13 Burst results for "Jacqueline Rodney"

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Locked Up Abroad

Locked Up Abroad

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Locked Up Abroad

"For the past three years journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on in a legal six-storey construction. Debris dump that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen ninety s Robbins new podcast the city from USA today in wonder uncovers our Chicago gangster named John Christopher worked his connections to the mob to literally bury a neighborhood and trash and how in doing. So he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north longdale. And how the residents fought back against John Christopher the mob and politicians on the take. And what this story reveals about how power works in cities across the country. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll hear host, Robin Aamer and the Chicago residents. I encountered the illegal dump you'll also hear from John Christopher himself. The mysterious man who arrived in a limo and forever changed the Chicago neighborhood. It's. A story. You have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever else you listen, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod. Also, be sure to visit the city podcast dot com. To learn more about this story and to explore nineteen Ninety-two north longdale and the six-storey pile of rubble in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me. Like, it's about a full city block it gets. It's a big. It's a big lunch. That's Gladys Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney who lived nearby. And it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees, there's like prairie grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? Miss. It was a myth that this the best I can say for. I I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here if I he hit oh big eighteen wheelers. Mine up, you know, I just thought. Well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to nip two guys. Sate miss. Listen, come down look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over? I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade, and I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge while the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination, and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago. But also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on this lot the story. I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive Ovan vacant let in a limo. You know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal dump six stories high. It was huge mountains concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city whole would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also like, corruption apathy and greed. Okay. If a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket and he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills? The man who built this dump had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the owner of the restaurant. He goes if you don't pay your milk money. You're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. This fucking tape. Table. I made a lot of money over there. And before he was done. The FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer. And this is the city a new podcast from USA today. Subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago Robin Aamer John Christopher longdale USA apple Jacqueline Rodney FBI Robbins Gladys Woodson Facebook Twitter official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years milk
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

05:23 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on American Scandal

"Chicago one thousand nine hundred ninety a guy with a loud, sweater, manicured nails and connections to some very powerful people idols and a limousine near vacant lot a fleet of dump trucks unload. Tons of busted concrete and keeps coming back. The pile of rubble grows behind residents homes cross the street from church and Annella mentally school the trucks keep coming until the heap of debris is six stories high for the past three years. Journalists Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal construction, debris dump that appeared in predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen ninety s her new podcast the city from USA today and wonder uncovers how Chicago gangster named John Christopher worked his connections with the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood and trash over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump changed the neighborhood of north longdale. And how the residents fought back against John Christopher against the mob politicians on the take and even the F. FBI you're about to hear a preview of the city while you're listening be sure to subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pot. Also, be sure to visit the city podcast dot com. To learn more about the story and to explore nineteen Ninety-two north Lauderdale and the dumps that grew there in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me. Like, it's about a full city block. It gets. It's a big it's a big live. That's Gladys Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney who lived nearby. And it's now it's pretty overgrown like, there's full-sized trees, there's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? It's a miss. It was a myth that this the best I can say for. I I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here if I he hit oh big eighteen wheelers. Mine up, you know, I just thought. Well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to Nick to a guy say MS Woodson come now look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over? I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade, and I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge while the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination, and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago. But also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on this lot the story. I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo. You know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal dump six stories high. It was huge mountains concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also by corruption apathy, and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket and he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills? The man who built this dump had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes if you don't pay your milk money. You're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. All the poison dysfunction. Table. I made a lot of money over there. And before he was done. The FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer. And this is the city a new podcast from USA today. Subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago FBI John Christopher Robin Aamer Gladys Woodson USA apple longdale Jacqueline Rodney Annella freyre grass Facebook Twitter Lauderdale Nick official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"Uh? Hello electorate listeners. This is Jen Taylor Skinner. A story for you. You know, one of the reasons we all vote is to protect the communities that we live in. That's why we stay engage to protect the spaces per live where work or families live, and we'd like to think that engagement works. It works in protecting us all but sometimes corruption ingred takeover and the only way to win is for everyday people to fight like hell, and this is one such story for the past three years journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on a legal six story construction debris down that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the ninety s you know, I'd never heard the story before. And it's fascinating Robbins new podcast the city from USA today in Wandry uncovers how a Chicago gainst your name. John Christopher worked as connections to the mob and the FBI to literally bury neighborhood and trash and in doing. So he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten. Episodes. You'll hear how the dump chains the neighborhood of north Lonsdale. And how residents fought back against John Christopher against the mob against politicians and even against the FBI. You know, sadly, the story reveals how power works in cities across the country. So I'm gonna give you a treat your belt to hear a preview of the city, which you'll hear the host, Robin Aamer, and she's great, by the way, you hear Robin. And the Chicago residents who I encountered the illegal dump you'll also hear from John Christopher himself. The mysterious man who arrived in a limo and change the Chicago neighborhood forever. It's a story that you have to hear to believe also you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever else she lists. And you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city Todd enjoy. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown, but we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city. Block gets. It's a big. It's a big lot. That's Gladys Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney who live nearby. And it's now it's pretty overgrown like, there's full-sized trees, there's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? It looks miss. It was so miss this the best I can say for I I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here. If I had a big eighteen wheelers line up, you know, I just thought well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to Nick to a guy say MS Woodson come down look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over? I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade, and I've reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge while the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination, and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago. But also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on this lot the story. I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo. You know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal dump six stories high. It was huge mountains concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers and construction cranes. But also by corruption apathy, and greed. Okay. If a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket and he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills? The man who built this dump had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes if you don't pay your milk money. You're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. This fucking thing. I made a lot of money opener. And before he was done. The FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer. And this is the city a new podcast from USA today. Subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago Robin Aamer FBI John Christopher north Lonsdale Gladys Woodson USA apple Jen Taylor Skinner Block freyre grass Facebook Robbins Nick Twitter official Todd Wandry Jacqueline Rodney five one hundred dollar
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on American History Tellers

"For the past three years journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six construction debris dam that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties her new podcast the city from USA today and wondering uncovered how Chicago gangster named John Christopher worked his connections with the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood and trash and how in doing. So he exposed to Kogyo's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north lawn Dale and how the residents fought back against John Christopher the mob politicians on the take and even the FBI. And what the story reveals about how power works in cities across the country. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll meet host, Robin Aamer. And the Chicago residents who I encountered the legal dump. You'll also hear from John Christopher himself mysterious man who arrived in the limo and forever changed. The Chicago name. Hood. It's a story. You have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can follow the on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod. Also, be sure to visit the city podcast dot com. To learn more about this story and to explore nineteen Ninety-two Llandough and the dumps in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me. Like, it's about a full city block. It gets. It's a big it's a big live. That's Gladys Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney who lived nearby. And it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees, there's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating a miss. It was a myth that this the best I can say for it. I I started visiting this lot which isn't a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here it I he hit. Oh, big eighteen wheelers. Mine up, you know, I just thought. Well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to nip to guide sate MS Woodson comedown look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over? I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade, and I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge while the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination, and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago. But also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on this lot the story. I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo. You know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal dump six stories high. It was huge mountains concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall with do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. There's and construction cranes, but also like corruption apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket and he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills? The man who built this dump had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes if you don't pay your milk money. You're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. At this fucking. Table. The money over there. And before he was done. The FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer. And this is the city a new podcast from USA today. Subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. What if the experience of driving a luxury vehicle wasn't limited to just inside your car, but extended out into the world around you.

Chicago Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA apple Jacqueline Rodney Llandough freyre grass Kogyo MS Woodson Gladys Woodson Facebook Twitter official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years milk
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

Hollywood And Crime

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

"Hi, it's Tracy. For the past three years, journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six-storey construction. Debris dump that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties Robbins, new podcast, the city from USA today and wonder uncovers how a Chicago gangster named John Christopher, worked his connections to the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood in trash and how in doing so he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north lawn Dell, and how the residents fought back against John Christopher, the mob politicians on the take and even the FBI and what the story reveals about how power works in cities across the country. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll meet host, Robin Aamer, and the Chicago residents who I encountered the illegal dump. You also. So here from John Christopher himself, the mysterious man who arrived in a limo and forever changed the Chicago neighborhood. It's a story. You'll have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcast. Wherever else you listen, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod also be sure to visit the city podcast dot com to learn more about this story and to explore nineteen ninety two north Llandough and the six pile of rubble in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It gets it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline. Rodney who live nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees. There's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating a miss. It was a myth that this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here. If I had a big eighteen wheelers mine up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to Nick to a guy, say, MS, Woodson, come down, look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade. And I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on the slot. The story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in limbo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also by corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the owner of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. This fucking table. I made a lot of money over there and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer and this is the city. A new podcast from USA today subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen. If you're like me, you can't get enough true crime. It's why you're listening to Hollywood and crime right now. And it's why you're probably always on the lookout for new ways to get your daily dose of real life crime stories. Well, let me tell you about murder minute, murder minute, delivers bone chilling, true crime stories straight to your mobile device. The Email or taxed signing up as easy and fun, and the design looks like a chat log, so it keeps your ears free, you know. So you can listen for people creeping up behind you everyday. They released a new episode that delves into the gruesome acts of America's worst serial killers both the well known like Ted Bundy, and

Chicago Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA apple Woodson freyre grass Dell Rodney Llandough Ted Bundy Robbins Facebook Hollywood America Nick murder official
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

"Hi, it's Tracy. For the past three years, journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six-storey construction. Debris dump that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties Robbins, new podcast, the city from USA today and wonder uncovers how a Chicago gangster named John Christopher, worked his connections to the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood in trash and how in doing so he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north lawn Dell, and how the residents fought back against John Christopher, the mob politicians on the take and even the FBI and what the story reveals about how power works in cities across the country. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll meet host, Robin Aamer, and the Chicago residents who I encountered the illegal dump. You also. So here from John Christopher himself, the mysterious man who arrived in a limo and forever changed the Chicago neighborhood. It's a story. You'll have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcast. Wherever else you listen, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod also be sure to visit the city podcast dot com to learn more about this story and to explore nineteen ninety two north Llandough and the six pile of rubble in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It gets it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline. Rodney who live nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees. There's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating a miss. It was a myth that this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here. If I had a big eighteen wheelers mine up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking the truck to Nick to a guy, say, MS, Woodson, come down, look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade. And I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on the slot. The story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in limbo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also by corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the owner of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. This fucking table. I made a lot of money over there and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer and this is the city. A new podcast from USA today subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA apple Woodson freyre grass Dell Rodney Llandough Robbins Facebook Nick Gladys Twitter official Jacqueline five one hundred dollar
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

The City

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

"But it washed my trolls Bacall that miss was getting all in my house. I had son at as and all that my house was turbo. Miss Dickerson and others living. You're the one junk Christopher to compensate them for all the damage he'd already done. But back trial, John Christopher turned around and use this against them. He claimed they weren't really worried about the dumps. They're just trying to shake him down. Here's how he described interaction. He supposedly had with one Northland resident to the city's lawyer. Let's go back to our reenactment. Can you give me an idea how many people complained? Five seventy, not all at once in. Can you give me a general idea of the nature of your conversation with these people? You really don't wanna know. Know I do wanna know who give me ten dollars giving you ten dollars. Yeah, you, you ain't going to make it off Roosevelt road. And what was your response to that will see? I'm here. Did you get the names of these people? I didn't need to the care of myself. How did you take care of it? I just told them my, it ain't nice as mother nature for ten dollars. John Christopher was painting himself as the victim and to some it seemed as rather than compensating them, he was trying to buy their silence. Here's Jacqueline. Rodney who heard from earlier talking about living next to the rock crusher. When I went into coordinate, asked me to testify, yes, me did. I'll want money. John Christopher, did the lawyer when I was sitting in the deposition ESPN what is it do? Do you want? Do you want money? What is it that you want from this operation? And I said, I want you to move. I want you to leave my neighborhood because she's destroying it. He told me, I wish we had you on our teams. And I didn't know what that meant. What does that mean? And you know, they thanked me for being there. I didn't know what that meant. John Christopher had previously cast doubt on the city's legal arguments, and now he cast doubt on the residents motives. So one full year after he first showed up, the city's lawsuit was still grinding its way through the court and the dump across the street from the elementary school had grown into a mountain almost six stories tall, so tall that the piles of concrete slabs towered over the house next door. And ultimately, this mountain took on a nickname mount Henry. How did you died feel about it being called mount Henry. He was quite subdued about quite sad about it. It was like he couldn't get nothing done about you like he'd been duped. I have been used to dunk that there. That's next time on the city. The city is a production of USA today and is distributed in partnership with wondering, you can subscribe to the show on apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you're listening right now, if you liked the show please rate and review us and be sure to tell your friends about us. Our shows reported and produced by Wilson Sayer Jenny Koss and meet Robin Emma or editors Sam Greenspan. Ben Austin is our story consultant original music and mixing by Hannah's Brown, Jennifer Mudge, Chris Henry Coffey, David w starred in reenactments. Additional production by Taylor making about cockerel and Bianca media's Chris Davis is our VP for investigations. Scott Stein is our VP of product are decorative producer is Liz

John Christopher Miss Dickerson mount Henry Bacall VP USA Chris Henry Coffey Spotify Rodney Ben Austin Wilson Sayer Scott Stein ESPN Liz Bianca media Sam Greenspan Taylor producer Chris Davis
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

The City

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

"We will object to the use of the term waste was this pas on this firmament. Henry Henderson had previously won cases dealing with hazardous waste according to federal law. Hazardous has a very specific definition for waste to be considered hazardous. It has to be highly flammable or reactive or toxic stuff like that. Henderson new this case would be different because a pile of crushed Uproxx is not the same thing as glow in the dark sludge in the strictest legal sense. This waste was not hazardous, but he never expected his team to have to debate whether in the eyes of the law. These dumps were in fact waste. What do you mean by wastes in a kind of shrewd and tactical move John Christopher, and his lawyer argued that this stuff wasn't waste at all. We will check to use of turn waste when referring to Adams for the purposes of this deposition when I am talking about waste, I am talking about the materials that your company ordinarily receives and sells. Okay. So we are talking about concrete rebar, asphalt clay stone, things that nature after something that is not waist. Okay. I don't want to get into for the purpose of the question. We specific when she identifies what she's speaking about. You are just not to answer. When she uses the term waste unless she specifies I don't handle waist. Okay. And I know I am getting brought into a suit because of ways as the defining dirt asphalt, broken concrete is waste. I know that, but that is not waste, and that is not an issue to go over at this point. I don't handle waste it. Is your contention that you handle material? Is that material. Material. John Christopher argued that he wasn't dumping waste but recycling material. Under city law. Anything that could be recycled was not considered waste. And in a legal brief, John Christopher's lawyer argued that the materials at the site weren't waste because they were being recycled. Remember John Christopher said that he was operating a rock crusher to pulverize all of that waste material, whatever it was and recycle it back into gravel. Of course, the problem with that argument was that only a very small percentage of the stuff he was bringing to the lots was being recycled. Much of it was just left there. The judge. In this case, Lester Forman died in two thousand three. So we weren't able to ask him what he thought about these arguments. But Henry Henderson says at the judge, took these arguments seriously enough to consider the junk Christopher could be in the right. This was clue. The case here where you could say, look, there is a value to this concrete. There's embedded value in all kinds of things can be treated as waste. That's actually the genius of the recycling movement is looking at imbedded value and things that are treated as waste, but actually have reuse possibility Henderson also believes that the judge was swayed by the fact that in a strict technical sense, nothing being trucked. The lot was hazardous as wasn't cyanide or arsenic. Nothing obviously threatened to catch fire or poison people. He thinks it would have been easier to get the injunction if it had been. Just two days after the city sued the judge denied the request for an injunction city tried again, and their second request was also denied. The case would keep working its way through the legal system. But while it did Christopher would be free to continue dumping. How did you feel during this time? I mean, I can imagine frustrated and going to a lot of community meetings was people being very, very upset and outrage about the fact that this actively was continuing to recur in their community. This was this is a big deal. We will fighting in court and he was still operating. Again, here's Jacqueline Rodney who live near one of the dumps eight put is much as he could on the site while we were in court. Ten months after John Christopher, I showed up north Lonsdale. The dumps had almost doubled in height and the neighborhood was about to find out just how destructive this non hazardous material could be. That's after the break..

John Christopher Henry Henderson Adams Uproxx Lester Forman Jacqueline Rodney Ten months two days
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

The City

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

"There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It's it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson Jacqueline Rodney who live nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full trees. There's like fray grass. So what it looked like when it was when he was operating. A miss. It was a miss. I this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale after hearing a story about something that happened here if I hit, oh, big, eighteen wheelers line up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking the trucks in to a guy, say, MS Wison, come now look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade and reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets built in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on this lot, the story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers and construction cranes, but also by corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're gonna pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. This fucking table. I made a lot of money over and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Nima and from USA today, this is the city. Let's start at the beginning before the dump trucks came before the lawsuits and the secret FBI tapes before the arrests and the president's executive order before the mountain appeared and then disappeared. Along with the guy who put it there. There was daily. Daily, deliver his inaugural address, fly on WB b. m. from office. Fourth nineteen Eighty-nine Chicago's new mayor sworn into office. It's time to leave behind all setbacks, disappointments and battles because in the campaign for a better Chicago, all allies. In the forty years, leading up to his inauguration. Chicago had lost nearly a million people along with hundreds of thousands of jobs. The new mayor, Daley wanted to stem that tide. He wanted his Chicago to wake up from its post industrial slumber and thrive. And we either. City while we sit back in watch decline. Daly began a major push to revamp Chicago's aging downtown, paying special attention to the tourist friendly destinations in the loop on along the lakefront he'd go onto renovate navy, pier with its one hundred fifty foot tall, ferris wheel, expand McCormick place. The biggest convention center North America, and build millennium park with its big silver bean and Frank Gehry designed amphitheater. He also said about rebuilding crucial parts of the city's infrastructure including roads and highways. Chicago is ringed by highways named for dead politicians. The Kennedy, the Eisenhower, the Stevenson millions of cars and thirty years of wear and tear and ice and salt had worn down these aging roadways

Chicago FBI North America Frank Gehry Daly north Lonsdale Gladys Woodson Jacqueline Rodney MS Wison Robin Nima Daley USA official Kennedy Stevenson president Eisenhower executive five one hundred dollar one hundred fifty foot
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on AFTERMATH

AFTERMATH

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on AFTERMATH

"If you're a fan of this podcast, we have another one you might wanna check out for the past three years. Journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six-storey construction debris down that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties. Her new podcast is called the city from USA today. I'm wondering it uncovers how a Chicago gangster named John Christopher, worked his connections to the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood in trash and how in doing so he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north Lonsdale and how the residents fought back. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll hear from the Chicago residents who first encountered the illegal dump. You also hear from John Christopher himself, the mysterious man who arrived in a limo and forever change this neighborhood. It's a story. You have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever else you listen, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod also be sure to visit the city podcasts dot com to learn more about the story and to explore nineteen ninety two north Lonsdale and the dumps in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It gets it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline. Rodney who lived nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees. There's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? Amiss. It will miss. I this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here, if I he hit oh, big, eighteen wheelers, mine up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking truck to nip to a guy, say, MS Woodson, come down, look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade. And I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets bills in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on the slot. The story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also my corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. At this fucking tape. Table. I made a lot of money over and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer and this is the city. A new podcast from USA today subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago north Lonsdale Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA Rodney MS Woodson apple freyre grass Jacqueline Facebook Gladys Twitter official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years milk
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Accused

Accused

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on Accused

"If you're a fan of this podcast, we have another one you might wanna check out for the past three years. Journalist, Robin Aamer has been reporting on an illegal six-storey construction debris down that appeared in a predominantly black Chicago neighborhood in the early nineteen nineties. Her new podcast is called the city from USA today. I'm wondering it uncovers how a Chicago gangster named John Christopher, worked his connections to the mob and the FBI to literally bury a neighborhood in trash and how in doing so he exposed Chicago's ugliest divides over the course of ten episodes. You'll hear how the dump change the neighborhood of north Lonsdale and how the residents fought back. You're about to hear a preview of the city in which you'll hear from the Chicago residents who first encountered the illegal dump. You also hear from John Christopher himself, the mysterious man who arrived in a limo and forever change this neighborhood. It's a story. You have to hear to believe you can subscribe to the city for free on apple podcasts or wherever else you listen, and you can follow the city on Facebook and Twitter at the city pod also be sure to visit the city podcasts dot com to learn more about the story and to explore nineteen ninety two north Lonsdale and the dumps in an exclusive augmented reality experience. There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It gets it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline. Rodney who lived nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full sized trees. There's like freyre grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? Amiss. It will miss. I this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale. After hearing a story about something that happened here, if I he hit oh, big, eighteen wheelers, mine up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking truck to nip to a guy, say, MS Woodson, come down, look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade. And I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets bills in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on the slot. The story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in a limo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of a so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people. You know, I didn't think they'd care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also my corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're going to get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. At this fucking tape. Table. I made a lot of money over and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm Robin Aamer and this is the city. A new podcast from USA today subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago north Lonsdale Robin Aamer John Christopher FBI USA Rodney MS Woodson apple freyre grass Jacqueline Facebook Gladys Twitter official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars three years milk
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

The City

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

"Chicago is built on a prairie the skyscrapers downtown tower over a completely flat landscape which made it all the more remarkable when John Christopher's giant illegal dumps begin to rise out of nowhere casting their long shadows over north Lonsdale and the homes of Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney. It was that. At least two stories right. Hall as all of these houses around us. That's so big and he didn't watery down. The dust was all over the neighborhood everywhere. I don't care how much you clean. I still can write my name all Michael's. I have glass tape. I still can write my name in the table. We left off a guy named John Christopher, had established a pair of illegal dumps onto vacant lots north Lauderdale on Chicago's west side, one down the street from his Woodson and miss Rodney and an even bigger one. Just a few blocks away across the street from an elementary school and not only was John Christopher dumping truckload after truckload of gravel and bricks and rusted of medal. He was also operating a rock crusher a giant piece of machinery, the pulverizes concrete into gravel. Whenever he operated the crusher we all know because our buildings would be shaking and you could hear the mortar falling could hear the more falling through the walls of sound like the house houses were about to carry van here. The rock crusher two blocks away because it was shaking ground. Not only could we at when it was shaking. Our houses are more was falling out of the buildings to the point where we could see outside from inside the house. MS. Rodney MS Woodson and their neighbors and north Lonsdale had confronted John Christopher the dumper and we're determined to take them to court. The got the city of Chicago on their side and sue John Christopher that was in June of nineteen ninety. He said, I'll do what I won't when all and how I want. And I'll stay there as long as I want to know. You won't. We, you definitely not going to stay here. Except he would for longer than anyone could have predicted. I'm Robin namer from USA today. This is the city..

John Christopher MS. Rodney MS Woodson north Lonsdale Chicago Jacqueline Rodney Hall Robin namer USA Michael Lauderdale
"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

The City

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"jacqueline rodney" Discussed on The City

"There's this vacant lot on the west side of Chicago. It's about a half dozen miles from Chicago's downtown what we call the loop. And this lot is huge. This lot looks to me like it's about a full city block. It's it's a big. It's a big live. That's Gladys, Woodson and Jacqueline Rodney who live nearby and it's now it's pretty overgrown like there's full-sized trees. There's like fray grass. So what did it look like when it was when he was operating? A miss. It will miss. I this the best I can say for it. I, I started visiting this lot which is in a neighborhood called north Lonsdale after hearing a story about something that happened here if I hit, oh, big, eighteen wheelers, mine up, you know, I just thought, well, hey, somebody just parking their trucks in this to guy, say, MS, Woodson, come down, look at this. Do you know somebody's dumping over. I've been reporting in Chicago for more than a decade. And I reported all kinds of stories about the built environment about secret tunnels hidden underneath the loop and about how your place a train bridge. While the train is still running. I've also reported on housing discrimination and predatory lending so stories about all of the remarkable stuff that gets bills in Chicago, but also about how it gets built and about all of the foul and crooked things that people will do when they think nobody's looking. And so the story of what happened on the slot. The story I want to tell you stunned me despite everything I already knew about Chicago about how corrupt and ruthless. It can be about how stark the divisions are between black and white, rich and poor between the people who hoard power and the people who will fight for their fair share. Anytime you see anybody drive over a vacant lot in limbo, you know is no good. This story is about a giant illegal, dump six stories high. It was huge mountains, concrete garbage built from the broken pieces of a city in the midst of so-called renaissance thought that downtown city hall would do right by the people you think they care less about us and built not just by dump trucks and bulldozers. And construction cranes, but also by corruption, apathy and greed. So I said, okay, if a public official came by today and said, you know, I need five hundred dollars. What would you do any reached into his back pocket? And he pulled out five one hundred dollar bills. The man who built this dump, had deep ties to Chicago's criminal underworld. He looked at the honor of the restaurant. He goes, if you don't pay your milk money, you're gonna get a pineapple through the window. He profited at the neighborhood's expense. This fucking. Table. I made a lot of money over and before he was done, the FBI would be protecting him. I'm neymar and this is the city. A new podcast from USA today coming September twenty fourth subscribe now on apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Chicago Woodson Jacqueline Rodney FBI north Lonsdale USA Gladys apple official five one hundred dollar five hundred dollars milk