10 Burst results for "Jacqueline Cabrera"

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Sandra Shave Kernaghan NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals, They're still able to find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's Iemma Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Cory ER, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registers right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding up and highlight that in your collection, The collection of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston got the latest trend in pandemic distraction..

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Jill Kennedy John Michel Basquiat Kernaghan Sandra Shave Korea NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Cory ER Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KCRW

"You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall Managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum, Korea's used to ride on the trucks that not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sure about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest an exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Boston's Museum of Colonel Hands Basquiat Boston
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:21 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KCRW

"Aftershocks. A memoir by Nadia Wuss who opens with an earthquake. Hears about it over the radio and over pancakes when she's seven years old, growing up in Rome with her sister. Being cared for by her father, whom they love. After their mother has left their family but has returned to see them. Just for a day. Well, she's passing through town. The earthquake is in Armenia a long ways off, but not yet a wuss who says My mind has a seismometer inside it. Aftershocks is her memoir of a tough, interesting multinational, multi racial upbringing at adulthood that ranges around the world from Rome to Kampala to New York. Dozens of stops in between. It's the first book from Nadia Wu Shu, a writer, an urban planner who joins us from Brooklyn. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. You say early on. It's always been difficult for me to say the word home with any conviction. Moving on was what we did. Your father was a U N official. Where did you and your family live? How many places s O. I was born in Tanzania. My father was from Ghana. My mother is Armenian American. And because my father worked for the United Nations, we went back and forth between the headquarters of the agency he worked for which was in Rome, Italy. Two different countries in East Africa, mostly so I lived in Uganda, Ethiopia, Tanzania and then also went to boarding school for a while in the U. K. You loved your father and having read your book If I may. I love your father. I'm glad. Uh, Alas. He died when you were 14 and Oh, this is hard to bring up with you. But your stepmother told you something that sounds like it meant it was Like it was meant to cause another earthquake in your life. Yeah, So I have a very complicated relationship with my stepmother. It still is complicated. There was a lot of tension and sort of competitiveness for my father's attention. And she I moved to New York when I was 18 for college and you know she would come and visit occasionally, and we had kind of a petty argument. But through that petty argument, she sort of revealed to me that my father had not died of cancer as I had always believed, but that in fact he had died of AIDS. And I still to this day don't know whether that's true. But I kind of decided that it shouldn't matter. But at the time, I think for so many reasons, it really was an earthquake in my life because my love for my father and my story of him in which we had a very open, honest relationship that I could return to was so important to me and this revelation, sort of Made me question that story, and it really did sort of set me off on a tail spin to sort of try to understand what what I could believe in what I could hold onto. If I didn't have that story reading the book, I had the impression that you might have felt that way because age might suggest to promiscuity in your father as he traveled the globe, which just didn't fit up with the father. You knew. Without giving anything away. I mean, if that was true, A it's got nothing to do with his love for you and b. I. Yeah, I can see why your stepmother she can't hurt him any more. But I don't know. Somehow in her mind, she thought she had hurt you with that knowledge. Yeah, I mean, I think it's a very self centered thing that I thought I in my story of my father that I was the most important person in his whole world and that he couldn't possibly have had a life outside of the life that he had with me and looking back on it as a grown up, you know, that's ridiculous. Of course, he had a life outside of the life that he had with me. He did love you and your sister. Exactly, And he loved us so much and no revelation changes. And I think that that's that's ultimately where I where I came to, and realized that no story anyone can tell me can change that love and that experience in that connection that we had with him. Yeah. Uh ah. Lot of this memoir is written from the confines of a blue chair that you got out on the street. How did that happen? Yes. So after that revelation, and I was also going through a break up at the time and really just going through a period of depression and anxiety, and I would go on these really long walks around New York and on one of those walks on my way back to my apartment. I saw this blue chair and something drew me to it, and I dragged it home with me. And then ultimately, it ended up being sort of. Ah, ah, whole country for me that I retreated to for seven days while I went through this period of depression and anxiety but also sort of reckoning with this grief that I hadn't really dealt with. Um and yes, but much of that time sort of sitting in that blue chair. When you've sought professional help for what you even refer to his panic attacks. It strikes me that that's um, well, meaning people don't quite understand why it's not helpful to say it's not your heart. Don't worry. It's all in your head. Yes, Yes, I ended up going to the hospital because they didn't know what was happening to me. And I've actually learned since that This is very common for people who suffer from panic attacks the first time it feels like a heart attack. And you feel that something is definitely seriously physically wrong with you. But I do think that there often is that reaction like just calm down, you know, but it is very different from like I'm just having a little bit of worry. It's a very different kind of much more physical experience. Jazz helps, doesn't It was interested to read about that? I like jazz to Oh, nice. Yes. Oh, my father listened to a lot of jazz and always did when I was growing up, and he was always trying to get me to listen to jazz and teach me about jazz and particularly the more avant garde jazz. I always kind of rejected because it's so dissonant, and it didn't make any sense to me And my father would say hard to hum along with John Coltrane. You mean Yeah, exactly. And I would you know My father would always say you just have to listen differently. You know, It's like learning a new language, and I was like, I don't want to learn this language. But then later later in life, you know, particularly as I was going through this difficult period. Dissonance just made so much more sense to me in terms of how is experiencing the world and I found myself sort of drawn to my father's music and actually ended up marrying a jazz musician. So there's still that connection. My word. Your father must be endlessly delighted. I think you would love it. Yeah. Nadia Aru Shu her memoir. Aftershocks. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks so much for having me She's lovely. When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate..

earthquake New York Aftershocks Rome Tanzania Nadia Wuss Nadia Wu Shu Museum of Fine Arts Boston Ghana Nadia Aru Shu United Nations Armenia Brooklyn John Coltrane writer Los Angeles Lisbon Italy Andrea Shea
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sure about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I'm gonna say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Corriere, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to Traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The latest.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston NPR Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum Museum of Fine Arts director Corriere
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:29 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Scott Simon. Aftershocks. A memoir by Nadia Wuss who opens with an earthquake. Hears about it over the radio and over pancakes when she's seven years old, growing up in Rome with her sister. Being cared for by her father, whom they love. After their mother has left their family but has returned to see them. Just for a day. Well, she's passing through town. The earthquake is in Armenia a long ways off, but not yet a wuss who says My mind has a seismometer inside it. Aftershocks is her memoir of a tough, interesting multinational, multi racial upbringing at adulthood that ranges around the world from Rome to Kampala to New York. Dozens of stops in between. It's the first book from Nadia Wu Shu, a writer, an urban planner who joins us from Brooklyn. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. You say early on. It's always been difficult for me to say the word home with any conviction. Moving on was what we did. Your father was a U N official. Where did you and your family live? How many places s O. I was born in Tanzania. My father was from Ghana. My mother is Armenian American. And because my father worked for the United Nations, we went back and forth between the headquarters of the agency he worked for which was in Rome, Italy. Two different countries in East Africa, mostly so I lived in Uganda, Ethiopia, Tanzania and then also went to boarding school for a while in the U. K. You loved your father and having read your book If I may. I love your father. I'm glad, uh, on the last he died when you were 14 and Oh, this is hard to bring up with you. But your stepmother told you something that sounds like it meant it was Like it was meant to cause another earthquake in your life. Yeah, So I have a very complicated relationship with my stepmother. It still is complicated. There was a lot of tension and sort of competitiveness for my father's attention. And she I moved to New York when I was 18 for college and you know she would come and visit occasionally, and we had kind of a petty argument. But through that petty argument, she sort of revealed to me that my father had not died of cancer as I had always believed, but that in fact he had died of AIDS. And I still to this day don't know whether that's true. But I kind of decided that it shouldn't matter. But at the time, I think for so many reasons, it really was an earthquake in my life because my love for my father and my story of him in which we had a very open, honest relationship that I could return to was so important to me and this revelation, sort of Made me question that story, and it really did sort of set me off on a tailspin to sort of try to understand what what I could believe in what I could hold onto. If I didn't have that story reading the book, I had the impression that you might have felt that way because age might suggest to promiscuity in your father as he traveled the globe, which just didn't fit up with the father. You knew. And without giving anything away. I mean, if that was true, it's got nothing to do with his love for you and b. I. Yeah, I can see why your stepmother she can't hurt him any more. But I don't know. Somehow in her mind, she thought she had hurt you with that knowledge. Yeah. I mean, I think it's a very self centered thing that I thought in my story of my father that I was the most important person in his whole world and that he couldn't possibly have had a life outside of the life that he had with me and looking back on it as a grown up, you know, that's ridiculous. Of course, he had a life outside of the life that he had with me, and he did love you and your sister. Exactly, And he loved us so much and no revelation changes that, and I think that that's that's ultimately where I Where I came to and realize that no story anyone can tell me can change that love and that experience in that connection that we had with him. Yeah. Uh ah. A lot of this memoir is written from the confines of a blue chair that you got out on the street. How did that happen? Yes. So after that revelation, and I was also going through a break up at the time and really just going through a period of Depression and anxiety, and I would go on these really long walks around New York and on one of those walks on my way back to my apartment. I saw this blue chair and something drew me to it, and I dragged it home with me and then Ultimately, it ended up being sort of. Ah, ah, whole country for me that I retreated to for seven days while I went through this period of depression and anxiety but also sort of reckoning with this grief that I hadn't really dealt with. And yes, but much of that time sort of sitting in that blue chair. When you've sought professional help for what you even refer to his panic attacks. It strikes me that that's um, well, meaning people don't quite understand why it's not helpful to say it's not your heart. Don't worry. It's all in your head. Yes. Yes, I ended up going to the hospital because they didn't know what was happening to me. And I've actually learned since that This is very common for people who suffer from panic attacks the first time it feels like a heart attack, And you feel that something is definitely seriously physically wrong with you. But I do think that there often is that reaction like just calm down, you know, but it is very different from like. I'm just having a little bit of worry. It's a very different kind of much more physical experience. Jazz helps doesn't was interested to read about that. I like jazz to Oh, nice. Yeah, So my father listened to a lot of jazz and always did when I was growing up, and he was always trying to get me to listen to jazz and teach me about jazz and particularly the more avant garde jazz. I always kind of rejected because it's so dissonant, and it didn't make any sense to me. And my father would say hard to hum along with John Coltrane. You mean Yeah, exactly. And I would My father would always say you just have to listen differently. You know, It's like learning a new language, and I was like, I don't want to learn this language. But then later later in life, you know, particularly as I was going through this difficult period. The dissonance just made so much more sense to me in terms of how is experiencing the world and I found myself sort of drawn to my father's music and actually ended up marrying a jazz musician. So there's still that connection. My word. Your father must be endlessly delighted. I think you would love it. Yeah. Nadia Lucia. Her memoir. Aftershocks. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks So much for having me Mrs. Lovely when the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe Suddenly work under very different circumstances, with exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat. Made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers..

earthquake Aftershocks New York Korea Rome Tanzania John Michel Basquiat Nadia Wuss Nadia Wu Shu Scott Simon Museum of Fine Arts Boston Kernaghan Ghana United Nations Armenia John Coltrane Brooklyn writer Nadia Lucia
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"jacqueline cabrera" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News