35 Burst results for "Jade"

“Hillbilly Elegy” Reviewed

The Big Picture

04:15 min | 5 d ago

“Hillbilly Elegy” Reviewed

"Amanda wonderful to see you on this thanksgiving week. How are you doing. I'm so glad to see to sean. Have you thanksgiving or early. Thanksgiving such as it is this year and the year. Lord twenty twenty. So we're gonna talk a little bit about hillbilly this episode because it's certainly inspired a realization. That are in oscar bait time and we're gonna start doing a few more oscar show episodes of this show because the oscars are close fish there five plus months away. They're not ordinary all that close. Nevertheless hillbilly allergy is a movie that has been tabbed on the oscar predictors sheets for a long time and this is an adaptation of jd. Vance's twenty sixteen memoir a sort of a reflection of his time growing up in in ohio and reflection on his family from kentucky and how they raised him and what has happened to america over the last fifty or so years. And you know. It's a certainly complicated book and a controversial book. You know. I had not read the book or even looked at it until i saw this movie but to prepare for this episode. I dug into the book a little bit. And it's an interesting tax. I would say it is not a book for me personally. Not a book that. I responded to But the book and the film have a pretty significant difference and that is that the book is a deeply political text and it is sort philosophical texts. in a way it's a. It's an ethical in reflective text. About what can happen to people in america and why america is the way it is right now. The movie is a melodrama about a family. And that's more or less it so tell me you know you're from the american south. I'm just. I'm just a snotty easterner. Quite from kentucky. But what do you make of the hillbilly elegy phenomenon. Before getting into the movie i Yes i am trying to be respectful here. So i wanted to read the full title of hillbilly allergy. The book which is hillbilly a memoir of family and a culture in crisis. My family is from a different culture than this particular family and jade is writing about his particular experiences and there is It it a difficult childhood in a lot of ways. This is a story that touches on addiction and abuse and poverty and it is also about family and his personal experiences and so to that extent. Jade events has the story of his own life. There is also the sociological aspects. I did read parts of needless to say. I didn't particularly agree with the sociological conclusions. But that is life in america. I think what's interesting about. This book is the popularity it had it was a big deal and it was on bestseller lists in two thousand sixteen when it was released in early. Two thousand seventeen and it did become kind of one of the key tax in this movement of an music so many air quotes here liberals trying to understand the trump voter and whether that pursuit is useful or whether this was the book to guide that pursuit we can really put it aside but again it was in a political context even for people who possibly didn't share the conclusions of this book and this movie does not want anything to do with any of that and i think there are a few reasons why we can talk about but it is. It's pretty fascinating because it was such a high profile book and such a controversial book. I think that the adaptation adaptation just totally stripped that away is noticeable and it also leaves the adaptation itself in search of a purpose. And that was my other. Take away from this movie. Well i have several but one of them is that. I don't really think that this movie knows what it's doing. Besides as you mentioned in the joe possibly trying to win some awards

Oscar America Kentucky Oscars Amanda Vance Sean Ohio Jade
The Promise of Cloud-Native Gaming

a16z

05:09 min | Last week

The Promise of Cloud-Native Gaming

"The first voice. We hear his jade as she explains how. She became obsessed with a young age. None of the thongs. We take an investment advice. Ca six nc dot com slash disclosures for more information. So i always knew. I wanted to make games. I figured it out. When i was about twelve years old i was visiting my uncle. Who lived in san francisco at the time. And i made it my mission to beat him at all of his games before i left for the and it was during that time that it dawned on me that someone gets sneak games and i thought awesome. Why not me. I had already been into robotics and done a little bit of programming. That's when i really decided to focus on that as a creator and started working on game projects mice airtime so how does building for cloud differ from what you've done before have always been attracted by the bleeding edge of games aims constantly. Reinvented if you look at what. A video game was ten years ago. It was totally different twenty years ago. What drew me to for example working on the assassin's creed franchise in building that up. The next consoles were coming in. That was big opportunity. Go okay what can we do with eight x the processing power and so a lot of those questions not have pushed me towards my career decisions all along as what attracted me to google this time which is okay. It's not ajax. It's the cold data centers processing power. Okay it's the whole model for how we think about client. Server multi-player games needing to work is totally offended and change some of the largest games today fortnight clans. They run most of their network on the cloud. So john what distinguishes what we have now from true cloud streaming or what you call it gaming. Which is what we're seeing now. Looks like it's actually mostly being hoisted existing council enters title development for playstation Stocks on and it was been found. These gains fundamentally different popcorn in some most excited about the second way of games that might become around the corner be called in cloud needed games. What really on any game. It's built around four cloud that's only play of all in the cloud infrastructure as opposed to something. We are currently in the first wave of cloud gaming and really what. We're seeing the convenience of cloud gaming. What we're seeing is okay. It's all the games that we can play another places but we get rid of the download time. We can play more instantly. We don't have to worry about dates to play on different screens other great benefits by the really exciting thing. And i think that's what's gonna be kind of the cleveland of what. Tv was radio is when we unlock. What the second wave of cloud gaming one of the things is obviously the client server model right. Now you're limited to the interactions and simulations that can run the locally on people's machines no matter what even if you're running your example fortnight is running on the cloud and a lot of other games are as well in the back end. There's still designed with the idea that they have to run on a local pc or a local consoler local mobile device in some cases. And really what's going to unlock not only the processing power and what we call elastic q. Of the data center but also the idea that essentially any game can be designed like one big land party. So you don't have to worry about networking times. You can at least know exactly what those are in an designed for them. Measure them in a consistent way and also hits up against a limit of how big of a shared experience you. Are there new game mechanics or even game genres that. You find uniquely enabled through the cloud. Johnny britain about how it might help solve games. Cold start problem. But what are some of the other mechanics. You see enabled by cloud gaming when you think about the magic of cloud gaming. You're being sent a stream that from the pipes and stuff. It looks exactly like a stream of video data when you think about this new paradigm there can be a one to sort of infinite and very strange connection of what in quits impact that stream so if you think about it someone. Typing in the side of a youtube shot can have an input into my environment. They type tomato tomatoes. Start falling from the sky in my game. Thousands of connected to my game could be. They're playing the rule of. Let's say zombie hoard. That's attacking those all could be real players right and they're in quicker just on a mobile phone in a very simple interface for doing that. Because the zombie needs controls. I think a lot of the really exciting things that disassociation of direct relationship between number of people connected to client either one or exceed or whatever. Hundred is ugly. The biggest we've seen and this way. That huns of inputs can impact. The simulation live

Jade San Francisco Johnny Britain Google Cleveland John Cold Youtube
Shough leads No. 11 Oregon over Washington State 43-29

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Shough leads No. 11 Oregon over Washington State 43-29

"Tyler showed threw for three hundred twelve yards and four touchdowns in eleven th ranked Oregon's forty three twenty nine come back over Washington state job tossed a sixteen yard scoring strike to Travis died late in the third to lift the ducks to a twenty one nineteen lead he added a short TD pass to Johnny Johnson in the opening seconds of the fourth to push the lead to twenty eight nineteen die karte two second half touchdown passes and the ducks piled up five hundred eighty two total yards in improving to tune out freshman jaded Laura threw for three hundred twenty one yards and two scores for the Cougars who led nineteen to seven but couldn't stop the ducks in the second half I'm Dave Ferrie

Ducks Karte Tyler Johnny Johnson Oregon Travis Washington Laura Cougars Dave Ferrie
Kris Jenner responds to Kendall party backlash

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Kris Jenner responds to Kendall party backlash

"Facing a bit of backlash after throwing a star studded birthday slash Halloween party. Amid the pandemic, The model and reality star had fellow celebs over for a costume party in L. A. Jenner apparently asked guest not to post photos to social media, but well We wouldn't want anybody to know what we're doing when we're admonishing you not to do and no that did not stop her sister Kylie. Some of those images show Justin Bieber, the weekend Jade and Smith and others in attendance. While some critics knocked Jenner for hosting the mostly Maskell ist bash, she did have atleast one defender, her mom. In an interview with Andy Cohen on radio Andy Chris Jenner said. These are her words all weaken do is live our lives The best way. We know how and be responsible and do the right thing. And we're doing that exactly.

L. A. Jenner Kylie Justin Bieber Andy Chris Jenner Jenner Jade Andy Cohen Smith
Willow Smith Calls Out Jada's Parenting Style

Daily Pop

05:18 min | Last month

Willow Smith Calls Out Jada's Parenting Style

"Are you running for some daily pop? Cuz we've got some Smith family drama for you today. Willow is coming after her met her mother questioning her parenting skills at her own red cable. Are you kidding me? This is Jaden was harder on her than on her brother Jaden during a new episode of red table. Talk on Facebook watch Willow shares just how differently they were treated great up. There is a difference between how black moms will treat their daughters and their son. Oh, oh my goodness, right? Let's go back through is true something as simple as just like getting up at the right time. It would be like you might like to maybe like, oh no school school is about to be you better get dressed. We need to get it would be like wage in my room like, okay got it. But then Jane is actually like nothing listed. Are you ready to and he'd be like, maybe one moment off? Thank you. She is asking for a debt said it's right there honey you to me where you have a black bar? But you don't question her parenting in front of everybody. I do think Jade is one of those people that's very open communication. Tell me how you feel kind of mother one hundred percent. But I also think in black families and I will save this growing up in a big family and the hood a lot of times moms and parents are harder on girls because there's this thing ingrained in your head that if something happens with your daughter your daughter gets pregnant or becomes a birth mother. It's a direct reflection on you. So a lot of times like people don't even care about the father they like, oh near that boy knocked her up, but the mother there's a lot of shame that goes on the parents and growing up my mother never talked to me about the birds and the bees at all. My sister got schooled in it from the time. She was thirteen years old and it's weird that that's how it works like, yep. Just saw this whole thing happened with t i, yeah and how crazy everybody was like, oh my God. This is so insane. Meanwhile, I'm like, oh that happens. All those on you know, I think has a lot to do with also on the Note just you know, as a mother myself. I feel like for a woman you have to be very strong. Like I wanted to be so secure in her self-confidence seems to be like the most important thing you can instill in my daughter and being confident means like you get up you show up on time. You work hard you put in your best and you feel good about it. And so like I can see that and it's so funny that example because literally off hook up Chase from a nap the other day, he's to mind you and I said Chase are you awake? You ready to go? Five more minutes mom and I was like, okay honey UT five more minutes. You need a rest. I don't know if it's just a little boy, but it was just a funny example. I'm like, this is already a happening in my life. And there are only two right I feel like mothers and suck. So that Dynamic is very unique. Like I definitely think that women and parents think that they can be harder on girls because I feel like they think girls can handle it. I feel like with boys. I feel like a mom. I see it with my own mom and my own old dog, like he has always been regardless of what drama or what he's had to go through. He's always sort of Taken extra good care of him. I just feel like if it's a boy and you're a mom you just have an extra soft spot regardless of race or anything like that. I just think moms and sons have a different Bond. It's like dads and daughters. I feel like whatever child you have. That's the opposite gender of you. You are a little bit softer towards I can see that I totally can totally stay. I think the dynamic is now shifting I think with the world shifting and now, you know having to have harder conversations with boys at younger ages kind of the same ones you kind of have a girl about consent and about sex and all of those things. I feel like with everybody being mindful of this patriarchy Society. I think that's going to flip and it's going to change a little bit. Yeah. Yep. Think yeah, I hope I mean I still feel like just because of how I'm positioned. I'm like I already feel like I have to be like, you know, you you fight for what you deserve you are equal to your counterparts, you know, I feel like that stuff you have to like push into daughter still because if you don't if they don't think that going growing up then they accept less than and that's where I feel like we've gotten to the point where we got to where women, you know, they were traditionally taught that it's okay. If a man makes more, you know, if and then finally now we're getting to the other side of that and we just have to keep that momentum going like we're equal. We're all very equal talk to your son and your daughter the same way is what I guess. It's still to me and Society like I'm going to still push up for Chase, but I feel like it's almost a given still for a man to get equal. I mean, I'm still like given like he's going to get it cuz he's got that leg up because he's going to be a man. Yeah and the woman I have to be like make sure you get your your peace Honey Pig. To caution her you have to prepare her for that reality because men don't face that as much which is the problem. I mean, even in our own lives and our own circumstances, we know people that are of different genders and might make more than us or do more than us, but they don't work as much as we do, that's happening right now. So it's just one of those things you just constantly have to be aware of I

Chase Jaden Facebook Willow Smith Jade Patriarchy Society Jane
Life in Front of the Lens

This Week in Photo

05:35 min | Last month

Life in Front of the Lens

"Hey. Welcome back to another episode of this week in photo I'm your host, Fredericton Johnson. Today. On this interview I'm talking with Mal, reilly jade about well first of all, she's written a book called in front of the lands in it. Sort of goes into the the world of a model in front of the Lens and some important tips and tricks on how we as photographers behind the lens can have a more successful relationship that results in great photos. So she's put that together. So I thought it would. Be Great to have a discussion about that and talk about it. You know what are the pluses? What are the minuses where the landmines for photographers that are looking to get into this genre photography? You know shooting models and it's it's it could be a minefield especially in these days with the metoo movement and all that a lot of photographers a move into this genre, but don't for fear of doing or saying the wrong thing. So Riley is here to help us hopefully not step on any landmine. They. Well, welcome to the show how are you doing and get. Thank you. Thanks for having me on here. Yeah. Yeah I'm excited to dive into this topic. This is like I said a little intro there. This is obviously an important topic and photographers deb you look at all these gorgeous images of beautiful women in magazines and online etcetera and they dream of one day shooting like that. You know. But the hurdle to get to that as a where do you find people? You know there's a lot of amateur models but not a whole lot of professional models that that that know how to pose I wanNA talk about that, and then also some of the. Pitfalls that photographers should avoid win trying to shoot this kind of genre. So let's let's start with just a little bit of history on you. So Riley Jade, who are you in where are you from and what brought you to this world of modeling? Yes I must trillion. And side muddling about eight years ago Mazda Uni and I just did as a hubby about full years and then I started to get into more paid work and yeah when Kobe not happening I'm traveling around and around the world. Shooting which I absolutely love. So Yan and obviously during lockdown I was stuck in one place so I decided to put. Together. And how's it going? How's it going so far? Yeah. It's honestly going so much better than I expected. I hit one hundred styles not long ago and I had so much amazing feedback which is what's really important. So yeah, really scared we'll let let's to help get the word out about it because I think it's like I said I think it's a really important topic for photographers to sort of understand how to move into that genre. So let let's talk about that a little bit. So you've been photographed many many many times you've worked with many many many photographers of all skill levels I'm sure. Out of all the people you've work with what are some of the some of the traits of the more successful photographers out there you know is it is it become Organi, their assertive or their collaborative would you feel the trade of the successful photographer? Say like the key to any successful she is communication and respect you know if you've got those two nil been, you're gonNA have a great shoot. Definitely. You said being a collaborative if it. You know no matter. Even if they took the race specific idea still including the models ideas hiring mannequin you hiring a person with ideas and experiences the IT'd be a waste not to you that. So definitely, like communication respect and having that sort of teen collaborative approach to shoot is key. Yeah and then that what does that collaboration look like? There's like you know when when the photographer first contacts you and says, Hey, you know that. Is it. That, they know what they want and they allow you to input your thoughts into what the the final shot is going to be or. Does it manifest differently. Ya. Think it depends on the type of you know if it's T.F. p. then it's obviously the models ideas really needs to be included. But you know if a photographer contact me for a page with a specific idea that collision comes in the fact that they still they get my agree I agree to those ideas really communicate them well. Is that okay with you excetera. So that's just not a big. Information Dump on me, it's back and forth communication like agree with that. And then we get to the shoot. Odd Do you have any ideas to add to this exemption it just really makes for a more enjoyable experience everyone and great sheets. Great shots. So yeah. Yeah. It should be fun. Right at the end of the day is should be doing a shoot should be you're having a good time you know it's work obviously, but it shouldn't be stressful or shouldn't be attitudes on set in that kind of thing if you had that kind of thing happened where you in the photographer. Just didn't gel in the final shots reflected. I get along with very much. But I think. The issue is when people micromanage. That sort of when it. makes it a bit hard. You know they don't give me a chance to even post it all this a movie hand up here and there, and so I think it's important just to you know you're hiring someone with experience and you know who knows what they're doing. So give them a chance to show you that anticipate of show the you this skills setting micromanaging is when it does kill shoot a bit.

Fredericton Johnson Reilly Jade Riley Jade Organi Riley UNI YAN Mazda Kobe
Ghosts in Your Bedroom?It's Probably Sleep Paralysis

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

05:40 min | Last month

Ghosts in Your Bedroom?It's Probably Sleep Paralysis

"While come back the savvy psychologist I'm your host Dr Jade Woo. Every week will help you meet life's challenges with evidence based research, a sympathetic ear and zero judgment. Today we look at the freaky phenomenon of sleep paralysis and experience that has inspired ghost stories and Ilian abduction conspiracies. Fortunately. There's a scientific explanation for why it happens and also ways to prevent it. Different Cultures have explained frightening experience called sleep paralysis in various different ways. And Brazilian folklore a crowned with long fingernails lurks on the roof and tramples on sleepers chests. In Japanese mythology vengeful spirits come to suffocate their enemies while they sleep. For Canadian, Eskimos, it's a spousal Shamans, paralyze a sleeper while giving them vivid hallucinations. And in Contemporary American culture sleep paralysis has taken on the mythology of alien abductions. Sleepers wake up unable to move seeing or feeling the presence of aliens or at least shadows in the room while experiencing zapping sensations and a feeling of suffocation. But it turns out that all of these symptoms describe sleep paralysis, asleep disorder, or symptom of a sleep disorder that temporarily alters a person's mobility perception thinking and emotional state during that weird transition stage between sleeping and waking. Sleep rouses surprisingly common almost eight percent of the general population has experienced it at least once. But if you're a student or someone with a psychological diagnosis, your chances of experiencing, it goes up to almost one in three. But rest assured sleep paralysis is usually harmless especially if it only happens rarely. But why does it happen at all? When should you worry about it and how can you prevent sleep paralysis? While, let's start with a little bit of sleep science. The paralysis part of sleep paralysis actually happens every night when you sleep even though you're usually not aware of it that's because of a special type of sleep called rapid eye movement or REM sleep. Rem Sleep is often referred to as a stage of sleep that takes up twenty to twenty five percents of your typical night. It occurs in a few chunks mostly during the second half of the night. During Rem your brain is very active the electrical signals from the brain look almost the signals has when you're awake. This is also when most dreaming happens along with a lot of emotional processing that the brain does behind the scenes. But importantly, your body is immobilized during rim. Other than the is moving around lots hands the rapid eye movement your muscles lose muscle tone. This is your body's way of preventing you from acting all your dreams, which is a good thing because otherwise you may be running of the room or punching your bed partner while you sleep. So every night during rem you are paralyzed while you hallucinate and process emotions. Usually you don't realize is happening because you're asleep but sometimes when the veil between sleep and wake becomes really thin and you find yourself straddling both worlds of wakefulness and rem sleep at the same time. That's where sleep paralysis can come out. Because suddenly you're awake and paralyzed while you hallucinate an process emotions. Often, this also comes with a racing heart fear and sometimes even a feeling of impending death or doom. The sensation collapse a few seconds to a few minutes though seconds or minutes can feel like a long time when you're scared out of your wits, no wonder people around the world have mistaken sleeper Hollis's for demonic attacks. The good news is that sleep paralysis is usually harmless is simply a temporary snafu and asleep wake brain system that Phil. To transition you completely from sleep to wake. If only happens rarely to you you don't need to worry. But for some people sleep paralysis is more frequent. They're more prone to it or more at risk for it than the average person. So, who are these people and why are they more prone to sleep paralysis? Let's start with narcolepsy asleep wake disorder that is rare and complicated but primarily, a disrupts ability to stay awake and sleep paralysis can be one of the symptoms. An, along with paralysis narcolepsy often also comes with hallucinations when you're falling asleep this is called hip hip jake host nations suddenly falling asleep or losing muscle tone during the day and having poor nighttime sleep quality. If you experience these symptoms along with being just really sleepy, you should ask your doctor for referral to asleep study. Another group of people who are prone to sleep promises is people with anxiety and trauma related disorders including panic disorder generalized anxiety, disorder, social anxiety, or death anxiety, and having experienced trauma or having post traumatic stress disorder or PTSD also can make you more likely to have sleep promises.

Anxiety Dr Jade Woo Partner Ptsd Phil Hollis
Parrots were removed from UK park after teaching each other to swear

America's First News

01:06 min | 2 months ago

Parrots were removed from UK park after teaching each other to swear

"Oh, boy. Oh boy. Luckily, some zoo officials at the British school British who had the wherewithal to separate these foul mouth, parents, uh Zookeepers say the birds keep encouraging others to swear. And it's not good for the kids. Billy Eric Tyson, Jade and Elsie joined Lincolnshire Wildlife Center is a colony of 200 gray parrots in August, a soon revealed a penchant for the blue language Now, Steve Nichols, the zoo's chief executive, says they're quite used to parents swearing, but they've never had five of them do it at the same Time. Hey, says most parents clam up outside, but for some reason they relish it. Uh, he said no visitors have complained about the birds. Most find the situation funny. He says. It amuses people. Pretty highly. Sometimes, when one tells them to F off, brought a big smile to his face this year, all right, Nichols said. The parrots have been separated to save Children's ears moved to different areas of the park, so they don't set each other off.

Steve Nichols British School British Billy Eric Tyson Lincolnshire Wildlife Center Zookeepers Chief Executive Elsie Jade
Philadelphia Police: More Than 50 Shots Fired In Basketball Court Shooting That Killed 2 Men, Injured 3 Others In Spring Garden

KYW 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 2 months ago

Philadelphia Police: More Than 50 Shots Fired In Basketball Court Shooting That Killed 2 Men, Injured 3 Others In Spring Garden

"People were killed, two others wounded when more than 50 shots were fired at a basketball court and park in the spring Garden section of the city last night. K K Y. Y. W's W's Tima Tima Menace Menace has has the the story. story. Roberto Roberto Clemente Clemente Park Park at at 18th 18th and and Wallace Wallace isn't isn't a a place place where where Deputy Deputy police police Commissioner Commissioner Melvin Melvin Singleton Singleton says says a a lot lot of of violence violence happens. happens. We We don't don't usually usually have have problems at this particular pregnant plague around here. So this is an anomaly here, but it turned into a crime scene with white chalk circles scattered all over the basketball court. Investigators were marking the shots that were fired about eight o'clock at night, and it was loud. It was 55 shots, and it sounded like automatic weapons. That's Brian Fitzpatrick, who was out walking his dog. Police say three men shot and killed 21 year old Khalid Henderson. They then fired at three others 18 year old Jade and Lucas, who was killed and 2 19 year olds who were wounded. There were a few dozen people in the park at the time, so with bullets fly Lying. Police say this could have been even worse. There was girls doing yoga right across the street as this happened, and there was someone skateboarding right on this corner, who had nothing to do with the crowd. Police have not released a motive. Some neighbors say they're worried about drugs in the neighbourhood in spring Garden. Tim Jimenez KOW news radio to

Roberto Roberto Clemente Cleme Commissioner Commissioner Melv Basketball Wallace Wallace Spring Garden Khalid Henderson Tim Jimenez Brian Fitzpatrick Skateboarding Jade Lucas
"jade" Discussed on Good Girls Talk About Sex

Good Girls Talk About Sex

07:57 min | 2 months ago

"jade" Discussed on Good Girls Talk About Sex

"Welcome to Good Girls Talk About Sex. I'm sex educator and sexual communication coach Lia carry and this is a place to share conversations with all sorts of women about their experience of sexuality. These are unfiltered conversations between adult women talking about sex. If anything about the previous sentence offends, you can't turn back now. And if you're looking for a trigger warning, you're not going to get it from me. I believe that you are stronger than the trauma you have experienced. I have faith in your ability to deal with things that upset. You sound good. Let's start the show. Today will meet Jade a 51 year old cyst gender female who describes herself as white bisexual monogamous in a relationship and the mother of two children who are still living at home. She's had two miscarriages and still gets irregular. She describes her body as Slender agreed not to be a guest on the show demonstrates a special kind of Courage the courage to be vulnerable and as honest as you know, how to be in that moment. That's why I love it so much when listeners contact me and say they'd like to do an interview J did exactly that for me. There is no greater confirmation of the work that I'm doing then offering that people who are listening want to be a part of it. So if you're listening and thinking you'd like to do an interview with me, please go to Leah Carrie, Yep. Slash guest I'd love to talk with you and now I am so pleased to introduce Jade. Thank you so much for being with me. You are a listener to the show who let me know that you wanted to be interviewed. And as you know, that is my favorite thing. So thank you so much for being here today. You're very welcome. I'm excited. Awesome. So let's start where we always start. What is your first memory of sexual pleasure? I was about ten years old and it was summer time. I was on a swim team in my neighborhood and in the clubhouse in the girls locker room. There was a sauna I was the last one to leave and I don't know what gave me this idea and it wasn't even on a it was just a dark empty room and I remember laying down on the floor. There was a little window so I had a little bit of white and I had a crush on a boy at school and I it was my first sexual fantasy. Basically my ten year old version of a sexual fantasy. I pictured him in the room with me kneeling next to me facing me while I was laying on my back and I had my swimsuit on and in my mind he was clothed his dressed and it was the best most very simple, you know, there was no I'm talking in what I was imagining. I think he touched me gently somewhere on my body and it wasn't even necessarily what we would think of them as adults as sexual touch, but there was just like this. Warm feeling throughout my whole body and I remember feeling aroused and wanting him to touch me in whatever. I thought of at that time at my young age as a sexual touch and I'm not even sure what that was. But yeah, and I remember thinking I hope no one sees me in here because it's so strange. I'm laying on the floor and the Sono by myself. Yeah, that's my first memory of sexual pleasure boss. So it was just laying on the floor. You weren't masturbating or touching yourself wasn't touched I myself. I was just completely still what an interesting and such a clear memory. Yeah. I know and I hadn't thought of that in a very long time until I started listening to your podcast and hearing you ask everyone. What was your memory of your first sexual experience and thought that's what That's what it is. Well, so was there a point at which those sort of I don't I don't want to say romantic fantasies but not the fantasies that involve someone touching you at what point did that bridge to you recognizing that there were parts of your body that you could touch and feel pleasure. Oh my gosh, Well, we'd have to jump a number of years ahead transition to the my first memory of masturbating. My mom used to recommend books to me as a kid. Some of them were famous books some he had read and when I was probably about thirteen so maybe eighth grade She gave me the Clan of the Cave Bear you remember that book? Oh my God, not only do. I remember it. That was the first book I masturbated to wage that's amazing. I have literally maybe told this story to a couple of people over the years like lovers or my ex-husband. I can't even remember. But anyway, so there's a scene in the book where the main character ala I think is her name Meats. The handsome and also injured human that's her same type of human and The evolutionary scale, right? So he's been raised by some down there by the cro-magnons even sure if I'm saying that right so they she tends to his wounds and they have this chemistry and kind of fall for each other and they have there's this incredible passionate sex scene that I can't remember now because I'm fifty-one and I was thirteen when I read that but it really turned me on and I remember I was in my bedroom and no one had ever talked to me about masturbation. Not four girls. Maybe I knew that boys touched their penises thought I might have known that but I have zero memory of Any exposure through other books or movies or I didn't I don't have any sisters. I wasn't really close to other girlfriends for many years as a child. So I didn't have girl. I was talking to about masturbation or sex or anything, but I had this large teddy bear. I straddled the teddy bear on my bed and just prep my sex Parts against the teddy bear kind of thrusting and moving and I had an orgasm. Yeah, that is amazing because that book stands in my memory. I remember the scene you're talking about but that's not actually the one that was for me..

Jade Lia Leah Carrie
‘Resident Evil’ Live-Action Series Ordered at Netflix

Gaming Ride Home

01:47 min | 3 months ago

‘Resident Evil’ Live-Action Series Ordered at Netflix

"A resident evil show, it's coming to net. Flix. NETFLIX's has another video game show to add to its weirdly growing video game TV show roster with the announcement that a resident evil show is in the works, the twitter account and on Netflix which shares all of Netflix's official announcements shared a picture of a script titled Resident Evil Episode One. Oh one welcome to new raccoon city. The accompanying tweet reads when the West kids moved to new raccoon city the secrets they uncover might just be the end of everything resident evil A. New Live action series based on Cap comes legendary survival horror franchise is coming to Netflix something about the phrasing of the whisker kids just makes it feel like it's going to be a kid show. I don't think it is, but it just feels like it's going to be like an animated spinoff or something following the whisker kids. Bradley Russell did some additional reporting on the show for games radar and wrote as per Netflix's the resident evil series will on two timelines and the. First Time Line fourteen year old sisters, jade and billy whisker are moved to raccoon city a manufactured corporate town forced on them right as adolescence is in full swing but the more time they spend there, the more they come to realize that the town is more than it seems and their father may be concealing dark secrets secrets that could destroy the world. The second time line has a serious time jump sixteen years into the future and with a whole lot more zombies on. The scene, there are less than fifteen million people on. Earth. Reads the synopsis of the Second Time Line and more than six billion monsters, people and animals infected with the virus. Jade thirty struggles to survive in this new world while the secrets from her past about her sister, her father and herself continue to haunt her

Netflix Billy Whisker Bradley Russell Jade Twitter CAP Official
Washington, DC sues Washington Sports Clubs for charging customers during COVID-19 shutdown

Ben Shapiro

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Washington, DC sues Washington Sports Clubs for charging customers during COVID-19 shutdown

"Of gymnasiums for charging customers during the pandemic. The six locations of the Washington Sports Club were shut down due to the covert crisis back in March. In a month later, the chain's parent company, T. S, I agreed to credit customers produced Jade and process requests for cancellations. The gym's reopened in June. But Attorney General Karl Racine says he received dozens of complaints that has not lived up to its earlier agreement till he's seeking a court order to force the company to offer credits and cancellations, plus pay civil penalties. On top of that two of the Washington sports Global Locations have since closed permanently. John Matthews on W. M a L and w e mail dot com In D. C. Mayor

Attorney General Karl Racine Washington Sports Club John Matthews Washington D. C. Mayor T. S
Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli Accused of Making Their Daughters “Complicit in Crime”

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli Accused of Making Their Daughters “Complicit in Crime”

"Persecutors, accusing Lauren Laughlin and fashion designer husband most emotionally of allowing their Children to become complicity in crime. Hi guys. Welcome back. Prosecutors, saying the couple instructed their younger daughter, Social media darling, Olivia Jade, how to conceal the scheme from her high school counselor, noting when their daughter as whether she should list USC is her top choice school. Lachlan replying, Yes, but it might be a flag for the weasel to meddle. Prosecutors have recommended a two month sentence for Lachlan and five months for generally, they're also expected to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines and perform community

Lachlan Lauren Laughlin Olivia Jade School Counselor USC
Britney Spears' Ex-Husband Wants Her Back

Daily Pop

08:25 min | 3 months ago

Britney Spears' Ex-Husband Wants Her Back

"Events daily pop. Hey remember when Britney Spears married Jason Alexander for just fifty five hours. Well, he wants her back now. Yes. They're right. Jason was spotted at a free privy protests at the courthouse yesterday he told us weekly. He still has love for Britney and he'd quote definitely the open rekindling their romance quote if they would give us an honest chance. Is he serious right now old what is furious? Is this heat in? Los. Angeles put that photo backup with the orange shirts. I can see that under boop sweat real quick. You know how hot it is in this Place look at. That alone. Look better though. Her he looks good. But I just like what is this guy I mean he clearly has nothing going on like the fact that he's GonNa show up even just give us weekly any sort of exclusively come on. This was how many years ago twelve thirty claims that two thousand four was when this fifty five, our wedding are. happened. They were childhood friends they got married very briefly. Now they've been I think in touch a little bit throughout the years I doubt recently my goodness. So the things he had to say about Sam you guys San has to be so livid right now. Right. So he said I got to see this code and he said I don't know him. He looks like he's in good shape but I'm in good shape. So Bravo to him she's got some type of feelings for him I. Guess I'm like Oh, my Gosh San if he ever sees you, he's going to punch you in the face. He's never gonNA. See Him this guy ever not a factor in her life, and this is the problem. What happens is even though he went there with good intentions quote unquote this just makes everything that Brittany's fighting for a spectacle and it makes it joke and if he really loved her and really wanted to be a part of her life and really wanted to help her, he would have stayed away from that camera and not became this headline. One hundred percent, and also for him to be like if they gave us an honest chance, she doesn't want you like I. Don't know who they. Does not she has no interest in rekindling your relationship I. Promise you that I don't know where he gets off thinking. Oh, if they just would just believe in our love like she's not petitioning for you bro at all, she's not looking for you in any day. Ever Gosh tell it like it is mortgage. Ed I love the. If a man sit outside like that for me I would feel some type of way about it in the. Sweat It's always flattering, right? It's always flattering to see. Talk about how he wants you back I. Mean it's Nice to hear whether you care or not of. The protest was held at the courthouse because there was a hearing about getting Brittany's data removed as conservative as we told, you yesterday according to court documents I'm really wants her care manager Jody Montgomery to step in permanently. So Jason has thoughts on that to telling US weekly Britney doesn't want to be under the conservative ship and he wants her to get what she rightly deserves. So how does he? Oh, how does he know he has not been in contact with her is will be. Governed from ghost talking to this man talent him where Britney saying he has no idea and Britney has said exactly what she wants and this for him. This was kind of a bold move because this hearing wasn't about changing anything this hearing was about let's check in. Let's see what's happening. The real hearing will come once they file papers and once she puts in court writings that she wants this change. This guy's making it worse for her get off her bag they offer not it's just. Weird. Do you think the intention because he wants Brittany back or he wants his own fame or he just was truly going there out of love for Brittany, and truly feels that she feels trapped and was trying to be a voice for her? What do you think I can't believe this I can't believe this is our Abe. Block. Are you kidding he therapy for fifteen minutes and it's going to be four because this is the last time we're talking about this. This is insane person. We have not heard one word about this person in sixteen years six I'm too hot over this. Crazy. You'll get the fifty. He'll get the fifty because what will happen is Cara Delevingne will see him on the news noticing that he's getting airtime. So then she'll date him to make Ashley Benson Jealous, and then he'll get twenty minutes. Oh my God. We're bringing car delving into this way. Okay. Well, let's move onto a couple that we've also talked about a couple of times before. New Year. So Tomorrow Laurie Lachlan and her husband Massimo are scheduled to be sitting for their roles in the college admissions gets scandal at the same time. The government's recently filed sentencing memo raises questions about what their daughter Olivia Jade may have known. So here's the new stuff. You guys. So Libya is never mentioned by name in the document, but they're quote. Younger. Daughter is referred to specifically prosecutors say in one incident Laurie Mossy Ma and they're quote younger daughter discussed how to avoid the possibility that a high school counselor would disrupt their scheme. So the family has not spoken out, but a source close to the family says their daughters had nothing to do with this. So if what the prosecutors are saying is true. That Olivia Jay did know about this do you feel she should be punished as well as her parents? Here She did no I just hello even if she knew or did not know she is a child and was a minor at this point in her life. That age you do as your parents tell you to do you follow suit you. You'd even realize the difference between right and wrong I could barely drive through MC. At that point by myself, give me a break. There's no reason that this young girl should be punished for anything like I understand her parents made a mistake we've been talking about it when I was reading the research is warning I was like for over a year literally been talking about this now for over a year and it's dwindled down to two or three months and five months number one. The she was seventeen. Leave her out of it. It's not relevant for her to be involved with the fact that their names are mentioned I get it. They need to be to kind of paint a full picture you do what your parents, how you to do. This is how we're getting into college. Sweetie you go. Okay. Mom just let me know where I need to be et Cetera not true Morgan you do what your parents tell you to do but let's say let's say you've got some awful parents right? Like I'm not saying these people are saying you got some awful parents and they say honey were broke I want you to go steal some milk and some candy bars and some cereal, and you know what? Go ahead and grab that xbox to they won't even suspect you. You're a teenager just go do it. Okay. If they get caught that could go to Juvie or get some sort of legal. Question. So Matt Your question. Your mother. Makes you sign your name on legal documents that puts you as a as the lender on alone and your mother then defaults on it ten years later should be. Held Liable Harris of thousand dollar loan that your mother made you sign for when you're seventeen or would you fight it? Well that's different because you would never have hypothetical situation that happened in. Dollar Loan. Drill, trust. It happens on sweet bitter. I just saw show where it happened. So where do you bring up that example? I agree with Morgan when you're seventeen years old if my mother would have told me sign the papers for this D to my kidney I wouldn't have asked two questions about it because my mother told me. But my problem is. This is the problem my judicial system we're sitting here worried about what a seventeen year old may or may not have known meanwhile Brianna Taylor's killers walking around free and the people who accosted Eliza McLean have not been nothing has been done to them. We know exactly what happened. We've seen the camera footage we've gone through everything. Why are we focusing on this and not focusing on what we do know?

Britney Spears Brittany Jason Alexander Morgan LOS Angeles Cara Delevingne Brianna Taylor Ashley Benson Bravo SAM Olivia Jade Olivia Jay Laurie Mossy United States Matt Your Laurie Lachlan Libya Jody Montgomery
Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli allegedly instructed Olivia Jade to lie to high school guidance counselor

Donna and Steve

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli allegedly instructed Olivia Jade to lie to high school guidance counselor

"To learn? Lori Laughlin and her husband told their Youtuber daughter to play it Cool. Well with her nosy high school counselor in order to keep their role in the college admission scam under wraps. That's what prosecutors alleged new court documents must emotionally even confronted the counselor for telling it admissions official at the University of Southern California that he doubted Olivia Jade was in crew based on her video blogging schedule. That's according to going around telling people you need to live for us. How dare you do your job? The filing states that Julie aggressively asked. What the counselor was telling you. I see about his daughters and why the counsellor was trying to ruin or get in the way of their opportunities. Oh, my gosh, This isn't good. No. The court document breaking down the case against a celebrity couple was filed by the U. S attorney's office is head of the pairs sentencing, which is coming up on Friday.

School Counselor Lori Laughlin Olivia Jade University Of Southern Califor Julie Attorney Official U. S
Lori Loughlin should spend 2 months in prison for role in college scam: Prosecutors

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Lori Loughlin should spend 2 months in prison for role in college scam: Prosecutors

"One actress Lori Laughlin, to spend two months in prison for her role in the college admissions fraud case. Prosecutors say love one was fully complicity in this scheme to help her daughter's getting the USC is phony crew recruits Laughlin and her fashion designer husband must emotionally Have both pleaded guilty in connection with the fraud. Prosecutors say generally should serve five months in prison for his role in the fraud. There you go, and I hear they're not ah, their daughter that this was all about Olivia Jade. I think her name is no longer speaking to the family. Oh, she's mad at family now Welsh because he's known, added her mother, But she wasn't in on the scam. Remember, that's right. That's right. So this was all mom and dad's doing and looks and she kind of held out. S so that she could maybe fight this and it looks like it's going to come back to bite her. Yeah, but she won't spend as long in prison as I think people were thinking she would. I mean, people were talking about a decade in jail. It's a little art. It seems a little little bit harsh. Pay off those fines.

Fraud Lori Laughlin Olivia Jade Welsh
"jade" Discussed on Mommies Tell All

Mommies Tell All

02:18 min | 3 months ago

"jade" Discussed on Mommies Tell All

"When you feel like you can eat after you've crossed that thrown up threshold and I miss while I do miss also the excuses like no can't do that. I'm pregnant like some. Sometimes, that is really nice to do. Yeah. People can't can't be mad at you and you give that excuse, no, they can't eat. It. Yeah. It really is. But, yeah. Well, guys. Thank you. For listening to our deep conversations with Carlene jade. Yeah. I feel like we should've talked like that. That would have set like a really cool tone. We didn't do that. Little You know what? Also if you're listening and you have some thought provoking questions, syndrome our way, and maybe like every couple of weeks, we could do like a thought provoking question during her episode just to like for everybody the deep end for everybody to kind of have something to like. I thought. Yeah. Call your best friend and ask her the question in like ask your husband link keepings not so surfacing. Don't talk about. AAA burritos. Or you can. Life also needs to be about the delicious small as. But then you know the bigger wise and house also need to be talked about two and I feel like you. I've learned so much about you and you've learned so much about me. Even in the past years of asking questions like this, I do when we do the because, I, do like learning about. Yeah. Well you guys. Thank you so much for listening. We love you and we really appreciate. We appreciate you. We appreciate you. We do Pat Yourself on the bat. Listen. I sometimes wonder sorry because I'm. I sometimes wonder I'm like, wow, we have a lot of people that tune into this and that really does touch me. The anyone anyone who takes time to actually listen to me talk Mike You, listen to me, talk alike, touches. May It's really nice. Nice. Thank you guys and thank you for tuning in every week and for readiness on itunes. If you if you're putting that five star out there, we love you so much because it does help other moms, find us, and hopefully we're creating a community where all moms can feel a part of it. So thank you and we will see you all next week. Yeah. I..

Mike You Carlene jade
Jada and Will Smith reveal marriage trouble on Facebook show

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Jada and Will Smith reveal marriage trouble on Facebook show

"Jade a Pinkett and Will Smith reveal something on her show that had been rumored about marriage trouble in a one on one conversation Friday on jade a Pinkett Smith red table talk she admitted to a relationship with musician August Alsina when she and husband Will Smith were separated she called it an entanglement and Smith corrected or calling it a relationship the couple said they never thought they would make it back but Smith reminded his wife of something he told her one year into the union that he would love her through anything on a lighter note a leading man joked about getting his leading lady back in more ways than one and then the two made a bad reference to ride together die together bad marriage for life their words but it is twenty five years and counting I'm Julie Walker

Jade August Alsina Smith Julie Walker Pinkett Smith Will Smith
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

The World

03:44 min | 5 months ago

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

"A landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar has killed at least 170 people with more feared dead Search and rescue efforts continued for a second day today, authorities say a pile of mine waste slid into a lake after heavy rains that sent a wave of mud and water that buried dozens of people. In a video from the scene. A greenish wave of water floods down a hillside into a valley below workers who are not visible in the frame are further down the hillside fleeing for their lives. Hold on a witches with global witness and environmental and human rights advocacy group. It joins us from Washington. It's jaw dropping this video Paul, it's hard to tell. But this lake seems really big in the waves that resulted from This hillside of waste are enormous. It's scary to watch what happened. How common are these incidents? Unfortunately, also come in. We've seen these types of incidents happened over the last several years with scores of Miners dying As a result, My understanding is that the situation in this case is even worse. An artisanal mining. These were informal workers scavenging the mining ways left behind by a larger mining company. Can you explain how this all works? So mining companies are granted licenses to operate minds. And what happens is as they are digging out the stone where the jade is located there, Dumping the waste into these huge files with building building building two mountains of waste, and you have tens to hundreds of thousands of people in formal miners. They're known locally as M S a Now These informal miners are often mining very perilous conditions with no protection and these rock piles can become unstable and is this like today will then happen. The leader of Myanmar's government on Song said she pledged to clean up the industry when she assumed power back in 2016. What is Myanmar's government doing to regulate these mining operations? And what's changed since on Sun City made that pledge? Well when the end of the government took power. The first thing that they did to address these issues was to suspend the issuances of new license or the extension of existing licenses in an attempt to gain control over the sector and to begin a reform process. Unfortunately, the fundamental problem in the J money area is that there is no rule of law. The area is controlled by armed groups, both me and my military as well as powerful ethnic armed groups and government backed militias. Are all extorting miners illegally taxing you really have along the situation that despite the government's efforts to reform the regulatory framework have not addressed some of the fundamental issues. Yeah, On some suit, she commented on this disasters, she says joblessness is to blame but doesn't sound like this is a new development, as she's implying, is that we have seen an increase in dangerous mining practices since the licensing suspension. One of the prime reason is being that as licenses are set to expire. Companies are mining as fast as possible or when their licenses to expire, though then often partner up with companies that still have activations is And mine as fast as possible in those sites, so that creates a very dangerous condition. Ciccio is right that the informal miners, they say, are often from impoverished communities who come to the jade mines of Contin continue state to try to strike it Rich. Unfortunately, that's a very rare occurrence and more commonly, monies will get hooked on methamphetamine and other drugs and will not be able to survive the experience. Jade industry is a driver of conflict. There's no doubt about it and the revenues That it turns to conflict. Actors are key in their ability to sustain their activities. So there's no doubt that there is a real link to conflict in jail.

Myanmar Methamphetamine Paul Washington Partner Ciccio Song Contin
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

Tim Conway Jr.

00:10 sec | 5 months ago

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

"Landslide at a jade mine in Myanmar has killed more than 160 people. The slide happened in a place that's in the middle of the world's biggest and most lucrative jade mining industry

Myanmar
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"I wonder if they were thinking about everything that Porgy and best represents of the many angles, you can view it from of the stereotypes of Carey's, but also the opportunities that brought them to that very stage. I wonder if they were thinking about everything happening back at home, people fighting for the right to a bus seat to an equal education. Thinking about how they were there in Moscow to fight for every black performers right to be on stage. The Breen Davis tour played a dozen or so more shows after Moscow, the last performance was an Amsterdam on June. Third nineteen fifty-six in all over four years. Production stopped in seventy cities in twenty nine countries. They performed Porgy invest for audiences that spoke eighteen different languages. The cast which changed over the years dealt with racism with people who miss red Porgy and best documentary with people who still shun them in the face of all of that they still wild. Then when they finally returned home Robert Breen got busy trying to arrange one more thing. He wanted the cast of visit the White House, he pulled all his usual strings, and wrote letters, appealing to the Eisenhower administration. He wanted the actress to be recognized for all the work they done for their service to the country. But the White House refused. There are many things to think about when we listen to Porgy and Bess to admire Gershwin's work to appreciate the beauty of the performances. And also to think about all the stories of all the cast members who've played these parts and Sundays words. Maya Angelo gave an interview in twenty ten almost sixty years after she performed in Porgy and Bess. She was asked why she went on the tour how she felt about the work. She said, I knew that there was art from the poets and from the Gershwin's. I knew there was great art. I also knew that they had been inspired by great art. The great art of the African American. More full? What's the other piece? I think about when I listen about the musicians who inspired the work in the first place, the ones Gershwin may have heard in those weeks. He spent in South Carolina listening and researching the ones in the churches or the nightclubs. The ones who get no credit even to this day. But whose work is praised performed and celebrated all over the world. This is our last episode of decompose for. Now, if you enjoyed the show, please rate and review us on your podcast app and tell us what composer, you'd love to hear about in the future. You can find decomposed on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter at decomposed show. That's at decomposed show. Tell us your favorite composer, and who we should cover next. For a complete listing of the music you heard in this episode go to decomposed show dot org. That's decomposed show dot org. For more about the music you heard this episode you'll see our reading list there for this episode. We definitely recommend the strange career of Porgy and Bess by Ellen Newnan along with work by Michael Cy you and John Harper Taylor. Find the fullest at decomposed show dot org. Decomposed is hosted by me. Jade Simmons, it's produced by Tracy Mumford and Ryan more, Chris Juillan is our editor, this episode was written by Tracy Mumford with me drawing on research, by Leinna Leeson, a doctoral student at the university of Michigan sound design by Aaron Cohen, engineering by Corey Schrapel. Thanks to Ryan cats. Our fact checker, the interim director of podcast for eight APM is Loren, d. Decomposed is made possible by inspired by you NPR's capital campaign, and the generosity of Ruth and John Hus. Before you go. Let's talk about how these stories get told decomposed is a public radio podcasts. That is supported by your donations this show and shows like it only happened with your support donate today to hear more shows like this from APM podcast. Give today at decomposed show dot org slash donate.

Porgy Gershwin Robert Breen Amsterdam Tracy Mumford White House Moscow Breen Davis Maya Angelo Bess Loren Carey NPR South Carolina Jade Simmons Ryan John Hus Eisenhower administration Ellen Newnan
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"I want to take you to a street in South Carolina. Right on the waterfront. We're looking up at a mansion that used to be a thing of glory. Now it's a rough looking tenement almost falling down, and packed with people who have nowhere else to go. There dockworkers and fishermen and a beggar on the street. A group of men is gathering to throw dice. There are palm fronds. The women are in flouncy skirts, the men in Chino's. And this. This is all on a stage. Because outside, it's twelve degrees. It's winter in Moscow to make things even chillier. This is Cold War Moscow, nineteen fifty-six and an American cast has come to put on Porgy and Bess. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaped classical music, the heart breaks, the betrayals, and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything. Here we're doing something a little different. We're exploring, not just who composed the music, but who brought it to life, we're going to talk about Porgy and Bess, the opera written by music legend George Gershwin who had a huge impact on American music. But we're also going to talk about the many performers who have sung the music. He wrote the opera Porgy and bass is supposedly a story of real life in the South Carolina slums, but it's been controversial. Since the moment it debuted in nineteen thirty five the opera is set near where I grew up in Charleston, South Carolina. It's a city of contradictions where people are always talking about how beautiful the plantations are or how charming the market is. And sometimes we don't realize that the market is the slave market, or those plantations were once. Places where slaves lived and worked, and so even today, the city of Charleston carries as much controversy as the opera Porgy and best still does today. People have been leveling the same criticisms at the show for more than eighty years, they say the characters are walking racial stereotypes, and they say it's another example of a white composer, getting credit for a score that draws heavily from black music over the decades, directors and cast around the world have had to wrangle with its troubled legacy. But they've also celebrated the creativity of the music and all the opportunities it is held for black performers in this episode we're going to take you from the operas inspiration to the premier and then to a very specific tour that unfolded in the nineteen fifties. It happened. When Europe was still we building after the devastation of World War Two, when it was the height. Of the Cold War. And when the civil rights movement was growing in strength. In the face of all this, the US State Department sent Porgy and Bess on a worldwide run and one government official called it their secret weapon. If you haven't seen Porgy and Bess. This is the super short version. The opera tells the story of Porgy a disabled beggar who's in love with Bess. Bess is struggling with addiction, and she's in a relationship with a violent man Porgy tries to rescue her from both. The opera is ultimately a tragedy by the end Porgy kills best as abusive boyfriend it's an act of defense. But by the time Porgy is released from jail. He finds that best is gone. She's headed north to New York with her drug dealer. The opera is based on the novel Porgy by Dubose Heyward Hayward, also grew up in Charleston. Not far from the docks. He writes about he was inspired. He said by story, he saw in the newspaper about a black beggar and attempted shooting with his wife Dorothy Heyward, adapted his novel into a Broadway. Play a few years later, George Gershwin, and his brother, IRA, joined in, and they worked to turn the whole thing into a full blown opera. Of course Dubose and Dorothy, Heyward, George and IRA Gershwin. They were all white. This was the reality. Of mainstream culture for really the majority of US history, the composers, and writers, and the lira Cest, and the theater producers, they were almost entirely white. There were incredibly talented black composers, Scott Joplin, Florence price, Samuel Coleridge, Taylor, and many others. But

Porgy Bess George Gershwin Dubose Heyward Hayward South Carolina Charleston Moscow Dorothy Heyward Jade Simmons IRA Gershwin US State Department Europe Scott Joplin US flouncy Chino Samuel Coleridge
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"On december. I nine thousand nine hundred ninety four a rare music dealer hustled through the London rain to make it to an auction held at Sotheby's. I know most classical music stories don't start in the mid nineties, but stay with me here. This music dealer. He was on a mission some clients had pulled their money and asked him to make very specific purchase. He was to bid on lot thirty three a small black Lockett the auction near opened the bidding at two thousand pounds. That's about five thousand dollars today. The price took off from there. Edging up and up and up, but the music dealer stayed in the bidding and he clinched the deal. His winning offer was nearly ten thousand dollars about double where they started lot. Thirty three was one the pricey little lock it was bound for the United States. The buyers were waiting. They didn't just want the lock it. They wanted. It was holding. Tucked inside was a strand of Ludvig van Beethoven's hair. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaped classical music, the heartbreaks, the betrayals, and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything. Now, you know, Mehtonen he's the biggest name in all of classical music. He's the guy people think of in this genre. Because he's everywhere if you learn to play the piano as a kid, I bet you spent hours playing this one. I know I do. The first Beethoven piece. I remember truly mastering was the third movement of the moonlight sonata. This finger BUSTER. And of course, there's. Yeah. That one. Beethoven story is one a lot of people think they know. But the truth is there are still so many questions, and there's so many people looking for answers. Researchers are digging away in his papers and compositions craftsmen are trying to reconstruct the exact kind of Pano he would've played on to know what it would have sounded like scholars are theorizing who his love letters were really for and they're like nine potential ladies they've come up with by the way on top of all that there's a whole flock of people who've tried to find an answer for why Beethoven went deaf. It's a cruel irony. Right. That one of the world's most famous composers whose work we hear everywhere lost the ability to hear his own music. And it's not that he just had a hard time hearing in his old age. Now, this started in his twenties before he'd even written any of the music. We just played. The theories for what caused his hearing loss are all over the place. And they've changed over the years. There's typhoid syphilis nerve damage alcoholism. And let me repeat they're all theories. People have so many questions about Beethoven in his life that they'll look everywhere and do anything like paid ten thousand dollars for a locket with a chunk of hair clip from the head of a dead Ludvig van Beethoven that lock it and the hair all five hundred eighty two strands of it. Now, sit at the Beethoven center at San Jose State university a handful of members from the American Beethoven society where the clients at that southern auction. They bought it and donated it to the center the hair strands underwent four years of testing. What did we learn? Beethoven likely had lead poisoning, which could not have been pleasant. But did that cause his hearing loss? Again, we can't say the why as in. Why did he go death? That's something. We might never know. Exactly. No matter how much hair we analyze or how many test we run. But the question I'm fascinated by when I play his music is the how how did he continued to compose when he couldn't hear it's easy to think his hearing loss held him back. But I think that's the exact wrong or protest this.

Ludvig van Beethoven Beethoven center Mehtonen Sotheby Lockett Jade Simmons London United States typhoid San Jose State university ten thousand dollars five thousand dollars two thousand pounds four years
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"That opening to the seventh symphony the first movement, the invasion theme, if you're listening to it thinking about World War Two it's Hitler you hear marching in. But if you're a Russian living in fear of prison camps, it could be Stalin and his secret police finally coming for you. Shostakovich's work can be read as praised of the state, and as critique over the course of his career. He was celebrated and announced when Stalin died in nineteen fifty three his iron grip on the country was finally released a decade after that Shostakovich went to watch up a form of his seventh symphony the group featured sixteen musicians from that original group in Leningrad who had played the work while facing starvation, death and an invading army. They had survived the siege. And they came together to play it again in front of the composer, the original conductor from that night was there to the man whose coat-tails at hung off of him like a skeleton while he led the performance he wrote about the night later about how they played the Leningrad symphony for Shostakovich himself. The city now lives, a peaceful life. The conductor said, but no one has the right to forget the past. For a complete listing of the music. You heard in this episode, go to decompose show dot org. That's decomposed show dot org for more about the music. You heard this episode. You'll also see our reading list there for this episode. We definitely recommend symphony for the city of the dead by. Mt. Anderson and Shostakovich and Stalin by Solomon Volkov. Find more titles at decomposed show dot org. You can find decomposed on Instagram Facebook and Twitter at decomposed show. That's at decomposed show. Tell us your favorite composer, and who we should cover next. Decomposed is hosted by me, Jade Simmons. It's produced by Tracy Mumford and Ryan Lor Chris Jolan is our editor this episode was written by Tracy Mumford with me. Sound design by Aaron Cohen engineering by Corey Schrapel. Thanks to Elizabeth Lundy our researcher and Ryan cats. Our fact checker the interim director of podcast for APM is Loren dean. Decomposed is made possible by inspired by you NPR's capital campaign and the generosity of Ruth and John Hus. Before you go. Let's talk about how these stories get told decomposed is a public radio podcasts that is supported by your donations this show and shows like it only happened with your support donate today to hear more shows like this from APM podcast, give today at decomposed, show dot org slash donate.

Shostakovich Stalin Leningrad Tracy Mumford Loren dean APM Jade Simmons Ryan Lor Twitter NPR Aaron Cohen Mt Solomon Volkov Elizabeth Lundy John Hus interim director Corey Schrapel Ruth Anderson
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"In the fall of nineteen forty one the Russian countryside was on fire. The German army was marching across the Soviet Union at an alarming rate and villagers were torching. Their own towns and farms to prevent them from being taken. The troops that were bound for Moscow were relentless intent on reaching the Russian capital, but Joseph Stalin, the Soviet leader wasn't about to surrender his city to Hitler. Stalin had a plan if the German forces were to capture Moscow, the city's most prize buildings were read to blow the Kremlin cathedrals the fanciest hotels and the Bolshoi theatre. The theater is as grand as you can imagine towering columns on the outside all velvet chandeliers on the inside. If Hitler made it to Moscow and wanted to celebrate his victory by going to performance at the Bolshoi the Russians were ready for him. They lined the orchestra pit of the theatre with explosives booby, trapping, the building and in an image. I can't shake ballerinas and circus performers were trained to dance on stage while holding grenades to kill whoever. They could if they got the chance lever a composer and a member of the Soviet secret police he had a very specific assignment. If Moscow fell if the German swept in if he could get close enough. He was to kill Hitler. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaped classical music, the heartbreaks betrayals, and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything. There are many dark inspirations at work in classical. One of the darkest is more. For thousands of years. More has brought music bands playing troops marched drummers and Pfeiffer right on the frontlines music is used to rally spirits build national pride and to mourn the fallen. Some of the most powerful pieces come from composers reflecting on war from Tchaikovsky's eighteen twelve overture to Britain's war requiem. In this episode. We dive into World War Two were music became a weapon for the Soviets as they fought the Germans and sometimes as they fought themselves. There was lead Nipper the composer turned would be assassin. He never had the fire that shot. Those ballerinas never pulled the grenade pins that plan at the Bolshoi was never forced into action, but in another Soviet city. Also squarely in the path of the marching Germans. There was a composer who did harness his music in the darkest moments of war. This is the story of the Mitri Shostakovich and the siege of money grad. Dmitri Shostakovich grew up in political chaos. He watched the fall of the last czar, the rise of communism and the formation of the Soviet Union. He lived in Saint Petersburg, petrograd and Leningrad all without moving the Russian city changed names and regimes around him by the time. He was ten he was writing political music like the funeral March for the victims of the revolution. And the only kept going from there his first symphony debuted when he was nineteen. And it wasn't just played Leningrad played in Chicago and Philadelphia to in the west his early music is steeped in Russian pride choruses that praise Lenin communist songs at the end of the symphonies. And

Moscow Hitler Soviet Union Bolshoi theatre Dmitri Shostakovich Joseph Stalin Saint Petersburg Nipper German army Jade Simmons Pfeiffer petrograd Tchaikovsky Lenin Britain Philadelphia Chicago
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"Again. The introduction. He told her is the theme for the whole symphony. It's faked the pesky force that keeps us human beings from ever finding contentment and happiness and the daydreams that can distract us giving us fleeting moments of joy, only to be ruined by fate again. He explained that the second movement was his own depression. Like that feeling you get when you're tired from day of work, and you're sitting alone. Maybe you pick up a book and slips out of your hand. You play memories of your youth and your head instead. The third movement. He said. Was the way you feel after a few strong drinks, you're not happy or sad. You're not thinking of anything specific you just let your imagination run free. It's a type of skate. And then finally the fourth symphony makes a suggestion one that Tchaikovsky probably wished he could take for himself. If you can't find joy within yourself. Look at others, go out among the common people and see what a good time. They have. The music paints have picture of peasants celebrating. But before the symphony ends. Fate intervenes. Again. Faith brings you back to yourself and the rest of the world dances on Tchaikovsky wrote. You have only yourself to blame. You cannot say that everything in the world is sad. Learn from the happiness of others with their simple. But potent pleasures, it is possible to live. If you're enjoying decomposed. The absolute best thing you can do for the show is to tell somebody about it. Help spread the word and take a moment to rate and review us on your podcasting app. You can find decomposed on Instagram Facebook and Twitter at decomposed show. That's at decomposed show. Tell us your favorite composer, and who we should cover next. For complete listing of the music. You heard in this episode Goto decomposed, show dot org. That's decomposed show dot org for more about the music. You heard this episode. You'll also see our reading list there for this episode. We recommend Tchaikovsky by Anthony Holden and tchaykovsky by Roland John. Wiley decomposed is hosted by me, Jade Simmons. It's produced by Tracy Mumford and Ryan Lor Chris Julian is our editor this episode was written by illicit Dudley with me sound design by Molly bloom, engineering by John Steele, Michael Osborne, and John Miller. Thanks to Elizabeth Lundy. Our researcher and Ryan cats are fact checker the interim director podcast for eight P M is Loren d. Decomposed is made possible by inspired by you NPR's capital campaign and the generosity of Ruth and John Hus much of the music. Featured is courtesy of Knox owes of America Inc. Before you go. Let's talk about how these stories get told decomposed is a public radio podcasts that is supported by your donations this show and shows like it only happened with your support donate today to hear more shows like this from APM podcast, give today at decomposed, show dot org slash donate.

Tchaikovsky depression Jade Simmons Elizabeth Lundy John Hus Ryan Lor Twitter NPR researcher Knox Loren d John Miller Tracy Mumford America Inc Roland John Ruth Anthony Holden interim director Dudley Michael Osborne
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"Uh-huh. In eighteen seventy seven Illitch Tchaikovsky was a musical star on the rise. Just finished writing his first panel concerto a piece of music that would become so famous musicians would come to call it the. But at this point, it wasn't famous and neither was he. Checkups Ke's main gig was teaching at the Moscow conservatory of music. He was thirty seven years old handsome with kind eyes and dark hair that he kept swept away from his for it. He had the try and find time for composing outside of his classes at the conservatory and the organized concerts on a shoestring budget. Time and money were tight, but he was making it work. And he didn't know it yet. But this would be a big year one that would change his life forever. He was about to receive two very strange letters. One was the beginning of a love story. The other would lead to what he considered the biggest mistake of his life. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaped classical music, the heartbreaks betrayals, and the acts of shared genius that changed everything. Tchaikovsky is famous for giving the world some of the most romantic musically. The fantasy overture Romeo and Juliet. Swan LAKE ballet. Romances that end in tragedy. Tchaikovsky's own battles with love with intimacy with finding a soul mate. I feel like you can hear them in his music. I'm going to tell you the tangled love stories behind one of the world's most romantic composers. Back to those two letters Trajkovski received eighteen seventy seven let's start with the letter that arrived on Chris winter day from a woman named dej devan MEK. She was a forty seven year old widow. She had twelve kids, and she was a multimillionaire, her husband had died just a year before he was a railroad tycoon, and he'd left her a massive fortune and von Meck her big passion was music. She'd commissioned the piece from tchaykovsky before but they had never met in person. Instead she'd been admiring Trajkovski from afar for a while. Now, she didn't just know his music. She was a huge fan. Her letter arrived after he conducted the debut of his March slob. And let me tell you conducting was not as thing. Tchaikovsky got horrible stage fright. He could barely keep together up there. But it was running low on cash. So we did it. On stage that night he felt clumsy and unsure of himself. Von Meck was in the audience. In B-flat, minor his March slobs starts out a little melancholy. But also playful like Tchaikovsky's got something as sleep. Which he definitely does. When the full string section comes in. He hits you with this joy, full expansive theme, and it moved by MEC profoundly. She wrote tchaykovsky a letter a pretty bold one. If you ask me, she wrote, I should like very much to tell you at length of my fancies and thoughts about you. But I fear to take up your time of which you have so little to spare. She went on. Let me say only that my feeling for you is a thing of the spirit and very dear to me. So if you will call me, a Radic, perhaps even crazy, but do not laugh, it could be funny. If it were not so sincere and real. Tchaykovsky didn't laugh at all. He responded right away. Why do you hesitate to tell me all your thoughts? He wrote if some happy day, you will do me the honor of writing me what you have so far withheld. I shall be very grateful and with that all formality disappeared. Von Meck took him at his word and replied with a long letter. She told him how she hated socializing and small and she asked for a photo of him. She said she already had two, but she wanted one directly from him. She told him how she was convinced that the perfect man was a musician with a great personality to boot. She was short Tchaikovsky fit the Bill again. This is all even though they'd never met. She confessed as soon as she'd heard Tchaikovsky's music. She started asking about him around town. She wanted to know everything about her new musical crush. She done so much asking around that at this point. She wrote that she pretty much knew when and where he was at all times. Okay. So a little creepy, right? Like when you get those random messages from someone on social media, and then you look back, and you see they've scrolled through all your pictures, and all your videos and left way too, many heart emojis, come on. If you got a letter like this, you'd be a little weirded out. Maybe even a little alarmed you might chock it up to an over enthusiastic fan. But there was something about von mex- letter. Maybe the way she described being overcome by his music, whatever it was Tchaikovsky connected with it. He said of the photographs she'd ask for and even wrote her some music. A funeral March. That was never published because he wrote it just for her. And then he bared his soul right back to her. He told her how he to struggle to become close with people how he was always afraid of disappointing them, social anxiety was something they had in common, which is why very early in their friendship. They made an agreement. It's a bizarre one for someone you feel so close to but they agreed. They would never ever meet von Meck was sure she'd be too nervous awkward and Tchaikovsky didn't think he'd live up to the version of himself that von Mak had imagined. But if they took away the pressure of having a meeting person, then they could just be themselves in the letters. They became intense pen pals, and I'm not talking about that one you promise to right after summer camp. And it lasted all of a week. This wasn't like that. These two were serious. They were writing each other. Almost every day, which brings us to the second. Strange letter Trajkovski got in eighteen seventy seven.

Illitch Tchaikovsky Von Meck Trajkovski Meck Jade Simmons Moscow Ke von Mak Swan LAKE ballet dej devan MEK B-flat Tchaykovsky Romeo Juliet thirty seven years forty seven year
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"A year later Rijkaard died while Paulina held his hand. And she followed not too far behind. Now before we close this at the sewed. I want to emphasize that the Strauss's are difficult couple capture their story is complicated for many reasons, including the fact that near the end of their lives. They lived in Germany Hitler rose to power. Late news career Rijkaard wrote pieces for the Nazi regime. He served as president of the state music bureau. But he also lost that top post when he insisted that a Jewish man who wrote the libretto for his opera be properly credited in the program. There are many important conversations to be had about how we think of music. Composed by people with ties to hate. We have more about that in our episodes notes and on our website, check out those resources for more background. For a complete listing of the music. You heard in this episode Goto decomposed, show dot org. That's decomposed show dot org for more about the music. You heard this episode. You also see our reading list there for this episode. We recommend Rijkaard Strauss man musician in 'nigma by Michael Kennedy. Decomposed this hosted by me Jade Simmons, it's produced by Tracy Mumford and Ryan Lor Chris Julian is our editor this episode was written by illicit Dudley with me sound design by Aaron Cohen engineering by John Steele, Michael Osborne, and John Miller. Thanks to Elizabeth Lundy our researcher and Ryan cats. Our fact checker the interim director of podcast for APM is Loren d. Decomposed is made possible by inspired by you NPR's capital campaign and the generosity of Ruth and John Hus much of the music. Featured is courtesy of Knox owes of America Inc. Before you go. Let's talk about how these stories get told decomposed is a public radio podcast that is supported by your donations this show and shows like it only happened with your support donate today to hear more shows like this from APM podcast, give today at decomposed, show dot org slash donate.

Rijkaard Strauss Ryan Lor Paulina APM John Hus Germany Michael Kennedy NPR Strauss Elizabeth Lundy Knox interim director Jade Simmons president Loren d Tracy Mumford Michael Osborne America Inc Ruth Aaron Cohen
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"Let's start somewhere the public usually never gets to see. Our rehearsal. You don't get to see them because they're full of mistakes and risk and things and orchestra doesn't want you to see. This hersal is unfolding in eighteen ninety four in the city of Weimar, Germany. The city Symphony Orchestra is rehearsing an insanely difficult opera written by their conductor himself Rijkaard's Strauss. Rijkaard is twenty nine and he's the junior conductor. His opera is called Guntram. It's his very first one. And it's a little ambitious. Even Rijkaard had to admit he'd got a little overboard. His score has parts for sixty two string players, and he only had twenty one to work with he described his own work, quote, insanely demanding especially for the vocalist. He felt bad for as male lead. Heinrich Zeller whose voice sounded so horse already. Still just in rehearsals that he might lose it entirely by opening night. Not a good sign. Rickards opera wasn't just physically demanding the music is dense and complicated. To which is probably why Zeller just can't seem to learn his part. Rijkaard keep stopping him over and over again to correct every little mistake. Finally, they make it to act three and Zeller takes a break. Now. It was Paulina day honest turned to sing her aria, which she does beautifully. She doesn't miss a single note. But suddenly, she goes silent. Why don't you stop me? She says clearly annoyed because you know, you're part Rijkaard tells her a some artists might take this as a compliment, but not Paulina this infuriates her with the entire orchestra watching. She launches her sheet music at Rijkaard's head yelling, I want to be stopped. Fortunately, she misses his head. The music lands in the violin section Paulina storms off to her dressing room with Rijkaard following close behind the orchestra could. hear them yelling at each other from behind the closed door, and one story goes that hearing all that commotion. The orchestra leader finally works up the courage to knock on paulina's dressing room door when Rijkaard answers the orchestra leader tells him that everyone had talked it over and they'd made a decision they refuse to play with anyone who would disrespect him the way Paulina just had. But Ricard says it's okay he in Paulina had more than made up. In fact, he said he just asked her to marry him. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaped classical music, the heartbreaks, the betrayals, and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything. And today we have little change of pace. The world of classical music is packed with dramatic figures whose lives are filled with intrigue heartbreak and suffering. Right. Well today, I want to tell you the story of a musical couple. That's more slapstick rum com than melodrama Rijkaard's, Strauss and Paulina Donna had one of those big splashy loves people often write about Rijkaard in Pauline a- as artists and means. But I think that completely downplays her role in his life. What I think news. I imagined this passive beauty admired from afar. Paulina was anything, but passive and forget a far she'd get right up in regards face if she needed to. She didn't just have a voice she had allowed that she loved to use onstage and off. Rijkaard loved that Boyce. Through music documented their lives together, their highs and lows their spats and their moments of total devotion. So that big seem while Lena caused and that rehearsal the yelling and the throwing of music that's nothing compared to what else is coming this. This is a story of a man meeting his match in so many ways. When

Paulina Donna Rijkaard Heinrich Zeller city Symphony Orchestra Weimar Germany Jade Simmons Rickards Ricard Guntram Lena Boyce Strauss
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"Right? Clara Schumann was one of the first to memorize the music for recital. Thanks, a lot Clara setting the standard for piano, performance that we still follow today. She's also remembered as an important interpreter of other people's music, not just her husband's but Beethoven's and Brahms who knows how much she's responsible for their legacies. I mean, she's like the ultimate influencers for this era in music, some people even think that Roberts music would not be remembered today without Clara promoting and playing it almost her whole life. She was determined that the world remember, Robert Schumann's, knee, and she succeeded she toward toward and she made his music famous. But one evening near the end of her life at the Saint James hall in London. She decided to do something different something rare. Clara took the stage. She done this a thousand times before she was sixty six now, maybe moving a little slower than she had before her gray hair was pulled back her fingers at the keys. I picked your her there on that stage. After all she'd lived through still up there playing. It makes me think of a line from her diary, which she wrote years before she said, I once believed I had creative talent. But I have given up this idea. A woman must not wish to compose. There never was one able to do it. And I intended to be the one it would be arrogant to believe that. Guts me to read that to know that she felt that way. But this night in London at this concert. She didn't play just Roberts music. She didn't just play the work of others. She sat down and she played variations opus twenty. Her own music. A p she'd never played before in public a piece that she'd composed despite the doubting and their critiques any expectations of what a woman could. And couldn't do. That night is she played. I like to think she believes she could be the one. And she made space for those of us who followed. For a complete listing of the music. You heard in this episode, go to decompose show dot org. That's decomposed show dot org for more about the music. You heard this episode. You'll also see our reading list there for this episode. We definitely recommend sounds and sweet airs the forgotten women of classical music by Anna, beer, and Clara Schumann the artists. And the woman by Nancy be Reich. Decomposed is hosted by me, Jade Simmons. It's produced by Tracy Mumford and Ryan Lor Chris Julian is our editor this episode was written by Elissa Dudley, Tracy, Mumford and me sound design by vowel Keller engineering by John Steele, and Michael Osborne. Thanks to Elizabeth Lundy. Our researcher Ryan cats, our fact checker and garett Tetum. For shaping the sound. The interim director of podcast for a PM is Loren d. Decomposed is made possible by inspired by you NPR's capital campaign and the generosity of Ruth in John Hus much of the music featured is courtesy of Naxos of America Inc. Decomposed is a public radio podcasts that is supported by your donations this show and shows like it only happened with your support donate today to hear more shows like this from APM podcasts. Give today at decomposed dot org slash don't.

Clara Schumann Brahms Roberts Robert Schumann London Ryan Lor Saint James hall Tracy Mumford garett Tetum interim director Beethoven NPR Elizabeth Lundy Loren d researcher John Hus Nancy Jade Simmons Anna Naxos
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"She performed it back at the von house surrounded by the city's orchestra. Sixteen years old. Critics were impressed one wrote that if the name of the female composer were not on the title, one would never think it were written by a woman. That of course was a compliment for the time. When I think about Clara, I think about her being caught in this trap. And she was remarkable because she was a woman something to talk about gossip about be totally shocked by can you believe that girl just played that? Well. For the record Clara wasn't just a great composer for a woman. She was a great composer period. Her work is powerful full of harmonic surprises. Robert Schumann wasn't the only musical genius in their relationship. And that relationship it's just about to get started. The tangled situation begins when a teenage Clara comes back from one of their performance tours after being away from months and Robert Schumann looks at her. Oh, she's not a kid anymore. Forget that pilgrim shrines stuff. There's definitely something else there despite the age difference. The two of them start in eighteen hundreds era and Fatua wish in writing letters to each other constantly even dedicating compositions to one another which is seriously romantic. I mean, why isn't anyone do that anymore? But romance side Roberts world was a lot darker than Clara new. He was composing turning out new work, but his diaries telev- losing his mind of deep fits of melancholy. Things that sound today light classic symptoms of depression in injury to his hand made it worse. He couldn't fully play his own music the middle finger on his right hand. When completely stiff imagine sitting at a piano with music in your head. What you can't play. Clara was the bright light for him smart talented beautiful and capable of getting his work in front of an audience. She had the spotlight, and she could charm people in a way, he just couldn't. She was perfect. I just wanna say Robert Schumann fell in love with a lot of women like his three sisters in law. Maybe a wealthy married family friend. He even got engaged to one of Clara's, friends and fellow piano students who also live with VX, but he was done with all that now at Clarice sixteenth birthday party, Robert and a bunch of friends pulled their money to buy her a gold watch the champagne was flowing and after dinner Clara sat down at the Pano. Her guest all around her. She put her fingers to the keys. And she played one of Robert's pieces. The schedule f sharp minor Sohn. When I listen, I can imagine she felt his eyes on her back as she played it that night mastering his music playing perfectly. What came out of his head? Not long after Clara. And Robert had a rare moment alone at our father's house. It was dark out Clara offered to walk Robert down the stairs holding a lamp, but he stopped her before they reached the bottom he kissed her. And she nearly dropped the lamp Clara was clearly head over heels. I kiss I love you think she'd wanna run and write about it in her diary, but no, she's a sixteen year old girl head-spinning with all these new emotions, and she can't write down a word of it. Because her father, still reads her diary.

Clara Robert Schumann Fatua telev Sixteen years sixteen year
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"On a fall night in eighteen twenty eight in ornate glass carriage pulled up outside of the famous concert hall in Leipzig, Germany. The door opened this little girl climbed out and she was sobbing. This was at the van house these spot in town the biggest stars of classical music had played their Mozart vaber. You name it that night. The place was packed with the town's elite eager to see a new performer and up. Those stairs. Went this little girl. Wiping at our tears. There'd been a dreadful mistake the wrong carriage had picked her up at home. And now she was late and her father was impatiently waiting for her when she got to him. She was shaking nervous and still crying. He told her to calm down. He needed her to pull it together. And she did nine year old Clara Schumann walked out onto the stage. I'm Jade Simmons. And this is decomposed. We bring you the stories that have shaved classical music, the heartbreaks portrayals, and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything. I'm a pianist and composer played all over the world. But I didn't start at the piano until I was eight which is like over the hill in the world of classical music sounds crazy. But it's true people in most careers don't start in preschool. But in my industry, it's expected, and it's been that way for centuries. You've heard the stories Mozart at a piano at three. Beethoven performing at seven. Chopin already composing full scores by that age a name that doesn't get mentioned often in that conversation. Clara schumann. If you're thinking Schumann, I know that name you're probably thinking of Robert Schumann her husband. He was the popular one are prolific imposer. And even if you don't know the pieces by name, you've probably heard his work. The only reason you ever heard of him or his music, that's because of Clara she made his work possible while composing her own music too. When I look back at Clara when I hear her music. I think about how she really was attempting the impossible and in some ways she pulled it off in other ways history kept her down. This is the story of a woman who was born to play and refuse to stop. This is the story of Clara Schumann. Whatever it is that child prodigies have Clara had it at five she could play by ear. She could transpose she could improvise her brain just work that way. She was her father's pet project for shore. Friedrich vedic was trying to build a reputation as a piano teacher, and what better way to do that. Then a turn out another little Beethoven. And if he could do that with his daughter, just a magin what he could do with your son. Friedrich train Clara for an hour every day, and then she'd practice for at least two more. And this is when she still seven eight nine years old. Performer wants brag that she didn't have time to play with dolls, especially not with other children. We know a lot about this part of Clara's early musical career because there's a diary that documents all of it. Well, I mean, it's technically her diary, but it was her father writing the entries at first, and he wrote them as if he were Clara just listen to this entry, my father who long had hoped for change of disposition on my part observed again today that I am just as lazy careless disorderly disobedient etcetera as ever. Yeah. That's her father writing in her voice in her diary that she's lazy talk about mind games. Despite all that supposed laziness and carelessness though Clara was an undeniable star and a resume was stacked first public performance at nine I solo concert at eleven then her. Other took her on the road to Paris, and she was a hit. It's not bad. No other women played the piano. They did. They just played at home.

Clara Schumann Clara Robert Schumann Leipzig Germany Jade Simmons Beethoven Mozart Friedrich vedic Chopin Paris seven eight nine years nine year
"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

Decomposed with Jade Simmons

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on Decomposed with Jade Simmons

"Imagine. If every time you got mad really mad. This welled up around you for everyone to hear. For imagine. If that time, you got your heart Bulkin. You know, the time that your chest open time. This just started pouring into the room. Every emotion you ever felt is inside classical music right there in the notes because the people who wrote it they're right there with you getting their hearts broken their dreams crushed hitting walls with their work. And also experiencing moments of just total and complete joy. I'm Jade Simmons. A classical pianist and storyteller, and we're bringing you a new show that breaks down the human stories behind the music. It's decomposed coming this April. You'll hear about the bizarre things captured and Clara Schumann's diary about Tchaikovsky getting tangled up with the very wealthy. Widow who made some peculiar demands about Rijkaard Strauss mining his personal life for musical inspiration much to the embarrassment of his wife stories of families and failures loss in triumph love, and oh, I cannot believe you really just did that. There's war royalty propaganda child. Prodigies? It's all in the mix right there in the music. For the stories that shaped classical music, the heartbreaks the scandals and the acts of sheer genius that changed everything listen to decomposed. This April produced in partnership with American public media and classical Minnesota public radio.

Jade Simmons Clara Schumann Rijkaard Strauss Minnesota Tchaikovsky
"jade" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"jade" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"Competitor. And feeding her kids as much pizzas possible. All right Jade, we've got some questions for you today. A few of which were posed by internet. Jay everybody who the show smiliar with internet j you are not. So this is a human you've never met. But he's familiar with you because he works for me. And he's listened to the episodes the episode that you are on. So he he came up with a few questions based on the things that you have a considerable amount of knowledge in I would say the first of which is I'm a firm believer in the law of attraction in it plays a huge role in how I live my life. What are some ways that I can attract more positive energy into my life? And again, these are all questions from from internet. Jay. Daily practice. Sure. That'd be a good start. So I feel like the inner the universe. I know. It's such a woo thing to say, but like the universe matches the energy that you're putting out there. So if you're complaining all the time, or you know, it's like the idea of like water meeting water. So if you're complaining all the time or saying how hard things are. It's like they're going to be that way. But if you're so, of course, that's you know, here he said the law of attraction, but for me something that I really just for the record hand up. Explain that for me. It's basically that like the fact that you're gonna attract what you are. You're gonna tracked what you're putting out there. So for me, I I try to do positive affirmations all the time for my. Goals this year. I instead of saying. I I make this amount of money or I have this type of health instead of saying I want these things or saying, you know, in any form of a negative word like I don't struggle with this anymore. I used all positive and present terms. So keeping every thought or as many thoughts as possible as positive as you can't. Yeah. And also like Mike is a good example like today as soon as I asked him like, how are you? He said better than ever. I told you that's what he says every day when we when I see him. He'll be a Mike, Mike. How you doing man? He's like best day. I've ever had every day. Yeah. So that's a big a big type of law attraction when you're putting that energy onto the universe. You're gonna track that you're gonna track those type of people..

Mike Jay Jade
"jade" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"jade" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

"This is episode seventy nine of the fierce and fabulous podcast with photographer casey jade how low and welcome to the fit veers and fabulous podcasts my name is courtney bentley i'm the sound of the fit and fabulous club of certified personal trainer in inspirational speaker for the into the stage i've found my passionate opening boss base get fit their business and looks fabulous while doing it every week i'm bringing you topped experts hope you reach your full potential life i through those doors and ignite the confidence with you have an infection energy enthusiasm for life sits down for some wine and let's become fierce and fabulous ach jade my girl her and i go way back to my very first workshop i hosted my very first moon workshop in october and as comfortable as it was for me to click publish on that event bright page and to search sharing that i was going to do these moon workshops i can't believe still to this day that i do them and how amazing the are and they were just so aligned with me and my mission and message it's just so beautiful my casey jade came to my very first one where i was super duper nervous and she was just such a right light in such a beautiful soul i had to get to know her a lot more her and i got to talking and i learned that she did these beautiful boudoir photo shoots for women and as someone whose mission is to empower women to grow tweed volved to be fit fierce and fabulous i was like oh gee this is next level fabulous she is such a gift to this planet and i love that her mission is to take women and transform how they see themselves by doing these photo shoots so duar photo shoot for those of you don't know is like a sexy play.

casey jade courtney bentley