17 Burst results for "Jacqueline Woodson"

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:21 min | 5 months ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Kioko, who has? he's from Puerto. Rico which makes him in American citizen. He has a monolingual, Spanish speaking parent that he has to translate for and the hatred that gets thrown at him because because his mother speaks beautiful language and the ridiculousness of that and. The fact that People's cultures constantly getting called into question and the thing about harbor me is I started writing that book a long time ago. I mean we've been dealing with mass incarceration in this country for a long time. We've been dealing with deportation in this country for a long time. We've been dealing with economic disparities for like long time, so so taking those kids and putting them in the room to talk about these questions that I've always had and that you know lots of kids have. Made Sense to me. I WanNa ask you about this particular moment, because kids on top of everything on top of these issues that we've been talking about about racial justice about the protests about black lives matter we're also they are also dealing with this corona virus and lockdown at home, and away from their friends, and all kinds of challenges that are associated with that. What are you hearing from them about this for about this sort of confluence of challenges right now? My son complains about teachers, not knowing how to use ill. I. Think that's one frustration for the young people you know. They're so ahead of us. In terms of using technology and here we come. We also like okay now. I gotta get to zoom call without like. How do we do this again? It's like. Zoo. So so I I definitely hear the frustration and the thing. My son said the other day was like I'm forgetting how to socialize with people, and that broke my heart because it is we. Are you know where pods where you know doing are sheltering where? Trying to figure out how to stay engaged, but we're engaged with a screen at the same time telling them to have less screen time you know it's it's all of these I don't know kind of contradictions going on and at the end of the day. They're like okay. So when is this thing going to be over at the same time? They're learning how to negotiate a main. Automatically! Put on their masks when we. Go into a store, and and again going back to their resilience, and their ways of being able to. kind of move like water with the Times is always. Gratifying Is that the hopeful. What's hopeful about this moment? I mean perhaps the pandemic offering them a chance I don't know to look up and see what's going on in their world. Even though that sounds contradictory, because of course, they're staring at screens the. Screens and everything, but there's something hopeful about that. I think I think there is a chance to more. There's gathering I mean even the family gathering getting around the table and having truck thoughtful conversations with your family. I think in terms of. Even engaging deeper via zoom right knowing that when you see that person, you're seeing inside their house. You're seeing inside their living room their bedroom. And you have a another kind of understanding of I think people are reading. More people are talking more, and even the marches and New York, you know people are heading to the marches and. And being allies and doing the work that needs to be done. Well Jacqueline Woodson was such a pleasure talking to this hour. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Anthony Lewis Great. It really was. That's Jacqueline Woodson she's the acclaimed author of Brown girl. Dreaming the day you begin after to pack and D foster the forthcoming before the ever after among many other books listeners, you continue the conversation. Get the on point podcasts at our website on point radio DOT ORG. You can also follow us on twitter. Find US on facebook at on point radio. Thanks for listening I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point..

Jacqueline Woodson Puerto Kioko Anthony Brooks twitter Anthony Lewis New York Brown
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:48 min | 5 months ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We're talking with Jacqueline Woodson about this moment in America. She's the author of. Of over thirty books for children and young adults, and she's won numerous awards for her writing her most recent book is read at the bone. Her Picture Book That Day you begin has been at the top of the New York. Times bestseller list for many weeks and Jacqueline. We've still got some more callers. I'd love to go to a couple right away. Andrea is calling from Baltimore. Andrea, you're on the air. Thanks for the call. Thank you tell you I'm like way up in age now I was in New York in the sixties when he had the rioting and stuff like that. And you know it seems like as one conversation with all most of so called lease, and actually align yourself with the system and work with Assistant. Like you know, teach people about races. You know I am not Cathy at all, but these people already know by racism because like. I WanNa know what's the point of keep talking even marching and protesting well she for years, but this is not gonna end and the people trying to do it. Don't even want it to end I want to ask you. Don't you say we should have a different conversation now? They're wrapping a chain. It's up to us to change and by that I. Mean exactly what I mean a country country make sure with him and they should i. don't think that this is ever going to work, and we need to go through our shelves, not only do we. Get from the Caucasian people. We get it from other people in the morning. Look like them. The more they discriminate against them case in point all the people who are able genders. They take all the money so much they don't. They don't. They don't use stores. And they take all their money out. The male flies is one good example here thing. Is You all because we are so? Okay, I'M GONNA I'M GONNA jumping because I think you expressed your question, really really well, and I want to Jacqueline a chance to answer it, but the the thrust of that Jacqueline. What's what's the point of keeping the struggle going? I think that's a really great question. Angie and I'm so glad you. Raised it and I I remember some of the struggles of the sixties especially around Look free lunches in school and and people marching I remember that one of the march was no money, no food, no school, and and basically people saying you know we're going to get our kids out of the system if this doesn't work and I. Think That's what Black folks saying. Now you look at all of the You know. Hollywood black lives rallies with black lives. All of these people creative writers television people You know playwrights actors. All saying you know what if this system doesn't get six, we're leaving it and we are taking our black money with us, and so I think two things are going on right now. I think black folks are saying. We're going to give you a chance to get this right, but we're done. We're out like like we know the power. We have in this country. We know you know what blacks it would look like here and so at and saying you know, show up. Don't just throw up a black. Black lives matter sign on your website, but show me how you're doing the work inside Your Corporation inside your theater inside Hollywood inside your stores, and we do have to make those I completely agree with you. I will walk an extra. You know ten blocks to shop at a black owned store. If that's if that's what's going to make the difference, you know and I think it's twofold. What's happening right now? I think we are doing something that is different than saying. You know what I, but also look at the Montgomery. Bus Boycott. It's like you know what we don't need to read. Your buses go broke. And things changed and I. think that's what we're doing now. We're saying we're going to be out here where we're not. We're not participating in these systems that have historically not worked for us. Are you encouraged as well Jacqueline by the fact that a lot of these demonstrations were seeing all across the country seem to be a very multi racial. I am so encouraged by. I can't say this enough is young people. Young people are done. They are like what wait what? What is this country? You're trying to leave us with you know and this is across all racial lines, and that's what these demonstrations are looking like. They're looking like young. People and Young Black People Young Brown people. Yeah I, mean you know and they are queer and straight, and they are trans and they're saying you know what it stops here, Mike it stops with us like our grandchildren are not gonNa have to have this fight, so so that's very encouraging to me to the young people I say, I'm sorry and young people I say I got your back and I say get out there and do your thing and I support you one hundred percent so I am deeply encouraged by what the people are. Are doing good good I. Mean it's. It's good to hear good news. In this moment of deep deep deep challenge, I wanNA talk to you about how you talk to your own children about these issues, and there's a wonderful bonus at the end of Your Audio Book Harbor Me, which came out in two thousand eighteen. It tells the story about six kids who meet weekly in a room. They dubbed the art room. That's a RTD short for a room to talk, and they talk about their lives everything from deportation to racial profiling. But at the end of the book, you've included a short q. a with your son Jackson I believe he was ten years old at the time. He's twelve now. Is that right? S. So. I WanNa to just play a short piece because it's? It's lovely and I loved listening to this, so here's Jacqueline Woodson talking to.

Jacqueline Woodson New York Hollywood Andrea Your Corporation Times America Baltimore Cathy Angie Jackson Montgomery Mike
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:11 min | 5 months ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Better Book for this moment actually is each kindness because I. I think that's one of the things that we're struggling with in this country. Right now is how to be kind be kind on social media how to be kind of person. How did you know how to talk to people so that they're able to hear us? without without rage. and I think you can get points across. That are very angry points, but you can get him across with kindness so so that's what I. That's my saying about the other side. Interesting I'm intrigued by what you said about Teaching kindness and trying to project kindness on social media. That's a challenge though it can be isn't. Responded this idea that social media seems like such A. an incubator in a way of rage and extreme and how we need to sort of. Of that and I don't know help. Our kids navigate that. Yeah I always say th-. Before you send out a text or a tweet, imagine it coming to you and how you would feel getting. Right, and so you hold up that mirror of to your actions, and I think it makes you think I think even if you took ten minutes and reread and revise, you can say something. That has the same impact, but is said with love and because the truth is i. know this sounds so remedial, but if we're going to do this work together, we have to be kind. That's all there is to. Know? Let's go to Kay. WHO's calling from Decatur Georgia? You're on the air. Thanks for the call. Hey. Thanks for having me. I just wanted to say. I have a grandson WHO's currently eight years old and we ended up having to have the talk with him. When he was four years old his mom had been a victim of identity theft, and so judge had given her paperwork to keep in her car at all times, because the person was still using her main. and Head of car accident at Walmart you, know. Of course you call the police. And when the police came, you know. They ran her licensed and the girl is a criminal using her name. So you know the officer, of course it. Back and she says Oh. I'm a victim of identity. Please look behind my car seat. I have the paperwork. He would not do it. He put her in handcuffs. He almost threw her in the car. People were filming and my grandson was the car with his mom and he's like. Screaming and crying so My daughter called out my own number. The person called me, said look, here's what's going on. Of course, I'm zooming the get to them. And all of it could have been settled. Had he just looked behind her seat and saw the court paperwork? So because it was such a commotion of the Supervisor Came Out the supervisor did listen to. My daughter, did toward the paperwork out did see that it was not her. but what happened to my grandson? If he was terrified of course I had to keep him. We couldn't send him to school Every time he saw police, he was ducking behind me, so we ended up having to have this conversation about people judging you by the color of your skin. That Mommy didn't do anything wrong. You know that He didn't do anything wrong and it just ended up. You know trying to explain to a four year old child. You know why why? Why did mom was treated like that was horrible? You know and it was just. US having to find a way to explain to a four year old about racial injustice and we still happen. To do these conversations so what I always do I just tell them the truth. It's their fault. Evil with evil when they did and still evil today. Can you thank you so much for that and I'm so sorry that your grandson went through this that your entire family went through this jacqueline. Do you want to respond to k? Now, it's heartbreaking. I mean bless his heart. One thing that I do love his. How resilient young people are at I'm so glad you're there for him. Kate I'm K-. I'm so glad his mom is there I'm so glad that the paperwork was there. 'cause dot forbid we seen what happens to people of Color in so many of these situations than it's terrifying in heartbreaking and and you know. I always think I talk about it in Brown girl dreaming my grandfather constantly saying you're as good as anybody. You have a right to be as good as anybody, and just the fat, knowing that it's of course, not his fault. It's you know it it it has. His not his mom's fault at this is, it's terrible. and I think you did you're doing what you can at an? It's amazing and a fabulous and just keep loving him up and. And him the right way to be and the way to justice I think there's I. The book I'm thinking of right off the top of my head. Well now he's eight, but Abram Kennedy's book I'm anti-racist. Baby was a great book, and Another book called. It's not my fault. I think which is about a kid who seeing all of this injustice in the world, and finally is like okay. What am I going to do about it i? Think that's the. The title I have to look that up but there there are so many great books. There's a book called stamps from the beginning that Abrams road, but he and Jason Renos an amazing writer wrote a middle grade version, and it would be great to do that as an audio book are to read that along with him, so he can, and he will through that book completely understand what happened, and and and how amazing magic and beautiful and strong years. Jacqueline WanNA. Ask You You made the point earlier in the hour. That black and Brown people talk a lot about race because they they have to keep themselves safe you. You talked about this at the at the kid let rally as well. The kid lit for black lives. Rally as well. How do we include White Kids in the conversation? White Kids who want to be involved in the struggle to be anti-racist. The same way. About it I mean I think everyone needs to be talking about race and I remember as a kid. you know we got slavery? People call the ICEE enslavement because we weren't slaves enslaved and and to call people, slaves take the onus off the people who wanted to own black and brown bodies so.

White Kids supervisor US ICEE Decatur Georgia Brown Kay Walmart officer Abram Kennedy Jacqueline Wan Kate Jason Renos writer
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:26 min | 9 months ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on 1A

"Com slash safety. Hi I'm a new Rhody and I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes were exploring big ideas about reinvention making amends and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me. This is one A. Returning now to our conversation with Jacqueline Woodson and her year of return experiences Jacqueline you write about how you experienced a kind of double consciousness. While they're belonging at at the same time not belonging and I think you started to allude to this a little bit a minute or two ago. What does that feel like to you is is that feeling? That that you feel can be reconciled. Yes I think it is. I think it is feeling I have here in this country right. I am of this place you know I. I'm from this place but I really I'm in this place but my I of this place I don't know I'm very American in so many ways and in so many ways. Not You know the same with New York. I grew up in the south until I was seven. And so those imprinting years. I'm very southern so I feel kind of outside in New York all the time and so getting to Ghana and seeing everyone who is my complexion Or darker or a slightly lighter Walking like ideal you know our language the way we speak is different but the openness is the same feeling very southern to me And then it not being my place. Right it. It's kind of For me in the end it did feel like yes. This this is this is how I will always walk the world and yeah in more than one place. Talk a little bit more about that. That two feet in two places or feet in multiple places feeling because it's fascinating you know it's a it's a it's it's at once Kind of A. It's a gift right when you look at it. Positively if I didn't have feet in so many world I wouldn't have been able to write thirty two books. I mean you know it's it's kind of it. It's what bills empathy is how we begin to understand And at the same time I do wonder what it would be like to exist solely in one place in one body as one being and that's never been the case for me So so going to Africa. I didn't go to Ghana. I didn't feel like I was going to be completely outside of simply by the color of my skin I knew that some part of me was going to have a belonging there But I didn't know that I would at the same time feel This outsider ness and where the outsider would play out. It played out You know of course in economics. It played out in language. I feel like I can't I played out. I moved differently than a lot of African women even though my daughter moves like the African women so that was all very interesting to me. Will you said that there isn't enough space in the New York? Times travel section to to capture the enormity of this experience. I hope we've gotten closer in this time we've spent together On the air. But if you could go down a road that you haven't explored yet in writing about your trip to Ghana or your children's experience or your experience with your partner I don't know of. What do you think that would be I think I would. I would want to go down the road of my children who identify as black and biracial right. You know. They always say we're black and Biracial to to make sure both of those parts of themselves are are acknowledged. And what does it mean to be black and Biracial in Ghana What it mean to be completely immersed in an African culture for say five years ten years. What would that look like for them? I think there are so many roads and I also think I want to hear other voices I wanNA. There's so much room to write about this to write about our experiences. As African Americans Caribbean Americans and as Africans So so I have the roads that I would like to explore but I also am always so interested in the voices of other writers telling these stories. We've talked on this show before about how American journalistic views of Africa can be so very narrow you mentioned before the idea that Africa's one thing of course it isn't. This sounds like an opportunity to broaden that perspective make it even more granular than before to get more voices talking about the personal experiences visiting Africa exactly. Well we talked a little bit earlier about what you really wanted to get out of. This trip was some truth. I I suppose that's what writers are always looking for whether they're fiction or nonfiction writers. At least I hope so. I think the truth ultimately is what you're looking for do you. Do you think you got it. I think I got some of the truth. I think there are many of them and I think each time I go back. I'll get some more but for me. I feel like the truth that I got was that I am of that place to and And that matters that that I can go there. And and even with the sense of belonging I felt to also feel that sense of belonging and next time to go and explore what that truth means and how that truth manifest with more time there with knowing more people with doing more stuff So yeah you're it's you know I think as writers we're constantly searching for the truth that matter to us and by extension matter to a greater good in a bigger world and I'm I'm at the beginning of him and I think sometimes that that sense of belonging that you get a little bit of a sense of your first time you go to a place that can give way to a sense of longing to go back and be part of it and maybe that's in your future to Jacqueline Woodson author of Brown girl dreaming and read at the Bone Jacqueline. What a pleasure. Thank you for joining us. Thank you.

Ghana Jacqueline Woodson New York Africa Bone Jacqueline Rhody NPR partner Brown
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"See Jacqueline Woodson this Friday November twenty second get lit with all of it we can't wait to see you there now we have your Friday plan we're gonna plan the rest of their fall and winter it's Monday it's our review preview series and we are taking a look at the attack joining us now to walk us through what's happening both on and off Broadway is Helen Shaw theatre cricket deter creek creek near cricket at New York magazine and bolts or thanks for coming on and it is my pleasure so so jagged little pill deadline is reporting that its growth a million dollars in its first week of previews and just so we're clear this is not a biopic of a landmark Alanis Morissette so so what is it exactly so this is Diablo Cody has taken a great part of that album plus some other songs from her of and made a story which is about the various for two families going through various difficulties and of course the only way that you can really express any kind of difficulty in your life is through singing Alanis which seems appropriate does seem appropriate Atlantic Records actually did a video premiere of head over feet which is a companion to the original cast recording they're releasing so let's take a listen so we can hear how a lot of his music is going to be re interpreted for this musical and friends and lacking that you you've already won Helen.

Jacqueline Woodson Broadway New York magazine Alanis Morissette Diablo Cody Helen million dollars twenty second
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

19:54 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Is called Oh alligators could be joining. The Border Patrol Vladimir Putin exposes a secret and Donald Trump is getting impeached. thank you thank you I have I have lost a little weight thank you so let's catch up on today's headlines Let's kick it off with the story that has been blowing up online today it involves zoo offense and a woman who seemed Dan King Way Too many times from the category of Lucky to be alive take a look at this video of a woman who crossed a safety barrier at the Bronx Zoo here in New York and had a close encounter with the lion the kept to itself but the zoo said the woman's action was unlawful and could have resulted in serious injury or death you gotta wonder what the Lions thinking here I know what the lines thinking he's thinking what are you doing a lion here can you see actually feel bad for that because look how confused here he's got that look like when you're not sure if you just walk into the bathroom Actually you know what I think the line was really thinking lines looking at her like what are you doing you're black you don't need extra danger and life lady what are you doing what you're doing right now technically cultural appropriation this crazy shit is for white people shouldn't be you shouldn't be man who thinks the notebook was a comedy he has always denied meddling in America's two thousand sixteen election but yesterday he was asked if he's going to meddle in twenty twenty and his answer was refreshingly honest is Russia as robot Mila alleged attempting to influence the twenty twenty elections in the United States. I'll tell you in a secret yes we will Clinton needs a secret so that everybody can laugh and so we go big but don't tell anyone please you gotTa love that classic Russian sense of humor you know threats we're sending to Siberia then after you live in forty years in Siberia. We'll like Douglas Funny Right yes spun me actually Putin is probably the funniest guy in Russia when you think about it because I mean it's easier to joke around when you're the only person the country not afraid of being killed by Vladimir Putin if you go on Russian Netflix he's got all the top stand up specials and his standup is great though he's just like women McCoy's evening like this but men die from poisoning this people drive Kurla gifts but the black people leaving Russia and finally let's move on to Tesla it's the call for people who want to save the environment but still want people to think there are assholes and while every new Tesla is a technological one there are still a few bugs in the system Tesla's smart summoned promises to allow your car to drive to you or location of your choosing from two hundred feet away with no one behind the wheel as long as the car is in sight for Tesla the right of the future may have just hit a pothole this morning videos of the car companies Thomas Feature failing and fuelling online criticism g. what's the deal with motorists shock by near misses ooh costly clips and potential dangerous crashes with startled pedestrians chasing after empty vehicles Tesla's latest cutting edge software is driving into high gear again man that car driving itself hall this is this is really a problem I mean I thought Uber Drivers were picking me up now you're gonNA call up your own call like hey it's me it's me I'm at the corner just south of the people you just mowed down on the sidewalk yeah no that's a daycare center keep going like here's the big cosmonauts smart enough to give them this feature and people are definitely not smart enough to have this feature all right because think about it people already drive drunk now what if you're drunk inside of like a casino and you accidentally someone you'll call that's just not going to end well trunk of a car why do I need my grocery bags to hear Adele I don't I don't eat ice cream getting that emotional leaving normal all right that's the headlines Ivanka trump story to watch president trump and if you've watched lately it's clear the impeachment battle has been getting to him for one he's tweeted two hundred seventy six times since Pelosi announced the impeachment inquiry lost back and he's been in such a bad mood that even watching Fox News hasn't cheered him up he's like yes I am the best leader Judge Beretta's everyone eight B well today trump's rage moved from his twitter feed to real life would during a press conference with the leader of Finland he did not react well to the barrage of impeachment questions is son walks out with millions of dollars the kid knows nothing and soda we go ahead asking the question was what did you Finlandia question wow trump was really pissed off they one minute he was the president the next second turned into a spray Tan Samuel Jackson it would have been amazing is if the finish president got a question but then through trump out of the buses like actually I would be interested ear Joe Biden get you screwed me again finished guy now please don't get me wrong I don't want you to think that trump didn't want sure well it sounds like it might be a good question let me see if I like to question go there maybe for the first time in three years I'll have a good question and I'll love it there is a report it came out just before you in President walked out here that the whistle blower met with the staff member of Adam Schiff prior I love that question be filed it shows Jeff Fraud and I love that question thank you thank you John and has to be one of the quickest emotional u-turns I've ever seen right because that he wanted nothing to do with that journalists question the next minute who was trumps favorite question in the entire world like trump treated that journalists the way people treat waiters you know who keep offering the same Ordos so the pasta weeks clearly haven't been trump's favorites impeachment is consuming his life his poll numbers of dipping again and on top of all of that the failing New York Times has reported this breaking news nine exclusive report in The New York Times documenting the lengths to which sources say president trump was prepared to go to stop migrants crossing the southern border he wanted the wall electrified with spikes on top that could pierce human flesh the New York Times reports the privately the president had often talked about fortifying a border wall within water-filled trench stocked with snakes or alligators writes the New York Times is reporting that president trump wants to build a moat along the border wall which was going to be filled with snakes and alligators which I know sounds crazy trump wasn't just coming up with all the warcraft upgrades to his wall no he was also lashing out at his aides when he felt that they weren't making progress on securing the border in late March president trump publicly threatened to close the US Mexico border but according to the Times reporters in a March meeting the president and said visors tried to turn them away from such a drastic move he responded you're making me look like an idiot and shouted Iran on this it's my issue the president reportedly berating then Homeland Security Secretary cures to Nielsen saying quote Lou Dobbs hate you and coulter h you you're making me look bad wow that is so sad imagine carrying that much about what Lou Dobbs and Ann Coulter think of you I mean that's one step away from being like you better embarrassed me in front of the booger I swear to God ask him a question now asylum-seeker who showed up at the border and then get this as soon as trump left the room the head of Border Patrol told everyone else to ignore the residents yeah that's wild you realize the only organization with a top guy gets ignored like that we hit a move beef you hear me kick the machine and make sure it's still doesn't work now some of you might be hearing these reports with snakes and alligators apparently it was real enough that his aides actually went out to seek a cost estimates they actually got a quote of snakes we don't really sell snakes this has been a comedy central podcast.

Donald Trump Vladimir Putin Border Patrol Siberia Bronx Zoo New York Russia Lions United States Dan King America Clinton Mila Douglas two hundred feet forty years three years one minute
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

13:14 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Headquarters in New York. This is the daily show with Trevor Noah Yours. Thank you so much again. Impeccable coming out how tonight our guest is an award winning author and truly fantastic writer whose new book is called. Red at the bone. It's going to be a wonderful conversation. Jacqueline Woodson is going to be joining us also tonight. Show Oh alligators could be joining the Border Patrol Vladimir Putin exposes a secret and Donald Trump is getting impeached. Thank you thank you I have. I have lost a little weight. Thank you so. Let's catch up on today's headlines. Let's kick it off with the story that has been blowing up online today it involves zoo offense and a woman who seen the Lion Lion King Way Too many times from the category of Lucky to be alive. Take a look at this video of a woman who crossed a safety barrier at the Bronx Zoo here in New York and had a close encounter with the lion the kept to itself but the zoo said the woman's action was unlawful and could have resulted in serious injury or death. You got to wonder what the Lions thinking thinking here. I know what the lions thinking. He's thinking. What the hell you doing a lion here. Can you see it actually feel bad for that because look how confused here. He's got that look like when you're not sure if you just walk into the bathroom a Actually you know what I think. The line was really thinking lines looking like what are you doing. You're black. You don't need extra danger in your life right lady. What are you doing what you're doing right now. Technically cultural appropriation this crazy shit is for white people shouldn't be you shouldn't be moving onto some international news. Vladimir Putin Russian president and man man who thinks the notebook was a comedy he has always denied meddling in America's two thousand sixteen election but yesterday he was asked if he's going to meddle in twenty twenty and his answer was refreshingly honest is Russia as robot. Mila alleged attempting to influence the twenty twenty elections in the United States. I'll tell you a secret. Yes we will definitely Clinton needs a secret so that everybody can laugh and so we go big but don't tell anyone please. Oh you you gotTa love that classic Russian sense of humor. You know threats. We're sending to Siberia then after you live in forty years in Siberia. We'll like Douglas Funny Right. Yes actually Putin is probably the funniest guy in Russia when you think about it because I mean it's easy. It's joke around when you're the only person in the country not afraid of being killed by Vladimir Putin. If you go on Russian net flicks he's got all the top stand up specials and his standup is great though he's just like women die from empoisoned this but from poisoning this people drive curling but the black people do not leaving Russia and finally let's move on to Tesla. It's the call for people who want to save the environment but still want people to think there are assholes and and while every new Tesla is a technological one. There are still a few bugs in the system. Tesla's smart summoned promises to allow your car to drive to you or location of of your choosing from two hundred feet away with no one behind the wheel as long as the car is in sight for Tesla. The right of the future may have just hit a pothole this morning videos of the car companies economist feature failing and fuelling online criticism criticism G. What's the deal with motorists shock by near misses. ooh costly clips and potentially dangerous crashes with startled pedestrians chasing after empty vehicles. Tesla's latest cutting edge software is driving concern. Turn into high gear again that car driving itself hold on this. Is this is really really a problem. I mean I thought Uber Drivers were picking me up now. You'RE GONNA call up your own call like hey. It's me it's me. I'm at the corner just south of the people you just mowed down on the sidewalk yeah. Yeah No. That's a daycare center. Keep going like here's the big cosmonauts smart enough to give them. This feature and people are definitely not smart enough to have this feature all right because think about it. People already drive drunk now. What if you're drunk inside of like a casino and you accidentally someone you'll call. That's just not going to end well. Honestly I think we should stop giving speeches. You don't need it's cool that can drive itself but you don't need like a college hoops in the parking. Lot useless fees like when they put speakers in the trunk of a car. Why do I need my grocery bags to hear Adele. I don't I don't leave my ice cream getting that emotional leaving normal all right. That's the headlines. Let's move Ivanka trump story to watch president trump and if you've watched them lately it's clear the impeachment battle has been getting to him for one. He's tweeted two hundred seventy six times since Pelosi announced the impeachment inquiry last week back and he's been in such a bad mood that even watching Fox News hasn't cheered him up. He's like yes. I am the best leader judge. But where does everyone eight be well today. Trump's rage moved from his twitter feed to real life would during a press conference with the leader of Finland. He did not react well to the barrage of impeachment. Questions is son walks out with millions of dollars. The Kid knows nothing you know it and soda we go ahead. Ask a question Sir was what did you want the president's Alinsky to do about pres- Vice President Biden and his son hunter you talking to me yeah. It was just a follow up of what I just asked you. Sir Listen you ready. Will we have the president defendant. Ask Him a question. I have one form. I just wanted to follow up on the one that I asked you. which did you hear what if you want you hear me? Ask Him a question I will but it may have been you a long answer. Ask this gentleman question. Don't be rude rude. I just want to have a chance to answer. The question asked the President Finlandia question. Wow trump was really pissed off. They one minute was the president the next second turned into a spray Tan Samuel Jackson. Ask Ask the president of Finland the question I double dare your mother. Ask him practice. It would have been amazing is if the finish president got a question but then through trump out of the bus like actually I would be interested to hear ear Joe Biden get. You screwed me again finish guy now. Please don't get me wrong. I don't want you to think that trump didn't want to answer onto questions at this press conference no. He only wanted to answer the questions that he liked okay. What's your second. Just what you shouldn't be asking to question like. You'RE GONNA WANNA ask me a favor. Ask One of the I will finish on you. WanNa ask one of the Finnish president. GonNa come back to you because I think you WanNa talk later sure sure well. It sounds like it might be a good question. Let me see if I like to question. Maybe for the first time in three years. I'll have a good question and I'll love it. There is a report. It came out just before you in President walked out here that the whistle blower met with the staff member of Adam Schiff PR. I love that question be filed. It shows that Schiff Jeff is fraud and I love that question. Thank you thank you John and has to be one of the quickest emotional u-turns I've ever seen right because one minute that he wanted nothing to do with that journalists question the next minute it was trumps. Favorite question in the entire world like trump treated that journalists the way people treat waiters. You know who keep offering the same ordos over over and over again people like I told you I don't want the Goddamn crab cakes. I don't what is that with a deviled egg. Oh Yea thank you John so the pasta weeks clearly haven't been trump's favorites. Impeachment is consuming his life. His poll numbers of dipping again and on top of all of that's the failing New York Times has reported this breaking news nine exclusive report in The New York Times documenting the lengths to which sources say president trump was prepared to go to stop migrants crossing the southern border he wanted the wall electrified with spikes on top that could pierce human flesh the New York Times reports the privately the president had often talked about fortifying a border wall within water-filled trench stocked with snakes or alligators. That's writes the New York. Times is reporting that president trump wants to build a moat along the border wall which was going to be filled with snakes and alligators which I know sounds crazy easy but to be fair. It's been very effective at keeping him out of millennials bedroom. That's probably where he got the idea. I mean it's either that was because he's talking. Immigration advisors an actual reptile great idea. Mr President could use the life according to the report trump wasn't just coming up with all the warcraft upgrades to his wall. No he was also lashing out at his aides when he felt that they weren't making progress on securing the border in late. March president trump publicly threatened to close the US Mexico border but according to the Times reporters in a March meeting the president's Nsen buys irs tried to turn them away from such a drastic move he responded. You're making me look like an idiot and shouted. Iran on. This is my issue. The president reportedly berating then Homeland Security Secretary Kirstin Nielsen saying quote Lou Dobbs hate you and coulter h you you're making me look bad wow that is so sad imagine carrying that much about what Lou Dobbs and Ann Coulter think of you. I mean that's one step away from being like you better not embarrassed me in front of the booger. I swear to God ask him a question now. The The Times report that's really blowing up is that trump apparently suggested shooting migrants in the leg to slow them down as they were trying to cross the border which is not just a crazy idea. It's also illegal illegal and apparently trump had a lot of illegal ideas in fact my favorite example is when he told a room of border patrol agents to just turn away every asylum asylum-seeker who showed up at the border and then get this as soon as trump left the room. The head of Border Patrol told everyone else to ignore the president's residents while you realize the only organization with a top guy gets ignored like that is McDonald's no because Ronald is always like remember top priorities making people smile and then he leaves on the managers like forget that Shit we we hit a move beef. You hear me go kick the machine and make sure it's still doesn't work now. Some of you might be hearing these reports and thinking oh I'm sure the president didn't really mean all the stuff and maybe he was just joking about the alligators and snakes but he doesn't seem like that like the moat filled with snakes and alligators. Apparently it was real enough that his aides actually went out to seek a cost estimates. They actually got a quote for the march which also sounds like the name of the most xenophobic Dr Seuss book ever can use imagine being the trump trump aid to call around to figure out how much it would cost to Philip border mode with snakes and alligators well. Luckily you don't have to imagine because he had the daily show. We have the exclusive exclusive audio of that call. Thanks for calling PETCO. How can I help you. Can I get it quote for how much it would cost for two thousand miles of of snakes We don't really sell snakes by the mile. Okay how about alligators. I need a southern border amount of alligators picture alligators hate Mexicans but alligators think about Mexicans..

president Donald Trump Vladimir Putin New York pres- Vice President Biden Border Patrol Tesla Bronx Zoo Jacqueline Woodson Trevor Noah Lions Mr President Finland United States writer Russia Dr Seuss Fox News Siberia
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"And listen there at talkin pets radio ki. Okay. I n radio right now, we're speaking with Ken foster, he is the author of city of dogs New York dogs their neighborhoods and the people who loved him, and Ken, I mentioned Jacqueline Woodson. What's her story about in the book? Well, Jacqueline Woodson first of all he's an amazing writer. She does a lot of young adult novels and children's books, and is someone that I've known and admired for for years. I mean, she was a dog person. So that's how she came to me as a possible subject. But in the book, she talks about growing up with a variety of animals in the house in Brooklyn. But being careful of German shepherds because one in their building was not particularly nice and ended up attacking her pet cat. And so she had a thing against German shepherds because of that which unfortunately happens to a lot of people when they have a bad experience with a dog of any kind. But as a adult at one point, a friend of hers rescued a German shepherd and couldn't keep it an ass Jacqueline to take care of it for a couple of days, and she'll completely in love with it decided to keep it named it mounts, and and fell in love with German shepherds. Basically, she now has a different second German shepherd who's got an older and a young German shepherd poodle mix named. Shadow. They were gonna name muppet because it looks so much like a muppet. So we talk with her in the book and also walked around her neighborhood in park slope and have this amazing picture of her and her two dogs right in front of these deco entry to the Brooklyn public library because she sort of starts the book off with this story. But also being a being a writer and storyteller as well. I see what you mean by the one dog the mixed berry actually looking up at because he really does. He's got long bushy hair. But he has the body and the walk of a German shepherd a very funny combination to see huge paws to..

Jacqueline Woodson writer Ken foster Brooklyn New York
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

16:12 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hands into it over and over watching the way the water ripples out and the way out and away. Like each kindness done and not done like every girl somewhere holding a small gift out to someone and that someone training away from it. I watched the water ripple as the sunset through the Maples. And the chance of a kindness with Maya became more and more forever gone. An encore presentation of in-depth not live no calls. Please doubled UCSB from Washington next. Call Jacqueline Woodson comes from Denise in Dayton, Ohio. Denise thanks for holding. You're on the air. Yes. Thank you so much. And thank you C span. Booty years of watching C span every genre. So many resources have gotten to be used for my own personal input my classroom, and I wanna say Daquan this the first time I ever called them through all the year. Two are amazing. I had not read all of your books, but each year when I had my own home. And now that I have all of the students are computer science. We started out the school year with each kindness by the time, we get to the point that it's done kindness done and undone. He used to see there is it is so phenomenal. I wanted that book and I bought one. And then another parent bought the book for me. I'm sorry. My phone went off voted for me. 'cause we use it every year it is so phenomena, and you can hear nothing it relates to kids so much. It's such a great way to start out the school year, the set the tone. I love that book. I'm gonna remorse so much to but I'm going to be more of your books. But I just curious. I don't think he had the phone down. Did you talk about how that got started? Because the kids can relate to those characters and before we get an answer. Denise you said, you're a middle school teacher. I actually teach K through six now, but we did have middle school. So take through eight. Okay, I'm computer science, but I've always taught modest way for public school. And I am an urban public school. I grew up in Philadelphia by teaching Dayton where military retired. Is there a khloe in every classroom? Oh my goodness. There's a khloe in every school, regardless of where you're at. Yeah. There's a khloe in a Maya. Right. Thanks. Thanks so much for calling and for using each kindness. It's so as being a Buckeye now. It started. It's an interesting story. So when Madonna was in second grade, I was being the mom and her classroom, and this one girl I adore came in and she had on these really cool pants, and I was like those radical pants and another kid who hadn't heard me when she saw the girl and the pensions like, oh, I can't believe you even wore those to school and for the rest of the day of the young girl who had the Patsy with try to sit at her desk when she got up she tied the jacket around her Lapin around her waist, and you saw you knew that her day was ruined basically. And the things you wanted to do most was get home and take off those pants never wear again. And the girl said it had no clue that she had ruined this child's day. And so inspired me to start writing it kindness. And I wanted to write a story about a girl who had not been KYW, and I kept trying to figure out when someone had not been kind to me to write that book and all that kept coming up as incidences in my own childhood when I had not been kind. And as round the time, I was writing it. My mom died. Suddenly and. And it kind of clicked that we have this idea that tomorrow, we're always going to have a chance to do the right thing, especially young people. They just believe tomorrow's always gonna come. And for me. It was this kind of moment of like. Wow. What if my character does not get a chance to be kind? Because when I first started writing it I thought and the she would have a chance at kindness. And the book became about the regret. And and the seize the day the fact that do it today 'cause we know not what's coming tomorrow. And in it the whole ripple effect came to me, I was literally sitting at the lake throwing stones in the water and thinking about this book and watching those ripples. And it's like this is it. So I think books come to me all kinds of ways. But that one had a very interesting journey Email from Gary perhaps you might consider dyslexia contributing to adult reader challenges. Going back to Leah. I think. Yeah. I think adult dyslexia as real as childhood reading differences. But if we're thinking about Lia and her frustration. I think even with learning differences. You learn to read differently you can learn to read differently and. And it takes time and it takes care, and it takes someone who knows what they're doing. And I think one thing that frustrates people. A lot is their lack of access to literature. Their lack of being able to get a book and open it up and read it, and I do watch a stress for people that you can listen to a book, and it's okay. And you're getting story, and you're getting comprehension, and you're getting sentence structure, and you're getting all of these things, and you can listen to a book and look at the book as you're listening to it as a way of gaining access. I'm not a reading specialist, but I do want all people to have access to literature, and until the code of reading gets cracked, in whatever way it needs to get crack there other ways to access good books, and I think everyone should have that kind of access Dennis Pasadena, California. Hi, Dennis you're on with author Jacqueline Woodson. Thank you very much, so Jacqueline. So I immediately saw your last name we share the same last name. I was wondering if you done any research your family history on the GM, wait while your name came from. Where were you were your family got that name? I grew up in Pasadena was born actually in Mexico, but my I had an aunt that was a teacher in San Diego, California. And after she retired. She started doing that family history. And so that family history has been so important to the rest of their family. And I'm wondering if you've done any time a history on your name where your family came from. And have you written anything about the family history? Yes, all the family history is written about and Brown girl. Dreaming all the way back to Sally Hemmings. So the what's clan is not a huge plan. So I'm sure we're connected somehow, but my aunt is a genealogist in Ohio, and she's done lots of research on the what's the name. The Woodson's are doctors lawyers. Teachers as you say in proud girl dreaming, what about your mother's side of the family. My grandmother taught for a little while just to like a community kind of teaching thing. And she was she was primarily domestic the domestic work my dad. My grandfather was a foreman and a printing factory. And then there are others that have various jobs that I don't know. But they all have bunch of cousins who are still in Greenville. I'm not sure what they do. But the what's inside is definitely the side that was earliest educated and for the longest period of time and you still smell your grandfather's cigarettes. I can't I can't died very early. He did he did. And he smoked Pall Mall. He's smoked I think they were unfiltered. And I still know what they look like. And I still remember the relatives who snuff. They will put that stuff under their lips. And then they have a Cantu to spit in tobacco. I guess. But yeah, I think I think the thing I remember most of my grandfather's is hands. He had these really strong hands that and you know, he was because he was always working the land are are our chiseling doing something with his hands. And I think that. Kind of part nervous energy part gift till I was this desire to always be working. Somehow there's a chapter in Brown girl. Dreaming called the fabric store at the fabric store. We were just customers. Yeah. So my grandmother's sewed, and I still I still so I still owe going to fabric stores, but that that passage is about going to all these places we went to in Greenville that we're still segregated and how they would. My grandmother didn't wanna go there because they didn't treat black people. Right. And but at the fabric store, we the woman she and the woman where friends and bonded and talked about fabric and talked about the family, and my grandmother felt like that was a place you could go and feel safe and want to give her money to because she was respected there. What was it like to write your memoir to write the autobiographical book after years and many many fictionalized Waie titles? It was a really it was definitely I was trying to relief relief relief to write something. I knew you know, to go back and figure out what I knew. But to know that it was true right to enter revisit the ancestors to go back and remember, my grandfather, and my grandmother, and my uncle, and my mom who had who died. And to go back to South Carolina. And, you know, visit the cousins and ask them questions, and and to look at old documents and to talk to my aunt and just a mind the history of generations, really. But. And also I started writing it because I was trying to figure out how I got to be a writer. How I got to this point of telling all these stories and getting all of these awards and getting all of this attention like that didn't come from nowhere. And then just wake up one day and say, I'm Jacqueline Woodson author like that. That's I'm standing on the shoulders of generations of people all the way back to a history of people who weren't allowed to learn to read and write and to go from there to here was amazing to me. And each time. I wrote something new are discovered. Something new about my family. I was like, whoa, we are easing. So so it was a good thing. Jay leaf Columbia, South Carolina. Good afternoon. Jay lethal with us. Jay lethal you with us. How old are you? Jay leaf. Have you read a Jacqueline Woodson book? Sadly. Sadly, no, okay. Has your has your mom read and Jacqueline Woodson book? Yeah. Okay. What would you like to ask MS Woodson? We'll put we'll put MS Jackie on the air. Okay. We'll put her on the screen. You can go ahead and ask any question you'd like. Right. Can you get needed and those who wanna become wet righty? That's a good question. Jelly. So what are you reading now? Torri? Guy. What's that book your reading jellies, Eric guy? Something. Diaries dark diary. Okay. I know dork diaries. So you like writing graphic novels or do you like writing poetry or do you like writing stories what kind of stuff do you like writing? Oh, good. So you're on the right track. Right. The way to be writers by reading right? So read as much stuff as you can because you want to write graphic novels. Reebok diaries read, you know, other graphic novels that you love, you know, they're all kinds of graphic novels. There is their nonfiction. I'm sorry all kinds of graphic books there nonfiction fiction. They're ones about poems like so just read as much as you can. And and right. Try to write something are right and draw every day if you can are as often as you can. And when you can't write or draw re keep reading and read slowly. So you can study how the authors are doing what they're doing. So you can learn from them. Do you have a library card? Yeah. Do you use it? Okay. And then you talk to your librarian about what other books you can read to become a writer. Okay. Next time, you're at your library, ask her tell her that Jacqueline Woodson asked you to ask her some of the books that she was suggest because you want to be a writer k. Okay, and Jacqueline Woodson. What's a book of yours that you would recommend for Jay leads to pick up at the library. I would say Jay lethal. You know, you should look at my picture books because you draw and you right? And those will also help you learn about writing. So why don't you start with the day you begin? You can get it at your library. And also pecan pie. Baby might be a good one and are asked your library, and which of the Jacqueline Woodson blitz would be good for you the picture books help you. Learn more about drawing and writing K. All right. Jay lethal gonna hang up now. Okay. And really appreciate your calling him. Good to hear your voice, Robert Atlanta. Good afternoon to you. Good afternoon. I love the way you handled that last call. Thank you. Question. Miss woodson. Two boys club in west Atlanta. Can you folks here me? Yeah. We're listening, Robert, okay? I see you as an opinion leader as well. As an author seems to be a terrible disconnect between between what we see. And some of the things I hear you saying. One one window on that would have been just a Williams eulogy for the Franklin. I think it was yesterday. I wonder if you might have heard that. No, it was the day before I thought, but I I had that Li I had to stop watching before the eulogy. Sadly, I saw a lot of it though. You know world these children are..

Jacqueline Woodson Jay leaf Denise Ohio writer Greenville Dayton South Carolina Washington Brown khloe Maya Daquan Leah Sally Hemmings Buckeye Dennis Pasadena Reebok Robert Atlanta
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Like I feel like now I'm going into those rooms for the young queer kids in the rooms. SE bat Mira as well as everyone else needs to see the other Miras that. But, but in terms of my literature, I never have to make a choice. No one was say, you can't put a queer person than this. I have not after two pock indie foster. If you come awfully the deer want like so many of my narratives have Amen, are Lisbon's in them. I think that that burden of dislike, because there is like the dangerous thing. There was like the danger zone of like this is a dangerous adult, but then there's also the burden of like of that thing that I think you also talked about for a moment, which is like Noah's like appearance. Like privilege or like need to to provide this information about what queer folks are often also straight parents right? Like. So it's straight parents job to tell you what criticism and then really separate now, kids from like a queer dolt who might be able to actually offer like or honest or lived perspective like I know for me, that would have been so helpful because it was I was just like staring into a void of like, well, I guess nothing is my few because I've never met anybody that was out tonight. And I know teachers if I look back, you know, that couldn't be honest about what was going on in their lives, and that would helped me so much. So like your, I'm so glad that I mean truly like thank you for being a personal that goes into the schools. That really means a lot to me as as a member of our family that you get to be out there and and providing lake some just some, just some, you know, some context, you're like, look, you might get a pool. All like that. It's it could include a pool. I'm to go videotape myself walking around the property for the next. Exactly right. That's so good. I also want to ask another question about sort of like your your your history writing. Was it always easy to sell or contextualized for like the publishing industry. Books with people of color. And then specifically black folks in like leading or or main character roles, was that something that was easy to do or was it hard sell? It was like, what does it continue to be like? I feel like it was. I think the hardest part for me was writing and I came out, I came. Into the world of publishing at a time where I feel like the Bodega those will open right. We had had milled your Taylor while to be Myers, Virginia Hamilton, excuse me, going back to James, Baldwin, Audrey Lord on the Giovanni like they have been this crew of writers seventies the eighties analysis on new Jack. And then that was me I for young adult writers beating William star Draper while to be mice kind of limb that the punch of less that publishers will end than those after routine. Some vision of talking about the importance of multiculturalism literature. People are talking about own voices who was when I write this and boom here I am Jacqueline Woodson with these black characters. So unlike a publisher's gold mine in this way, right? And it was again about that timing when I came through. I think if I had come through maybe in the mid eighties, it wouldn't have happened..

Jacqueline Woodson Jack Virginia Hamilton Lisbon Noah publisher William star Draper Audrey Lord Myers James Giovanni Baldwin
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Listen to those bras. Do you do look back? So does that, does that color your experience of that book still like or or do you personnel you passed it of Brown girl, dreaming like is it is in full to think about that? Or is it like a book that you still think of as a huge success because it wasn't Houston dictate. To, you know, it's a gift to the ancestors. That fuck means everything to me. That you know, it's it's my family, so I love it. I think one of my favorites based on how long you have been writing and the changes that I know have happened for queer folks during those times. Like, could you could you always be out and do your job. That's a really good question. I think I always have been out and maybe at points in my life. It was quieter, but I don't think anyone didn't know. I, you know, my publishers always knew my girlfriend's like I, I never my kids asked me. I remember, you know, early on his would ask me if I was married in, I'd say, why you find to get with me something, but at tennis Sykes Gordon and that I would say, you know, we're not allowed to get my partner night, aren't allowed to get married. Now. It's just say in now we aren't allowed to get married, zero interest in getting married. But you know, I say I have a girlfriend have apartments us amazing physicians. She's at counter Lord, like you know. But in will always written books with characters from very early on. So. So it wasn't like, I mean, I feel like it will. Lying and that well, I mean, sure. But like that's also a whole other thing is people like not reading and you're like, no, like straight up. You can use the context clues like. Yeah, you can put it together like it's fine. I'm fine with you putting it. I'm trying to give you the information. But I would just imagine. I mean, again, it's like this has I wonder if people now even think about this, but like this has changed so much because I remember that very specific argument like separating queer adults, early, even people in their like late teens from like kids like how, how important that divide was to some well since human beings. Well, I think that feast fix that for us. Yes. Thanks the Catholicism that I grew up. Yeah, yeah. No. And I think you know, sat there, things that was War. I never. I never felt like people thought I was going to the dangerous around young people that reside Vegas more about talking about it and people not having head Palmer stations with your young people about queer issues. And so the kids being like not the parents not being ready to expose their kids to local homo sexuality. But what I think that that's really changed like kids, the kids, you know, you might, you know, might son who's ten. I know he's family, but you know, he talks about being gender non binary. Like the the language of young people is so broad in the spectrum is over on like their freakiness is like, what do you mean? Someone has to be straight like like then an end across the board of the young people meeting these days. They're like, you know how, how never assume had of sexuality and never never assume gender, like and these these straight. You know, these kids who are coming from all kinds of families having these very real conversations. And I think that's the work that people have done to to change the narrative. So so it's it's not a felt like early on. One thing that I would have to choose is if I was walking into a school. It wasn't, you know, an all black underserve school and you know, some Kim was like unmarried. It was kind of like, are you a big old night light and like, do I want them to focus on that? But I want them to focus on seeing, here's a black woman who's coming from sayings that same situation and and has made it as writer and making make it too. And I didn't want that. You know that that message to be race with them kind of being like while she's listening. So she so different for me that I can't even imagine doing what she does so so that that little, the kind of choices I felt like I had to make early on, and I think I don't anymore..

Sykes Gordon Kim black underserve school Houston tennis Vegas writer partner Palmer
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Well, and I'm a, I'm a stand up comic that you don't have to at all convinced that the they're like jokes are not silliness. I actually take my job really seriously. So something that I reject his win, other comics will be like as joke. I'm like, will. I mean, is that the disrespect that you have for art, I can get real serious and real lesbian ROY quick. But no, like an. I also think I mean, this makes me think it is not. This is not the same at all, but it makes me think of like win when call me about your name. Oh, was really know. It was in. I was assay was also moonlight I've saw I saw both times I saw both times when both of those movies were nominated or at least when they were part of like Ord season this year and word season the your prior own, the hosts would call out like those actors and and like the hand job that's on the beach in moonlight, like backup play during the Oscars intro and stuff like that and and no other sex scenes that are in any other movie like this is a this is a funny joke to you, like I wonder if you like backed up a little bit, if you could figure out why this was so funny to you wouldn't if it's 'cause it so like homophobia like, I wonder if that's why you pasta so point by Saad, both ears. With both movies well, and the way that those actors were treated in in and it was very in. That's, you know, now when we like can have give this lip service to dislike. Now we're cool with it. Like these movies are hits. These movies are winning best picture in your like I would feel so much better if that movie won best picture without the joke about the about the behavior like that would make me feel like you actually took this seriously without Paul on the wrong movie out. Know what I mean. That would also be nice. Yeah. Well, I'm sorry that happened to you. I truly Agee Mira, you know, it's just the mega moment. Like, you know, this person while they only Mike actions, it just all meant growth, but everyone so so I feel like it was a necessary moment in time for the country for me or me to remember why I'm doing the work. I'm doing where the country to understand a work ahead of us. So I do think it had to have, you know, that's how I back at it. Oh, I think that's very gracious. Take. Slash, maybe it also helps you continue to work. You know, you can't be like, no, literally, fuck everything. Because otherwise we hard to get up in the morning. And it's also you don't want to give anyone kind of power, right? Let them take your power. So yeah, they but one thing limited. She saying like, why is it that every time I opened up the screens and look for your name on the national court. I see this person's picture light. We need to fix like, yes, that that you know it. Let's get this energy back to where it should be. And I thought that was interesting too. That is interesting. We're certainly in a moment right now. We're like, that's, I mean, not that this is a new moment, but as a lesson it's important to continue continue to think about, like as we're like in this moment of there's a lot of ally ship going on right now that like I don't think I've seen as much in the past in lake my adulthood, this feels like the most that people are talking about things from an allied perspective, but still it's kind of. You know. Again, just like, let's use queer movies. For example, it's let's use those movies that call me by your name. I loved. I loved that movie, and I also would like love it. If those were actually out queer actors that would make me bad. You know, if we were able to do that, you know, because those those guys who think are so talented and I think they did a great job. But boy wouldn't. I love to see two people together who, like I know have to live this. Make me feel though maybe feel so good. Chew was plus definitely put the spotlight where it should.

ROY Saad Oscars Mike actions Agee Mira Chew Paul
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Are you reading right now? Are you reading something? Am I'm working on another adult books, one deadline for Dame? Yeah, we'd how how? Like how many books are how many books you ridicule year your numbers are? It doesn't make any sense to me. I'm trying to understand your productivity. It used to be. I call it BC before children was to a year. And then once they started having kids, it slowed down a little bit. This year was a more productive year. I think also while you know this, I feel like get work done on the role because I'm so isolated in a way, and I was on the road, the lava that the national award and and so those lighting a lot. And this book that I'm working on. Now this adult book is raggedy Ann all over the place and. For one day. Yeah. Is that a? Is that a fun feeling when it's like raggedy all over the place? I actually kinda liked that in stand up, like if I'm if I'm working on something noon, it doesn't work yet for me. That's actually kind of a fun time in the process. I like looking back on it. All right. I hear that the moment is it's it's hard to live with so, oh my God to who isn't hard to live with, oh, normal people. Okay, fine. Well, look, we're artists. We get to do what everyone. What you. You Brown girl, dreaming twenty fourteen. That's the year that that came out. And then that that one a ton of awards in like maybe put you in a different category of exposure. It is that. You know if it was, it wasn't interesting year. I don't know if you know the whole back story behind that, what the national book award and you should tell you should tell me the backstory because I feel like our listeners like this is all very interesting stuff while the won it won for young people. Literature was it's a memoir in this historic growing up in between the north and the south, and beginning a, you know, a family that was well thing. One of well off and one that was not so well off, but when it won, the personal is emceeing announced to the world that I was allergic to watermelon which issue and as a joke. And then it became this whole thing because knows they racist comment to make, and and it just kind of had this whole reverberation of round the country, especially people of color in that in especially in that..

Dame national book award raggedy Ann BC one day
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"And if you softly following well at this kid and you want nothing bad to happen to him and melon something, does you get angry rating? You're like, okay, I'm gonna walk down to the whirlwind change it. You know, you and I have that in common in terms of an artistic goal. I, I definitely I didn't know it when I started doing standup. It's been in like reflection that I have realized that I think has started doing stand up so that people could well number one to make myself safer because it was like I'd come out to the whole room and then it's like, well, there's other witnesses so like you can't beat the shit out because like these people saw to, you know, and then also just to kinda like really literally to create safety because I wanted people to meet me. I'm like, kinda smiley and friendly, and I was literally like if you just meet me and again, it's not really me. It's like the character that I'm playing on stage. If you just meet me then like maybe you will want to give people like me a fair shot or some rights like some room to exist Zafy field, true to what you were doing as a writer. Yeah, definitely. I think he will. Yeah. Yeah, I would definitely say that would say that. I think you know, people don't know what they don't know. They're very scared of what they don't know. Oh, what they think they don't know what they think they don't want to know. So I think for me, it's creating these worlds and putting these people in to those worlds and and giving those people voice and then give a, you know, there's this person up reading since this ship, who is an academic historian. She's done a lot of work around, quote, unquote multicultural literature, which is what it was called in the seventies. And I mean in the nineties, and then really. Bringing to late the importance of people reading across lines of race, class economic class, across lines of gender, sexuality, all these ways in which people kind of bubble themselves in only one kind of thing. So they don't. They never meet queer. People never meet people color or the Nimick went Leonard, meet debt people, whatever they put him quote other is, and I think that a me the literature was about, yeah, introducing readers to the people that they, they, they don't know, and showing the ways in which there is some way intersection -ality in all of us as human beings and yes, so so it is part of that bigger narratives that would trying to create without word. And then the part of me is like after reading thirty-something books in still having people Egypt's about some stuff. I'm just like, you know what? I'm done. That guess, yes, this is me clapping. You don't have to do all the work you don't have to. I'm I'm, I'm firming that. What is that feeling? Tell me more about that. The allies to step up right leg outside. Russ does not having to explain it and for people to come on their witness in speak, offend and induce some of the word. I feel like a lot of us have been doing a lot of the work for a very long time and. At what point are the people to do it? So I don't know. Yeah, I'm I'm sure that that is a feeling like, you know, he said, running thirty bucks, and then like in your books can still to the same conclusions. You know that that's it's RAD to have like a ceases statement that pushes you through the world, but then also frustrating when that thesis statement can stay the same as you've created so much art and as the art has been successful and you're like, I almost wish. I mean, I'm just imagining a Memphis ising that it might be a relief to have that statement be able to change for there to be like an adjustment, earn up dating like, oh, well, since we've gotten this far now we can work on this thing. Ethan, right. Even having a work get dated right. But the thing is like circle dated yet. Like how come someone him look at? If you come south land say, oh, that happened a long time ago. It would never happen now. They can't because this still happening..

Leonard Zafy Egypt Memphis writer Russ Ethan Nimick
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"When you look at when you look at the issue, deportation, est going off forever. You will. You look at the show up cease Taliban communities of people color that so forever. When you look at the history of mass incarceration, I may other, you know a school to prison pipeline. These all things that we're talking about now. I mean, uh, specially on communities that have not the communities that are impacted by the same way, but it's not this in going up. But time said, I'm so glad to hear that correction because you're right. And I think, well, I guess I just look back at like my schooling. I mean, I know you can't see me can only voice, but I will tell you I am a white person and my schooling, like maybe I would have read about. A character dealing with like one issue. You know what I mean? Like maybe I would have read a book where there was like a young black woman who was like the first person to integrate a school or whatever. You know, like I would have read like that book, but she would have existed. Sort of like outside the framework of a system is just like one issue at a time sort of thing as opposed to like what you're doing with this book is almost acting as if like a bunch of issues happen together and are all systemically related. Like, wouldn't that be wild? If that was true. If they interacted with each other, the affected by them and also the the issues interacted with each other directly. And I think that's something that feels like different about this book, but you're right, it's not like of course, that's how it's been the whole time. That just wasn't my experience as a reader. Yeah, school is. I remember, you know, if you come soft lose twenty years ago and it's about a kid who gets killed in case is a retelling of Romeo Juliet, twenty years ago I asked I self will what would be they'd be now in the nineteen nineties, and that would kill a young boy. And that was the thing that that was the devil we knew. And when you open that book today, looks like a headline chase implant. It was twenty years ago right now this last year. When you look at Diablo when you look at at imperial in the history of. On people who are killed by cops back in the day is just a long line of the same crap. I mean, I, I think it's it's wild to. I don't know if you if you when you wrote that in the nineties was the response that people like believed that that was a thing that happened like I'm just curious about like a general like literary world response. Well, black communities were like, Yup. Eight communities like this would never happen. And you know, I got that feedback a couple of times and I was like, wait what you know, because they didn't have social media. We didn't have the same everyday hype lines that was showing the world the what was happening in communities. And so so now we do have that and it it's different. But yeah, back then it got us an interesting response in that some people were like. It could never happen Mike. Why is she writing this look? This lay basically. I mean, I, I completely believe that because I am away Persson who was alive in the nineties, and I can imagine that if I encountered that book, I mean, I would have been like a kids. I don't know that I would have been able to now speak on it, but I think even my teach, like I just think it would have been like a, what if this happened sort of thing as opposed to like, oh, this is the thing that happens. And here's a way that you could care about it by like being introduced to these characters kind of thing, even if it's outside of your community. Yeah, it's an interesting how we come to our empathy, right? And I think so much that comes to us through being exposed to who and what we don't know and for some of the young people that's through literature. So for me, it was the question I was asking was, how do we get people to think about other people and the answers they need to feel something for them I and in the case of jail Mayan..

Persson Taliban Romeo Juliet Mike twenty years
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Com. Slash tour to get tickets to all of those shows. Please enjoy this conversation. Still. No, no, no careless. Well, first of all that we, we are working with the full support of technology. I am in Chicago. You are remotely in upstate New York, and we are still making this work because that, because, hey, as where people we've got technology now so we can connect with each other feel so good on the show. I, I have people introduce themselves. So would you mind introducing yourself? Hey, my name is Jacqueline Woodson and most of a time I live in Brooklyn, New York, but day I haven't booster and Jacqueline. What do you do with your time? I know what you do with your time. So the thing I'd do with most of my time is right, unloved, writing at bluff, writing sits about seven years old. I love telling stories I love making up stories on and the creating moral. So, yeah, writing is. The thing I do when I'm not writing with my family with coordinate Juliet amazing position and and our children Toshi in sixteen. So when she's not here and some Jackson Luoi who's gen a home village of other people that are helping us these world as our children. Man, that's ounce. That sounds nice. Yeah, it's a good thing. Sounds like sounds like you got some stuff together. I was so happy to. I've read a bunch of your stuff. I read another Brooklyn recently on a flight. A lot of your books are like appropriate for younger readers, but then also, I think really. Like interesting for me as a thirty six year old person I was reading. I think another Brooklyn is like, what is that is like the middle grade or like, what does that like reader? Another book landed my first adult mabul in twenty years, so my God, well, then I am I straight up horribly ashamed. I thought I was just like, wow, I can really connect with the youth..

Brooklyn Jacqueline Woodson New York Toshi Chicago Juliet Jackson Luoi thirty six year twenty years seven years
"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline woodson" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Jamaican literature that schifrin tanzanian literature from going how important you think that is to see us civic identity in the curriculum in what you study super super important do think that sociable west indian literature like i think map just across the board that tends to go on the road kind of like the way i and you know i'm still annoyed that i found really late and i'm really pissed off of that because i think tip before but you studied these dating well shows i like seeing and finding that and then obviously the communists and all these different authors that really irritates me i didn't have that when i was at school we hired a lot african american literature stub everybody knew about i know why the case but it seems everybody knew stories about i never saw a story bio west indian person and that's important i don't wanna speak for everybody here but i do think that like if you have a varied amount of stories and literature they're ready for young kids growing up to see themselves to see other piece of writing important just for just for shitting shaping that willoughby but just kind of seeing themselves in places and understanding new ideas and different things too i think that so i think oversee reading allows you to kind of get a portal into either a different world or the world that uc around you and when like when i was younger i was reading jacqueline woodson and i've read.

jacqueline woodson willoughby