17 Burst results for "Jade Clarke"

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"That he thinks that. Pierre romaine always looked at this. As j just given up the car, he shouldn't have pulled a gun and these John's phrase, why did you make me kill you? And that's how he's been able to live with it. I think so you know, if you would've just gone along with the program Jade Clarke, you wouldn't have been hurt. But when you pulled that weapon on knee, and he turns it around he's now the potential victim in this thing. Now, legally, it doesn't you don't buy that from a legal sense. You don't buy that. That's not the way it is. But from peers mindset, it probably was in John nails. At Johns got a great read on people in. It went great way of putting things. And so I think that's really accurate, and he also is convinced himself and tried to convince anybody around him that the blood on the sidewalk. Basically, you know, eliminates him as a suspect and a dozen at all. When I talked to prosecutor Tanaz MCI of about the verdict was in her office in the hall of Justice across the street from the courthouse back when is a reporter, the hall Justice was occupied by the sheriff's department and the eleven floor is part of the jail. He was an old and crumbling building. The elevators still had human. Operators is all been beautifully renovated now in the eleven floor is where the offices of the DA's major crimes unit are located Kaya small crowded office still has a steel security window leftover from his previous life as a jail. He looks down. What had been the enclosed wreck yard of jail. I believe it was a absolutely long overdue and just verdict. If I didn't believe it I wouldn't have prosecuted. I Wade out detective who take their cases personally. And they they're smart enough. To know they have to get personally involved the at the angry, and so forth to get the what they need to carry a case through and it creates a certain fierceness. And I think I connected view when I saw fierce you are in a courtroom. So I wanted do you have a philosophy about that? Do you need? Take your cases personally in order to build the fire. Do what you have to do. You know, bring fierceness you need to bring. I'm not sure I look at it as taking it personally. But I'm passionate about it on passionate about the cases. If I believe in the case, I mean, I don't do. A case onsite believe in the case. I will have them reassigned. If I don't believe in it or say dismiss it or whatever it is that we can do. But the ones that I have an I take to trial. I'm just passionate about and I guess you can translate that passion into being making it personal. But I'm not sure it's personal. It's just passionate both about the victims about the fact of making this person that's done whatever the crime is pay for the crime that he committed or she committed when this case, what was it that made you passionate 'cause I know John Lewin work on it for while in any couldn't do it. You were brought into. With something. He said, I went that keister. Did they say take this case? And then how do you get that passion? When when you're you're almost road into. Yeah. It wasn't one where I said I want that case. From what I understand it came into this unit because of the relationship that John had with the original detective on the case. And so came into major crimes ordinarily would have stayed in hardcore was again case, and I had just come out of hardcore. So it wasn't one of these cases where I thought, oh, I gotta have that case, but John Lewis and ended up doing darst's and some of his cases were doled out to other people, and I was a newcomer to the unit. So I got the case. And so yes, it was what we would call here kind of a hand off type trial. But when I started looking at the case and seeing how long it had taken. And how many what appeared to me to be gamesmanship on? How things kept getting continued in turn his changing. And when I got to talking to the other victim in the case, the surviving victim in the case. And the mother of. Of the actual deceased victim. In the case. I got to. Feel some of the injustice that was happening. I think that that field. Some of my passion for hey, we got to do something for this case. Defense. Attorney Winston McKesson obviously disappointed by the verdict in a phone. Call told me that he felt the joy deliberated the verdict out all the evidence. The defense to present. It was clear us talking about the third party culpability case that was disallowed by the judge. I respect judge Piller, I respect such pillar high. But I agree with multiple rulings. Ebay, and I believe. Hey, the judge made rule differently. The verdict could've been differently. We talking about the third party clip ability multiple things that me Jerry was crazy. I would say that. No. You know, these people these people putting a lot of time, and they went missing very close to the what I do think we were we are allowed to explore areas that I thought were right footed. Meanwhile, let's get back to the courtroom. After the verdict was read in department one of six judge fiddler set a sentencing date for the fall twenty seventeen. Let like everything else's case. Things would not go scheduled we're anticipated even from a cell at the county jail. Pierre romaine was not finished gaming the system. You might think that the verdict point and end and closer to this case, but think again. We'll get into what happened next week's chapter Justice delayed. I'm

Pierre romaine John Jade Clarke John Lewin hall of Justice John nails DA John Lewis Johns j Ebay Tanaz MCI prosecutor Piller Winston McKesson reporter Jerry darst Attorney
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

09:47 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Early on drives. Skid. School. Warm. You were people harassed by members. Job. The man on the witness stand in the neatly press suit and speaking in a calm and clear voice sounded nothing like the man on the wiretap recordings from two thousand and three for that matter the man described as a cold blooded killer. The one who spoke about taking care of business up close and personal. I was taken aback, and I think the joy may have been as well. It was almost like romaine was two different people Kesse walked him through his early life the private schools, he attended before graduating from high school and joining the air force and his subsequent assignment as a military. Police officer. Onto mice. Rose. As you've already heard we'll continue to hear throughout this trial. There's a lot of discussion and questioning and testimony about whether romaine was a gang member. And when he was a gang member, and how long he was a gang member, and seemingly every possible permutation of gang affiliation. And the whole time. I'm wondering why why does it matter isn't the point of the trial to determine if remain fired the shots kill j Clarke back in nineteen eighty seven. What does it matter? Whether he was again member at the time of the shooting or anytime after I ask detective Rick jets, and what was so important about establishing Pierre remains history as a gang member. Okay. One thing that I think it'd be explained to me if not our listeners is there's so much going on in this trial about whether romaine was a gang member or not on the night that Jade Clarke was murdered. And I don't get it. I mean, why is it so important to prove he? A gang member has nothing to do with the charges. He's charged at first reading worder with the use of a firearm, and that would be the same. Whether he's a gang member or use a priest. So why is there so much expanded by the prosecution on proving gang member? Why is it the defense attorney McKesson in his opening arguments that yelling, it's not a gang case. This is not a gang crime. What's what's the deal there? I would say two things first of all it goes to motive gang members. Do carjackings matter of fact, when I was a young officer, probably even a young detective, there was even a criminal penal code section for carjacking was just part of being a robbery to eleven P C eventually they came so prevalent, especially because of gang members that were doing these type of things in the city that in California specific penal code section was added specifically for carjacking. So it goes to. Mode of gang members, did these type of things priest use it on have a great desire to steal a car at gunpoint to to get a ride. So this is a gang member kind of symbolic type of thing. And secondly. This trial was going to be from a defense standpoint painting is positive picture of romaine as this possibly troubled youth a little bit that totally turned his life. Ran and became a police officer and was going to really focus on the positives of what he had done with his life post, killing Jade Clarke. So if they're going to put that out there, you can't just accept it without painting other side of the picture that it's his long history of being a pretty notorious gang member that was involved in violent crime. And actually what we found out that he was still playing that role in his moments when he least expected to have anybody listening to them, you know, he was talking to a fellow gang member or fellow gang members on the phone and talking the talk and. Acting the act of being still a gang member all the while posing by day as a, you know, a successful police officer. So the prosecutor MCI off was trying to balance the books in anticipation of the defense putting on this. Glowing portrait like how could just got me a murder when he's been a police officer, and he's made cases and so forth. Right. And that was the that was the the great take from those wiretaps was what we heard on those wiretaps is the way he talked that the subject matter of the drive bys vs walkup shootings and taking care of business. I mean, this is powerful stuff and it's going on. Why he allegedly wonderful police officer had glowing reviews by his supervisor. So you act one way maybe in public and when other. People are around. But this was probably the greatest test of what kind of character. This guy really was because these like, I think you mentioned unguarded moments when he's on the phone to a friend and talking the way he talked about the things he talked about. So you don't want to allow them the put on Dr Jekyll if you don't get to show, Mr Hyde. Correct. Just sitting here. I just realized that I think I'm drawn to this case, it must have been a subconscious thing I'm drawn to this case because I can trace back my own ultimate desire to be a writer of crime fiction to a carjacking involving shooting. When I when I was sixteen years old. I was in my car late at night. And I saw a guy running and I saw him hide a gun. And I was so curious about it. I after he ran away. I I pulled over and went to this hedge where I'd seen him hide something and I pulled out. This gun and pretty soon a lot of police cars descended in the area. And I told them what I saw and so forth, and it turned out that a little bit up the street a couple of blocks up the street. They're just been at carjacking and also back then the carjacking was not a term. It was an attempted robbery of some man in a car and he too was shot in the driver's seat. And I spent a night with detectives and police station. I did a description of the guy I saw and so forth, and I got really fascinated with detectives after that. And I started read I I started reading a newspaper to see if they ever caught the guy. I I know the guy was a victim was alive on that night. And then I have watching the paper to see if he passed away or anything like that. And they never caught the guy's never called into being a trial or anything like that. But that fascination with detective let me to reading detective novels and then eventually led. Me to wanting to write detective novels, and now here I am talking about a a case in Los Angeles about a carjacking gone bad. And you know, I guess I should have seen that the that two things adding up, but I it just occurred to me that this is why fascinated with this case. So back to the mode of in the Pierre romaine trial while it is not required that the prosecution prove motivation in order for joy to convict in. Nonetheless is vital to provide the joy of all aspects of a case to Mana case here that says this man killed this other man, but we don't know why that is a really risky move. It's all about reasonable doubt in trial. And if you can't provide the motive for Klein, then that leaves a hole in the case that could easily be filled with doubt. So establishing romaine is a gang member goes to motive again is a criminal enterprise its members commit crimes, including carjacking and murder. So if you can establish the romaine was gang member when this crime occurred, then you're stabbing mode of the flip side to this is the defense if they can prove or even suggests that remain was not a gang member on the night of the murder, the new undercut the motive in this case. So this is why there was so much focus placed doing this trial in Romains gang history. And so much dispute about it. Now, let's get back to the testimony upon being discharged from the air. Force. Pierro remain returned home got a job at a car washes, head of security and applies. Both LAPD in LA county sheriff's department for a job he said, he. Wanted to be a law enforcement officer. He had taken the LAPD's written tests and physical exam and was waiting to be called in for an interview on the Nightshade Clark was shot with all these preliminaries out of the way McKesson got down to attacking the evidence against his client. I where the scar on pier remains right forearm scars from the wounds left in the summer of nineteen eighty seven.

Pierre romaine officer Jade Clarke murder McKesson LAPD j Clarke Rose Rick jets Romains attempted robbery Pierro Los Angeles LA county Kesse prosecutor attorney Nightshade Clark Dr Jekyll
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"And we'll look an evidence of ones that parade that he knew this addiction, but his brother school. Castlemed to army. There's no evidence that the road was involved. And it's the brothers cordless again away. The brother. Script. Avocation? He was working fulltime, Jeff he was going to rain. Trained for the. About his trade as a loose. The show that this is not this is if everything about this with all of this. I mean, the people today should search for. Washing all the people looking for to win. We can trace heating Jerusale. We didn't go back to the people have been. All. I just. They're just looking good. This case will reject about this. Recall. To me just offense suggest when? They just wanted to sit down and say we. To me. This was a dramatic turn in trial. It was big stuff. It seems as though McKesson had found a potentially viable pathway towards reasonable doubt. Remember the prosecutor s to win over all twelve of the jurors defense attorney only has to win one because if you can get one to hang jury and mistrial is declared then you're Victoria's your clients out on bail in the prosecution has to decide whether to go through a trial again to admit defeat. There's a lot of things that can happen. So it's an interesting situation when you get to a trial the prosecutor has to win twelve mines the defense attorney would like to win twelve mines, but only has to win one to be successful. On top of all that. I'm sure you picked up the edge McKesson voice. It's getting personal in department one of six, and this is almost guaranteeing that there will be fireworks between the defense and prosecution before the case was over. And something else I should put on the podcast record year McKesson in his anti prosecution. Comments mentioned that this win at all costs that he was seeing when all the way back to the jury selection when pre sure you've referring to a couple of incidents that occurred during that process in the early days of the case, you will get into all that after word from our sponsor. This episode of murder book is brought to you by novel suspects novel suspects as website newsletter. The lines up the best coverage of the world of mystery thrillers, including books television, podcasts and movies, then delivers it right to your laptop tablet phone or in box novel suspects hawks to the biggest names in the John row Lee child. David dodgy, Sandra Brown, alpha Burke, and Harland cove and to name a few to find out what books they are reading shows. They're been watching and their latest true crime podcast. Obsessions wonder if they have listened to murder book yet, the even interviewed me Michael Conley? If you times, you can find all this and more novel suspects dot com slash murder book again, that's novel suspects dot com slash murder book. Okay. Let's get back to the case. So first off the actually had to pick yours in this case twice. The first effort was abruptly scrapped when an unusual Currence happened doing a break in the deer as Joyce elections called a clerk working for the DA's office, inadvertently viewed defense, attorney McKesson note, some perspective juror selections and rejections that were left visible on the defense table while he was out of the courtroom when the clerk reported this to the prosecutors. The judge was then notified in a hearing was called to determine if the breach was serious enough to cause the process start over. Kayak didn't wanna put any kind of potential cloud on the subsequent verdict in the case. So the prosecutor made a motion to began all over again with a new pool of jurors judge fiddler agreed in the process began again, the next round of jury selection was interrupted again this time when McKesson accused Mikhail of improperly rejecting a potential juror who is an African American woman. He claimed that the prosecutor was trying to keep African Americans off the jury remember both the victim and accused in this case where black so this was not necessarily Kasim playing the race card. It was more like he's playing the LAPD card if he asked me, and the indication was that he would be attacking the credibility of LAPD in its investigation. I mean, I think it's well established at the African American community in Los Angeles. Most likely all cities in the United States would hold a higher level suspicion and distrust of the police based on decades of neglect unequal, law enforcement and. Shootings of unarmed citizens and so on so the more people with this possible viewpoint McKesson could get on the jury the better chances at a hung jury or even an acquittal. So he called Mikhail on it and the accusation led to what is called a Wheeler hearing in which McKay off had to justify dismissal of the juror. What she told the judge was that a juror in question had smiled at McKesson when she was seated for questioning, but then leered at her McKay off indicating a bias that caused the prosecutor to dismiss her. The story was backed by detective Mitzi Roberts who is seated next to MCI off at the prosecution table during the process, she told the judge that she did not see the women Lear MCI. But that the prosecutor had immediately turned and whispered to her than it just happened. After hearing that the judge ruled that there had been nothing improper about the prosecution's dismissal juror. Now back to the defense case McKesson revealed more the intended defense strategy to court zeroing in on those mystery blood drops that were found on the sidewalk next Jay Clark's car on the night of the killing. I. Eight. Which? Victims. Which was excluded from this. Because the blood type is responsible Maine's. Law so excluded from the Victor because he's. Well, we. With blood type. His wife all. How? She knows because their son was ill. And they was ability that you made flooded into blood typing. And that's when they show both. So he was a suitable blood force. Type at the city, and we just found that match on on. As a. The fly in the moment for the new defense strategy was this McKesson needed direct evidence that Andrea was killer. The judge repeatedly warned the defense attorney that third party cope ability at its own burden of proof and that much needed link was not going to be built on hearsay or merely. The fact that the getaway vehicle may belong to Andre judge fiddler wanted a direct link between Andre the killing with the jury would not hear the defense's contention that he was indeed that killer. So in a trial four zero to hearing a hearing outside the jury's presence is seemed in this trial, at least on defense case that nearly everyone of the defense witnesses had to be vetted. I in a four zero two. So the judge could hear what they were going to testify to and decide whether that was proper for the jury to hear MacKenzie. Initial witness was his DNA expert. Jessica Beckham who has I examined in a four zero two before being allowed to testify in front of the jury after jurors were seated she proceeded to simply echo, the testimony of the prosecution's expert in regard to it being impossible to tell if the DNA found on the bullet and match to peer remain, come from the blood on the projectile or the fiber that was attached to it next McKesson wanted to put Pamela romaine back on the stand in front of the jury. But I she was examined in a four zero two. She testified at the brothers romaine where often at odds with each other and fought. But she said Andre was a drug dealer in a car thief revealing that he committed a carjacking back in nineteen Eighty-three stealing a Cadillac from a woman at gun point. He ended up in jail for that. But as she described the crime sounded similar to what had happened on Highland avenue in nineteen Ninety-seven with Jade Clarke, but the defense attorneys efforts to use Pamela to establish that Andres blood type was oh like those mystery drops on the sidewalk we're turned away. Hearsay? The judge wasn't going to just let her say my husband, my ex-husband. Now, dead husband was typo. He wanted medical records or something like that. And McKesson wasn't in a position to at least provide those yet those blood drops and Andres potential connection to them would haunt this case for months after this trial was over at the end of the hearing fiddler told the cast and he had not reached the needed threshold for third party culpability. He ruled the Pamela remain with not be allowed to put. In front of the jury and to say much of what she just said doing the 4:02 hearing. It was a blow to the defense.

McKesson prosecutor attorney murder Andre LAPD Pamela romaine Jeff Los Angeles Maine United States Jade Clarke Mikhail McKay Harland cove Mitzi Roberts Michael Conley Currence Victoria
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"All. She just very his could've been that thing. Could the fabric on? I'm sure to remind the court of the special jury -struction second service Angeles since. Angeles is two or more read more Turkish vans. One point one point. Jer. Doubt interpretation is consistent with and jet. One. Invert tation sector. Is that came from the fabric? But not that they separate Tisch. Six. That was. Slip back somewhat. Then split was to be tested. It could. So the people's position is the getaway on my mind. My one had access access to belong. The argue that Mark line. Hussein prince for on the passenger side. Well known this. But he was a good friend of. Patrician? Talk about that. And. Told the court that this new strategy came up during the break in the trial found that kind of curious because it seemed like the underpinnings of had been laid doing prosecution. I guess it means that the defense attorney just happened to ask the right question or the key question of Catherine Lisi at the end of testimony doing the prosecution's case. Leg. Lawyer. I'm going to go back to that. And refresh your memory by playing it again. So you can buy the. What does that tell you does tell you? Whether you got to DNA from the tissue. Combination vote or. The mind there to determine if the bible reading the fires in combination. With McKesson just being thorough in his cross examination. Or was this defense strategy already brewing? Regardless that one question asked during the prosecution's case open the door to a key part of the new defense strategy of third party culpability McKesson was clearly going to attempt to mount a case that would hold that Andre was the shooter and that on the night of the killing he was wearing his brother peers close. And that when Jade Clarke fired at his killer, the bullet passed through those clothes, and that's how peers DNA ended up on the bullet without him even being there. You've probably heard of touch DNA where we're talking about something called wearers DNA here you wear a jacket in some of you stays behind on the fibers of that jacket when you take it off. Still it seemed like a long shot defense, no pun intended. And prosecutor MCI off was quick to say, so. Acts. Shows. Sean. It is. Yes. It was. People. Get. Let's see. England. The castle was fully expecting the prosecution's response. That there was insufficient. Blood on bullet to the tight war. Guy there. That he. Beijing. In causes damage. Bye. From the fabric alone. Then. Roller Wardi, Jack. What is that his brother own what they? Will come into evidence is his brother was an active member. What is that? His brother was also Carthy. And will come in. He is his brother. Justify two big injuries. And

Hussein prince Carthy McKesson Angeles Andre Jade Clarke Beijing Mark line Catherine Lisi Jack prosecutor attorney Sean England
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Just a heads up. This episode contains explicit language in subject matter. Not suitable for young listeners. I'm just frustrated on suffering unto so frustrated. I don't know what else to say. But I never had this happen. There's nothing more interesting in vital than sitting in a courtroom and watching the drama of Justice played out for real. I loved it. When I was a reporter. I love it when I drop in on trials to do my research for books, and I loved it when I could get in and see some of the trial involving romaine there's a visceral feeling to it. The stakes are always high, and you feel that in your chest. Even if you were just a casual observer people's freedom and reputations are on the line, our belief in the Justice system is on the line. It's the arena where society decides what is right, and what is wrong, what is acceptable. And what isn't and punishment is meted out in moments that are as harsh as the echo office lambing steel door, you sit in a courtroom and watch a trial, and you realize pretty quickly that this isn't like TV or the movies. This is real. There's something about it. That's not captured properly or completely or accurately in those kind of popular modes of entertainment. California versus Piero main the case had all this intrigue and alive is started coming to the surface as the case progressed tempers, flared and accusations were made. Email. I wanted of what? I'm talking. Symbolise and giving late or epochs about Alex. I ethics. Oh, yeah. I have an ethics. When the lawyers are calling each other names, you know, the passions are high the stakes are even hired. I love this stuff. And it goes right in the memory banks for the next Lincoln book. I right. Now, we're in the middle of the trial. The prosecution has rested its case and the defense is about to start as defense attorney Winston McKesson with fine of saying, there's no pancakes thin enough that it doesn't have two sides. Well, we're going to get into romaine side of the pancake. Now, I'm Michael Conley? And this is murder book. Insane. Until everything wanting. With something. Thank you to this week sponsor the website novel suspects. When I'm not writing about police detectives, I'm often writing about a defense attorney Mickey Haller he's known as Lincoln Moyer because he works out the back seat of Lincoln towncar. He was inspired by a real attorney. I met at an LA dodgers baseball game almost twenty years ago. We were just sharing small talk. And he mentioned he was a lawyer. Then he mentioned he worked out of his car. And then he was very quick to say this is not because I'm a failed attorney or because my career is on the skids. He said it was because it was the best way to do it. He explained that LA county there were forty different courthouses and four hundred miles of freeway and being mobile gave them an edge. It gave them an advantage. Other attorneys didn't have so he's sort of a half case. Bill travel sort of guy any courthouse any case. Anyway, when I took that and created the Lincoln lawyer book series, it kind of filled an interest, I've had almost all my life. I've always love stories about the law and about trials, and I guess this goes back to my reading of tequila Mockingbird. When is twelve years old? I often think that if I had not become a writer. I would probably go into all in maybe become a criminal defense attorney. But now in a way, I get to be a writer and to practice law, homey in the pages of fiction. I covered a fair number of trials. When is a journalist the first one, I actually had a personal connection to. It was the trial of a well-known doctor in the community. And he was from the neighborhood where I grew up, and he was charged with dealing drugs out of his practice every day. I sat in the courtroom and watch the trial and the doctor son who my age, and I knew from the neighborhood attended as well. So it was kinda strange. I didn't feel like I was the unattached journalist supposed to be. And when the doctor is found guilty, I have to admit I felt guilty myself because I had to go over like an intruder and asked the family if they wanted to comment. Anyway, many other trials followed murder trials mostly because they were what made news they all help. Give me the foundation I needed for. What would later become the Lincoln Moyer book series? And I think the lesson I've learned over the years in both reality and fishing is that the most interesting trials are interesting for what happens outside of the courtroom, where at least outside the view and hearing of the jury this is where you see them anew Garing, and the misdirection that happens before the jury is even in the box. It's where deals are made in the seeds of drama and character planted. I love seeing the gamesmanship and sometimes out now anger the flares between lawyers and on occasion. The judge is well. But then of course, it all gets sealed hermetically sealed behind the facade of civility when the jurors enter and take their seats in the box and the judge and everyone else smiles at them. Let's go back to the Jade Clarke case, the defense appear romaine began with the series of surprises right off the bat before the joy was even brought in defense attorney McKesson announced to the judge and the prosecution that he was going to pursue a new angle of defense.

attorney Lincoln murder Lincoln Moyer LA dodgers Winston McKesson Garing LA county writer Jade Clarke romaine reporter baseball Michael Conley Alex McKesson Piero California
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Reminiscent of the way Jade Clarke was killed. But tell me legal going through their hitting advised Sanders ship, so not not a ride on. We got from a different cloth. They still doing dry card will operate like that get up close hersal until you're busy. Jackson was the prosecution's last witness to take the stand. But before he stepped down. He was questioned by McKesson who managed to score several points for the defense. Are you aware of? Recover from. Big call comes back to the air will. Well, you know, as I would say. Cussing but best game. No. We here. Our your ways blood? Same. This. Switch through there. Entropy? You're looking for is a. Hand associated we. Is big. A. Associated with the bullets filed in this. Appear. Because you kill us for Yury of how all in this room as whole. Air from five thirty in the morning. And. At eight fifteen so. Probably two and a half hours by the time when we actually to into a half hour of search. Two thirty. Have you ever locate? He. A show. This remains the metal. For gunshot. We should heard. Hugh. Thank you. Romanies home of door. That you so. With fabric. Final year. Circulations? The answer the answer, sandy. Mckesson definitely scored some points with his dwelling on what the prosecution was missing from its case. And I also had to wonder about the decision to play wiretap conversations to the jury. Yes, they present Pierro main in gang mode. If you will there seemed to be no doubt about that. But they also gave him the opportunity to question the evidence in his own words, and suggests that this was a racially motivated framing. Remember, a defendant is not required to testify in trial. And at this point. We don't know if romaine will ever take the stand in his own defense. But even if you should elect not to he's already in effect, the charges in these recordings that were made when he was on unguarded telephone calls that could be significant it seemed to support McKesson opening statement where he said no point does he acknowledged this crime. I guess that's why courtroom dramas have always appealed to me from the Killa Mockingbird to the Lincoln lawyer attorneys are putting high stakes positions where they have to weigh the wrist versus the rewards of any potential move. They make but this case was real life. Not fiction DNA evidence strong witness testimony, and those wiretaps the prosecution's case was now complete because of a scheduling conflict, but MCI off it would be twelve days before the case would resume in during that high eighties. The defense would come up with a strategy that they hoped would answer and explain the evidence against peer romaine and even point a finger at someone else. It was a surprise strategy that would increase tensions between the lawyers in the courtroom. Frugal and giving late for you. The ethics of alley. Dive into all that next week in episode seven. Mike conley? And you've been listening to murder book. I wanna thank our sponsors as well as our police consultant with Jackson, Tim, Marsha Mitzi Roberts. I also wanna thank to honorable judge. Larry p fiddler for letting us record the trial. Murder. Book is produced an edited by terra Langford who also sat through every moment of the trial with a pair of digital recorders. Grace Kelly provides a music, including our theme song by the grave additional music by pon five and premium beat post production and editor services provided by fan and additional editing by Jason Kane. Lasso? Thank you Joe and Mike AM studios in Tampa. To see photos from

McKesson Jackson Jade Clarke romaine Yury Murder Sanders terra Langford Grace Kelly Jason Kane Pierro Mike AM studios Mike conley Hugh Larry p Tampa MCI Marsha Mitzi Roberts Lincoln consultant
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Murder book. Now, let's get back to the case. The prosecution police felt confident that they would now be able to counter any claim by Romain that he had killed Jade Clarke in an act of self-defense. It would seem that they were now locked and loaded from trial. But that was still not the case. There were the usual problems mounting co- case prosecution finding witnesses memories fading challenges to the preservation of visible evidence etcetera. Plus there was also the delicate issue of race that had to be taken into consideration. Going back to that month of wiretaps LAPD had collected several times in those tapes. Romaine posits the belief that the investigation targeting him was racially motivated. It just mad that McCain out there like it used to be getting they get caught up like they wanted. They get caught up. You know? This was a big concerns and prosecutors because remains defense attorney at the time was Matt's. Letcher a well-known LA defense lawyer who had clashed with judges in the past about rulings? He believed to be motivated by racial bias in the Justice system. So once again, the wiretaps that were so much a part of the prosecution that would reveal the double life appear remain could also be important tools for the defense because they laid out the strategy of racial bias in the defendants in words and at the same time contain no smoking gun. No unequivocal in mission of guilt. Anything can happen in trial. Any attorney prosecutor defense attorney any of them will tell you that anything can happen and LA in particular has its own history of jury verdicts that didn't quite seem to turn on the evidence. But rather social issues including race. So one more time the prosecution attempted a lengthy plea negotiation with Romain to avoid a trial and during these negotiations to defendant was so confident in his own case that he repeatedly held out for no jail time. When John Lewis told me that I was like, you're kidding. Really no jail time for killing a man during a carjacking. But that was the case. His attorney and his position where will he doesn't wanna go to jail. He wants commission, and I would say to him through his attorney he'd be standing next to us. And I had permission from when I would have these meetings. The attorney and myself and remain. I had permission to speak to remain directly. I would do this right in front of his lawyer. And I would say listen, peer. You heard of this guy. It doesn't matter. How you've lived your life since then there are certain things certain incidents. Certain prior things that happened that you're just stuck with. Okay. You kill this guy. You can have to answer for that. You're not going to get probation. Loon was not surprised by this. He had seen it often in coal cases that he had worked where there were years and years sometimes decades between the crime and the prosecution the suspects often spend many of those years convincing themselves that they did not commit the crime. When you have a cool case, you're stuck in nineteen eighty seven. Right. So Pierre remain in one thousand nine hundred seven who was he. Well, he's young gang members just gotten out of the service. He's out doing these crimes and the peer remain that you end up seeing in two thousand four two thousand ten and two thousand fifteen is not the same person. Now, that's a common situation for me in my cases. Because generally speaking, I have somebody who's committed one crime only one crime, and it occurred many years ago, and they've lived a decent life other than that. And they've spent however many years it's been since the murder they've spent down on a time not just trying to convince others around them. They didn't do it. But literally trying to convince themselves that didn't commit this crime and p. Pierre will main really really was pushing hard as he could even internally trying to convince himself that he didn't do this calling and I would talk to his lawyers, and he would be president. And I would say listen, here's situation. I've got your DNA on the bullet fired from j Clarke. You committed the crime understand. You're not the same guy. You were twenty five years ago. You say now turn out that actually in the midst of all of you know, his police work etcetera. He is still getting caught on wiretaps while he's working as a federal police officer on talking about, you know, shooting drop the N word etcetera. On wiretap. So this is not a guy who has reform sell. This is a guy who is trying to present that he has reformed self and their different things. Nevertheless with the potential issues of trials still there pleading Goshi actions continued on and off for more than a year. And finally settled on an offer that seem to good to turn down.

attorney Romain president j Clarke murder LA John Lewis Jade Clarke McCain Romaine Letcher Loon Matt officer prosecutor twenty five years
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"A quick note to all our listeners this episode contains explicit language and subject matter. I couldn't get this case to trial. He delayed and delayed in delayed in this episode of the telltale board we're going to examine the relentless efforts of detective and a prosecutor to finally get this coal case into court and headed towards that hope for Justice for Jade Clarke, I'm Michael calmly in this is murder book. The terrible for the case. This is a little bit more than we have a couple of questions for him. Peers been allowed to commit murder and live a free man longer than j Clarke was ever even on this earth. And that disgusted me. This episode of murder book is brought to you by Zola Zola is reinventing the wedding registry. Registering planning process to make the happiest moment in couple's lives, even happier to start your free wedding website. And also get fifty dollars off your registry on Zola Goethe's, Z L, A dot com slash murder. Book murder. Book is supported by skill share. Join the millions of students already learning on scale share with a special offer two months of unlimited access to over twenty five thousand classes on skill share for free sign up. Skill shared dot com slash murder book. After being charged with I be murder in two thousand and four the case against Pierro main languished as changed attorneys engaged in protracted clean and Goshi actions and the prosecutor assigned to the case was transferred from one unit to another within the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. The irony here was that some of the best evidence accumulated by the LAPD and the case was part of the cause of the delays. Every time remain chains attorneys. The new attorney had more than a thousand hours of wiretaps to listen to and to get up to speed on. There was also DNA evidence the needed to be examined by the defenses own experts. And all of that was before the lawyers even got to the luminous files on the case that had accrued over the years. By the two thousands the records on the j Clarke investigation filled. Six binders that six murder books in the LAPD Cole case unit. Frustrated by the lack of movement towards Justice for j Clarke in spurred by his promise of long ago. Jay's mother you Launda. Rick Jackson, the lead detective on the case since the night of the killing in nineteen seven went to see his friend. John lewin. A veteran trial attorney in the DA's office who specialized in col- cases. In fact, Lewin who has time was in his mid forties. Had never lost a cold case at trial and this despite the fact that he didn't usually take on the cases ahead DNA matches. He chose the tougher cases. More often built on circumstantial evidence and motive than forensic matches and still he had never lost. His record would result in him being called the king of coal cases. When he was later profiled by Los Angeles magazine, a tough hard nose lawyer who is built like cases, solid Lewin is demonstrative and bounces fists on the table. When he's making a point like you'll. Hear him doing his interview with me. Rick Jackson came to me and says, hey, listen, we please take this case. Honestly, it was not my Khanna case. It was DNA hit in all those cases to me are very interesting to investigate generally speaking. Once you get a DNA hit a lot of times, they're still challenging their logistically, challenging, etc. But they're just not as interesting, they tend to a lot of times be stranger cases, low motive high evidence cases versus high mode of low evidence cases, which are more of my interest. But in any event Rick comes to me, and I Rick, and I were close, and I said, you know, what? Okay. I'll do it. Go inside on and soon realized that peer remains apparent legal strategy was to simply stay away from court. I couldn't get this case to trial. P delayed and delayed in delayed. Police and prosecutors had DNA hit that tied Piero main to the killing of Jade Clarke remains DNA was matched to genetic material on a bullet that Clark had fired that killer, you might think that would be all that was needed to convict romaine. But that was not the case. They were missing a key ingredient. And that ingredient with Clifford Phillips j Clark's passenger on the night of the killing he had been eliminated as a trial witness because he had gone to see a hypnotist in hopes. Remembering more details about the crime in the shooter. Cliff was a guy who never got over. What happened never got over? So originally when the crime happened cliff was getting a lot of grief from everybody from the cops from the victim's family of how come you can't remember how can you can't get a better description it cetera. Here's Clifford Phillips. That win. That is a mom wanted to speak with me to find out. What happened? So I went over there and. Matter for the first time, actually and her brothers were there, Jay's uncles. I don't recall their names. But there were two guys there, which I know where his uncles. So they wanted to know what happened. So I just ran over this story about what happened. And I recall one of the brothers being syllabus sit about why didn't I do anything to help his nephew? And it really hurt my feelings and offended me at the same time because and respond. How could I do anything? You know, I got pulled out the car I had no weapon, and I was in fear of my life is will. So do what I think any human being would do try to get away in did. I was able to do that. And as mom Jade's, mom, she intervene on my behalf. And she kinda checked her her brother and told him to stop badgering him. You know, he did the right thing and trying to get away or he would be dead too. Cliff on his own was so Gil ridden. And so sad that he saw out a hypnotist to hypnotize him to give him. So that he could provide better information. That was against the rules in California courts. And that men he was out as a witness which raised a major red flag for the prosecution.

murder j Clark Jade Clarke Rick Jackson prosecutor John lewin Cliff Zola Zola Jay LAPD Los Angeles magazine trial attorney Zola Goethe Clifford Phillips Los Angeles County attorney Khanna Launda Justice
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Center. You may think DNA is the panacea. You match DNA from a crime scene to a suspect. And it's a slam dunk. Right. Not in the Jade Clarke case. The LAPD had remains DNA on a board fired by j Clarke in the very last act of his life. But in this case, it was always two steps forward and one step back. Romaine the gang member was now remained. The federal police officer serving as a supervisor on a force of provided security to bases in Los Angeles. Los Angeles air force base in Elsa. Gundel? In fort MacArthur, down in San Pedro romaine. Now had insider knowledge of the criminal Justice system and would become a formidable foe in the efforts to bring him to trial. So this is really kind of confounding habit. A guy who had been twice arrested for separate martyrs was a in the gang files as a member of one of the most violent gangs in south, Los Angeles. How does he end up with a badge in a a gun holstered on his hip at seeing Zach thing I thought when I first heard that and ultimately from my research through talking to people from the federal government. He initially had been hired as a contract company employees that provided more security services for the LA air force base. But a lot of their work entailed? Having to use sworn officers from the neighboring cities and so eventually they opted to become a swarm department with the department of defense. Please at the air force base. Once again detective, David Serik. There was a lot of animosity with him some of the other people that were working there part of that just from they had some contract at security guards. And then when they expanded to begun DOD police they hired some officers maybe were injured at other departments here in southern California or some guys that just transferred. So I think there was maybe a lack of respect because he had never been a an actual police officer. And now he's a supervisor so little dynamic there. But I mean, I never got into that. The do, you know did he have to go through any training to make that transition from essentially security guard to police officer like they send them to any kind of posts thing or some of the guys did some didn't do I believe five recall correctly. They hit initially set a date and everybody was in go through flexi. What's federal law enforcement training center, glencoe Georgia, and that's probably probably two month course. The relatively short but the dig up moved up. So some guys went from security guard to DOD police officer almost overnight, and then they slowly farm them out to the to the academy. Okay. Anything that happened Pierre? I don't have any went. Yeah. Okay. Eventually went. As a contract employee. Pure remain had risen to the rank of Lieutenant and Chuck wanna hear that. It's just kind of mind boggling, but they did what they said was kind of a minimal background because he said he had done the job for that we well and hadn't had too many issues, and they were wear some things in his background. They saw the one murder case. But they took him on his word that it'd been dismissed for DNA and several of his arrests have been taken off his rap sheet for factual, and since that he had manipulated into getting and they hired a as a sergeant big downgraded as a sergeant. But he's now sworn Sargent supervisor. That's how it happened. Do you think we just accept us as as one of these cases where someone slip through the cracks whereas something that is a great of greater concern? Because this guy was not only street legal as weapon, but he he was close to them a lot of damage to people. He could've been I think it's it's the worst case I've heard of of somebody getting that type of job where there's definitely documented history. I mean, there have been people that got jobs for it's not really documented and it's determined later. But this guy had this stuff documented before and it just didn't get investigated properly before he was hired. According to federal documents Romains hiring is a police officer was controversial because of his arrest record and internal DOD memorandum written in nineteen ninety nine states of following. We were aware of Mr. Romains background prior to selecting him. Last year. We noted that the more recent arrests resulted in charges either being dropped or he being found factually innocent per legal counsel, citing title, seven the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four arrests that do not result in conviction may not be used in making employment. Determinations carry the most weight for us and making the employment decision was Mr. romance conduct performance in service as a contract security officer at the Los Angeles air force base. He rose to the rank of Lieutenant and served as shift supervisor we felt that his employment history was more relevant than older arrests. The DOD police. Nothing to get some kind of tended to be the land of misfit toys at a lot of guys that didn't qualify to be a police officer here in California, for whatever reason, maybe they got disqualified in the process for who knows what or they were injured or there was something lacking. So the federal requirement to be a DOD police officers a lot less than LAPD, you're the sheriff or what have you? So you had a handful of guys over like that that were that were there. But I never really got to direct answer from peer why he was you know, we found out that he was applying these different agencies and not getting hired normally or something in the background. You know, maybe stole something Cox common something relatively calm. And like that court drug usage that was too recent to the point that you're applying for the new position couple times that I asked him we kinda gave me these vague answers, which living to believe that play with them being honest. And now, we know why? I still remember when I got called in by by Rick to be interviewed what was different about. And I was just sharing with someone out here in the hallway. Normally if we asked like myself as detective now as supervisor by an officer to come back because I wanna talk to him about a case or sometime formation on. I don't bring him in the interview room. I just stand on my desk the question he or she goes about their way. But it was different. There went to our HD, which was that the old police headquarters building and Parker center. And so they put me in the interview room, which put you on alert. Yeah. Immediately. So I don't know if they knew had some prior law enforcement background. But I'm like, okay. This is this is a little bit more than we have a couple questions for you. And you can tell by the line of questioning that they wanted to know if he and I had a friendship or maybe it was I think a part of whatever he had done prior to. Was easy to explain away within minute or to the interview bull? What was how did they find out that you guys knew each other like your LAPD officer was like, do you think they look through LAPD records ac- who would've worked at that air force base or something? No. If I if I recall correctly peer had applied, and I think it was some Cisco. He put me down as a reference. Okay. Yeah. And then they ever call. You about him San Francisco PD. No, I don't I don't remember. They may have sent out a Mailer. I don't recall that far back. I know they didn't call. And then I got the call from from Rick, you know, to to come in and adventure. They showed me is. You know, why? Much strange, though, the in the room, and there there's saying like why were you his reference or something? Yeah. Oh, it was you could feel it. But it dissipated real quickly.

officer supervisor DOD Los Angeles LAPD Jade Clarke Romaine Rick j Clarke Elsa Mr. Romains Zach David Serik murder California Romains Pierre fort MacArthur
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Opinion. When Rick Jackson Tim wash reopened the case in two thousand and three and got a warrant from a judge to take DNA sample from romaine. They knew that as soon as they knock on his door that what they were doing was going to cause a lot of concern and most likely with stimulate some phone calls from romaine to people we had run with in his gang life. So they got a second warrant as well. A warrant it put taps on romaine cellphone and his home phone number once taps were in place. They went out to San Bernardino county where he now with his family and knocked on the door. They told him they were there to take saliva swabs from his mouth almost immediately after the visit the phone calls started. And remember at the time of these wiretaps in two thousand and three romaine was a badge and gun carrying police officer in a supervisor several other officers as well once again a heads a these call. Contain extreme language. No, they try to rehash some shit's. No, they had no from from, you know, seventeen years ago, you know. You know 'cause. Nigga get miss lobby, you know, seventeen years ago, they tested and say, you know, that's what it ain't. It ain't you for. That's how they fear for me. That's right. But they trying to say that, you know, you know, the sob left on the on the ground. You know, we tested, but the Slava from the bullet, which would which I know is the same from the ground. You know what I'm saying? Yeah, they trying to say that we couldn't test that. 'cause it wasn't enough. You know what I mean enough us to test? So, you know, they try to get a saliva ship to try to compare to the you know, slob left on the bullet shit. Yeah. That's what they say. When they come up in this morning. It should you know, some some, you know. No. Like they came over. No, sure. Yeah. A guy, and I'm just, you know, regular my reality. I'm shook you know, what I'm saying? Yeah. They just came on one to get that shit, and then got up outta here. So you know, it's going to be the time. He's seventeen years ago. You try sit. And all of a sudden today months, something all of a sudden mind, you know, try to convince that jury. You know? So they reaching all they just mad that McCain out there like they used to be getting they get caught up like they wanted to get caught up. You know? You know? That's why we're trying to holler home. Even you know, what I'm saying shit with jumping off because because I was trying to make us focus. You know, what I'm saying anything, you lose perspective because they don't wanna see. You twist it up at all. And they. Over the next several weeks, they accumulated hundreds of hours of phone calls to or from romaine, many of those he talked to where dented his gang members. But there was no smoking gun tape, the detectives and prosecutors to baited it what was said in Mant by romaine when several of the calls, but romaine never said anything that clearly implicated him in the killing of j Clarke. To refresh your memory on the details of the case. Twenty one year old j Clarke was fatally shot in his own car in nineteen eighty seven near a Hollywood nightclub doing the shooting. He fired a bullet at his own killer, which was later discovered on the ground at the crime scene by the LAPD. A few weeks into the investigation and informant led them to peer romaine who was arrested and questioned. After gathering, physical certain Stansell and witness evidence. The police charged romaine with murder. But then the key witness in the case Clifford Phillips Jade's passenger on the night of the killing had gone off on his own and got himself hypnotized. So he might better. Remember, the details of the crime and the man who had killed his friend. In legal terms. This was a no in Clifford was not allowed to testify that crippled the case. And it was eventually dropped. Pierre romaine was set free. Detective Rick Jackson was a lead investigator on the case from the very beginning. Almost sixteen years went by sixteen years at included his retirement, and then return to the LAPD before he reopened the case. He submitted the bullet jaded fired at his killer. Two new DNA analysis in hopes that the result would link the human tissue on the bullet to the murder of Jade Clarke. I remember the day. We got the call. It was December seventeenth was in the afternoon. I got a call from one of the lab people that did Serology work, and he had gotten a notification from the private lab that had done it that it was a match between DNA sample. We'd taken from pure remain and DNA from the tissue on the book. We immediately got a warrant for his arrest. Got the case file, we'd already prepped the DA's office and given everything we're just waiting for the final confirmation that was submitted to them. They filed a warrant we walked through to get them quickly in the next hour or so and then surveillance units had him under observation and made the arrest sins. The warrant was signed. It was arrested in south LA. He was with a friend of his from childhood days. It was a role in sixty game member who was on parole for kidnapping and rape. And was also on several the phone calls that we've picked up on the wire they were parked somewhere at a business location. I don't remember the real specifics but surveillance team took him into custody brought him to as for the potential interview, which we almost new positively. He was not going to talk to us and you get and then he was arrested in book jail division at Parker center.

Pierre romaine LAPD Clifford Phillips Jade Rick Jackson Tim wash San Bernardino county j Clarke murder Jade Clarke Rick Jackson LA Parker center officer McCain supervisor Stansell kidnapping Mant Hollywood investigator
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Buck. And we were pretty successful in the first couple years. We saw seven or eight cases in that gave us time to catch up with the DNA ham. And we went from there, and it actually became a very very very successful unit. Let me jump in here to thank one of our sponsors. There's never been a better time to start listening on audible, probably like you. I find it hard to find time to sit down and read a book. And that's why like audible, listen any device anytime anywhere at home on your commute or just on the go. You'll also enjoy easy audiobook exchanges rollover credits and an audio book library keep forever. Even if you cancel with audible, you get access to an unbeatable selection of audio books, including best hours, motivation, mysteries thrillers, memoirs and more at the moment. I'm listening to Jack bays by one of my favorite authors. Joyce, Carol Oates. I really like anything she does. But this time this audio book, she's playing in my backyard. It's a mystery it's thriller, and what I find most entertaining is about a writer of mysteries and thrillers. And so I'm listening to this audio book and constantly nodding in agreement with how this guy thinks sometimes laughing at his audacity and his pompousness and wondering am I like that? And just all through it. I'm just finding an extremely entertaining. And I really can't say enough about the performance of the reader Joe Barrett. The way he does the characters just fantastic, especially lead character jagged speeds. So again, that's why like audible just go to audible dot com slash murder book or text murder book to five hundred five hundred browse that are unmatched election of audio content. And listen for change audible members, get even more like exclusive audio programs audio books and audible originals every month as an audible member you get one credit. Good for any audio book. Choose plus to audible originals from changing selection. You can't get anywhere else. Get started with a thirty day trial. When you go to audible dot com slash. Murder book or text murder book all one word to five hundred five hundred audible the most inspiring minds. The most compelling stories the best place to listen now back to murder book. It was while working in the newly formed case unit in two thousand three the detective Jackson would take a cough from San Francisco that would breathe new life into the long-dormant Jade Clarke murder case. I got a call was from a San Francisco police department sergeant who is assigned background investigations for police candidates in their department. And he tells me that candidate of his that he's working is somewhat that I had contact with back in nineteen eighty seven. I arrested him for murder in little surprised at that. And I find out it's pure remain. I remember just saying don't worry about it come down and spend a day with me all up this case book, and when we're done he will no longer be police candidate. It was that simple in my mind. He was hardcore gang member had no doubt. He did our murder, and I think that would the evidence was support that. And that would be the his candidacy is a police officer. I remember sergeant Sirker said well, do you have any idea? What this guy is doing right now, he says, well, he has now federal law enforcement officer. After I got up off the floor. You know from being shocked by that I made further enquiries, and and he explained exactly what he was doing. And how long you've been doing it for? And this was all completely new information to be shot. Romaine was a department of defense police officer assigned to the LA air force base. He was a sergeant actually and had been for few years, and I can of Ford with this information. But I have to say the case flash forward in my mind, and I knew right away. Wait a minute. This is two thousand and three DNA's. The thing we've been using this new coal cases a lot and we have that bullet item number three the famous bullet with tissue on it. That is going to likely reveal the actual DNA of the person who shot j Clark. And that's what started the reinvestigation. After receiving that call from the San Francisco police detective Jackson did two things right away. He checked with the LAPD lab to make sure that the board recovered during the initial investigation was still being held in evidence, and the Uman tissue that was on it had been preserved. He also drove out from police headquarters downtown with his new partner, Tim Marsha to the Hollywood station where the murder book from the sixteen year old case would be held in archives. He knew the book would contain every move that he and his then partner run Edo had made on the case from the very first hour the investigation.

murder detective Jackson San Francisco officer Joe Barrett Carol Oates LAPD Tim Marsha sergeant Sirker Jack bays buck. j Clark cough partner writer Jade Clarke Joyce Ford Romaine
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Prosecutor. In nineteen eighty seven. There was no DNA wasn't being used in the United States as far as forensic potential nineteen Eighty-eight starts there is no longer a case against peer remain. It's gonna get dismissed we know on Dixon because we don't have that good of a case on Dixon without romaine. And it's going to go away. The case is going to be over. And at that point. It looks like we're never going to get Justice for j Clarke. What happened to the people involved in Jade Clarke case soon after the charges against romaine were dropped Jackson and his partner. Ron ITO promoted from Hollywood to the department's elite robbery homicide division where they were put with new partners. Eat a win onto investigate actor Robert Blake in the murder of his wife. Jackson were major crimes specializing in high profile cases, including the murders of police officers. In the meantime, Pierre remain had beaten, the murder charge in the j Clarke ace, and according to daily PD, he returned to his neighborhood and his gang activities. In nineteen ninety three. He was arrested in another gang related murder. But when it came time for that case to go to trial, the key witness change story. Where he previously identified romaine is the killer. He now backed away from that and said he could not make the ID for the second time romaine walked away from a murder charge. A free, man. But he wasn't satisfied with Justice freedom. What romaine had started doing? I would soon. Find out was going to court in petitioning for a declaration of innocence on the cases that he had either beat or had been dismissed. And he tempted to do that with the murder arrest and criminal filing for the j Clarke case. Fortunately, I was notified by the district attorney's office and went to court and testified that it should not be dismissed, and that he in my opinion based on a lot of evidence was the actual shooter, and they should not walk away. A factual innocence ruling that is approved by judge is basically the same as of mcquill, and it is taken off of your criminal rap sheet. And that's what remains trying to do with all his cases. In you were dead set against us because he felt he was known your your heart that this was a killer. But also, then wasn't there hope that you know, the door wasn't closed on that case wasn't or other things could happen. Yes. And that was part of my argument to the judge fact didn't wanna lay out exactly what I had been doing for several years since the case had started and had been dismissed. And so I went in into a hearing in the judge's chambers with just the judge and laid out what I had been doing to monitor romaine hoping that somebody might come forward. We might learn who the informant was that would be willing to testify. Maybe romaine would get picked up with the weapon that was used something that could put us over the top and get the case refiled against him. And after the hearing and my private meeting with the judge. He agree. Read and case was not given factual innocence. Jackson continued to work cases as Los Angeles dealt with the highest murder rates in its existence. Big and small cases parts of the Rodney King investigation as well. As the OJ Simpson case murder after murder and never stop. It added up after twenty years on the job. He made a decision. In September of nineteen ninety six. I hit twenty years on the job. My wife really felt why she wanted to relocate ahead. Basically agreed to do that so much had revolved around my work, and we moved to New England obviously long way from Los Angeles. And in my heart. I knew I really wasn't ready to retire. I still like my work. I still had that mission of working homicide cases inside of me. I knew that. But for family reasons, I did it. And fortunately, I seem fanned out that I had made the wrong decision. And unfortunately, my wife, and I divorced. I

romaine murder Jackson j Clarke Jade Clarke Pierre Los Angeles United States Dixon prosecutor. Ron ITO Rodney King Robert Blake Justice robbery Hollywood partner Simpson
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"He tells me he's disappointed in himself. And I ask why. And he says, well, I just I was there. I'm sure I saw something that I'm just not remembering so as frustrated so I went and got hypnotized. You what? This is chapter two of the telltale. Bullet this podcast contains adult content and language. I am Michael Conley. And this murder book. We just lost our best witness nothing at make revolver pointed at my friend. Is this a joke? We're never going to get Justice for j Clarke. Thanks to Ardabil for supporting murder book. Get started with the thirty day trial. When you go to audible dot com slash murder book or text murder book all one word to five hundred five hundred thanks the stamp SICOM for supporting murder book. Get a special offer that includes a four week trial plus free postage in a digital scale. Good a stamps dot com. Click on the microphone at the top of the homepage type in murder book. All one word. On a summer night in nineteen eighty seven twenty one year old j Clarke was fatally shot doing the tempted carjacking outside a Hollywood nightclub. He managed the fire is own gun at his killer and the bullet passed through the suspect and came to rest only a few feet away. Where was found and recovered by the LA police a month later and informants tip led detectives to to gang members, including a man named Pierre remain who was a suspected member of the rowing sixties Crips gang. He was arrested examining question. Detectives found what they believed was a healing through through on remains arm, and they charged him with murder. In this case, they were ready to go. They had accumulated a lot of evidence. They had a key witness and Clifford Phillips who is with the victim when he got shot confidence in the case was very high. But then something went wrong. Before we get into what went wrong and continue with the case. I wanna take a moment here to talk about what a murder book is. And what it means to a case it is after all the name of the podcast. The murder book is the heart and soul of any case. A blue plastic three wing binder. It contains everything records photos recordings contacts. Anything that comes up in the case goes into the book. And the murder glove and takes on the characteristics of the detectives on the case meticulous thorough detailed incisive sometime sloppy. Sometimes incomplete most times holding the keys to solving the case. This. I Ron EQ that in this electron engage where most records are digitized and carried on chips most attacked as I know hold fast to their murder books. They clinched them under their arm some sick as firewood as they worked the case. I sat down for breakfast recently with Tim Marsha and Mitzi Roberts to LAPD. Detectives who helped carry the Jade Clarke case three decades of investigation. I should also say they've been helping me for more than a decade with my books and the TV show by. Missy Robertson particular Z inspiration for Rene Ballard who has appeared in the last two novels. I've written. Before we talked about, the j Clarke ace, I asked him about murder books. Why is it that in this highly technical world that the murder book isn't that laptop wise it still after all these decades, a classic minder? There's two reasons I think one reason is the policy procedure is that we provide discovery to the district attorney into the defense were still required to give paper copies of our investigative materials. So that even though society is going green, the legal purposes, we have to provide hard copies, but I think goes deeper than that is that when you have an investigative book, and especially like, in coal cases, you want to personalize that case to yourself. So in a coal case murder investigation that murder book is the bible, and you get to learn your victim through these doc. Kamenz where it if you're looking at documents on screen, you just don't have that personal connection to. Whereas when you're working fresh case, you have the family and relatives other witnesses that you connect with in you, get your motivation and learn about the victims through those sources, but in a cold-case, it's just those hard copies in the photographs. I know my murder book like the back of my hand. And if I'm looking for if if I'm in trial, and the DA wants document, I know exactly where that document is even if I have murder book of ten thousand documents, I know where that document is. I would have to say if it was on computer. It would take me about thirty minutes to try find that. On a on a computer for some reason. It's just it's like muscle memory the murder, but it's like I have to have it in front of me in than everything's good. We think about two on again going back to the court cases. The talk about how whole case investigators just carry the torch for the prior detectives in that murder book becomes the torch. Because that's what you're carrying you're taking hours and hours of work that prior detectives have done, and you honor that and then you're trying to move it forward in that book represents every let's go like even a little further is my childhood friend. I got a call at work from childhood friend because somehow they learn that I'm working cold case murders, and this lay her mother's sister was murdered in foothill division in in the mid nineties. And it was unsolved. And she asked me look into it, and Tim, and I went down before he'll division in search for the for the murder book in it's gone. We can't find it. The book is gone. And this lady was in her house gets knock on the door answers the door. She shot in the face and kill execution style. I can't do anything without Letterman book, sometimes you can try and recreate. If there's evidence, but I can't do anything with that. I need I need to Mainz by need to know, what happened in regional vestich in you can't recreate that. And so without that murder book. No starting point. That's really sad. How can go missing or the all over the place or central or are very quickly. There is now they're they're starting to do a home side library where everything's getting digitally uploaded. But back in the nineties and an eighties and there wasn't. I mean, there's a records retention system. But unsolved cases, usually are supposed to stay with the divisions. And that there in lies the problem in. Ever was in charge of the homeside unit during that time, and what steps that person put in place to preserve these murder books in how much worth he put into the cold cases. And there's just some divisions where things came up missing whether because there was a a fly note, some of the divisions had flooding or required or quake. And so they had to temporarily be moved out. And then during that process, they just. They just disappeared. Wouldn't shock me to think that a detective might took a murder comb never returned it? Something that was close to that heart retired. I mean that wouldn't shock me. No, we found examples of it's interesting within the command staff that when you're coming up within the department you everybody starts out as a uniform cop. And then that some point in your career, you make a decision to go to detectives or do I stay in uniform, but commanders that we've had that are more well rounded at work both it worked uniform they worked detectives. But you see the ones that just were in uniform their whole career. They don't understand the values of like murder book and in one case where cold we're aware. One captain after the ninety four Northridge earthquake. They had a lot of image at the at the station house, and it was an area where they were storing old cases in when he saw these old cases on the floor and all that he gave instructions to toss. All that stuff. We don't need it anymore in. There's a good chance. Murder book. Msci was talking about was probably one of those ones that were told just throw it out into us. You're throwing away somebody's life. Yeah. You're throwing to tell anybody that calls about a case that you pretty much can't work at at all if there's nothing you can do 'cause you can't locate the murder, but but then have that personal connection where two friend that's calling you and kind of and they've told you you're kind of my last hope. And there's nothing you can do. What do you seem people had loved ones murdered and years decades go by and nothing's ever happened to get over that. Or is it they just learn to live with it. Or what lifetimes it's people react differently. But I've always felt like it's more buried steep. The I dunno goes in a place buried deep within and then we come back, and that's like a lot of times. I'll wait the last thing will do notify the family for looking into a case. Because unless we know that it's going somewhere, we don't want to bring a backup because. A lot of the families. When you tell them that you're actually looking into it. And there's actually an opportunity that may be solved. It's like you're right background that day. It's like wherever that was deeply buried is right now back to the surface. I think we learned to live with. I mean, it's weird. But when my dad passed away, the may ask me to give the eulogy of I went down into the garage where he would always be tinkering weekends. And I was trying to get just some motivation to write the eulogy and I sat at his desk, and I looked up and there was a little piece of paper that was pinned to a board. And it just said the meaning in life in three words since I took the paper off on like wonder why this would be there. And then I could see that. There was writing on the back and I flipped it over. And it said it goes on. So it all stuck with me. But I think that's what happens to victims families their life goes on. But there is that. Hole there that this filled with questions and over a period of time. I think we see that they lose the anger. The sorrow Innis is still there, but they learn to deal with it. But they want answers. So

murder j Clarke Jade Clarke Tim Marsha Michael Conley Ardabil Msci Justice Mainz Clifford Phillips LAPD Missy Robertson LA Innis Ron Letterman Pierre Hollywood
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"For. I have no doubt in my mind. That's exactly what it was. It was still scab being over and healing being four weeks old. But it was very distinct in very unique looking and right away. When I saw that wound myself, I knew this is what it was. And I know exactly in my mind that time knew what went down at the crime scene. All right. So you're you're having a gathering of evidence. Probably not one piece is a slam dunk piece of evidence. And you're now have him sitting in an interview room at Hollywood station. And it's time to talk to them. How do you prepare for that? What's that like for detective? Well, that's your goal is to get the person. Who now have though doubt was the one responsible across an interview table in front of you and the station in custody, and we did our background. We got information remain. We had a lot of connecting pieces of evidence that put them there. And we have that bullet wound. And we have the bullet that went through that arm. Do we have DNA at that time? No. We have bled typing. No. But we have piece of tissue, and we have the two wounds an entry and an exit, and that's the reason that was laying there because at exit that arm. So we're ready to go and always kind of prided myself on the fact that I could usually get people the waive their rights just on my interview techniques, and he did in fact, waive his rights. I told them we wanted to talk to them about incident that happened in Hollywood. And I didn't know exactly what if any his involvement was and we needed to talk to. The interview started off good number one. You just want to get a chance to talk to them and get it on record. He denied ever being in Hollywood having anything to do with any kind of shooting in Hollywood. I asked him for an explanation of what I knew was through and through gunshot wound on his right in her farm, and I should add that I knew this since I saw the wound. He was right handed. And I visualized exactly how the crime scene went down. But I wanted to get it from him. And he wasn't gonna go there. It wasn't. He's not the typical person you sit in interview that south central Los Angeles gang member of the Royal in sixties. He was an experienced guy had law enforcement experience in the military. Became a military. Police officer of all things in the air force. So he at least was aware of some of the procedural things that police officers and detectives do when they're trying to investigate a crime. But once I confirmed, he was right handed, and I had him extend his arm. You could see that the entry wound which was down toward the wrist area was a little bit lower in the exit wound was going a little higher. So it it traverse that way because he was standing outside of that car with his hand pointed down toward Jade Clarke with seeded, and when the standoff was going on that's where his arm was extended downward at Clark Clark would be pointing his gun when he got it out underneath the seat, and he'd be pointing up at romaine in the direction of where romaine was pointing the gun at him. And the shots were fired remained fired more Clark fired one and it went in that upward direction it entered his arm went three or four or five inches and exited a little higher. So when it came to this interview, how did he explain having a bullet in his arm? He denied that. It was. Womb. He said that he had received that in an accident that he'd had a few weeks before was he talking about the accident at the Waco parade. That's the only accident. He had. Yes. And I remember looking at that report in showed no injuries. Now before I could press him further to explain something. How did this happen is he going to say it was a rod that went through his arm, which would cause a lot more trauma. And I started to press him into given an explanation that we could tear apart and he clammed up. That was it. He invoked his rights. He wanted his attorney. And that's what the interview ended standard than I wanted it to because there was a lot still to cover. Even though he stopped to talk and denied things is having the accident report. This is no injury and him explaining how he got the injury. It was that useful as evidence. It was extremely useful. The fact that at least he had given us an explanation and how he got that wound. We could tear that apart. And we were able to buy the use of the Inglewood officer. Who took that report? And it showed that there were no injuries sustained. Now, some kind of a rod or something going through somebody's arm. It's going to cause significant amount of blood loss and pain that is not going to go down is non injury. And so we had them walked in there. After the interview we needed to get some blood from rain. So we went to a hospital. We also went to the coroner's office who look at gunshot wounds routinely, and we went to a very senior member of the staff at the coroner's office. Dr Choi, he he said he thought it was consistent with a gunshot wound. He could not rule out some potential other possibilities, but very unlikely. So you amassed all this evidence. He presented a district attorney's office. What happened the district attorney charged romaine and Dixon both with one count of murder and one count of robbery. And that's when the ball started rolling. We had physical evidence we had witnessed evidence we had circumstantial evidence. And in my mind. It was no doubt that these were the two guys that did it. And also, I would have never taken it to the DA's office. In this case, they were ready to go the accumulated a lot of evidence they had a key witness. Who is with the victim when he got shot confidence in the case was very high. But then. We just lost our best witness.

romaine Hollywood Clark Clark officer Hollywood station Los Angeles Jade Clarke attorney Waco Dr Choi Inglewood robbery murder Dixon five inches four weeks
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Didn't. I asked detected Jackson about the shooting that was outside of what would seem to have been a crowded club. Where there are a lot of witnesses. Is there a Steria what happened in the moments after the shooting there were people exiting the club? But there's nothing I don't think there was any by great commotion other people watching and seeing varying things the best sense of what the assortment of witnesses that ITO interviewed at the station could come up with was that after the shooting both suspects directly rand northbound from their positions at the vehicle oneself Specht from the driver's door. And the second suspect sidewalk and when one block which was maybe seventy eight yards, and then ran westbound on St. col Willoughby. While I was at the crime scene. My supervisor detective Russ Custer who ran the homicide unit had made several inquiries at the local hospitals. Also sent out a medical art. He he was trying to determine if anybody showed up at one of the -mergency rooms having a gunshot or suspected gunshot wound that lead nowhere. No one had shown up. No one had come in where medica- medical matched. And so that was a dead end. Another bid of information. I learned from Ronnie Dojo was based on his interview with the witnessing James Ryan who lived on citrus avenue, which is one block due west of Highland. Ryan had called the police and let them know. And then it was eventually brought to the Hollywood station. He heard gunshots. He had just gotten home from work. He went to a second story window looked out. And this is a matter of seconds thirty forty seconds after hearing those shots, and he sees to male blacks running southbound on citrus from Willoughby street. He says one of the men was carrying what appeared to be a revolver in his hand. And they were yelling in the direction of white sporty car that was driving also southbound in front of them. At some point. Ryan saw the white sporty car. Stop quickly back up to the position of the two men running. They both jumped in the white car, and then the white card burned rubber and accelerate quickly southbound on Sicher savvy and Ryan would later point out those skits to us which became important as well as well as the description provided of what we now believed was the getaway car. Doc all of about Jade, and who he was about this car, and why was special tune that he might not want to give it up even at gun point Jade Clarke, he was twenty one years old. He had just moved into a new apartment over near Los Angeles high school, which is south a few miles of the crime scene. He was an aspiring DJ. He also had worked. I believe with still working at a video store. He hadn't had this car Wong. It was completely paid for car. Partly as a gift from an uncle. I'm not a car person necessarily. But I remember thinking it was really a sharp looking car with a nine hundred eighty four three hundred Nissan, z X. But what was unique about it? And I found out later was that it had been customized. Usually there was a a hatchback to the rear with no trunk. This had been squared off. Trunk had been put in. It was a soft top convertible black over like, silver, gray. I remember thinking that night that I had never seen the car quite like that as far as the customization? J Clarke wanted to be a DJ. And that was why he was with Clifford Phillips Phillips was a DJ at the time and had taken Jade under his wing. He was a hardworking, honest guy. You know? And what we knew of him. You know, he had family members over presumed to be in a lifestyle that wasn't the straight narrow, but we never saw Jay doing participate in any part of that lifestyle. He had jobs, and he was a hard worker. So and then he wanted to get in the DJ life. So assumed honest guy. So that's why we allowed him to hang out with this. So he's a good guy. Bear sauce spoken. You know, he was just a good guy. And we never expected on all that went down, you know. And they heard that he had a gun. Shocked everyone. But especially me being there seeing him hold this done in point a gun at someone. So. But. I don't know everyone has secrets sexists.

James Ryan Jade Clarke Jay St. col Willoughby Steria Russ Custer supervisor J Clarke Jackson ITO Los Angeles high school Specht rand Hollywood station Ronnie Dojo -mergency Sicher Highland Clifford Phillips Phillips
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"Invaluable. All right. I want to step in for a second and tell you about one of our sponsors that makes this show possible. I don't have my own Harry, Bosch Rene Ballard to keep my house protected, but I have ring ring's mission is to make neighborhoods safer. You might already know about their smart video doorbells in cameras to protect millions of people everywhere. I'm one of them ring helps you stay connected to your home anywhere in the world. So if there's a pack is delivery or surprise visitor. You'll get an alert and be able to see here and speak to them all from your phone. It also serves as a law enforcement tool. I have a property that I'm not always at and I have it protected by ring cameras and someone broke into that property, and I got whole thing on video, and I was able to pass that onto the police department. That was all thanks to ring. You have a special offer on ring. Starter kit. Just go to ring dot com slash murder book with video doorbell and motion activated floodlight Cam the starter kit has everything you need to start building a ring of security around your home. That's ring that com slash murder book. So you're at the crime scene handling all that the collection of evidence and so forth, your partner, Ron ITO is at the Hollywood station. Dealing all the witnesses that and then pulled in after the shooting, including Clifford Phillips who had been in the car with Jade Clarke at what point do you start to talk to ITO and put things together as to what happened during the shooting. Yeah. At some point while I was probably still at the crime scene. Although I'd get more details later, I found out from my partner who was interviewing witnesses at the station, the basic scenario of what happened in that came from the witness cliff Phillips who was a friend of Jade Clark's and was in the passenger seat when the the whole incident first started, and what I learned was they were both sitting there when the driver's side door was opened. Like complected, black male pointed a gun at Jade. Clarke told them to get the fuck out of the car. Get the fuck out. Cliff? Phillips was stunned and starting in the passenger seat watching this whole thing happened when he saw his friend reach underneath the car seat and come up with a small caliber handgun, semiautomatic handgun. And he was shocked because he didn't know he had that gun. And he basically saw this standoff occurring between his friend and the man outside the car he could not see the man's face. Because the car was a lower vehicle and face of the suspect was out of view for him from his vantage point who is pulling his prank net. Remain in my head for good thirty to forty five seconds before finally get yanked that car myself. Once I got yanked out. I am my faculties census or Sharpe's attack and anew what what was going on a carjacking. Then my fear. My naive traits were out the window new was going on and. Right. Then went into survival and try to remain calm and actually tried to speak until my friend give up the car. And as I was doing it while getting choked. Say we'll go scrim away from my. Attacker break loose and and run. And that. Recall at maybe getting a five or six steps away after broke loose. That's when I started hearing gunfire. And it startled me. So that feel actually failed to ground out of sheer panic and fright. But I think I got up quicker than feel and continued to run, and and then I ran into an alleyway and he. Alone. A couple of other guys were outside in. About a minute later. So we came back to the scene, and that's where my friends slumped over in the car. And he was fighting for his life. And I remember about the pull him out and another guy at to sing with me. The adviser. No, don't pull them out. You know, you can't pull them out. So what I do recline his seat. And so he could be kinda prone position and try to make as comfortable as in. I was really prodded affect that. He was still alive when a paramedic Scott there and thought he would make but he didn't.

Clifford Phillips Jade Clarke Ron ITO partner Hollywood station murder Rene Ballard Scott Bosch Harry Jade Clark Cliff Sharpe forty five seconds
"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

Murder Book

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"jade clarke" Discussed on Murder Book

"When I got to the scene which was about four fifty in the morning. Highland was very little travel at that time of night. The car was parked facing. Southbound at the west curb a Highland again. It was a commercial area small businesses. There weren't many people around at that time. The scene had been cordoned off by the original officers who responded to the radio call. I remember being approached immediately by a an officer who had a small caliber handgun that. He said he'd recovered from the seat of the victims vehicle, and he removed it for safe keeping and provided that to me, which I member putting it in the trunk of my police car. I approach is seen at some point the criminalist that was assigned to come out to assist me at the crime scene investigation was there as well as print personnel. And the photographer record the crime scene. Upon looking more at the crime scene. There were some things I noted immediately that I knew were potentially very important one thing I noticed was a small caliber expended bullet a bull that had been fired from weapon. The bullet was on the ground on the pavement of the street right near the driver's side. Rear tire at some point upon closer examination at some point of the crime scene. I could see that. There was some dark fiber material adhering to that round which minute hit something most likely a clothing item. Which at that point. I didn't know if it was from maybe the victim's clothing, or if it was from potentially suspects clothing that had been standing at that drivers door was that lucky you get a bullet sitting right there at the crime scene. Yeah. It was very lucky in the first thing that crossed my mind when I saw that fiber on the bullet was that bullet did not go very far when a matter of one or two feet before it fell to the ground. So obviously, it hits something more substantial than just clothing fibers. In my mind thinking that night at the crime scene. I was hoping that potentially had hit the suspect because there could be blood on that. And obviously did hit a suspect. It was it would be a through and through to him. So I knew right away that was a crucial piece of evidence. Weiser blood there on the driver's side. There was no blood that was visible. There was some blood in the car which obviously came from the victim's injuries. However on the passenger side of the car along the sidewalk that runs north and south along Highland. There were some blood drops starting about the center of the car and moving north along the sidewalk there in Highland maybe thirty or thirty five feet north, and then they stopped. But those blood drops I should say did not show a directional tail on them as if they had been deposited by somebody that was running or moving very quickly along that sidewalk. So if these blood drops were connected in some way to this crime. It was someone calmly walked away dripping blood that would be my opinion. Yes. Let me jump in here for a second. And talk about Rick Jackson again. I know he sounds like a modern day version of Joe Friday here with his just the facts recitation of the case over the years. I've been amazed at his recall of the little details of the many cases. He's worked those details. In the way, detective methodically works case are things I've been taking from Jackson for years, we've worked closely together on many projects from my books to TV shows and scripts to now this podcast the truth is I chose this case for the first season of the podcast largely because of Rick, and what I knew about his, dedication and relentlessness when it came to his cases. But it hasn't always been a friendly relationship. You could say our interactions or lack thereof. Go back more than twenty five years to when I was a reporter in Los Angeles. And he was a detective with the major crimes unit of LAPD vaunted robbery homicide division Jackson were most of the big media cases back then, but he was the kind of guy who didn't have much use for the press. In fact, if you saw Rick Jackson's name and one of my stories, it was likely following a no common quote. So the way the LAPD broke up their investigative services back then was that there were eighteen geographic divisions and each one would have their own detective squad, including a homicide table as they called it with four to six detectives, and then the Aleve robbery homicide unit was located at the department's headquarters Parker center downtown. It's pretty much the same now. But there are a few more divisions Parker centers empty and a new headquarters was built about a block away. If there is a big case, especially when it draws media attention. It is usually handed off to our St. because detectives are generally more seasoned and specialized they've been around the pier romaine case, for example, did not make a blip on the media radar. It was a black on black crime that occurred a year that average more than two murders day, the city against all that death and Jade Clarke, just wasn't news. Are you St. wasn't interested? As thirty year observer of the LAPD. In fact, I moved to LA to go to work for the Los Angeles Times a month. After j Clarke is murdered the difference between Archie and divisional -tective was physically apparent the elite are these squads dress differently than detectives carry themselves differently. And when they assumed lead on a case, they more often than not swarmed it with many of the detectives from major crimes homicide special coming in and taking over and Rick Jackson was part of that. And I can still recall being at a crime scene and seeing him and other are HD. Detectives arrived to take over and it was like, okay. The big shots have arrived. I wrote about some of this cases net put me in Jackson's orbit. And I would reach out for him for comment and understanding about what was going on the case. And this was a course about as useful as spitting in the win. He didn't call back reporters, I have old newspaper clips at say, he refused to comment or did not return repeated phone, calls, etc. I like to say he didn't understand the talking to the media was talking to the public and the public had a right to know. But that argument was also about as useful as fitting in the wind. So it was a stress relationship between Rick and Maine. I remember this one case the media dubbed the wiccan murder case, which Jackson was lead detective on. And you could say I was lead writer on for the LA times. This UCLA student had been brutally murdered. I mean like stabbed twenty times and his body was found in an old railroad tunnel that was in the mountains that rim the San Fernando Valley, which is nor side of the city. The tunnel was already cloaked in mystery because it was very close to a hideout used a couple of decades earlier by Charles Manson and his followers. In fact, locals in that air just referred to the tunnel as the Manson tunnel. So this UCLA kid was pretty smart and came from a good family, his mother, in fact was at church secretary and everyone in his family was involved in their faith. This only added to the mystery of what had been up to and how he ended up in the Manson tunnel. Media wise, the story was competitive from the start and reporters were digging around at UCLA into this kid's life, and so on and soon it was discovered that he was a member of liquor circle at the school. Now is a pagan religion that can involve witchcraft and this, of course, flew in the face of who this kid was thought to be on top of that there is defeated on the walls of the Manson tunnel. That included pentagram assemble with Oko connotations, and it was unclear whether they had been there or painted on the walls by the killers. Who was believed that there were multiple killers that would have taken at least two people to carry the victim's body into that tunnel. So anyway, the rumors were flying about this case and this kid and Wicca and witchcraft and possibly even Newman sacrifice. So I'm trying to get to Rick Jackson for some clarity on. This is this part of the official investigation. Where are we reporters chasing rainbows? But true to form. He took no calls and never return them. He was detective Rick. No common Jackson. Eventually, though, he cracked the case. And it turned out that the wick angle was just a deflection. The victim was killed because of a dispute with two friends, even the wicked circle angle was explained as a college kid, exploring, new face and ideas while away from home for the first time. I think it's been ironic that many years later recommend were together on various projects, including this podcast. I sometimes think boy where were you when I needed you on the wicked case, but what he is shared with me. In more recent years has been invaluable.

Rick Jackson LAPD Highland reporter Manson tunnel Los Angeles Times UCLA Los Angeles officer Charles Manson Jade Clarke j Clarke robbery Joe San Fernando Valley Parker center