a piece of furniture that you compare the mobile phone as well you know which is which people consider very sophisticated manufactory. You you take it apart. And there's not that much that goes in there and there are a lot of regulations to keep you alive in a crash to keep you safe to keep you moving you moving at one hundred kilometers an hour and everything that you touch or feel or conc- on the car has been designed by somebody so while the dream of design or the image of car design somebody sitting in sketching beautiful exterior. There's a lot of putting together little bits and pieces and in a design studio. We've got designers who designed the exterior. But then you'd have some who are specializing in lamps and other details We split up into six different as people. Who do the branding. There's people do all the communication all the publicity. The logos the way project ourselves beyond the cause Including the motor shows the dealerships typically Design today will have some influence on the dealership Point of sale two colors even the costumes of the hostesses which is also pot off car design thought if god design right and then you've got what i do people who do strategy where we look at the plan for the next ten years. Look at synergies look at different products. Look at different different situation. Points try to create vision for the future that can then be translated into the all the other projects today. you know. you've got people doing the software or the interaction. The screen human machine interface faith. Hmi and then there's Will be called color material. Finish designers so a car is the only product that sold in a multitude of different colors. Specifications mccollum trim levels each of them should look homogeneous take shoes for example. You get a pair of fatty desk trade as maybe three or four color choices on one physical object you know apple did five different colors. And it's like wow. I probably got ten fifteen different permutations combinations and then all those colors and all those finishes need to work together. And then there's always special edition spo traditions. Then we've got casts smarter learners Physical klay sculptors fabrication specialists. Who make things out of hot materials of that that level of craft in there. It's like a massive factory. I call it the creativity factory here. Then we've got to have an area to take the car outside because when you look at a car inside it's not in its right environments. You've gotta take it outside to look at it in reality in nature and against other cars with natural light I don't know i would say it's like going to the zoo. And looking at a tiger or going to the getty and seeing.

europe last week three five different colors one hundred kilometers an hour two colors over thirty thousand different one physical object four color today ten fifteen different permutat about five hundred brands first about five hundred car each apple chinese european six different of fatty
"jain" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"jain" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Odds and ends and doe handles. That was one fine rear view mirror. Aj great job but presumably because it was your first job you already felt like wow. I've made it like even though it's just a small mirror i shouldn't complain or There was a moment when i was complaining and fifty five year old engineer came up to me and and told me how lucky i was because he thought he was going to be designing and By the time he finished his engineering college got his job and bent into an engineering department..

fifty five year old first job one fine rear view mirror
Tom Davies on Making Glasses for the Movies

My Wardrobe Malfunction

02:38 min | 3 months ago

Tom Davies on Making Glasses for the Movies

"Aren't very well. Don't in films very well in general films. Don't do very well at all. And i was very lucky to what jenny bevan Who love the idea of the actors wearing exquisite iowa. Because i kind of the original brief. Just to make a free for emma thompson. Is his bugle sunglasses. The script called for this iconic piece. So i went in to do that. And that's what a went in for and it was a beautiful beautiful design. Came up with if i don't say so myself. So it was so because she's a fashion designer in the film very well renowned and they had to be over the talk quite glamorous and i did a beautiful so jackie o style frame embedded a sort of a line of gold eighteen karat gold in the top of the frame. Because this lady. She's a fashion in the seventies in the film. But she made a big thing in the sixties. So i thought should be sixties inspired. You know she's a more mature to. This is assault. Put the golden side to make them just beautiful. And it's a great scene which you look into liberties. The frame right into the camera like this A and i said to. Jenny said you know the problem with this. Film is in the seventies everybody in the seventies glasses. Because there's no liza surgery. There's no contact lenses and everyone wears glasses. I said you know you got to do everybody. What you call make like glasses soccer. Make him plus. She's all the extras as well as well. It was fun said. Where do you see the film which fully because so many classes in their the jain almas big over the top seventy s glasses on some characters. I should have bought. I've got script dot says. I remember getting the script. I'm reading the script. I run thinking. Why are they giving me the script. This is amazing like literally disney. Give me the crazy. Come like you know getting the script out and i'm like i'm going through it reading i'm getting out. I'm going rutland glasses looking through glasses. Look i literally wrote on every page where i could possibly justify a pair of spectacles in the movie and what went down with any we went through and basically walked away from a second meeting with a brief to make you know literally hundreds of frames and it was great because i met with a mistake. I sort of dark to the door to said our. Don't think we're doing glasses. This movie i should. And this is my. This is my reenactment. And i've made frame for emma. She picked it up and she goes. Oh these are amazing these days and that was

Jenny Bevan Emma Thompson Iowa Jackie Liza Jenny Soccer Rutland Disney Emma
The Impact of Australian High Performance Computing in the Coming decade

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:01 min | 6 months ago

The Impact of Australian High Performance Computing in the Coming decade

"Joining us in the podcast. Today we have professor shawn smith that director of national computational infrastructure and see i and he's also a professor or computation of nanno matera science and technology at australian national university. Professor smith is also a fellow of the royal australian chemical institute a fellow american is association for the advancement of science a fellow of the institute of chemical engineers and he will be sharing with us the highlights of high performance computing at nci. Thank you professor for joining us in the podcast. Today i thought we kick off by taking a look at the evolution and development in australia. Research backed by high performance computing and data infrastructure which plays a pivotal role in national research. But also have wide ranging economic and social impacts. I'm so for example as you pointed out in your presentation at supercomputing asia Looking at the year two thousand twenty the events challenging for many with the pandemic but particularly so for australia with the bushfire which i thought i very salient. Examples of where policymakers and help provide as neat fayza reliable information to get a sense of what is yet to come to better manage the situation but beyond these examples is also cancer research. Physics et cetera. So for our listeners. Can you tell us more about you know audi australia. Research are backed. By high performance. Computing infrastructure have evolved over the decades. You certainly are one constructive way to approach that question. Jain may be. If if i summarize the way in which australia to tijuana one phones compute facilities have evolved over the past decade which gives a flavor of how that the sick to hebron australia has developed in the major demise signs that have been really key in driving it forwards so we have to tier one facilities in australia One is the australian at the australian national university campus. Here in canberra the other one is the posey supercomputing center in person west australia. So both of these centers were set up in their initial in the current model as it were nearly a decade ago and when nci was stood up in its current form. The australian national university has long long history of computing. But the carrots. Nci was put in place around about twenty eleven two thousand twelve and we build a new data center on campus and put in the previous supercomputing facility which was called ryan now when i was set up with financial input from the federal government. They then we're really looking for a degree of leverage of their investment And so the federal contributions to were helped to facilitate the standing up of the big facility and the big shane And the new data center per se and they contribute a certain amount of our national expenses. But i asked us dan to negotiate the larger part of operating expenses. With am i just stike holders. And in the case of nci. This was done by substantial collaboration with four major organizations. I was the australian national university. Which is our organizational host. It was the csi. Giovanni australia and the bureau of meteorology so the one university into three big government agencies collaborated in a way that allowed to build out and develop and the common thread across those three. Big agencies was really climate weather simulation and geospatial science earth sciences and so for example the the great majority of large-scale climate modeling research is done at nci. And it's done. In collaboration between the bureau of meteorology the csi and the university sector which has some substantial activity also in that mind so nci became if you will the collaborative sandpit that these organizations could actually work together on very large common data sets in degenerate very large data. It's through the simulation work and the the other component of that was with geoscience australia. They are the secretaries for the international agreements which bring labs scout satellite imaging data four alpine out of the globe down to australia and nci was tasked to work with Jason social strata. To figure out how to host is enormous data sets and make them there in available findable so forth and accessible and utilize -able

Australian National University Australia NCI Nanno Matera Royal Australian Chemical Inst Fellow American Is Association Institute Of Chemical Engineer Shawn Smith Professor Smith Posey Supercomputing Center West Australia Bureau Of Meteorology Tijuana Jain Hebron Audi Asia Giovanni Australia Canberra
Podcast Advertising and Digital Identity With Rishabh Jain

Sounds Profitable

03:51 min | 8 months ago

Podcast Advertising and Digital Identity With Rishabh Jain

"In september. Twenty twenty there was a major shakeup in data collection which seemed to market trent alexander article on the subject called does the loss of digital. Id impact podcasts. Advertising that covered the trends and its effect on the podcast advertising industry and it's linked in the episode details to bring down what this means for digital and digital will handle looking more. like podcast. I spoke to reshape. Jane formerly of libraries the people at library experts at data collection and data stewardship and workshop was kind enough to lend his expertise. Rashad thank you so much for joining me here today. On the sound profitable podcasts. It's a pleasure to be your ryan. Thanks for having me. Yeah and so you know you have had a chance to work together for a little while now in different companies i've been at and so you're over at live ramp which is really cool and the reason i wanted to pull you into this conversation today. Is we're going to talk about the loss of digital ide- that everybody's so freaked out about in the whole advertising ecosystem and we're going to talk about how it relates to podcasting so to start things off as you're the expert on the article was really more about what the space is overall in. Not just podcasting. Could you give us a little bit of background on. What's going on with this concept of the loss of digital id and what identity. Which i believe is what's coming next. is is really all about. Yeah for sure. So there have been this slow movement and announced become really big with chrome of losing digital. Id's so actually the very first one was safari. You know it's really hard for advertisers to work with safari and then fire. Fox implemented something similar. So it's really hard. Fratto has toured with fire. Fox that you know people. I think got used to that and so had we. We don't talk about that as much. But then when google chrome announced that they're going to remove third party cookie at the start up. Twenty twenty two is essentially time line that they gave. That became a big deal because was started to happen at chrome is essentially more than half of people's browsing. And so when you remove the third party cookie you basically removed the main identifier that people use today to do advertising. So what i mean by that for those of you listening. Who are you to advertising is. There's this small snippet of code or a basically a small file that gets written onto your browser so literally onto chrome any. No a lot of people know this. Because there's this thing clear. Cookies clear cash so what these companies do is they actually write an identifier so you not something arbitrary. Abc one-two-three and that allows them when you go to different websites to see that. It's the same browser visiting those websites. Enough i'm using my computer and i. I go to a clothing website so clothing dot com and then after that i go to a magazine a magazine dot com than the clothing. Company can advertise to me on the magazine website. Because i have the same cookie right. They can identify that. It's the same browser being used. When i go from one to the other and now that chromos getting rid of net. That's going to be a really big problem for for advertisers. So that's what most people are upset about recently. Very interestingly apple decided that they're going to actually ask a question about whether or not the user wants for the company to track them with with identifiers writes Jail which is also going to throw a similar wrench into the mix

Trent Alexander Fratto Rashad FOX Jane Ryan Google ABC Apple
Frailty Is A Thing?

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:33 min | 8 months ago

Frailty Is A Thing?

"I am excited today to introduced to you dr mucci. She has the coolest instagram page. That you're ever gonna wanna watch so her pages linked in the show notes and we are going to discuss. Frailty today which. Until i ran into her. I didn't even know an actual medical thing. So thank you for joining me. Have i so i just thought frailty meant you know i have a very good definition of frailty. I just thought it meant that you started losing the ability to move freely. And then you've told me that there's actual stages and it's a medical thing so why don't you start by telling everybody what frailty actually is to a medical doctor a right. Thank you very much for the kind introduction jets and so frankly is very commonly used announced a families look after all people and they just say oh mommy's a bit freia and she's slowed down a little bit out. Of course they chum failty in medical world as means completely different thing and their definition official definition knees highly if they reduce physiological reserves allocco physiological reserves. This means and why is it important to understand while this happens. As a result of amalgamation wolf three major factors as a result of aging process amalgamated with age related diseases we accumulate over the life span as less side effects of medications. Let me give you an example. What this means. So recent example for my clinical practice beatrice is ninety two year old lady. She's quite fit. Well lead independently. She before the lockdown. Actually it was running classes in a swimming pool oval senior citizens so very engaged with her community and leaving a beautiful life with quote a good quality of life however decreases ninety two and in the lost two three years. Should he'd have a few medical problems into stroke clinic with couple of meanest strobes diagnoses on. Jain ah should also has a little bit okay. High blood pressure. Some kidney disease muggle problems. None of them are actually bad enough to impact on. Have day to day functioning. She takes madison's will. These conditions is on block thin as full day mini strokes or cholesterol tablets. So she's functioning will and then one day should develops really a bad kid named action or you're north talked infection and it was bad enough for her to be a stylized in hospital and what happened. She became very confused. Deal various and rather than spending just two three days in hospital For intravenous antibiotics shea had two weeks admission in hospital because have confusion was resolving and of course what happens told their doubts if they spend a lot of time in in bed completely condition muscles wasted away by them. Homeless admission is keen swimmer. Could not stand to go into a rehabilitation facility and it was good two months before she actually returned home and she was not back to normal cell sure required carrozza assistance required Family to help. And that's what frailities. It's their amalgamation. She did not know that. Race frail have family did not understand why mom sophie to while swimming the day before teaching her class next day hunterston agen and actually swearing which Merited before in. How confused state why this will happen into. It was very traumatic for the families. And that's what i said. I explained frame because of course as a result of a previous mini strokes should have reduced brain reserves and urinary infection. Eat infection there are toxins in the body which up poisoning the brain. Now in you. And i we might not have a major program but had strokes if so bring presents lou and should develop a confusion shays ninety two age related changes to the boogie moss and muscles. Do you know on net. After the age of fifty we use about one to two percent muscle mass every year. So just imagine when you come to ninety two remember. She's actually switch. It wasn't bad But you can't go against the nature so there you go mini strokes causing reduced brain reserves. Shays ninety two year old with reduction in her muscle mass spending two weeks hostile bat eligible kidney problem on the background and of course urinary tract infection led to deterioration that and have completed different individual at the

Dr Mucci Carrozza Swimming Kidney Disease Confusion Madison Shea Urinary Infection Sophie LOU Shays
"jain" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

03:21 min | 8 months ago

"jain" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

"Jumping <Speech_Male> out of the <SpeakerChange> bad jordan. <Speech_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Coming up on <Speech_Music_Male> psychology vaughn <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> soon. I'm <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the co founder of numbers <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and people's energy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and wear <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> company that brings <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> big <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> scale daughter about <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> what's happening in the world <Speech_Music_Female> together with <Speech_Music_Female> the experiences <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of people on the ground. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> There <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is a lot to learn from <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> children. That we <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> very rarely. I mean <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> i took that young people <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not getting <Speech_Music_Female> listened to. I mean <Speech_Music_Female> i think children are <Speech_Music_Female> probably <Speech_Music_Female> the most <Speech_Music_Female> islands <SpeakerChange> group <Speech_Music_Female> in our society <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female>

"jain" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

03:25 min | 8 months ago

"jain" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

"About ups and downs. Surely we all have them. People are very difficult. I tried to the things. I was going to manage. The at one is ideal as an entrepreneur. That people free that they have these adversities that they see in their lives and they actually end up feeding that. Maybe they're not about to do that right. And i feel that as an entrepreneur you have to expect at accept. Both expected an accepted that they're going to be upset. Downs and i d i defined. That is the only read you you and i know that we are alive. Is we a heartbeat and the hardest advent looked like it goes up and down up and down and many smooth. Your dad to do you want to live a life of a dead person. That is living his mood life. Or you wanna live life of the person who is allied that is constantly going up and down and knowing that when you are down just hunker down because next beat is going to be up and menu on the top of the beat. Never get too because you know. Winter is coming and it could be down next right so all these know that it is not about what is happening about knowing that these things are just barber being allies inventor entrepreneur and founder of dyson ltd said. James dyson knows a thing or two about failure. Actually a better way to wear. That would probably be that. He's an expert on not giving up three fail in a court from an old interview with fox company. He states i made five thousand one hundred and twenty seven prototypes of my vacuum before. I got it ride. There were five thousand one hundred and twenty six values. But i learned from eight one. That's how i came up with a solution. So i don't mind failure also fun fact in may twenty. Twenty dyson was named the richest person living in the uk. So we are going to introduce you to a very important term right now which is used a lot and is also misused a lot the tom is chronic disease. This is rachel shelton of social medical sciences and associate director of research a center for public health promotion columbia university find that. We've had such great improvements in terms of prevention and treatment of infectious disease. So people are living much longer lives now. Both within the united states and globally people are increasingly being diagnosed with chronic diseases across the life course and that commonly refers to heart disease cancer stroke diabetes and obesity. And what's interesting. A lot of the behavioral risk factors for those chronic diseases are very similar so factors like dietary behaviour nutrition sedentary behavior physical activity smoking and alcohol use so as public health. What we really need to do is put a focus on prevention and really identify. What are the key levers. what are the key policies. What are the key strategies and communication messages that we can have across the life course that can help promote health and prevent chronic disease and really also think about what are the key factors in the neighborhoods. We live in in our worksites in our communities in schools that can set up people for.

rachel shelton James dyson five thousand two united states uk may twenty Both fox one hundred and twenty six val three one hundred and twenty seven dyson eight one Twenty dyson for public health promotion columbia university a thing sciences social
"jain" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:55 min | 8 months ago

"jain" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Growing up. One of my fondest memories was of going to a local market with my mum every month in the small town in india where we live we would spend the morning walking through an intricate maze of small stores and street vendors stopping at her favorite spots where everyone knew discovering what fruits were in season and what kitchenware was in stock. She would spend hours examining things from all angles quizzing sellers on their quality and where they came from. They would show hurt the latest tools and gadgets the ones that they knew she would like and we always walked back happy and satisfied arms overflowing with dozens of shopping bags having bought so much more than what we originally intended addicted later as a college student in the bustling steve. My sense and i would spend a similar few hours every month on fashioned street. A euphemism for the rule of small stores with the latest claude's at traitress. We would spend hours. Rummaging through piles of claude's trying on dozens of trinkets getting advice from each other in what looked good and what was on trend. We would then combine everything. We had brought to negotiate a big discount. Each of us had different rules. One was created putting the look together. Another one was better at negotiating the discount and a third was always the time keeper to make sure that we got back to school on time. Shopping is so much more than what you buy. It's a treasure. Hunter discover something new a personalized recommendation. From someone you trust. It's a negotiation to get that great deal and a time spent catching up with friends and family. It's social it's interactive. It's conversation over the last two decades. I have been researching consumers in emerging markets around the world digging beneath the surface to truly understand who they are how they live and what they want when they go shopping shopping like everything else has moved online. Shopping online is great. It's convenient at the click of a button delivered to your doorstep. It has everything. It has great prices. But it's also static and in boston. You sit alone in front of a computer or a mobile phone. Scrolling through hundreds of choices identified by goddamn delivered by machine. When you do have a query you interact with another machine or the bought an actual human being. What puzzles me about. This is when you speak to a successful salesperson. They will tell you that the secret to closing a sale is the conversation. People want to buy from other people. So why do we forget this most crucial ingredient when we shop online this impersonal anonymous expedience is leaving many of us. Actors fight returns at an all time high. And we're left feeling. Did i buy much. The guy by doolittle doesn't really look good on me today. Even need this and for the one billion ken's you must want you to the internet. In emerging markets shopping online can be overwhelming the unsure whether they will get what they can see unsure whether they can trust the center. What them money we get lost in cyberspace. The question is john. We create authentic real human conversation at scale john we it online marketplaces that are convenient and abundant and human. The good news is that the answer is yes. Companies in emerging markets around the world in china india and southeast asia are doing just this using a model that i call conversational calms. It's hard to believe isn't it. But let me give you a few examples. I show an indian company where you can build a trusted authentic relationship with the seller online. The best part about shopping with my mom was that the sellers knew who she was and she knew that she could trust them. They would scroll through the hundreds of choices in the store and pick an make personalized recommendations just for hook knowing what she would like and what would work for her.

india Each One third claude dozens of trinkets dozens of shopping bags one each month
Piyanka Jain On  How To Growth Hack Using Data

The $100 MBA Show

05:07 min | 9 months ago

Piyanka Jain On How To Growth Hack Using Data

"Hello welcome everybody. Thanks for joining me. My name is guide today. I'm gonna teach you how you can use attacking to grow your own business. So before i start how you can use growth hacking. Let me start by describing or explaining what growth hacking is. And for that. I'm gonna read an exit from my book behind good decision. So he goes growth hacking discipline within organization with the senior focus of driving. Scalable growth. Hacking team typically consists of product development design analytics and marketing and it uses a pole strategy to attract customers that is the include engagement driving experiences within the product by understanding uses motivation behavior and provide immediate value to engage customers. What's his the traditional margin approach of marketing department reaching each customers after the broad theme has This again is expected from my book behind a good decision for those who are interested. So you guys thinking some of you. Maybe you have a million dollar business. You have a few team members in your thinking okay. You're talking about a multidisciplinary approach with broader development design analytics marketing and his team of three or team of one. And nobody's folks at what we are trying to. What would this is trying to say. Is that essentially. The growth hacking needs input from different aspects of business so it needs a product in the design put. It needs analytics. Marketing put and it can be done by that same person. And i'll show you. What are the key components of attacking so therefore key competence of growth hockey. Go through one by one by one. And isaac go toward that also a showcase this with an example from facebook. How facebook did that so the forest competent of growth hacking is a must have product so fullest. You need a product or service that is currently able to engage majority of your. You must already coming to your side and that is your based products and so much. You must understand so growth hacking chicken. Take you you cannot take you from zero to ten it. Can you know if you already have on. You already. Taken your your your website. You have someone gives you. You already have your water to take an exhibit. One wrote hacking bake you from one to ten and so that is the kind of exponential growth if you do it systematically can be enabled. So what does it mean so you. For example for your product you already have a product or service that is you know that that that your end users are quite enjoying and they're coming back for your side That is your must have products. The second competent of growth hacking is undestand must have experiences. What does that mean. So you need to understand your most Engaged consumer and through research analysis figured out what their needs are what they love their side and you know and so this would include finding girls drivers you know for example things that uses do which engages them we use a framework call. Three questions to be going through. This will rock lines or teach our We teach Through courses entrepreneurs like you of how do you. How do you understand how you unravel the growth drivers for your own business. And that's called tricky questions. Famous miss by the way framework is also dead book behind every good decisions for those of few interested in the book is available on amazon and other places and the chapter you're looking for is under leadership section. It's called tricky questions book. So what essentially the key questions framework is is the three pillars three key questions. You ask the first question. You ask your a day business. How am i doing and through asking this question. You define the defining the key metrics with which you're to measure the success of your business. You know the top. Kpi's the second question to ask. What are my business. Diva's dynamics what drives on doing that. You answered by what for your assists and these will help you unravel the key drivers for your business. For example if y'all measurement you know how you doing By growth and profitable. Maybe a bit then the drivers of business you know. Maybe it's an acquisition strategy. Maybe it's engine started so you'll you'll need to figure out your own business and third competent off or the third party. The third part of the third key question is who my customers. How language so once you're used this approach this'll help you 'unravel the must have experienced. That is the driver for example for for facebook. What they found was that point when they suppose that was voted five million customers already out when they established us. What being both hacking

Facebook Isaac Hockey Amazon Diva
Cyber Monday deals abound

Clark Howard Show

05:35 min | 10 months ago

Cyber Monday deals abound

"The clark deals crew has been working literally around the clock for a much longer period than historically. The clark deals team would work with most of the effort prior years being black friday week through cyber monday but this year not like prior years. The sales spread out the entire month of november bleeding into all the way into this. Friday is cyber monday for most retailers has become cyber week and it can be overwhelming. It's obviously overwhelming for our deals. Team can be overwhelming for you as a consumer with every E mail message. You get or text you might get from retailer you've done business with in the past or do currently screaming. How great their deals are so it really requires action not reaction on your part to plan out number one that you don't overspend and number two that you are getting real deals not non deals and so i know that if you are among the more than one third people somewhere roughly a little more than a third whom look at shopping during the month of december for christmas as more chore than joy. This is even harder for you to think through this way. But i'm more concerned about people who get really excited by deal deal and spend money. That is really more than your wallet is designed for and so that's why back to basics. I want you to think about coming up with a budget. Not too late even if you've already been clicking and buying black friday week and now in cyber week you're like oh look at this. Do you look at that one. Go ahead and assess what you've already spent and how that fits into what you really can't afford to spend through this. Christmas selling cycle second win. They're things you're interested in. Just take the time to write down the offers for example like Historically have been the top draws in the friday and now cyber week deals and they get really really confusing so no this the real deals come with. Tv's and various forms of electroncs that our current technology not state of the art. The very best doorbuster kind of deals are those that are off brands or More minor brands an example Sam's club has a hot item today where they're selling a seventy five inch. Tv four k whole bit from philips philips is not a premiere brand in the united states anymore and it's five hundred and ninety nine dollars. There was a cheaper roku. Tv seventy five inch with best. Buy for four nine thousand nine that when sold out five nine thousand nine for seventy five inch. tv really really great. But it's Yes you'd call that a second tier brand and then when you look at the first tier brands samsung. Lg sony the tv's. That are the best deals for black friday. Cyber monday in this week of cyber week our. Tv's that may be Last season's models or models that they had oversupply of or they made specifically as value additions for retailers. To sell this week and there are great. Great great deals especially when you step down to the second tier or third tier brands. Listen this when if you want a jain normal. Tv best buy has an eighty five inch imagine eighty five inch tv. A high sense. Four k nine hundred ninety nine dollars. I mean that's ridiculous and they have an l g eighty six inch for fourteen forty nine so there are a variety of really really great deals on. Tv's and for people looking at more reasonable sizes like looking from thirty two inch. Tv's that right now are seventy nine dollars and up Sixty five inch. Tv's cheap is two hundred fifty dollars and there are great. Great deals available and avoid with electronic spying state-of-the-art because today's state of the art is much more money than current technology and we'll be current six months from now or whatever at a fraction of the price that state of the art is right now

Sam's Club Philips Philips LG Samsung United States Sony Best Buy
Google antitrust case is opening salvo in war with Big Tech

The Tech Guy

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Google antitrust case is opening salvo in war with Big Tech

"What is the latest? You might ask what is the newest Mr Mr Tech Guy if that's what your name is, what is the latest news? about the IPHONE, right? We don't have to talk about that Ad Nauseam. You either get under you're not if you're getting you're getting excited and if you're not then you don't care. You're happy with whatever you have. there is some question of course about whether the iphones camera. Will. Best the? The camera of the. I guess the current leader, which is the Pixel Five. I don't include Samsung in that bunch. I know a lot of you do mike beat our chases my my Samsung as twenty as a best camera ever. But I think most camera nuts photography nuts will have to ask Chris, martyr foget. But most of most of the camera shots I know, say they too much processing in the Samsung both Google and? I phone to a more. Natural Look. And yet, both are using the state of the art and computational photography get more detail to get better low light performance. Number of people. Including Marquez Brownlee, the Youtube Star. Are Now weighing in saying you know. Even the old pixel. Even, the Pixel four four, a has a better camera than the new iphone. Isn't that's shocking. I think they're both I have to say I, think they're both so good at this point. That it's really now even the Samsung it's really now matter of personal taste. The opinion. Not, so much. The actual quality of the images which you like better. All of them do some significant processing it's just whether you like more or less than. How well they do in low light I'm looking for we haven't seen the iphone Pro Max, which is going to be the best of the new iphone twelve. Bunch because it's got the biggest sensors got It's actually kind of a cool technology. Optical image stabilization and it does it by when you jiggle the phone you know because you're his hand held, it jiggles the sensor, the chip. To, match your jiggles to to to smooth it out. And that's something really I don't think we've ever seen a phone before we've seen in high end cameras but have a phone. That's pretty good. Pretty good and the iphone you know is when just out of the box I think gives you a great images so we'll see. We'll. See What else? What else is going on? facebook and twitter CEOS are going back to court tested dot court Congress to testify a little bit more. This was the week that the Department of Justice decided to go after Google for. Being a monopoly for. Antitrust. Interesting. It's going to be interesting. We've been waiting for this. For a while everyone knew that the justice, department is going to file this suit and there's some merit I have to say there's some merit in the suit. because Google is Jain. ORMUZ and it does use its advantage in search. About eighty percent market share and search to help it I think in other areas it's for instance in advertising at both makes the market. Sells the advertising and places the advertising. Functions that could all three of them be separate? But Google does it all and that kind of might tilt the plainfield a little bit in their favor? But Google is quick to say well, but there's other places you can go to buy ads come on we're not the only one. So it'll be interesting to see the. Of course you remember the last big. Antitrust lawsuit against. which was who almost a little more than thirty years ago with the Department of Justice going after Microsoft, they don't go after many. Tech companies after many companies at all, there's only been one big antitrust action in the last twenty some years. And that went that went out with a fizzle that was the time Warner. CNN. Merger. with what was it at and T. Half I can't even remember anymore. That was really kind of a little bit politically motivated. I have to say and it went by the wayside pretty quick. Could say there are those who do this is politically motivated as well. If that's the case while I wonder. what will happen I don't know. We'll see. but I as I said I, think there's some merit in The case I don't think anybody would end the e probably gonNA pursue their own action. In this regard I don't think anybody would disagree with that and yet what do you do you? You can't break Google up. To. Make Google Sell Youtube in the shopping and just stick to search maybe sell advertising. I don't know if that's a good solution.

Google Samsung Department Of Justice Youtube Marquez Brownlee Chris Mike CNN Congress Microsoft
Like Father, Like Son!

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Like Father, Like Son!

"It's time once again for America's favorite show, the radio adventures of Dr Fluid brought to you by Tech Floyd Dot Com this week starring Lesley Karrar Rudolph Chuck McCann as Dr Floyd's mother and father. We'll ask dot heroes they end returned to settle river city to the Floyd family home. They were summoned to the home by Dr Floyd's mother who had shocked the crew with the stunning news of the return of Dr Floyd's father. They were now standing at the front door of the house after just having knocked. Your. Putin. Putin Doug. Grant I'm in no mood. I'm blind mommy. Dr Grant is so good to see you. Brought your little puppy ships. Again to. What a good poppy speak come spray. She misses, Lloyd. Puppy hairs a puppy tree. Trust wonderful that your father is home. Sway Oh come on inside. Your father will be up from his nap soon he came all the way from the condos morning you know who he was Bush to. Feel show. You. Come on. He chips. Perpetually under the assumption that you're adult. Don't. Show neither need another one is biscuit shot into my speaker Snot. Thank you very much as our heroes go in to meet Dr Voids, let's check in on that evil mastermind Dr Steve Socks assistant featured who have just landed down the street from the Floyd family home. All right now here's the plan featured I put on this crudely-made deliveryman outfit. then. You're going to deliver this package to Dr Flowing. In when he reaches out for its, you'll push this button on the side. That's it. That's all you have to do. Really well, the box expands and captures anyone who's touching it in an escape proof prison on wheels. I. Got it from prisons in a box dot com. Really will then I will come and roll the prison back to the ship and take Dr Floyd back to my secret lair you will not be able to do anything after that point. Because, you'll be trapped in the box. Obviously look when you push the button, it's going to activate the box and whoever's touching. It gets trapped inside the prison that includes the person who pushed the button. Look. I don't have time to argue about this. We'll discuss it later when I, get you out of the box now get out there and put my pled into action. Dr Steve has enacted a bland to kidnap. Dr Floyd meanwhile are unsuspecting hero is currently sitting in the living room of his family home watching his mother's Pomeranian puppy Mr Bernie jains do. Say. Jay. Okay Comey. Yeah. The depth of his talent knows no bounds or after noon everyone. Your away. I feel like a million ducats and what a spectacular welcoming committee I have to welcome home. Hello there. Everyone I'm Dr Floor Jay Floyd senior. This is Dr Grant. It is a pleasure to meet you sir, the pleasures, all Puerto Laar. Out. Quite. A grip. You've got their Dr Floyd senior. Says Dr Grant Federal Puppy Chips yes I'm not actually a dog here. We treat. And where is my boy? Son Compare your father I'll gladly. Put me down no gene. Sudden Hey. I was just so excited to see you. That's all. It's been a while. Yeah long while. I'll get it you to keep talking book Florida I know I haven't been around a long time I'm sure you're upset about that but I wanNA make sure that we get caught up on this visit. All right. Really you mean. Shirt, do son I wanNA take it nice and slow I. Know You want every detail about how uncovered a lost city and hot a Condo when I'm done telling you about that in retirement for me head out on another adventure. Hey there's a crudely disguised delivery guy at the door with a package for Dr. Flowing As Mrs Floyd Dr Grant and chips into the kitchen to help make some lunch both Dr. Floyd and his father void senior head down the hallway to the front door. Both Dr Floyd's junior and senior reach out for the box. They touch it up the exact same moment and as they do the perplexed Fisher pushes the button on the side instantly engulfing the three of them in. Prison on wheels moments. Later, our villain Dr Steve is pushing the rolling prison down the street to ship. Can you hear me? Did we catch Dr Floyd? Father what do you mean father own wait? I, misunderstood you know it's not much farther. We're almost there in fact, steve is almost to a ship with our hero and his father diabolical plan could Dr Steve have in store for Dr Floyd. How will he react when he finds out that he not only has Dr Floyd Dr Floyd's father as well, and just how is bridget getting along with the doctors while trapped inside that box dishes figure. My good. Find out next time on the radio adventures Dr Flowing.

Dr Floor Jay Floyd Mrs Floyd Dr Grant Dr Grant Dr Steve Floyd Dr Flowing Dr Steve Socks Dr Fluid Putin Doug DOT America Lesley Karrar Chuck Mccann Florida Lloyd Bush Puerto Laar Mr Bernie
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Janissary Music

Classics for Kids

05:39 min | 1 year ago

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Janissary Music

"I'm Naomi Moon Welcome to classics for. Kids. Let's start this show off with a bang. You. Know how? When a certain kind of music catches on whether it's rap or jazz or Latino suddenly you hear it all over well, all over Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries you would have heard Turkish flavored music like this marked by Ludwik von Beethoven. A very reasonable question would be if Beethoven was German, what was he doing writing Turkish music? The Sultan who ruled Turkey used to have a very select group of guards called Jan Aseries, actually, jams areas, what the Turkish term for new army sounded like to European ears like most armies. The Janice series had a band and since this was a Turkish army, the Janice every band used Turkish instruments like bass drums, triangles, and cymbals when the Sultan of Turkey since January, bands to Europe people went nuts over the exotic sound of those instruments hey, couldn't get enough of Turkish. Music. European composers knowing what their audiences wanted to hear started writing. Turkish. Sounding pieces and even set some of those pieces in Turkey This is the overture to Mozart's opera the abduction from the Seraglio. Seraglio. Was the Turkish Sultan's palace a palace which he kept US sizable Harem of wives. Plural. Very poor. Mozart wasn't the only composer to set an opera in Turkey German composer. Carl Maria. Von Vaber did to and he even gave his opera a Turkish name. Abu Hassan. And Turkish sounds crept into orchestra music too. For Instance Haydn's symphony number one. Kendrick. Since people associated the sound of drums, triangles and cymbals with Turkish army bands that Haydn symphony came to be known as the Military Symphony. The best symbols in the world are still made by the same family that made them in Haydn's day the Zil jains, the name zillion is Turkish for symbol maker a Turkish Sultan gave it to the first symbol maker in the family almost four centuries ago today zillions live in Massachusetts where they make the symbols you here in rock bands and symphony orchestras. That's from Wellington's victory by Beethoven. After. The FAD for January music died down the cymbals bass drums and triangles didn't go back to Turkey those instruments. Oh, their place in today's orchestras and bands to the eighteenth century European craze for Turkish music of all the composer's latched onto the sound of the January band I think Beethoven did it best? My favorite bit of January music is tucked into the middle of the last movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. That Sound is a controversy soon, the lowest pitched woodwind instrument there is it's acting almost like a bass drum. Back when January music was popular, you could buy a piano equipped with a special. January pedal by thumping down on it, you could accompany yourself with your own personal triangle and drums percussion section. Unfortunately today, those pianos are only found in museums when both amodio Mozart composed his Turkish Rondo he managed to get the piano to imitate Janice drums even without a special pedal. That's Mozart's Turkish Rondo. Now that you know about the Turkish part to find out what a Rondo is, join me next time for classics for kids.

Ludwik Von Beethoven Turkey Turkish Army Mozart Haydn Janice Europe Military Symphony Seraglio Naomi Moon United States Von Vaber Abu Hassan Carl Maria Jan Aseries Massachusetts Kendrick Wellington
"jain" Discussed on Standing On The Shoulders

Standing On The Shoulders

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"jain" Discussed on Standing On The Shoulders

"Bollywood because remain fift- assistant director for another twenty years. So that's when applied to go to college. Do My masters. I was going to do communication design, but it was literally a day before submitting to the Royal. College of Art I changed my mind again. Decide to apply for attraction design and I think that was perhaps the best decision I made, and I think going to. The G did change my life. It kind of brought all the things I was interested together in one space I'm interested in working with people I like to bit of design, but also like to storytelling and night to make films, and it just kind of the atmosphere. My colleagues, the Tutu's. It really had a big influence. For people who don't know what interaction designers can you describe what that means and put into practice I interaction design today would be seen as somebody who designs quite specific interactions between people and technology in a sense of anything from user interface design to interactions between say smart objects or connected objects and people corrected products and sawn, whilst I suppose what restarted was. Was a lot broader. It was more like imagine this technology, and then what would it mean to live at this technology? What world would be in so? There was already these aspects of thinking about the future to ask questions like Dave to consider unintended consequences, so it was, and it was making it was designing, but there was also of contextual thinking and considering. During her two years at the Royal College of Art and I've got really good at dreaming up those what if scenarios she gravitated towards ideas about how people and technology could interface and found herself mixing with some of the most talented people in the UK tech seem this lead to positions at two of the top designed lead tech groups, mobile phone company Nokia and Microsoft Research. Those were phenomenal labs at that time I remember visiting them and being so enthused by what was coming out of those spaces they had a different approach to creating interactions with devices were in many ways thinking bigger, they worth thinking about the contexts. Tummy a little bit about what you did at those places. What attracted you to them? And how that context has really informed what it is that you do today? I think the board. The organizations had really huge influence in different ways so I think. With not care, it wasn't so much the work I did, but the people I work with I think it was probably one of the Best Group of people I've ever worked waste. There was such a lot of collaborative spirit and hotness shapes and kind of investigative thinking in that cohort of people that. I brought on practice later on last Microsoft of research. My boss at the time was Alex Taylor who is a social scientist and I think he introduced me to a lot of. Really fascinating concepts in social sciences, asking questions about things in so many different ways, an area that is close to my heart. The social science concepts helped to enrich the world's that Anna was building and helped to make sense of an predict the interfaces that she was Xining so working with Alex. steele was a pivotal moment in her career I worked with him for almost two years at Microsoft research in order at that point like the briefs He would ask me to think about were like rethinking intelligence in the home. Or what does it mean to limit intelligent things in the homes we were talking about. Robot companions and so on. This is ten years ago. So I think that was a huge influence in. In. Research lead measures which in design, but also brought in an off speculation and I think that is also a completely replaceable experience. She played around with all kinds of pressing ideas from a robot that consumed and well recycled organic waste to a world infused by RFID chip readers. After a few years at the lab, she was inspired to look a little further, and in two thousand and nine. She formed her own group Super Flux with her partner John Darn. How did those experiences inform super flux? You're design lab. It just kind of fell into place where I chose to move out of a structured institution, I think one of the things I was really craving autonomy, and it was also on the same time that my partner John. who had us more start of himself was also looking to do something like that so. We kind of informally collaborated on our first project. Into thousand nine, and I think it just took off from there. I think we both were pretty much recent graduate, so we hadn't yet caught into the kind of comfortable paycheck secure life scenarios. We were in a shared house. We didn't have any. Obligations apart from making show via money to pay the rent and food tweet, and so we could really. Explore and experiment thing and build, and so be remotely broke for a bit. Happily. They didn't have to stay broke for too long. They started to attract lots of great clients and collaborators. They dreamed up a camera that filmed in the fifth dimension with quantum physicists at the university. Of Oxford, they dreamed up pets that were powered by WIFI synthetic bees that would buzz around with natural ones, and they also worked with neuro. Prostate assists at Newcastle University to conceptualize a latter day miracle, helping those with degenerative eye conditions see again through injectable viruses. Lots of world building work is inspired by something that we humans are genius at world destroying. For the past three years, her lab has been developing a research project called mitigation of shock takes a climate change, altered future, involving food and water scarcity, and brings it home literally in this instance we chose. To invite people into something that the experience everyday their homes are very domestic space, but set in the future. What would our homes look like and feel like in a world that has been severely impacted by climate change, and so we build this apartment, and it was like a London apartments set around twenty fifty or so. Ben Our son John and my son, who's Su was six at that point would be around our age, so it was like far away in the future to affect.

Microsoft Research John Darn College of Art partner Royal College of Art fift- assistant director Bollywood Microsoft Alex Taylor Research lead Newcastle University Dave UK Oxford Nokia Su Anna scientist
"jain" Discussed on Standing On The Shoulders

Standing On The Shoulders

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"jain" Discussed on Standing On The Shoulders

"Even though if you look around. The that feature present is unfolding is complex security turbulent. The trans reports and kind of visions that are presented to us by. Those who have the power to present? Those visions are often glean.

Engine Competitions for B-52 and F-15EX

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Engine Competitions for B-52 and F-15EX

"Wings mount to the pile or the pilots of the wings, and then a complete cockpit redesign. So. They're actually asking for eight engines and think young not to Max Flank and give us much more details, but think of these are the engines that are like on the back of big business jets. Yeah, yeah. We'll. We'll talk about those in just a second I. IT might be worth mentioning that previous on even Wanna use the plans, but in some cases plans in some cases, proposals or ideas to re engine. The the B fifty. Two's did include going four larger engines at at one point, they were looking at for Pratt and Whitney pw. Two thousand engines are the military designations F. One seventeen. which is what you find basically on the seven Boeing seven five seven and on the on the C. Seventeen. At one point, there was a proposal for four least Rolls Royce rb. Two eleven engines That didn't go. there was Competition at one point proposed between that are be to eleven, P, W, two thousand and also the CFM. In jains, which is what's on the Boeing seven three sevens and some other things. But now we're looking at. It's called the commercial engine. Reengineering program will redundant. They're the commercial engine reengineering program CRP or I guess we call that. SURP- well I. It's kind of funny because we've got now a commercial space program, this is a commercial reengineering. One of the things we've talked about recently. especially with military aviation is. Using off the shelf components for whatever whatever the need is not creating a specific, a specific mission, specific platforms, specific engine or electron ix, but what using what's out there to do that? So that's really where we're going with this and like Brad said. The the engine pilots in the structure they wanna keep as simple as possible, and this has been kind of a trend in believe it or not. The warbirds circuit. The recreated emmy to six choose. That were replicas. Have the NACELLE 's built for the. Engines from world. War Two, but have more modern engines hidden underneath them so you're you're so you're getting the same look and you're getting the same thrust ratios. ETC, but you have a more powerful much better engine, so they're. They're looking to keep the eight eight engines for balance and for. If you lose one on takeoff, etc, so and so max taken away with what are our choices? Envelope, please you have from from General Electric well, there's actually to possibilities, but one is the t.f thirty four, which has launchpad said is popular on many. Many Biz jets it's also a very to that is what powers the eight ten actually So that's that's one possibility, and that's an engine that's been around for you know for a while. It's very reliable. It's a good engine. Another possibility from GE is what they call their their. Passport engine, which is a newer newer design that GEE is working on for for a regional and business jets. so that's from. General Electric from Pratt and Whitney. There's the PW eight hundred. Series, which is also a an engine for regional jets and business jets, which is produced by pregnant Canada and it actually has the common core with the geared turbofan engine, except it doesn't have the big high bypass fan, and it doesn't have the gear, but the core of the. Pragmatism you. Eight hundred series engines the same as the geared turbofan. In from Rolls Royce. We have the F. One thirty, which is the military designation for the commercial. be are seven hundred series, which is another business jet. Engine so these are smaller diameter than the high bypass turbofans you see on seventy three seven's a three thousand family series in all of the others smaller diameter, but it turns out not a whole lot different from those t.f thirty-three engines. Their stuffed into the into the beef twos will as our insider into the engine world in our ringer. Where do we put our money on the bet I'll. Pick. Pick a winner now, so so the air. Force will have a relatively complicated or complex system for evaluating the proposals. Will take into account. A number of different factors in in this case. Some of those factors will include things like fuel burn because. A more efficient engine requires less aerial refueling. That's a that's a good thing. It'll include things like maintenance costs. What are the you know? The life cycle maintenance costs a variety of different other aspects to it I don't know if engine maintenance proposals or plans, or are going to be associated with these, or or not, or if it's you know, the maintenance is going to continue as it has with t.f thirty-three terms of WHO's doing it I don't know, but it'll be A. Interesting process, this is actually the sort of the second phase of this This proposal process the the the three of them in the first phase. If you WANNA, call it. That created digital prototypes. This is very interesting I. I don't know if this has been done to this degree in the past, but the since the first round submission from the three engine makers was a digital prototype submission, but the final proposals is comes up really fast July. Twenty second is the deadline for the air force the government to receive the final proposals.

Whitney Pw General Electric Boeing Max Flank Emmy C. Seventeen Pratt Brad GE Canada
Fashion History Now: Nurse Uniforms

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:47 min | 1 year ago

Fashion History Now: Nurse Uniforms

"One of our most recent episode was about the history of nurse uniforms and we talked about how the nurse's cap is very specific symbolism and how the wearing of the cap really started to die out in the late seventy s moving into the eighties but we got an email that. I'd like to talk about from listener. Bath Case Bolt. Who SAYS ONO? No CAPS did not quite disappear as quickly as one thought because Beth is a registered nurse and she writes I was in the nursing program at Alderson broaddus college now university in Philippi West Virginia from nineteen eighty four to nineteen eighty eight. She says we wore navy. Blue dresses with stiff white cotton aprons complete with bibs or navy pants with a small style. Top with white pin tucked front and caller. She says the uniform double knit and they didn't necessarily change their uniform colors in the four years but what did change the color of the stripes on their caps. A and I thought that was really interesting. And she goes on to say that from nineteen ninety three to nineteen ninety-six. She says I taught an L. P. N. program at Danville Community College and Daniel Virginia and our students wore yellow dresses with white aprons. The male students were black pants with a yellow and blue shirt. They receive their caps in their second year. Instructors wore full whites including hose if you didn't wear pants. Nurses always wear white hose and the caps were required of everyone except for the male students. So you are correct. There is no alternative for men with cap so I thought that was really interesting that well into the nineteen ninety s nursing institutions of education. There were still wearing the cap requiring it to wear the cap in so many of you sent us so many fantastic images of yourself and your nursing uniforms over the years that that was really cool. I can't remember which listener in particular. But she sent us a picture of herself in the sixties with her many quote unquote mini skirt uniform. That was really need to share those with Marissa. Because we talked about that. Like how short did it get in the nineteen sixties? So thank you. We'll share those with her. Yeah and I actually asked talked to my mom too. Because my mom was a nurse in nursing school in the nineteen seventies but. She's at her school that the cap was just for pure ceremony. They had to wear it at the candle lighting ceremony when they graduated but that was it. She said we hated caps. But my mom was also a little bit of abroad burning hippie. Sorry mom very much so in response to our prom episode P- listeners. Eileen Chatterton and Jordan Brady Bolt wrote to us to tell us about the prom and homecoming tradition in Texas. Which had never heard of. Have you heard about? Oh yeah because I actually grew up in Texas when I was in middle school so it the homecoming was a huge deal even even in middle school not just high school if you have one if you didn't have one that day of homecoming you're kind of like. Oh No. I'm so embarrassed sized from people who even have more than one where and they're huge. They're like these giant clusters of flowers like of ribbons and bells and everything hanging off over them. So sometimes you maybe your parents would buy one. Sometimes your grandparents would buy you want and then maybe your boyfriend would buy one so sometimes girls were wandering around wearing like two or three of these. Jain corsage is but That was something that your your date would bring to you. Input on your wrist. Yeah but this is something you would wear all day at school. Oh interesting very

Caps Beth Texas Marissa Alderson Broaddus College Philippi West Virginia Danville Community College Daniel Virginia Eileen Chatterton L. P. N. Jordan Brady Bolt
Covid-Who?

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

09:23 min | 1 year ago

Covid-Who?

"Thank you for spending some time with me today. Listening to the POD and man. What a crazy time. We're in right now. The toilet paper apocalypse. That's we're living through right now. We may survive cove in nineteen but none of us will be able to clean our asses. Okay it's interesting. You know because in a lot of ways I'm very removed from normal people life and when I say normal people life. I don't think any of your normal okay. Let's be clear but but you followed the social norms right. Married kids homeowners 401K. Like all the norms and for me I voice followed my own path and done my own thing and done it my way because it's just who I am and I say that to explain to you. How far removed? I've been this like corona virus hysteria. see much news you know. I stopped watching news during the last election because our whole country turned so hateful an ugly to one another. I WANNA be a part of it. It's actually really embarrassing to me to see people's behavior and to know that like that's what the rest of the world thinks of America like it's just embarrassing to me and I actually really love politics by in True America style. We turned it into a giant soap opera and ruined it. But I'm pretty far removed right so I don't I don't see a lot of news I already worked for myself in work remote so I don't have co workers in an office building to worry about. I don't have kids so schools. Being canceled doesn't really affect me right so I'm just cruising along business as usual kind of oblivious to what's been happening in the world because I live in my own little bubble and create my own world I had no understanding how all of this was affecting people and their families and this is really what I want to talk about. Today is the impact this is having on us as individuals how to protect our sobriety during extra difficult times like this and how to manage the anxiety that comes with all of these weird circumstances that were faced with. Many people are now working from home. Office buildings are closed down obviously restaurants I think most of the grocery stores are still open. I know a lot of them have shortened. Their hours gyms or closing Schools are closing right. Kids are home in my state just yesterday. They cancelled school for the rest of the year. They just announced yesterday like Don for the rest of the year. And everybody's kind of talking about like. What the heck are we going to do? And I think for me like I was just cruising along business as usual i. It hasn't really affected my business so to speak but I was hearing a lot of my friends talking about especially coaching friends right talking about their appointments drying up like people aren't scheduling and in their getting scared. They're getting in some financial insecurity right. Because we don't know what's going to happen. Are People really not purchasing? And I posted this and the facebook the other day because I had like two friends in one day that are not entrepreneurs but they have their own private practice. They work for themselves and they were talking about this exact thing like. Oh my Gosh I look at my calendar for the next two weeks like nothing's going on my phone's not ringing. I don't know what I'm GonNa do and I started thinking like our people not spending money and I posted this in the facebook group. I was like a my missing something or people not spending money like I don't understand and one of my girlfriends in California who I adore. She's fabulous and she's she actually called me his. She's like Angela. No people aren't spending money. Everybody's freaking out. Their kids are home. People are losing their jobs. Like I didn't know people were losing their jobs. I didn't know that was happening. Like why would people lose their jobs but when you think about it? The economy is going down. People aren't leaving their houses. Obviously a lot of businesses are going to be affected the travel industry my very best friend works for a jain norms resort hotel in Phoenix and a ton of people are getting laid off right because all their numbers are down. So I think because I'm just in my little bubble I don't recognize these things right because I'm not a part of that world so it's been really interesting for me to see the true impact. This is having on people in the fear. That's coming up because of it and I wanNA talk a lot about that stuff because I don't want everybody going off the rails like this is a tough situation. I get that and the stock market right. It's all really weird and scary and causes a lot of stress and fear financial insecurity. Fear of the future and I really would love it if we could just keep it together. Try Our best not to fall apart. Have some really strong coping mechanisms right. So we're not turning back to drugs and alcohol and just get through this challenging time together more than anything. Let's just get through it together and for those of you that are not in our facebook group. I really recommend you get over there and join the facebook group FACEBOOK DOT COM forward slash groups forward slash addiction unlimited. I'm doing a lot of really cool stuff in there. I'm doing free online meetings. I say online groups because I don't do anything a specific or smart recovery or celebrate recovery. I like to just have a recovery conversation because of course. I don't like to follow anybody's rules right so if I did in online. Aa or NA meeting that I have to follow their rules. And I don't WanNa follow anybody's rules. I like own rules. That's why I do all of this stuff on my own. That's why I have a podcast. That's why created my business. That's why I mike courses because I like my way and I like my rules. My rules are let's love everybody and I don't care what your path to sobriety is as long as you have a path to sobriety. I WANNA support you in that and I want to help you do it to the best of your ability and I want to help you be successful. So we're doing some online groups right super laid back. We have a lot of fun. You guys know I do Monday. Night Group coaching. That's always been a thing and this is free. I'm just throwing some of these together for people to register and do this for free because I want to support you guys getting through this difficult time and making sure that we get through at the best that we can and we cannot do it alone so if you want to know more about those groups as I'm posting them I'm only posting them in the facebook group so I suggest you get you little buns over there and join the facebook group so you can jump on some of these online meetings. We're going to be doing and I'm going to be doing a couple of day right. I'm trying to do one later at night. So that it's available for people. Certainly my people on the West Coast a lot of people in California and their two hours earlier than me. So I'm trying to do some later in the in the nighttime for me. So that our folks on the West Coast can join us also Also for our people in England and Australia New Zealand right. I'm trying to do some different time slots to accommodate as many people as I can. But you're only going to find out about it in the facebook group so get your buns over there and join the facebook group so one of the things. I WANNA touch on really quickly. That just came up in the facebook group the other day this is one of these stumbling points for people when they want to get sober right you guys. Drinking and using drugs takes up a lot of hours a day right. It's it truly. Numbs you for many many many hours and where I think people struggle is. They think that they're just going to stop drinking. And not have the next drink but they don't WanNa put anything in all of those hours that they would have spent drinking so if you wanna just not drink and sit around and obsess about not drinking. You're going to lose the battle. You have to fill those empty time slots you cannot all of a sudden have an additional eight to ten hours a day of nothing to do right that you normally would a numbed out with booze and just leave those hours empty. You are not going to win that battle. Okay in this is why we say this is why I say. I don't know if anybody else does it for me. Being sober and being in recovery is about building a new life right. I can't just quit drinking and remain the same. Selfish self centered. Lying jerk off. I was when I was drunk right. I'M NOT GONNA stay sober if I remain the same jerk off. I have to rebuild myself. My Self Esteem. I have to rebuild my life so that I'm living a life that I'm proud of as a human being that I'm proud to be. That doesn't just happen because you stop drinking. You've got to fill in your time. You have to spend time with yourself figure out who you are. What do you like to do? You have to figure out some hobbies you have to figure out how to expand your energy in positive ways that you feel good

Facebook California America Phoenix West Coast DON Angela Private Practice AA England Australia New Zealand
Scaling Human Conversations with Paul Michaelenko, CEO of Listen App

Inside VOICE

06:29 min | 1 year ago

Scaling Human Conversations with Paul Michaelenko, CEO of Listen App

"So you started your career in music like many in the voice base you started as an artist and I know you grew up playing the violin and found you could sing. You studied music and college. Can you take me through your journey? A little bit from music to teaching vocal coaching to now getting into product design in creating a voice tech startup. It's your interesting background. I actually didn't know that Quite a bit of people invoice come from artists backgrounds. I think that's really cool in my childhood fell in love with the violin. Became obsessed with to be honest later in high school transition to piano and voice and went to school got ran. Aground and buckle performance was in la. Studying under Solo. Best coaches like Seth Riggs also Madonna and teaching Michael Jackson. Studying was very fascinating time. And then after call it pursued all sorts of artistic different gigs on the side and then I took up also voice coaching and through the years. I continued coaching. That actually became something interesting because I started observing. There's a way to create sound when you're speaking or I should say when you're singing that's optimized to your human body so for example like you know the Bel Canto. Singing style comes out of tradition. When they're trying to create sound over an orchestra or Jacker to Jain Auditorium without microphones. So they have to optimize the human voice and I thought what was interesting though this technique was developed for optimization of the human voice what if we could apply that also to speech and I just started observing the way people would talk. And I'm not talking about like saying or whatever like that's different disciplined but like strictly. What does your voice sound light and started? Developing the methodology of helping people optimize their speaking voice. Where you know. There's a few essential things that have to happen for an optimal speaking voice. It's resonating ahead. Resonating the chest proper breathing support and then connecting it altogether Dynamic range that you can have and developed whole methodology. It's called total body. Boys actually told by voice dot com put together a little podcast where people can go through the methodology benefit themselves. You know maybe getting rid of certain bad habits or whatever and so started. There then transitioned to product design joined a startup started doing of design from that went through a few startups. Just kind of moving. My way up learning just fell in love with early stage environment and Then became obsessed with the idea but this time I was already an experienced product designer became obsessed idea of how do you design for an voice enabled interfaces and that led me of course to broadcasting fell in love with podcasting? Started my own. Podcast on musical literacy. It was called Mozart and me at that time and the idea. What's we would help people who didn't have a musical education. Listen to music with more intelligence if you will where. They're being more thoughtful in understanding. What's happening how do you listen to the baseline or what's interesting about the Rhythms Cetera? So it was a fun podcast but very difficult doing all solo. I kind of got burnt out and at that time started thinking about the all. The different podcast outs. That were out there. I downloaded every single one and didn't love any of them and just started prototyping and designing own until somebody came together on mobile. I love that and I think yeah we were talking earlier. There are so many artists in the voice tech space. And you really start to kind of us. Not only your creative mind but what you know about sound design to bring things together and I was reading your blog and you wrote a recent article about air pods and something that you wrote really resonated with me that I just wanted to read real quick. You said people don't like to be alone even worse to be seen alone. It gives the impression that you're socially inadequate or that you don't have many friends. Consequently were always on the phone. Creating the impression that were needed by someone. Air Pods provided elegant solution. For this peculiar social conundrum. I remember the first time I initiated a conversation with a stranger on the streets of New York wearing air pots. I asked him what he was listening to. And he replied. Oh I'm not listening to anything. I just keep them. In sensing the unusual nature of this behavior. He started to justify it saying things like they keep my ears warm. But I wasn't fooled. He was alone in the air pods. Made him feel like he was connected to other people. I think that's first of all beautifully written. But can you speak to this? Why are air pods in here? Ables and voice important in making people feel connected. Do you think Oh. This is so huge I really think that air pods people missing or undervalue. Maybe how sensational phenomena it is. An airport is just the first wave. Now we're going to be seeing. Many other. Brands create really big products in space. If you look at airport volume just how. Much of the on many of them are being sold in terms of revenue. They're just air pods there close to net flicks it's absolutely mind staggering Mike Many of them people are buying. And what's happening? That's most interesting but I wrote about article is that people are leaving them in their ears when they're not listening to because they're so comfortable that is a completely new behavior for consumers who are engaging with media on a mass scale and I think it's close in peril. Jabbour was happening with the IPHONE. So now you get essential you get access to people in new social abstraction the audio so they can be available to interact with content or even with one another the audio because now they have a piece of hardware that's on their heads on their ears amounted to listen and speak at all time. So that's fantastic. And we see the social ask intimate already where people don't WanNa be by themselves and people will always be on their phone on their screen as if like even if they don't have anything to do just even pre sensation busy or something because let's just a sociological factor in society. An air pods. Are I think the most elegant weight to get past this yeah? I think it's interesting how you wrote it. And we've had on the show before. I'm not sure if you know them. But Dave camp and Andy Bell via are the two guys who just love here balls and talking about how great they are. And exactly what you're saying you're connected to the content but you can still be connected to people on the outside And it's blending both of them and I just never thought about it as a something. We've visually see in the way you spoke about it so I thought that was really great. How you wrote

Bel Canto Jain Auditorium Seth Riggs LA Mike Many New York Then Dave Camp Mozart Ables Andy Bell Jabbour Michael Jackson Madonna
Report: Beilein out as Cavs head coach

GSMC Sports Podcast

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Report: Beilein out as Cavs head coach

"Line will soon be former coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers as woes tweeted out here again. Tuesday night that The John After after a brief tumultuous tenure Jain leaving the Cleveland leaving as Cleveland's coach associate head coach J. B. Bickerstaff will be elevated head. Coach balloons expected to say goodbye to staff and players on Wednesday upon return from at the All star

Cleveland Cavaliers Cleveland Associate Head J. B. Bickerstaff
Fashion & Film

Dressed: The History of Fashion

11:32 min | 1 year ago

Fashion & Film

"Episode actually has been on my mind since our very first season and it combines both my passion and my career because today we talk about fashion and film and we actually thought this was a particularly fitting episode with which to launch season three seeing as it's February. WNYC which is an eventful month for fashion in film. We are currently in the midst of course of the International Fashion Week Circuit and the Ninety Second Academy Awards Air. Just this is past Sunday February ninth. Not that I've seen many of the Oscar contenders this year. But let's be honest. I mainly tune in to see what everyone is wearing. Yes exactly the same. Although I did watch rock man last night which I know I loved. You're so so on costumes. Were amazing. Customer agree on that yet and we actually got to see a couple of them in in person when we were in L. A.. Recently which was very cool but the Oscars is definitely one of fashion industries. Highlights of the year. You know. I think it's safe to say that. What celebrities as where to this star centered? Event is just as exciting as the awards. Show itself and I'm sure many of our listeners will be joining us in watching the pre show coverage where where we will get an up close and personal look at all the glamour shirt to be on display on this year's red carpets and speaking of red carpet April you and I both. It's had our very first red carpet experience last month when we attended the iheartradio podcast awards. Yes and I will have to. I have to say getting ready for that stuff. Takes a really long time. I had no idea. We're inheriting makeup literally. Our it was very fun. Yeah it it was very fun so you're going to hear a little bit more on our first fashion history mystery of the season where we talk about all things red carpet including our favorite picks from this year's red carpet and an interview with Bronwyn cosgrave. Who is the author of the book made for each other which is an in-depth behind the scenes? Look at the history the of red carpet fashion so the Academy Awards dates back all the way to the nineteen twenties but the first films are being made as far back as the eighteen ninety s so the movies being produced ladies for over one hundred and twenty years you know. I think we should probably preface this episode by saying this is only intended as an overview of very huge topic like Jain enormous topic. Yeah I mean it's so big that we've chosen to focus almost entirely on the relationship between fashion as as it relates to American Hollywood films and for the most part I mean there will be a few exceptions and even by narrowing our discussion. There are still so many fascinating winning stories and players involved with a subject that it is impossible to cover them all in one episode. And that is why we are bringing you to yes and as you said. Casas is a huge topic and there are many different angles which we could look at the intersections of fashion and film. Historically of course the most obvious one is the depiction of fashion in film and that is fashionable clothing as costume worn by characters in support of the visual narrative of any given plot and this fashionable clothing can be worn both in contemporary films. Those intended to be set within the time in which their audience are living now currently when interviewing them and also period films film set in the past so clothing and fashionable clothing at that is one of the most vital production elements in selling link any given period in history it is very central to the quote unquote look of a specific time and place and we have to give many a costume designer props further further historical accuracy over the years but April. I think you would agree that present day fashion is a pretty powerful force and even the best designers have been guilty of implementing unconsciously or not contemporary beauty and fashion aesthetics into their period costumes. So if you look at any number of the westerns from the nineteen sixties for instance instance set in the late nineteenth century. But I can't even tell you how many heating ladies in these films are costumed with bouffant hairstyles eyeliner. They're so good. You know not to mention that these electric colors of their bustle gowns so fashion in film and we're using the term film today because while the majority of the movies were talking about where filmed on film so fashion and film have been inextricably linked since the earliest days of cinema. The I motion picture films were produced at the end of the nineteenth century by the first decade of the twentieth film production had fast evolved into a mass entertainment industry tree. Hollywood obviously as we all know in Los Angeles California was epicenter and the home to over seventy studios and counting by nineteen fourteen and prior to the advent of film. Theatre was a hugely popular form of spectator entertainment. And it was thanks to this medium that that female audiences had long been accustomed to viewing their favorite theater actresses and the clothes they wore as the latest word and chic and and actresses wore high fashion on an off stage and we'll heralded as fashion icons in newspapers. Fashion Magazines and film would prove no different different with its bevy of Silverscreen starlets who would capture the admiration of millions of women audience goers all across the country so with the film industry fast on the rise in the early twentieth century. We see the debut of the first film Fan Magazines such as photo play and Motion Picture magazine. And both of these magazines presented actresses as this fashion trendsetters. And you WANNA go down a rabbit hole. You can go to media history project dot org forward slash fan magazines because they have a huge archive five of keyword searchable magazines on there. So have a blast so far but it will it will take up an entire afternoon. Photo play even had a regular column dedicated to fashion which often featured full-body photographs of actresses so as to best display their entire gowns printed in black can white though. These photographs were accompanied by text. That really detailed the gowns color and fabric for the enquiring reader actress Norma talmadge was featured so often in the fashion section in a photo play that she was even named fashion editor for a short time in nineteen twenty by emphasizing the dress and appearance of these early film stars. These he's magazines played a pivotal role in establishing film actresses as fashion icons. But you may be wondering who was dressing them today. We're all accustomed to the important role the costume designer and Costume Department and Film and Television Production. Obviously what would Miss Marvelous. Mrs Mazel be without Donna and her talented team of assistance. Cutters fitters Taylor shoppers. dyers agers the list. There are a lot the people helping out on those productions. Let's just say Oh. Yeah but actually in the earliest days of cinema. There was no such thing as a costume designer and thus no costume department dedicated educating to produce in costumes for a specific movie so according to costume designer and historian Deborah Landis in her book dressed century of Hollywood costume design. She's actually written quite extensively on the history of Hollywood design. So you're going to hear her name. Come up quite a bit so according to Deborah Producer Adolph Zuqar and director. D W Griffith were among the first to recognize the importance of and need for the professional costume designer. And this was in the nineteen ten's but we still do not see standardization cassation of the costume designer and department until the nineteen twenties so prior to this actors and actresses were largely expected to provide their own wardrobes for contemporary foams. With many I mean those who could actually afford it. I suppose many of these people work directly with their favorite fashion designers to create their specific onscreen. Looks for instance. Paul Poiret as you all know who we adore and love. He designed the period costumes for acclaimed actress. Sarah Bernhardt in the nineteen twelve French film. The loves of Queen Queen Elizabeth. It does not surprise us at all. That far was among the very first fashion designers to embrace the new medium of film as a way to extend. His influence is an advertise his brand although he would never admit it. Of course big neither would contemporary lady Lucille Duff Gordon. Who designed the gallons for the leading ladies for over twenty films between Nineteen Fourteen and nineteen twenty two starting with the perils of Pauline starring? Pearl White I love that AH film And in April nineteen eighteen vote dedicated to page spread to Lucille designs for actress Clara Campbell Young and the Nineteen nineteen eighteen film. The reason why which was written by Lucille sister the famed novelist turned screenwriter. Eleanor Glynn thanks to there's well known collaborations nations. I mean. Is it any wonder that Motion Picture magazine declared that quote motion picture actresses where the latest modes and they declared this in its September nineteen fourteen issue. The article goes on to say that quote women revel in the style of gown much better in the picture show than she can in the pages of some fashion journal but this brings up a very very interesting point April because we all know how quickly fashion can change and what was in fashion when you're designing and then shooting a film while it might have changed I by the time. The film was released six months to a year later. Case in point Lucille's designs for Clara in the reason why might have been presented by vogue as the latest fashions nineteen eighteen. But I know at least one of those designs came straight from her nineteen seventeen collections. Clair West one of the very first screen credited costume designers address address. This very issue in an interview with women's wear daily in December nineteen nineteen according to her fashionable film costumes reproduced thanks to new fashion forecasting which is fascinating. She goes on to say quote. It is particularly difficult to dress characters for the screen when one considers that the close not only must be up to date but they must be several months head of style and you know by designing for the future Claire and other costume designers designers of this time really consider themselves both costume and fashion desires case in point one month prior women's wear daily had interviewed West about the influence silence of Hollywood on fashion in an article titled Motion Pictures To Create New Fashion Center and at the time West was under a seven year contract with the picture and distribution distrubution company. lasky famous players company. Soon to be known as a name. Some of you may recognize paramount pictures quote as for the role which motion pictures plays plays and fashion resort. In Miss West opinion there is no limit West oversaw the designing and making of costumes for the entire film company. So this is no oh small order and she did this in a three story building devoted entirely to costume production just to give you an idea of the size of this costume. Department West fulltime fulltime team consisted of sixty five women including five flower makers ten designers. Numerous seamstresses to Taylor's staff hairdressers. There's a number of assistance quote in this way said West. We have the ideal conditions under which fashions should be created and created. Is the keyword right here because they were not buying you know off the rat clothing cast for both period and contemporary films. The majority of the clothes seen on the stars in Hollywood films were produced made to measure for them in

Hollywood Motion Picture Magazine New Fashion Center Lucille Duff Gordon Ninety Second Academy Academy Awards American Hollywood Oscar Norma Talmadge Bronwyn Cosgrave Miss West Sarah Bernhardt Paul Poiret Eleanor Glynn Jain Casas Clara Campbell Young Los Angeles California Deborah Producer Adolph Zuqar
'Cobb Salad,' 'Poke,' and 'Shave Ice' Added to the Oxford English Dictionary

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

02:04 min | 2 years ago

'Cobb Salad,' 'Poke,' and 'Shave Ice' Added to the Oxford English Dictionary

"Going to jump into the must haves of the month and before that what are we got okay this one doesn't really have anything to do with new foods to try or anything like new products but I thought it was a cool story to share anyways so poky cobb salad and we so your favorite shave ice have all been added to the Oxford Dictionary Nicole Yeah I thought some of these were in the dictionary Oxford so this is this is like the Oxford dictionary that the webster's or the Oxford usually does have like food like is Caesar Salad I'm assuming that's her could be so why did it take so long Ed Cobb I don't know They did that other words though other food related related words they added are simmered and Chewy as a noun and I guess I found out Chewy in Britain is actually slang for a piece of chewing gum so that's why that's now in there and if you're a star wars fan which I am the new trailer came out the other day it looks awesome they've added lightsaber and paddle one so would've paddle on it and that's like a young jet like Jain training the Oxford Dictionary player and simmered has never been in the dictionary what about simmer probably I don't understand feeling dictionary as they didn't have simmered in there we'll shave ice that's two words shaved yeah but they have phrases interesting so their official now Oxford is like the old English kinda dictionary so it's like you know it's more proper proper English if we were in England and you know it would be how the Queen speaks okay I just wonder how changes things for the world or for those words or doesn't think it's all social media ploy this is how they get people talking about the Oxford dictionary maybe because isn't it usually webster's that everyone gets all crazy when they add new words maybe Oxford's like hey why to get all the attention we're going to start doing that and maybe people are paying to get the words in the Hollywood a star on the walk of fame you know you pay like tons of money someone has to like sponsor you and pay and anyway so you think the local pokey shop is is paying conditioning they all paid a dime yeah and the question is which local bookshop because there's like eighteen just around the corner from us now I want

Ed Cobb Britain Oxford England Webster Hollywood Official
Biology, Ethics and a Pair of Millionaires

Science Friction

09:08 min | 2 years ago

Biology, Ethics and a Pair of Millionaires

"Episode I'm joined by Jane Lee who has pretty Mario and Elsa Riaz they to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together but there were a couple yeah that's right also was forty and it was fifty seven and they couldn't do it on their own so in one thousand nine hundred one they decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing called him vitro fertilization and I've e F I mean today creating a baby using ivf is totally commonplace and begin stree- over familiar but this was the early Eighties win the technology and the science was so new that this just was we this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of swim and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds the moment of conception an event that has taken place in natural environment the womb since the dawn of human existence now it comes in gloss and with it a host of problems moral ethical in legal so Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV if that when the couple come here the techniques still very much being susta this is experimental stuff yeah and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University but back then he was the Clinical Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne was very difficult from Queen Victoria Hospital Sova General Hospital and everyone thought that obviously is just a phase wasn't going to work it wasn't an last and that we wasting everybody's time doc doing and collections after to me natural song goes on spontaneous ovulation so it's not unusual to have to collect exit two am four am six I am so we had a lot of opposition and all I v F treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg she created every month if they collected it at the right time it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo if they timed it too late they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here actually getting a baby out of IV of treatment would have been extremely low when the races rocked up in Australia yeah but a talented trio at Queen Victoria Hospital was changing all of that and they were about to put Australia in the the F. history books so I wanted to do the IV if in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to sort of utilize methods that upton animals scientist Alan Trounson originally trained as a bit and he was recruited to the hospital by IVF pioneer car would call would he add made work with John Leyton to develop a totally different system which was using fertility drugs to stimulate the women's we could get more eggs and hints more embryos what happened is is that actually work that was a system that actually work it was a huge leap forward they found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time. and freeze them and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is every stage in artificial auctioning still precarious so in those early days a significant proportion of those embryos just were lost in the phrasing prices will only about the tain percent survive treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for wannabe parents Allen trouncing an and I found the could cope with disappoint but absolutely you know very well let's actually because they understood this was a very early in in terms of the research so the chances of getting outcomes would be very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods of using John and in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the heck did you uh-huh okay so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jain they land in Australia had Elsa Riaz respond VF Treatment Will Gab. Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea just way she was dressed in my she spoke Mississippi very well off ever probably struggling to spend the money Florida's squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight I relatively much more than what they are now and with quite a big deal to come in have a here and leave over here we felt sorry for him and my secretary always suggest to be discounted faithfulness Israel's who've had no idea that they were hard wealthy he remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with but she had good reason to be very hollies triangle they had a terrible history. I guess you've gone through this beforehand and they've pretty stressed to fly over here they had one child who they'd lost done with he was murdered I think we're next Senate confirmed the de tough and rather really came to have another child and if they're only hype that's why they came to throw you both Mario and L. Surreal had children with previous partners but they'd tragedy else's ten year old daughter had only recently died she'd been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that is absolutely horrific so that maintains that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process that's right there was but the process started well three Brioche created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm so they had three chances of success Yup and lied about eleven o'clock midnight on our set evening and she was very dramatic everything was lots of drama so she had her ex collected to a street is beforehand fertilize and they would have developed and we would have chosen the best probably wanting to US Ramdas back which would then be tempted to be frozen suggesting the Million Dollar Question He Elsa Riaz Has three embryos frozen did she get pregnant no unfortunately she didn't Elsa miscarried the first embryo but then rather than try again straight away the reassess headed to Chile in nineteen ninety-three some reports say they adopted a baby there but then the ultimate tragedy flying back to California in crashed Elsa and Mario both died and what they left behind was a massive estate valued at eight million dollars and of course there too remaining embryos the news reached Australia the next year in nineteen eighty four and that's when all hell broke loose in Nineteen eighty-one childless Californian elsewhere and Mario reels came to Milton's Queen Victoria Hospital to join the Ivy if Creole's couple failed in their first attempt to have a child and left Australia leaving behind the two embryos for a second attempt at a later date before the couple could try again they were killed in a plane crash in Chile two frozen embryos in the fridge over nobody knows who is the move who's responsible no one really knew what to do with the Riaz embryos in the early days of Dr Deb Kovacs more first of all we didn't have further ambrose whatever Awadh and secondly we didn't ever anticipate the fact that patients moths all built for young people they're all infertility H it didn't really occur to some of the talk in the early days we had a very simple consent form with no different heading consent form for an operation but soon after that we included consent foam which d the options and the raiders case Jane triggered bid consent Foams but what you found out is that it also unleash these Almighty public debate about the Status frozen embryos and the ethics of obvious I mean this was hard stuff where embryos groups of cells all they something more he is one of the rights for we need a legal guardian who has the interests of these his chew babies at hat and he is the Anglican Church of you is that I've regarded as a positive gift from God that is there is a tremendous new opportunities available in this new technology the Riaz case also demanded lawmakers onto the question when does human life begin and if an embryo was considered to be a person should enjoy the same legal rights as a child but I can two frozen embryos really be as to a

Elsa Riaz Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital Jane Lee Mario Florida Secretary Israel Mississippi Eight Million Dollars Million Dollar Thirty Percent Ten Year Milton
A Deep Dive Into Kelp Killers

PODSHIP EARTH

09:48 min | 2 years ago

A Deep Dive Into Kelp Killers

"This week. I traveled to California's Mendocino county to scuba dive with local. Oh abalone fishermen Jank Lincoln's and Mike Escrow from the California Ocean Protection Council to get a firsthand look the impact that warmer waters lessee the stars and a massive increase in Purple Sia jains a having on everything from Kelp to abalone. I meet up with Mike Escrow. Who's is the marine ecosystems program manager the Ocean Protection Council Luckily for me. Mike's also a dive Mazda a former C. ground fellow and and hold a master's degree from cal State Monterey Bay in Marine protected areas might where are right now. We're here at Pebble beach on the North Coast and Sonoma's county and we're going to go out and try to see some abalone but probably gonNA see a lot of very much kelp unfortunately okay so in front of us. We have this yellow bag and it's got a lot of equipment that quite remember what I'm GonNa do is so well we got right. Here is as we have your scuba tanks so all your errors in here we got your. CD that stands for buoyancy compensation device and so that's going to help you adjust buoyancy underwater as you get a little deeper grier. GonNa add some areas. You get a little shallower. You're gonNA that Samaria out. We got regulator here which we're going to hook up to the tank so that you can breathe underwater. That's important all your rubber. All your neoprene so so that's GonNa keep you nice and toasty in that water which is probably about between fifty and fifty five degrees right now so you'll be glad you have that wetsuit in that best and it sounds like you know what you're doing which which has got because I'm glad I'm here. I hope I know what I'm doing. I've been now instructor for a few years now. So what do we do next should be putting your B. C. D. on your tank so I'm going to show you how you do that. This big strap goes around. How much do we have in this tank so this is this is a steel eighty so so you got eighty cubic feet of air in here dependent on your air consumption. That's probably anywhere between thirty five fifty five minutes air but we'll be checking in judge others air supply as we go through the coal now go ahead and turn it on you can hear it pressure as and we'll test it so most important thing second-stage's. That's purge valves. If you ever get any water you can just press that right. They'RE GONNA go ahead and take a breath. Make sure it's working compressed Air Nice. This is your alternate second-stage right here so that that's just the backup so take breath. This make sure it's working right. I love that first breath of pressure as their morning warning. This is an important piece right here. Here's your console all the data. This is all the data exactly this and piece of data right there. This is how much air you have in your tank and then he got a compass sounds. Jack's going to be doing most of our navigation today but if you want I want you can play around with the compass a little bit and help you navigate under water. We're not going down deep enough or stand down long enough to worry about kind of decompression but it's going to have so that's it. I feel good all right. I feel like I know what I'm doing now. So do we get changed now. I think it's GONNA be easiest to get changed now. Okay so we got booties. They probably go on last well. Maybe the hat goes on last-second. Say here's your suit so this is about seven or eight millimeter state is gonNA keep yeah yeah okay so go ahead and get that on once. You're all suited up. I'm going to do the same okay regret pefect before I go ensued up. I asked Jiang Lincoln's and local resident who's led the campaign to bring attention to abalone collapse and who will be leading today's dive to explain the device is now calibrating okay so I work with reef check which is a volunteer data collecting organization in California and I collect abalone Loni data for them. I measure the sizes of Abalone what I'm showing you. Here are some special calipers designed by Josh Russo who is also also a reef check diver specifically for measuring Abalone so that you can do it quickly underwater and it uses a plastic paper deeper and punches so you punch the paper on this zero location then as you measure abalone you punch and then when you're finished you can take the little piece of plastic paper out and measure all the size of the abalone is very fast very efficient and we can get up to one hundred fifty punches and one tank of air which is about half of what you need and a site to build evaluated super low tech yeah the little holes there yeah so from the histogram of size you can determine the size at maturity and you can determine the spawning potential ratio which is very important important in an abalone fishery okay so now for the moment truth. I have to actually get to freezing border. Okay this moment. I'm actually pretty nervous. I remember the last time I went scuba diving looking at the world fifty feet above my head and realizing that there was actually no way that I could make it out without at and unlike like the Caribbean and the border here murky and freezing okay now. I'm working with from the beach into the ocean. Okay I just was attempting to go down to the ocean floor but it's taking me a while to sort out the the right buoyancy level for this suit and God luckily I had gloves on because we were literally crawling along the ocean floor with our hands and the Purple Patch as far as I can see which admittedly was only about five feet but they I mean they were everywhere we stay down for about twenty minutes being moved around by very strong tidal surges and a lot of the time I talked just completely claustrophobic and directionless took a lot of effort to keep president and not give into fear it also took a while for my Easter just to the pressure which at first was just the pain was so intense and just crazy to painful bear then like magic. It disappeared getting out of the water. I'm filled with just so many emotions excitement to be exiting a very foreign weld Tara at the C. Hitch an infestation gratitude for Mike keeping me safe and the complete Adrenalin high just from being on this adventure then unfortunately we just starting to cough up some blood which I find out later was normal but at the time was just shocking okay mic that that was more of adventure than house quite intense coming in the water. Thank you for being such a good guide lead. Yeah you got it man. Absolutely as a challenging day we had limited visibility at say probably no more than five feet at any given time so pretty green down there and a lot of a lot of water movement so we were. We were blown back and forth pretty pretty good but with us fun it was. I just thought I was I mean I know I am cramp but like I just suddenly be floating floating back and I'm like Mike so when you see where we came out of the warden and you're like there's a lot of said made me feel a teeny bit. That's definitely the surgeon. I've experienced but I'm not a north coast either. I'm a I'm a Monterey diver so it gets it gets way more narrowly up here. So I mean to me is far as the I could see that were purple see the actions I mean it was he couldn't see that but as far as you could see they were everywhere yeah. There were a lot of them down. There and I think the craziest thing for me was just seeing how how how much they'd grazed. I mean they'd you know urgency grazers. They eat plants. They eat algae and they'd grazed everything down to bare rock. So's is pretty much urgency. As far as the I could see I mean I've never heard of them. Described as grazes yeah that's a technical term yeah but they're there and so the sea stars used to eat them mm-hmm and then they will wiped out. Yes exactly so so what happened is the sea stars are one of the major urging predators specially a couple of big species so sunflower stars which are picnic. Odia and giant giant spine stars which are species of highs astor. Those guys got hit really hard by sea star. Wasting disease started in twenty thirteen thirteen twenty fourteen really wipe those guys out and so without those natural predators to keep him in check. The purple urging just exploded so quickly though I mean like the timeframe Yo Tokiwa Matt is just kind of like often I think about climate changes slowly moving in like this has happened quick. Yeah I mean this is this is pretty much instantaneous. Ania on a on an ecological scale which is really

Mike Escrow Jiang Lincoln California North Coast California Ocean Protection Co Ocean Protection Council Mazda Program Manager Mendocino County Second-Stage Pebble Beach Monterey Caribbean Sonoma Grier Instructor Ania Josh Russo Jack
"jain" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"jain" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Blocked by John Jain. Lisa lacerra, Fox News. The Trump administration policy returning asylum seekers to Mexico put on hold but not right away. Fox's Steve Rappaport has more live. Lisa judge. Richard Seaborg delayed enforcing his order until Friday to give us officials chance to appeal. The lawsuit filed on behalf of eleven Central American migrants, and legal advocacy groups say the Trump administration is violating U S law by not adequately evaluating the dangerous migrants face in Mexico families seeking asylum. Typically, get released in the US while their cases worked through the courts. President Trump argues sending migrants back to Mexico eases the strain on an immigration system that he describes as maxed out Mexicans and children, travelling alone are exempt from the new policy. Lisa steve. Outgoing homeland security secretary cures to Nielsen says she continued to support President Trump's policy of security of the US Mexico border and her first public remarks since her resignation sin. The majority leader Mitch McConnell thanked her for her service during Nielsen provided experience and study leadership her grasp of the issues and dedication were major asset for department at is a result for our country, then democratic leader Chuck Schumer calls her tenure a cruel chapter on which the agency follow through on President Trump's worst impulses regrettably, her full embrace of the child separation policy leading to thousands of children being ripped away from their families Nielsen's resignation was announced yesterday. Actress Felicity Huffman among the wealthy parents accepting plea deals and the massive college cheating scandal was accused of paying fifteen grand daughters. SAT exam fixed. She released a statement saying I am in full acceptance of my guilt and with deep regret and shame over what I have done. She apologized to her family, friends, and colleagues and.

President Trump Mexico us Felicity Huffman Nielsen Lisa lacerra Lisa steve John Jain Fox News Lisa Richard Seaborg Steve Rappaport Chuck Schumer Fox Mitch McConnell President secretary
"jain" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"jain" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Having tremendous success with China. I find Jain frankly, anyways. Be far more than Brian. I think that China is actually much easier to deal with. The opposition party. Oh, well, folks, you can imagine how that went over that went over like a lead balloon that did not sit. Well, that the child calms are more honorable than crying, Chuck and Nancy. That they're much easier to deal with because they're more upfront and honest, then Chuck and Nancy. It's much more productive dealing with the child calms than it is with the Democrats. The media. They were righteously indignant which to me if they'd be consistent. They should've taken that as a compliment the media, loves communists, they idolize communists, in for Trump to think that they're tougher than communist media ought to be proud of that. But somehow for some reason, they're insulted. That a leader is considered to be more upstanding in decent an honorable than lying. Chuck and Nancy. So the the media would just lobbing questions. It was not a formal press conference. And one of the reporters said Mr President, Mr president, given how the meeting went yesterday are you now going to decide to declare a national emergency? Is that the only option laugh? Have the right.

Chuck Nancy Mr President China Jain Trump Brian
"jain" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"jain" Discussed on TechStuff

"Because they had received Jain enormous numbers of stock options, suddenly had to deal with the reality where those same stock options weren't worth the paper they were printed on. It became a point where everything when you're when you're awarded a hundred thousand stock options, but then every stock option is worth less than a penny. It's only is not that big of a reward. Netflix had luckily. Secured additional investments just before this dotcom collapse and they were doing so in anticipation of holding their own initial public offering. But they held off on that obviously because the dot com had so destabilize the market that it was not the right time to try and declare going from a private company to a public company, but it did have enough money to get through this initial slump is around this time that Hastings and a couple of executives including Mark Randolph met with blockbuster executives. And this was the infamous meeting during which blockbuster had the opportunity to acquire Netflix. Netflix is asking price was somewhere in the fifty million dollar range, and that was considered way too high by the executives over a blockbuster. They said, there's no way you haven't demonstrated that you have this value, especially in today's market where we're seeing internet companies go belly up left and right. So John Antioch, oh, the CEO. Uh-huh. Of blockbuster, at the time said, no dice, you don't have the staying power. You probably won't even be in business in a year and so- blockbuster walked away from that deal. Now while that was a setback for net flicks, the team decided to push even harder to get to profitability. The customer retention numbers were looking promising and Hastings said in interviews, the expected by the end of two thousand one that Netflix would have five hundred thousand paying subscribers and that they would become cash flow positive. As a result ended up being a little ambitious. The executive team also made some other big predictions, some of which have sort of proven to be true, but in a different way than what they had necessarily intended back in two thousand one, one of those predictions was that Netflix will become such a popular platform. The independent filmmakers would use Netflix as their production studio. Essentially, they would create films meant to go straight to Netflix is service and bypass studios and movie. Tres entirely to go a different direction than what typically you would see in the industry. And you could argue that we're seeing a lot of that today only now we're looking at it from digital delivery. Now broadband delivery as opposed to DVD's. But the same principle seems to apply. So as a very forward thinking prediction, the web designers, meanwhile, we're working to identify ways to make the online experience more intuitive for new web users because up to.

Netflix Hastings Jain Mark Randolph John Antioch CEO executive fifty million dollar
"jain" Discussed on Final Games

Final Games

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"jain" Discussed on Final Games

"Got me thinking like oh really the only game i need is a c compiler if i have a compiler i can just remake all the games that i really like the tools to make them and then i'm okay but i figured that probably doesn't count either and that's kind of sidestepping the whole thing and i thought really i can make me on c compiler as long as i have the machine code documentation and i was like okay this is a bad thread this way off the beaten path here those like deserted island so i'm not really going to be short on things to do i've gotta go fishing there's probably like birds stay alive i mean we'll talk about the deserted place after this game but yeah you are right you you know you're going to stay alive so they started thinking like really on some level what i'm bringing with me i think is more about music than about a lot of other things the juke books choices we've yeah yeah i think i think the jukebox choice is a pretty strong choice for a lot of reasons but i also i think a lot of the games that up until this point in my life i spent the most time playing are also games that just have incredible soundtracks and i don't think that's a big coincidence and then also part of this part of this listening choices about like i'm a parent of two in a studio co runner and i have no time to play games anymore so this is just like really really like a fantasy this is like what if you could play any game you wanted for as long as you wanted and it's like oh my god what would i even do trying to play go to war right now before it gets spoiled to i'm trying to lead and this how people find the time to even play like a single player game for like the let alone a jain novus.

jain novus
"jain" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"jain" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

"Give her his kidney but also in a new report i saw they're claiming oh they were never even that serious to begin with a couple of he was much more into his career that's what they're claiming that's what team selena says shamas jain okay and to put that album on i guess at your truth than what not but you know it's going to be a headline it just it really is tossing a big chunk of mutt he thinks she did a dirty he must be so pissed and something must have went on to release that because i think it takes you gotta sack up when you're going to say stuff like that to a girl that's beloved a and b damn near dot that it's a wild story when you dig into it in other wild news and we don't need to spend too much time talking about it just because we don't have too much yeah i think that i know we gotta raise through we had so much i still have so much stuff we'll just race through the oh my god there was that whole wild corey feldman drama if you missed it he got stabbed allegedly now we did the cops called bs yes that's the police say that they found no last rations on his body but then he shared a photo like this little tiny hole he thinks he may stab by syringe how about this casper the friendly ghost stabbed him that's what i i'm not a conspiracy theorist but it may be heath hiv positive and just come cockpit that whole thing because of shame and like oh as a way to like den down the line ceo i've got hiv idaho no i mean holy hell away to take that to the worst place for peres i mean why else would you say you were stabbed at this rate.

selena shamas jain ceo peres corey feldman idaho
"jain" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"jain" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"To try and fix this problem what we got a lot more aerodynamics knowledge now particularly through computational fluid dynamics and big science like that there is an idea you can employees some of this new knowledge to carry out design tweak sony super sonic aircraft which will quantum bits of it now there is doing this at the moment and he 2021 hopes to fly a small airplane that has for instance a a very long thin knows ritual penetrate the air better and hopefully reduce a sonic boom there and have you seen jain's blended into the bodywork all of that they think may reduce the sonic boom to something like a low thought a sonic thought a sonic thought okay a k however there is a aerospace engineer in california and a group of colleagues who think that they can actually get this too must disappear completely by taking these modifications even further can can you tell us a little more about what they're doing yeah one of the things they're doing is is having the engines mounted well ford of the wing that could be on a boom on the site of the fuselage shockwaves from the wing then would be reflected off the exhaust plume that's coming out of the back of the jet engines that plume as well could be a tinkered with have a slowermoving layer of at the bottom of it which without quieten things down further so that a number of other tweaks around the system they think and they've had some independent tests carried out using 3d modeling could make this a very quiet airplane indeed is the idea to reflect the noise up instead of down today's that what's going on with ldl though is reflecting it up as opposed to being down and then absorb dissolving it and bouncing or abassi making these bout waves so this on it boom blaze bounce off into other directions that rather than into the ground.

jain engineer california
"jain" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

Epicenter Bitcoin

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"jain" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

"So what we do is we actually built aquarium jain's as a separate layer which you can scale you can run a thousand query engines or however many your application needs for performance characteristics in it's a query engines that you're actually issuing your your application quarters into and they will relate transaction data to you're sort of single transact or for your database so that's another important characteristic of how we looked scaled us interesting so at the moment looking at your website it looks like there are multiple stages of how this will be deployed it currently i think you're at this stage where one can deploy this or of internally and have all these features that that we mentioned in an earlier or down the road at some point we'll have the um on the ability to deploy this as a federated live consortium blocked chain safe for like a consortium of insurance companies or banks or something like that and then in the future a further down the line i think the idea is to have a like a public network um that one can use near with any type of application um um talk about the differences i mean if you all these deployments would require different types of consensus race you've gotta fully distributed network that require some kind of consensus near presuming that the validated reserve or a anonymous or synonymous and if you have a more federative model then that requires a totally different epa consensus i have you given any thought yet about what this is going to look like as you deploy these different various types of.

insurance companies epa aquarium jain
"jain" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"jain" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"So what we do is we actually built aquarium jain's as a separate layer which you can scale you can run a thousand query engines or however many your application needs for performance characteristics in it's a query engines that you're actually issuing your your application quarters into and they will relate transaction data to you're sort of single transact or for your database so that's another important characteristic of how we looked scaled us interesting so at the moment looking at your website it looks like there are multiple stages of how this will be deployed it currently i think you're at this stage where one can deploy this or of internally and have all these features that that we mentioned in an earlier or down the road at some point we'll have the um on the ability to deploy this as a federated live consortium blocked chain safe for like a consortium of insurance companies or banks or something like that and then in the future a further down the line i think the idea is to have a like a public network um that one can use near with any type of application um um talk about the differences i mean if you all these deployments would require different types of consensus race you've gotta fully distributed network that require some kind of consensus near presuming that the validated reserve or a anonymous or synonymous and if you have a more federative model then that requires a totally different epa consensus i have you given any thought yet about what this is going to look like as you deploy these different various types of.

insurance companies epa aquarium jain
"jain" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

Off Camera with Sam Jones

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"jain" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

"For instance you know this whole thing about ad living you don't actually paraphrasing is illegitimate rehearsal technique and the and what i mean by that is that you if you know if you read a if you're doing an audition for like you know the soap opera young in the whatever something and you don't like the script and you're like heavens having trouble then what you can do is put it into your own words and and take it off the page and say war would you say you know to be or not to be what would you say well i don't know what to do and what i'm fucking my mom's fuck the myongchol or whatever you say you know you'd bill like he put it in your own words you know i don't know where that a kill you know slipped my throat or so you so you then go back to the taxed and then you say the text uh and that's paraphrase and that's a legitimate uh rehearsal technique that that is was meisner uh i guess came up with is a you learn how to have all the since behind your own words he put those young jain's exactly and as if would be something and as if is a substitution of particular is asian where you go you know okay you going to do this scene it's it's it's um you got a i was in a movie i played a kkk guy and the guy comes next searcy this actresses well that's it you know our kids on that uh they will have black kids go to our school you know and um and i can't really relate to that i know but it to me the director said you know it's as if your son has cancer so that's in particular is asian that's a substitution her will we call in as if it's as if your son has cancer so i can't i don't care you know i don't care i went to an interracial quit school me sam sure so i can really relate to that so that particulars eishin that as if is helpful right so you don't have to do some magic trick of i'm suddenly going no like deal that way and yeah if i'm playing hitler.

jain director
"jain" Discussed on Plus 7 Intelligence

Plus 7 Intelligence

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"jain" Discussed on Plus 7 Intelligence

"What's that we had to present at the end he was he had a bunch of s like djeddai quotations like uh quite gone jain's um always remember your focus determined to reality we talking to uh antic injuring the um the phantom menace so i just got really i was like wow you know i can combine my love for star wars with all this mindfulness this sort of mindfulness movement that that i'm experiencing right now and and i'm really throwing myself into and it just made sense i was just like you know why don't why don't i turn this into a website so that i can share with other people i'm sure there's other soon benefit from it and in others tons of star wars fans out there so um you know i'd love to connect with as well and and teach how to have a better minds forget the talking about the mindset stuff in a minute but the first i wanna know you have kind of a story of how you sorta switched your your main fandom from lower the ranks than star were so can you tell me about that yes absolutely so you know i haven't always been the a a huge star wars fan of actually grew up owes introduced to a geek the geek world with the game called heroes question as fantasy setting and then i got into my stepfather introduced me to the hobbit and you know that led me to lord of the rings in love the lord of the rings i played fantasy base word games that sirat emulated lord of the rings but it was uh it was rather recently actually that i started playing the x wayne measures it's star wars x wing miniatures game fantastic.

jain