35 Burst results for "Jacqueline"

"jacqueline" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

05:23 min | 1 d ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Crisis, it was acute the difference between the elites that had access to financial services and the rest of the country in places like Brazil, Argentina, Chile, who wouldn't even walk into the drawers of the banks. Is that what led you to leave? 1986 you leave chase to go work in the nonprofit sector basically really young woman at this point in probably 25 and you probably making really great money and chase and but what was the thing that just gave you, you know what?

"jacqueline" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

05:51 min | 1 d ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Many years ago, when Jacqueline novogratz was working for an NGO in Kigali Rwanda, she spotted a boy wearing a blue sweater. It was strange because the sweater seemed very familiar to her. And the more she looked, the more she realized that it was actually her sweater. A sweater, she had donated to goodwill a decade earlier. Jacqueline had a kind of epiphany moment where she realized the interconnectedness of the world and her own potential to make an impact in someone's life. Today, Jacqueline is the cofounder and CEO of acumen. It's a nonprofit that raises money from donors who are actually called investors to finance social enterprises around the world. Acumen has delivered more than a $100 million in loans, grants, and investments in things like medical clinic, solar energy projects, and businesses that help low income people around the world. Jacqueline applies the principles and ideas she learned as a young investment banker, not to make a massive profit, but to help empower communities to grow and thrive. Jacqueline grew up in a pretty large household. She was one of 7 kids the daughter of a military officer who served three tours of duty in Vietnam. And as a young girl, she was particularly inspired by the stories of women saints. Those were the only stories that we read that were essentially the narratives of women who directed their own lives. They were also the first examples for me of people who lived and in some cases were willing to die for an idea. So I don't know if I thought of it in terms of, you know, I want to change the roles of capitalism, but I definitely wanted to do good and to be of use from a very young age. What did your parents expect out of you? You know, when you were a student and you eventually were ready to leave home and go to college, what did they expect you to do and to become? You know, when you grow up as one of 7, particularly as the eldest, I think what you integrate into yourself is more that sense of responsibility for the tribe. My parents had a great expectation that we would take care of ourselves at some level. And importantly, take care of others. And contribute somehow to the world. So it was a quite vague in terms of dreams. I was of that generation where parents didn't dictate where you would go to school or even how you would get into school, but rather independence. When I got into university, I actually wanted to be an English major. And that was when my father intervened and said, you know, you're never going to be able to support yourself as an English major. Maybe you should be an economics major, which I was not at all interested in. But I compromised and I went to foreign affairs and economics and took every English class I could, whether for credit or not. So I was, I think it was more driven by my parents to make sure I could provide for myself and for the world. When you, when you graduated from college from the University of Virginia, you went to a job interview at Chase Bank and apparently the person interviewing you said, why do you want to be a banker and you said it because my parents really forced me to apply for this job. Is that true? Did your parents kind of push you to go or for a bank? Yeah, and my parents didn't they didn't force us to do anything, but they were and still are an incredibly powerful, I would say moral force in our lives. And so we were always cutting deals. I paid my way through school, and I was fiercely independent, and yet also, I guess, a dutiful child. And so the deal we cut when I announced to them with a lot of certainty that I was going to take a year off after school because I had worked so hard through university. They said, well, that's a great idea. However, we think it would be good experience for you. And then as a kid who couldn't afford to travel, but always yearned to know the world, it was in that interview where the guy was like, well, that's too bad if you don't want to be a banker because this job, you'd be in 40 countries in the next three years. You became a banker and spent three years. In fact, doing that. And traveling around the world. And I mean, now when you look back at that it's hard to believe that you were a banker, knowing what I know about you and what's happened to you in your life. But I mean, working for Chase, you know, a classic New York bank. I mean, it must have given you a really important foundation for what you would eventually do with your life. I

Jacqueline Jacqueline novogratz Kigali Rwanda NGO Vietnam Chase Bank University of Virginia New York
A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:19 min | Last week

A Recipe for a Hollywood Fight

"Michael viner was the owner of dove publishing. He had a number of decent books that came out in the 90s, the most famous one was you'll never make love in this town again. And when I was dating Jermaine Jackson's ex-wife, Margaret Maldonado. She was working for him at the time, but for Michael viner. And one day she sneaked me in early copy of this salacious book, and no one had seen it yet, Margaret got the proofs and begged me not to show or tell anyone about it. I said, no, no, I won't. I'm not going to write about it. I just want to read it myself, okay? So I go back to the hotel or wherever I was and start reading this book and the proofs and maybe two years ago, I read a couple of the more filthy chapters on this show. The book contains a bunch of stories written by three prostitutes and one actress about this sexual encounters with a bunch of different Hollywood celebrities. There was a Robin and Liza grier, Linda Hammond, and Alexandra daddy. And inside are all these lurid tales of what these girls discovered while having sex with the likes of Nicholson Warren Beatty, Don Henley, Bruce Willis, Robert Evans, John Claude Van Damme, Mickey Rourke, on and on. And a very, very detailed stories. Whether they're all true or not, I don't know. It's just the horrors point of view. So my jaw was on the floor when I started reading this. A couple of days later, I'm at Evans house for one of his great get togethers. Robert Shapiro, Geraldo Rivera, Jacqueline bessette, Beverly Johnson, Neil sedaka, a lot of luminaries in addition to the dynamic to all of Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty, who are always at Evans house back in the 90s, and now I have all this information inside me bursting out and I don't know that Jack Warren and bob know about this. And then my eyes couldn't believe what I was seeing. The publisher Michael Weiner walks into the party. And he lived a few doors down from heaven, so it kind of made sense, but I know all this information from the book he published and I grabbed Margaret and I go, what the fuck is he doing here? She's like, what's the big deal? I go, he's publishing a book about what a few hookers have to say about a few of the men at this party. But balls on this guy,

Michael Viner Margaret Maldonado Evans House Jermaine Jackson Liza Grier Linda Hammond Alexandra Daddy Nicholson Warren Beatty John Claude Van Damme Margaret Jacqueline Bessette Robert Evans Don Henley Mickey Rourke Bruce Willis Robert Shapiro Robin Beverly Johnson Geraldo Rivera Jack Warren
"jacqueline" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

04:08 min | Last month

"jacqueline" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Of who's coming, how well they mesh together, and what the flow of the event is. And I make that recommendation to people where I say those things, hugely based on my previous entrepreneurial career as a wedding and event producer. Right, exactly. And so luckily, throughout my entire career, while I made stops along the way, I have corralled all the skills that I've collected up over time and I use them throughout the things that I have now and the things that I'll launch in the future. But the reason why I say, guest lists first is because you could have a ton of great friends and a ton of great associates and colleagues. But just mashing people together without giving any thought to, does this chemistry make sense? These people belong together for this particular type of event. It doesn't always work out, right? And so for me, it always starts with like, what's the goal? Is the goal here to really make sure that the married couples that are in our life, we feel supported and empowered. Okay, I guess we're going to have some couples over. About detroiters, 'cause of course I'm originally from Detroit and I want to save space for detroiters to come. Okay, the twitters can come. And so so much of it is guest list, right? Recognizing that it's easier to cater to your audience, it's easier to cater to the types of people that you're having. If you focus on a common goal or a common focus of why these people are coming, I'll say that. And then hello is important. When are we going to do certain things? But I would say those couple things out the gate are what make what can make for a fantastic event. I could talk all day about dinner parties. Well, two things will get you started. I love what I love. Yeah, you have to come back on the show and tell us all about how do we do how do we do good parties in general. But how do we how do we do we gatherings? Because you really talked about that gathering. And I have that in my heart. I have that in my soul as this gathering. I just haven't refined it as much as I would like. I need to give it more intention. I think you just honestly, you know what I would challenge you to do between now and our next conversation is to just do it. Right. Because you're going to be like, oh, well, let me wait till Jaclyn comes back on the show, then I'll get some of this. With the comment focused comment. Well, Jacqueline, it's been such a pleasure to have you on today. I love the conversation. I love your heart space. I love what you're doing out in the world. And I think it's so important and so timely and so needed right now that we all step up as leaders. And I think the space that you're in helping people own and claim their leadership is super important right now because I think it's probably the most important time in history because it's also the biggest opportunity for people to step up as leaders, right? I mean, anybody in this space, I think if they're focused on how can I help other people from that servant leadership role, you're needed, right? Your number, it's your number, whether you think it is or not, if you have that little thing in your heart or in your chest that you're like, I wonder if, then yes. Questions get answered in the action. Questions? Get answered in the action. But you got to take some action. Exactly, yes. One of my good friends always has the phrase God can't steer a parked car. You've got to be driving, right? He can tell he can tell you right or left or give you the inkling of right or left, but you got to be in motion. You can't just be sitting there in the parked car. Well, thank you so much for coming on today. Please come back to the show when you want to visit more. We'd love to have you come back on as you're launching new projects or just updating your projects. We'd love to have you on Jacqueline M baker dot com. Is that right? Yeah, it is. Absolutely. That's the quickest way. You can connect with me directly there or even more connect more directly with my team at info at Jacqueline and baker doctor. Perfect. Yeah, so please reach out and shoot her your questions. I'm sure she would love to answer any questions you have around any of the stuff that we've talked about on the show, or the book, or if she can help your organization great, reach out to her organization about that. So thank you so much and God bless you. Thank you, Matt. Thank you for having me. Thank you for being a part of the bright by podcast. For more information, go to bright vibe dot com that's BRI TE by VIP dot com. Thank you for listening.

Jacqueline Detroit Jaclyn Jacqueline M baker baker Matt
July 4 parade attack victim remembered for love of family

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

July 4 parade attack victim remembered for love of family

"The highland park Illinois community where 7 people were killed by a shooter at a July 4th parade say their final goodbyes to their loved ones On Saturday edoardo was buried on what would have been his 70th birthday among those attending governor J B pritzker He was remembered as a loving father and grandfather a day earlier mourners remembered 63 year old former preschool teacher Jacqueline Sondheim at a service at north shore congregation Israel her daughter Leah The world is darker without my mom in it And it's up to us now to fill it with a little extra laughter and help replace her light and love also on Friday 76 year old Nicholas Toledo zaragoza and 88 year old Steven Strauss were laid to rest police say the victims were random and that the shooter had no racial or religious motivation His being held without bail I'm Julie Walker

Edoardo J B Pritzker Jacqueline Sondheim Illinois Nicholas Toledo Zaragoza North Shore Leah Steven Strauss Israel Julie Walker
July 4 victims remembered for dedication to faith, family

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

July 4 victims remembered for dedication to faith, family

"Loved ones continue saying goodbye to the victims of that mass shooting at a July 4th parade outside Chicago The first of the 7 funerals began Friday with mourners remembering former preschool teacher Jacqueline sun times she was 63 at a service at north shore congregation Israel her daughter Leah The world is darker without my mom in it And it's up to us now to fill it with a little extra laughter and help replace her light and love 88 year old Steven Strauss and avid bird watcher was also laid to rest while mourners said goodbye to 76 year old Nicholas Toledo zaragoza a dual citizen who would travel from Mexico in the summers to be with family and edouardo a grandfather is being laid to rest Saturday a day after what would have been his 70th birthday I'm Julie Walker

Jacqueline Sun Steven Strauss Leah Chicago Nicholas Toledo Zaragoza Israel Mexico Julie Walker
Memorials begin for Highland Park shooting victims

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

Memorials begin for Highland Park shooting victims

"Killed when a gunman opened fire on a July 4th parade in highland park Illinois Thursday it was a vigil When we need the names of the ten people killed in Buffalo the 19 kids and two teachers killed a new baldy Congressman Brad Schneider a Democrat who represents highland park linked the July 4th parade shooting to recent massacres in New York and Texas Reading the names of people murdered with weapons of war That sound courtesy WLS today services are scheduled for two beloved grandfathers and a former synagogue preschool teacher 63 year old Jacqueline Sondheim 88 year old Steven Strauss and

Brad Schneider Highland Park Illinois Buffalo Texas New York Jacqueline Sondheim Steven Strauss
Police: Texas gunman was inside the school for over an hour

AP News Radio

01:11 min | 6 months ago

Police: Texas gunman was inside the school for over an hour

"Texas authorities say the gunman who massacred 21 people at an elementary school was in the building for over an hour before he was killed by law enforcement officers in that timeline is stirring anger and questions among family members I'm Ben Thomas with the story There was not an officer readily available arm That's Texas Department of Public Safety regional director of Victor escallon discussing the police response to shots being heard from inside rob elementary school Javier Khazars tells the AP police on the scene were too slow We heard the shots you know what we heard but they're just going to go back And listen to our job but the jobs must go in and see if I have that weight His daughter Jacqueline was among the 19 children killed We're right that Escallon says the response is being reviewed with the officers involved What they were thinking what they did why they did it the video the residual interviews will have a better idea Could anybody have gone there sooner You got to understand small town That sound from ksat I'm Ben Thomas

Victor Escallon Rob Elementary Ben Thomas Javier Khazars Texas Department Of Public Saf Texas Escallon AP Jacqueline
Texas school shooting suspect purchased guns and ammo week before attack

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

Texas school shooting suspect purchased guns and ammo week before attack

"Of one of the children killed in the Texas school shooting says police were unprepared and slow to move in to stop the shooting His daughter Jacqueline was one of the 19 fourth graders killed and Salvador Ramos attack on rob elementary school in uvalde Texas He says when he arrived during the attack police were still outside the building khazar says he was so upset He thought about going in himself with several others Authorities say the massacre inside a locked classroom lasted upwards of 40 minutes ending only when Ramos was killed by a border patrol team Ramos grandfather rolando Reyes was asked why he shot and wounded his grandmother before the school attack I don't know I don't know Reyes

Salvador Ramos Rob Elementary School Texas Uvalde Jacqueline Khazar Ramos Rolando Reyes Reyes
"jacqueline" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

07:54 min | 8 months ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"You mentioned your mom wrote poetry and poetry also plays an important role in your books, including your memoir, Brown girl dreaming, which is written entirely in verse. Was it because of your mom that you were drawn to poetry or do you find it's sometimes just inevitable for what the story needs? Part of it is because when I was a young person, I was very afraid of poetry. I thought it was this secret language that only dead white men understood basically. And it wasn't until I was made aware of the works of Langston Hughes and Nikki Giovanni's poetry. I first heard her reciting on an album on a record album that my mom had. I didn't make that connection that was politics because I was like, what is this? This is going straight to my heart. And so when I started writing, I knew that the way things sound it was important, the way things looked on a page was important. The way a line ended was important. And I learned that was poetry. I love that. And everything I write, I read out loud, so that makes a difference too, and how it sounds. So I've thought about your book harbor me quite a lot in the last couple of weeks, because just looking at the crisis in Ukraine and that there were clues to 3 million refugees. And in harbor me, it's a group of kids who are aware of often issues that we think aren't appropriate for kids to learn about or to think about. And yet issues that affect so many kids in this country or around the world, whether issues relating to incarceration or the fear of having to leave your home, and so I just wonder, Jacqueline, what stories do you hear from people who've read that book or any of your books where readers say to you this really hit me in this way or this really affected me? So many, you know, I think the thing that happened with harbor me is I was talking to young people and then the pandemic came. And then I started getting letters from young people who would say, you know, this is my life. I am Haley. I am Amari. So harbored me was like both heartbreaking and healing because I heard so many stories of so many kids across lines of race across lines of economic class, the stories of their fear and their heartbreak and the places in which they felt trapped inside their own skin. One of those stories and harbor me is about a white boy who moves into a predominantly black neighborhood and what that means for him to suddenly be other by no fault of his own. He's walking home and he's getting his next laughter. He's keeping this a secret, right? That there's this down low bullying going on. And then the way the kids rally around him and say, we will not let this happen anymore. And I think that's another story that kids talk about is like, that's unfair. That shit happened. You know, why would they do that? And I remember going to a school. This was with visiting day and visiting day is a story of a girl whose dad is incarcerated and a teacher said, well, we don't need to read this book because no one in this class has any one in prison, and of course that made me mad, and I'm like, I'm going to read that book. Yeah. And then when I read it, one kid raised his hand and he's like, my dad's in prison. Another kid raised his hand. He's like, my cousins in prison. My brothers in prison. And there were about 6 kids who knew someone who was incarcerated and the teacher said, I never knew that. And I said, because you never opened this door for them. And we have this beautiful conversation where these kids have been living with the shame of it. And I think of that often how we, as adults, we too often get to decide what the tone is in the room. What that tone is going to be, and what kids are going to feel safe talking about. And harbor me came this huge conversation among all these kids talking about which character fit their own particular narrative. And it was so great to see that and teachers talking about, okay, we're going to have an art room now. You know, we're going to have a space where adults give kids the space to talk. And it doesn't even mean having to leave the room, but being comfortable in our own silence. I find even with my own kids, if I sit very quietly, I hear things I won't hear. If I'm actually talking, or if they are aware of my presence in the room. And just being able to be in that space where young people are talking about all of these seemingly very quote unquote adult issues and it's like, no, these are their every day. I do want to ask about Brown girl dreaming since it is autobiographical. And so much of your work is wonderfully in the world of fiction, but how and why did you decide to share your own story? I was trying to figure out how I got to this point of being Jacqueline Woodson. I had grown up Jackie, the regular girl on the block, you know, one of four children. And I wanted to go back to the beginning and I was falling apart through the three years of writing that. And it's so funny, 'cause I would just write pieces and I'm like, this is not making sense. Why isn't it coming out as chapters? Why does this even matter? It felt so deeply specific and my beloved part. It was like, just keep writing. And then what was your partner and your family friends? What were they saying on this journey? They were like, oh, Jackie's falling apart again. She must be writing another book. Jackie's cranky again. She must have had a bad writing day. Like the same thing they've been saying for 20 years. But I remember going to my friend toshi Regan. She had read a bunch of these little pieces, and I said, why am I even trying to write this? Nothing was happening when I was born. Like, this does not matter. And she's like, what are you talking about? This country was on fire when you were born. And it completely unlocked it to that first poem, I am born on a Tuesday, February 12th, 1963. And it really began to make sense why I was telling this story. And I really started thinking, I'm going to tell this story in the context of American history, because none of us are existing outside the context of our country's history. And then I thought I was going to talk about my life and my mom and all this. And in the middle of writing and my mom died suddenly at 68. And suddenly that door closed and I was like, wait a second, I had questions. There were things I wanted to ask you. And then the memoir changed, and it became about myself in the context of my mother, right? Because we are on these journeys because of the journeys our parents were on because of the journey their parents were on and all the way back in time. And that's when all of it started making sense and all of it started having this other history to it. And when I finally got the book finished, my beloved editor Nancy Paulson just had her hand on my back the whole time. I was still saying no one is going to read this. And so I was stunned. I still am stunned by the journey that book has had. I've talked to book clubs where the Brown girls are all Indian. You know, all southeast Asians are all Asian and to realize as so many people who see themselves as non white saw themselves in this book, but what really surprised me were all the white boys who came to me. Who wrote to me. It's like, I love this book. I loved your grandfather or I wonder what happened to your brother. Everybody seemed to find some part of themselves in this book. And then I get these letters from white men in their 70s who knew my grandfather who knew hope and that he taught me baseball, your grandfather was the nicest man in nelsonville, and that blows me away. So just being able to get these.

Nikki Giovanni Langston Hughes Amari Brown Jackie Jacqueline Jacqueline Woodson Ukraine Haley harbor toshi Regan Nancy Paulson nelsonville baseball
"jacqueline" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"We're celebrating women's history month. And since the month is never enough, or keeping it going a little longer. I'm talking with trailblazing women at the top of their fields about their personal journeys, the progress women have made and how far we still have to go. Today, I am so excited to be talking about books in the publishing industry with one of my all time favorite authors, Jacqueline Woodson. We know that the stories we share with our kids influence how they see themselves and their place in this world. And yet, studies consistently show that the majority of main characters in American children's stories are male and white. In fact, in 2018, one city found that there were more animal and non human characters than non white characters in books published that year. And from 2019 to 2020, the percentage of children's books written about racially diverse characters are subjects grew by only 1%. Jacqueline is written more than 30 books for children and young adults, complex, beautiful stories that usually center around girls, women and people of color. One of my personal favorites is the middle grade novel harbor me. In it, a group of 6 kids get together after school each week and what they call the art room. That's AR TT for a room to talk. With no adults present, they share their feelings and open up about the very serious challenges they and their families face. Jacqueline has written two books for adults. Another Brooklyn and red at the bone, but she may be best known for her middle grade memoir inverse. Brown girl dreaming. It won multiple awards, including the 2014 national book award for young people's literature. And for years, it's been a staple in classrooms across the country. Though, as you'll hear later, recently there have been districts trying to ban it and it's not the only one. It would take a very, very long time to list all the awards and honors Jacqueline has received, but some of the highlights include serving as the poetry foundation's young people's poet laureate from 2015 to 2017, being named ambassador for young people's literature by the Library of Congress in 2018. Receiving a 2020 Macarthur genius fellowship, and the 2020 Hans Christian Andersen award, which is the.

Jacqueline Woodson Jacqueline national book award Brooklyn poetry foundation Brown Library of Congress Hans Christian Andersen award
"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:06 min | 9 months ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The south explode too many people too many years enslaved and emancipated but not free, keep marching and fighting and getting killed so that young people like me can grow up free. You know, it just fell into place and the rest of the book began to make sense and everything from, you know, where my mother was during the civil rights movement to the fact that my great great grandfather was part of the Civil War. Just surprised after surprise and with each one, I kept saying, we were here. We were here because I think the thing about our histories and our ancestors, it feels theoretical, right? It feels almost like something that's so not tangible because it's just a story. But the more you investigate the stories, the more I did, the more I realized that I am so part of a long line that I didn't just wake up this morning, Jacqueline Woodson, that is because my mother and my great grandfather, my great great grandfather. So there were so many surprises. As I was reading Brown girl dreaming, I was struck by the way you wrote about air. The word first shows up in this sentence about your father catching a football. Coaches were watching the way he moved, his easy stride, his long arms reaching up, snatching the ball from its soft pocket of air. That sentence astounded me. You then go on to talk about air throughout the book, you write about how there is too much air between words and the lilt of her words, a breath of warm air moving over each leaf and this about your grandfather's illness. His cough moves through the air back into our room with a light is almost blue, the white winter sun painting it. And Jacqueline, as I research this, I found that there are academic papers analyzing your use of air and dirt in Brown girl dreaming. I didn't even know if you know this. No way. I had no idea. Because I was like, I wonder if there's anybody that's written about this that I could ask her about it. And I found that there is an academic paper about your use of Aaron dirt. And I'm wondering about how conscious you were of at least the theme of air as you were writing. That's wild I had no idea that people are doing that kind of research on me. I think the air thing for me comes with the juxtaposition between the country and the city. And having made that transition as a young person. And when I think of the past, when I think of the south, when I think of Ohio, when I think of so much that has come before me, I do think there's much more air in that. I think of this moment and the city is being much more confining. So even in writing that scene, football dreams when I'm talking about my dad, like I see that moment as this very outdoor moment, you know, lots of white space, lots of sky, lots of field. And a lot of times when I look back on Greenville, that's how I remember it. When I look back on the past and the places that I can't touch are see anymore, I remember them as being much more open than the present spaces that are much more confined. On your website, you state that you once wrote a book in two weeks and it only needed a little revision, but the next book took four years. And I'm always astonished to find out that musicians have what the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Michael R Jackson calls dead trunk songs. The songs that don't make it to an album or to a show. And given how many books you've written, do you have stories that you've decided aren't worth pursuing when you start them or dead trunk books? I definitely have dead chunk books for a long time. I did not. I remember I was trying to write this book from the point of view of a horse. And it was a horse that was this girl's support animal. It just wasn't working. And I'm sure there are more there. I have another story that was called when the red dirt rose, which was one of my early books about the country. And I think it didn't make it as a book, but a lot of it ended up in other books, unlike the horse. Jacqueline, I just have a few last questions for you today. The first is about your Macarthur fellowship last year. You won one of the most prestigious honors in the world. The Macarthur genius award and I read that you're planning to use the grant money to expand the residency program you founded for people of color. Can you talk a bit more about the program, how you chose the name and your goals for it? Yeah, it's great. It's been great. We actually have a fellow here now. It's called Baldwin for the arts named after James Baldwin. And modeled a lot after McDowell, which was, as I said, earlier was my first residency. But gave me a lot of support in helping me figure, not financial support, but figuring out the design for Baldwin. So when we bought this property, we were looking for a space that was big enough. It's for acres, so and it has four buildings on it that we are renovating into studios for visual artists, composers, and writers that are bipoc, so it's for bipoc people. And I really wanted a safe space. I really wanted a place where people could come and not have to explain anything. I think as a fellow, even though the fellowships were phenomenal, I was often one of few people of color there. And I really wanted to create a space also modeled after cave condom, which I feel like changed the narrative of poetry in terms of thinking about black poets and getting their work out into the world. I wanted to leave something like that behind. So it's been a lot of work. And it's great. My last question, what is the release date of your next book and what is it about? The next book is coming out. I think in 2020 two, and it's called the year we learned to fly. And it's illustrated by Rafael Lopez and it's about two kids who are cooped up in their house and have to use their head. And it takes us back to the middle passage. And Virginia Hamilton's book, the people could fly. And that idea that black folks the way they freed themselves from enslavement was to fly back across the ocean. And that's coming out. Then that's a picture book. I'm also working on a middle grade that's sitting on my desk. I'm not going to say anything about it because it's not done and I'm superstitious about that. I also just finished the screenplay for red at the bone. That's so exciting. So, so exciting. Jacqueline Woodson, thank you for creating such beautiful work in the world and thank you so much for joining me today on design matters. Thanks for your great questions. It's so nice to talk to.

Jacqueline Woodson Aaron dirt Jacqueline Michael R Jackson football Macarthur genius award Pulitzer Prize Baldwin Greenville Brown Ohio James Baldwin McDowell Rafael Lopez Virginia Hamilton
"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:15 min | 9 months ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"At what point after last summer with mason, were you able to stop working side jobs and rightful time? So in 1991, I went to McDowell for the first time. That was the first artist residency that accepted me. I had been applying and that kind of changed my life and at that point I was working part time to no, I'm sorry, 1990, I went to McDowell. And then in 1991, I got a fellowship at the fine arts work center, which is a 7 month fellowship. He moved to provincetown from October through May, and basically they give you a stipend and a place to live. And that was the point where I said, okay, I'm going to take this leap. And I stayed in provincetown for 5 years because it was so much cheaper to live there. And I worked part time. I started teaching and writing for one of the local magazines to help make ends meet. You're usually working on more than one book at a time. How do you develop the story ideas? When do you know that this is something I want to pursue for a book? Pretty early on. I have the idea for the story and I have the characters voice. I think a lot of my books are character driven. I don't know what the character wants always or how they're going to get it in the narrative, but I do have a sense of place and some of the stuff I'm trying to talk about are work out for myself, because I always think all the books I'm writing, I'm trying to work out something for myself. Pretty early on. And of course, it falls apart. Of course, it becomes something completely different than what I thought it was going to become. Of course, it's a puzzle, like when you look at something like red at the bone where I'm trying to figure out so many things. But early on, I have the characters and a little bit more than that. Do you write a book from beginning to end? Or do you write your plots out of order and then piece them together? Or do you just sort of sit down and let the work surprise you? I led it to surprise me. I never know what a plot is. I just think you put two people in the room and get them talking. You have conflict. You have plot. You have it all. I do try to go from beginning to end for the first draft. And sometimes I'll get to the middle and go write the end and then come back and write toward, especially when it's falling apart and I'm not sure what I'm trying to say. And then writing that last line helps me understand where I'm going. When you say falling apart, what do you mean? I mean, it sucks. Something you wrote yesterday that sounded so amazing. You wake up the next morning and you read and you're like, this is, this is trash. And you think you have an idea that's a strong one for where you want the book to be carried to. And it's not. It's just superficial and dumb. And, you know, you're using tropes and cliches, which is the biggest fear for me, is like I'll pick up a book and read a cliche in it that I've written. So it's a lot of rewriting a lot of reading out loud when I get off this podcast. I'm working on a book now that I'm going to I need to just sit and read out loud and figure out what's happening and what I need to fix. You've said this about the stories you want to tell. I wanted to write about communities that were familiar to me and people that were familiar to me. I wanted to write about communities of color. I wanted to write about girls. I wanted to write about friendship and all of these things that I felt were missing in a lot of the books that I read as a child. And Jacqueline, you have, and I was researching the level of diversity in children's books now, and found a statistic from 2018. I couldn't find anything much more formal about 2021. But I learned that diversity in children's books as recently as 2018 looked like this, 50% were about white children. 27% were about animals or fantasy characters. 10% were about African American children, 7% were about Asian children, 5% were about LatinX children, and 1% were about American Indian children. So from what I understand, things have only improved marginally since then, three years ago. And I don't expect that you should be able to solve a problem you had no hand in creating and or almost single handedly trying to change. But given this problem is clearly established. What do you think it's going to take for publishing to make material changes in regard to diversity equity and inclusion? Publishing houses have to change. I mean, I think about someone like Debbie Reese, who has the blog American Indians and children's book, who's trying to single handedly change the narrative of the scarcity of books for and about and buy indigenous people. You look at the LatinX numbers, and there are a lot of LatinX writers. Why are those books not getting the shine or publishing? And then you go to the publishing houses, and they're white. You know, they are so white and but publishing houses need to change. And there's a reticence. I think people are not wanting to give up the power they have as publishers as editors as publicists. I mean, even my speakers bureau that a couple of years ago, they sent a car and I was like, really, you sent this card out where every single one of you except one Southeast Asian woman is white. I would be embarrassed to send that. And I remember writing in locomotion, you know, about white blindness, people not being able to see the whiteness around them. You know, from the point of view of this 11 year old boy, because I think kids see this, right? But I do think that's what the that's where the change has to come. I mean, at this point, you know, I'm Jacqueline Woodson, so I'm a safe person to publish. And what about the Jacqueline Woodson's of 1989 who no one was looking at? So I do think we have so much work to do. I remember in the early 90s, people were trying to do away with the Coretta Scott King award because they were saying that, well, now that's some black folks have won the newberry..

McDowell fine arts work center provincetown mason Debbie Reese Jacqueline Jacqueline Woodson Coretta Scott King
"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:20 min | 9 months ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"But yeah, I grew up in a very religious household. Bible study on Monday at home, Bible study on Tuesday at the kingdom hall. I can't remember what Wednesday was. Thursday was ministry school, watchtower study, and then out and field service on Saturday and back to the kingdom hall on Sunday. So there was a lot of religion in the household. And a lot of rules outside of the household. We didn't pledge the flag. We did celebrate holidays. A birthday parties. We didn't curse. It's just what was, right? As much as I'm Jacqueline Woodson, I was a jove's witness. It was all part of the same fabric in this way. Do you follow any type of organized religion now? Oh, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. I definitely consider myself a very spiritual person. And I definitely have beliefs from both my Jehovah's Witness upbringing and my Muslim upbringing that I hold on to. I think one thing I got from the religions that I grew up and was a deep empathy, a deep understanding of people that allowed me to be a writer, but no, in terms of organized religion, I don't ascribe to any because I just think that there's no way to be fully human and not have to be kind of a hypocrite to live that kind of life. You've written about how by the time you were three years old, you could write the letter J you love the sound of the letter and you promised yourself one day as you were practicing that it would be connected to your full name. But that became a challenge when you got to the queue. And I'm wondering if you can share with our listeners what happened? Well, the Q is a trick letter. I understand. Even the K is hard, but my full name is Jacqueline Amanda Woodson and I struggled with the letter Q to the point of becoming Jackie, you know, because it was shorter and easier to write. But it was interesting because I really, from a young age, I understood the power of letters and words on the page and how they transformed a thing. When I was growing up and trying to practice my name, I couldn't do the H in Deborah, which is my formal name D, H and that is how I became Debbie. Oh, that's so funny. I know two bees together so much easier than R 8 8. I guess they couldn't do the cursive, right? Trying to write them in cursive. It's so interesting because when I'm signing books for young people, I realize a lot of them aren't learning cursive anymore, so they don't know how to read it, which is mind-blowing to me that my signature is going to become obsolete for a lot of people who haven't learned the language of cursive. You read an article about you where it stated that you don't know if a is your favorite letter, but you know you like it a lot. And so would it be the curse of a or the Roman a or which a on the curse of a by far? I just think it's such a beautiful letter. And I love the way it looks on the page. I love the way it shows up. So often. And I don't know. For me, of course, it feels always like a beginning. The beginning that it is. To so many things. Check when you stated that when you were growing up, it was your sister who was the one that was considered smart. That you had a hard time reading, you had to read things over and over for the words to make sense. You've talked about this quite eloquently in your TED Talk. Yet you fell in love with reading and writing. Even though it was so difficult, it still was something that you were pulled towards. Yeah, it was a challenge. And I knew I knew I had an inside me somehow that it was just coming out differently. And I think that if I had been born now, I probably wouldn't be the writer I am, because it meant people having a certain kind of patience, but it also meant me not getting tagged as dyslexic or something which would have put me into programs that would have made me have to find trick ways to read faster or to write faster. And I think doing my process was the process of becoming a writer. Taking that time really deconstructing words and the way authors got stories on the page. So I do think that behind that quote unquote struggle was the makings of me as a writer. And so I don't think I ever felt any shame about it. I always felt even as a young person that I was right and the system that was in place to say that the way I was doing it wasn't the right way was wrong was a broken thing. And even with my sister and my older brother who were both very academic and off the charts in the way they learned, I just saw that is their thing. They just learned differently. And because of the system that was set up in our House, which was that they had to help me get to where I needed to be. I didn't fail, right?.

Jacqueline Woodson kingdom hall jove TED Talk Jackie Deborah Debbie
"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:50 min | 9 months ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The new season of design matters with Debbie millman starts in April. The episode you're about to listen to originally dropped and march of 2021. It's so funny 'cause even when I talked about being a writer, there are big fear was like, don't go spreading our dirty laundry, right? And I always thought the characters in my head are so much more interesting than what's happening in my real life. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative people about what they do, how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. On this episode, Jacqueline Woodson talks about writing for children and young adults. It was Madeleine lingel who said when you write remembering the child you were, because the essence of childhood doesn't change. As a child, Jacqueline Woodson loved to tell lies. There was something about seeing her friend's eyes grow wide with wonder that she loved. She got into trouble for lying, but didn't stop until 5th grade that same year she wrote a story and her 5th grade teacher said, this is really good. That was when Jacqueline Woodson understood that a lie on the page was called fiction, and that could win you accolades and awards. Flash forward a few decades and many stories later, and she is indeed one many, many accolades and awards, including a national book award, several newbery honors, and in 2020 she.

Debbie millman Jacqueline Woodson Madeleine lingel
Cops Catch Murderer of Music Guru Clarence Avnant's 81-Year Old Wife

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Cops Catch Murderer of Music Guru Clarence Avnant's 81-Year Old Wife

"Some of you speaking of crime have heard about the senseless murder of an 81 year old woman in her Beverly Hills home the other night that woman was, what's her first name? Natalie Avnet, Jacqueline admin. Jacqueline Avnet. The mother in law to Netflix's Ted sarandos. And the wife of the musical guru clarence Avnet, a man who is known as the black godfather and is admired by everyone from Bill Clinton to Snoop Dogg to Magic Johnson to Barack Obama to P diddy. You name it. There's a Netflix special called the black godfather all about this guy. So the other night, the Beverly Hills night was shattered by a home invasion on a very quiet street and a beautifully safe neighborhood called truesdale. There is no crime in truesdale, putting how this crime everywhere. The 80 year old couple had a private security guard on duty at the house, and yet still a burger smashed in the black sliding glass door. How brazen these motherfuckers now. And he fired off a round from his AR-15 that struck Jacqueline in the head and killed her instantly. At least I think it was the head. In a way, no one knows if it was aiming for her, but he hit it. It could have been an errant shot that just nailed it. Either way, it's fucking murder. Clarence advent was not hurt. Nor was the security guard. Good for him, he got out of the way. More on that in a minute. But now cops have caught the bad guy who killed Jacqueline Avnet. I hate the paper still say allegedly. Well, who do you think fucking killed? Do you think the husband shot has gone beyond her head? Oh my God, I can't stand these fucking journalists. The guy was caught in a backyard roughly an hour after the shooting and is caught on video, handcuffed to a wheelchair after being taken into custody. Why is he handcuffed to a wheelchair? Because this piece of shit surprised a convicted felon named Ariel Maynard, black dude, traveled from I like saying the color. It matters. Travel from Beverly Hills to the Hollywood Hills after the attack at the Afghan home to bang in another person's home. And he attempted to break into the home and nails, and in the process, this idiot shot himself in a foot with an AR-15.

Truesdale Jacqueline Avnet Natalie Avnet Jacqueline Admin Ted Sarandos Clarence Avnet Beverly Hills Netflix Magic Johnson Snoop Dogg Bill Clinton Barack Obama Jacqueline Clarence Ariel Maynard Hollywood Hills Travel
 Pfizer-BioNTech ask EU agency to OK vaccine for kids 5-11

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Pfizer-BioNTech ask EU agency to OK vaccine for kids 5-11

"As millions of Americans get Pfizer's covert nineteen vaccine booster shots FDA advisers say some people who received the Doris vaccine should also get extra protection we do have a unanimous nineteen out of nineteen yeah both the advisory panel has endorsed a half dose booster after bitterness Dr Jacqueline Miller outlined data showing the vaccine's protection wanes over time eight thirty six point four percent decrease in the incidence of cases in

Pfizer Dr Jacqueline Miller FDA
R&B star R. Kelly convicted in sex trafficking trial

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

R&B star R. Kelly convicted in sex trafficking trial

"Singer R. Kelly has been convicted in his sex trafficking trial in New York marches are a letter with the latest R. Kelly looked down and stayed motionless as he was found guilty of several charges including racketeering Kelly was accused of running a criminal enterprise of employees who helped him meet girls and women and keep them abedian to his rules well he's subjected them to sexual abuse US attorney Jacqueline crystallises Kelly was convicted because people spoke up to the victims in this case your voices were heard and justice was finally served Kelly's lawyer Deveraux Koenig says he's disappointed with the verdict Kelly faces up to twenty years in prison when he's sentenced may fourth

R. Kelly Abedian Attorney Jacqueline Crystallis Kelly New York Deveraux Koenig United States
"jacqueline" Discussed on Sprinkled with Hope

Sprinkled with Hope

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Sprinkled with Hope

"Host shane today. Our guest is jacqueline wales. She gives some amazing insight. We say that every time but just wonderful insight into fear we. We've talked about this a few times and she really does give some really good knowledge insight. She also gives you an amazing offer near right at the end. So please listen in And hopefully take her up on that offer. And i i would like to echo what she a saying in that is that yeah we do have and we do say that. We have some amazing guests on her show. But i think that speaks volume to the caliber of people that we've had on and that is these people are regular dislike you and i but they have an amazing message and you can be successful as well if if you just use some of these tools that we give you to push through these fears and get past them and like she you know. She mentioned a cool story about her life and getting a black belt in karate a at an older age and i thought that was really cool. Story about overcoming your fear and so. I hope you really really enjoy this message. We are so grateful for each one of you listening. We we send our love our well wishes with you. You are worth it. You are worthy. You are capable of receiving love and being loved and you should also love yourself so enjoy this awesome episode with us. Jacqueline wales This marquez welcome to spring with hope podcast in your shame today. Our guest has been booked required. A while. we're really excited to that. Jacqueline wales's joining us is gonna read a little bit from her website She says being fearless is not the absence of fear. But the courage to take the next step and i loved loved that joseph says as keynote speaker entrusted adviser. She's passionate about helping individuals. Discover the truth of who they are and opening up insights in skills necessary to unlock your purpose and full potential so you can truly embrace being fearless and create the career and like what you don't have to take the whole staircase. You just have to take the.

jacqueline wales Jacqueline wales shane marquez joseph
Power to Be Restored to New Orleans by Middle of Next Week

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Power to Be Restored to New Orleans by Middle of Next Week

"President Biden got a look at damage in Louisiana from hurricane ida uprooted trees and blue tarps covering shredded houses could be seen as Air Force One was landing approach through have your backs solicit gets done the president heard from people like Jacqueline hopes are the president of Saint John the Baptist parish our immediate needs our power water communications and financial assistance the president wants to see the rebuilding hold up when the next big storm hits seems to me we can save a whole lot of money got a whole lot of pain payee constituents if we go back we go back and find a better way deputies are warning people returning to areas outside New Orleans to come equipped like survivalist because of the lack of basic services I'm at Donahue

President Biden Hurricane Ida Saint John The Baptist Parish Louisiana Air Force Jacqueline New Orleans Donahue
"jacqueline" Discussed on Reality Steve Podcast

Reality Steve Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Reality Steve Podcast

"I was gonna say. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I was <Speech_Male> gonna say enjoy vegas when <Speech_Male> you're not going <SpeakerChange> to wait. What am <Speech_Female> i talking about <Speech_Female> agassi. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I will do <Speech_Male> my best <Speech_Male> all right. <Speech_Male> So <SpeakerChange> we'll be in touch. <Speech_Male> Take care <Speech_Female> thanks bye. <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> Thank you so <Speech_Male> much the jacqueline for that. <Speech_Male> That is a <Speech_Male> a. <Speech_Male> I really enjoyed <Speech_Male> that podcast. Because <Silence> there's so many things that were <Speech_Male> talked <Speech_Male> about. Maybe haven't been <Speech_Male> talked about publicly really <Speech_Male> kind of shared some <Speech_Male> things that i really haven't <Speech_Male> shared much publicly <Speech_Male> about in terms of my reporting <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> what i've had to deal with <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The stuff that has been <Speech_Male> sent to me over the last <Speech_Male> probably <Speech_Male> six to nine months. <Speech_Male> It's been interesting to say. <Speech_Male> The least. So i <Speech_Male> appreciate jacqueline for that. <Speech_Male> She's always someone that. I lean <Speech_Male> on behind the scenes <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> bounce stuff off of <Speech_Male> one. I've got situations <Speech_Male> arising when it <Speech_Male> comes to stories <Speech_Male> in this franchise and she's <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> helped me reconsider <Speech_Male> some of the things that <Speech_Male> i report <Speech_Male> So thank <Speech_Male> you to her. I hope he really <Speech_Male> enjoyed her <Speech_Male> freezing story. That <Speech_Male> stuff like. <Speech_Male> I said. I'm not to <Speech_Male> obviously well <Speech_Male> versed in it at all but <Speech_Male> i wanted to let <Speech_Male> her speak on it <Speech_Male> and tell <Speech_Male> her side of it <Speech_Male> and Really good stuff <Speech_Male> there so <Speech_Male> hope you enjoyed that. <Speech_Male> Thank you all <Speech_Male> for listening <Speech_Male> again. Thank you jacqueline. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For coming on <Speech_Male> please. Rate <Speech_Male> subscribe in review <Speech_Male> and apple. <SpeakerChange> Podcast <Speech_Male> much <Speech_Male> and <Silence> again <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> wish. <Speech_Male> Look two things <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> which we look at the tables. <Silence> This weekend <Silence> to <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> wish me luck that <Speech_Male> i will be the first <Speech_Male> to customer <Speech_Male> at the olive garden <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> this upcoming monday. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Music_Male> olive garden. That's opening up <Speech_Music_Male> on the biggest. <Speech_Music_Male> I want to <Speech_Music_Male> be the first customer. So <Speech_Music_Male> bad and i might even <Speech_Music_Male> documented on social <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> media so pay attention <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> monday around <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> eleven pacific <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> time so that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you off listening. Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for tuning in. And we'll be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back next week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so for jacqueline trumbull. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Reality steve. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll talk to you next week.

jacqueline vegas apple jacqueline trumbull steve
"jacqueline" Discussed on Reality Steve Podcast

Reality Steve Podcast

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Reality Steve Podcast

"Yeah i guess. I've just figured that. I i guess i just figured that it would never. They would never respond to me. Because it's ingrained in their head to not deal with reality. Steve so i figure my message is getting is falling on deaf ears. They're not gonna listen to it. I wouldn't assume that. I mean i think after. We've all been contestants. We know who you are and what the deal is in. It's quite interesting to know what you have to say. I mean put it. This way. I mean i have i. I have done. In the past where i reached out privately i And then you know it backfired. I was told. I was meddling in people's relationships and then it's just like okay. I reached out to help. I reached out to give you information about somebody that i thought was pretty relevant. If you're going to jump into a relationship with this guy and then it backfires on me. And i'm told a meddling in people's relationships and i'm harassing them. It's like well that's how they feel that's how they feel. Why would you then go public public with it. Just never went public with. They did okay. I mean look. I you do whatever you want. I just get really clear on. Why do these things if it's a an altruistic acts where you just want to. You just want the person to know what they're getting into then. I think there's better ways to do it personally. I could understand if i were in her position. I mean i don't know what this is you but like enjoying having the influence on the show. That's a really powerful feeling Enjoying the tension. It gathers i just. I don't think either of those things bad to feel. But i would just be honest with yourself about if you are feeling the stinks because that might be swaying direction and you might not be aware of it. Hurt willing to admit it yeah. I think there's a part of me that knows that this role i have in this franchise is to get the quote unquote truth out there at times. And so if i see something on tv. And i know something's totally opposite behind the scenes. Yeah there's a part of me that's like okay. What's being shown isn't the truth and my readers and my listeners wanted know the dirt that's what they they love as long as it's dirt about somebody that they don't like They love it. And so yeah. There's a part of me that wants to provide that and clearly. I have a lot of behind the scenes dirt but for the last six months or whatever haven't shared any of it and there's and there is some there is some shit out there. I'm not talking. About just you know sexual assaults stuff and rape stuff Here on. I'm not even talking about that. Not just not diminishing those things. I'm just saying i'm not even talking about that. I'm just talking about there. Are people in this franchise right now that you're watching on tv. That are putting up a giant facade. And i know about it. I have proof of it but again if i go of their publicly i become the asshole in public enemy number one and i hate women because i'm outing her and it's just like i you know that that's where it got to me to a point where i'm just like you know it's not worth it anymore. It's not worth it but it doesn't mean it. It doesn't mean i don't know something that's true because i've got you know the info sitting on my phone hell smaller. You know much lower level stuff. But i texted you that video this weekend or at the end of the last weekend. You know of amd argument right now. My without using names we can. We can say like i. Am i gonna use names. But i can publicly talk about it. The video i sent you of somebody on paradise this season. Who's hooking up with. Somebody else and i sent you the video of the proof of them on a facetime remember. No i've no. I've not regarding that. Are you sure he's not to me. Yes i know. I did hold on. Let me go back. I know i did member. It was like it was like thursday or friday night. Here jacqueline.

Steve amd jacqueline
Jesse Jackson and His Wife Are Hospitalized With Covid-19

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Jesse Jackson and His Wife Are Hospitalized With Covid-19

"And his wife, Jacqueline, are both hospitalized in Chicago after testing positive for Covid Jesse Jackson is vaccinated. He received his first dose of the Covid vaccine in January during a publicized event, where he urged others to get vaccine, especially African Americans, who lag behind white people when it comes to vaccinations. Jackson is 79. His wife is 77. They are both being treated at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

Covid Jesse Jackson Jacqueline Chicago Jackson Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Jesse Jackson and his wife, Jacqueline, hospitalized with COVID

Buck Sexton

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Jesse Jackson and his wife, Jacqueline, hospitalized with COVID

"Jackson and his wife, Jacqueline, or hospitalist after testing positive for Covid 19. The 79 year old civil rights leader is vaccinated against the virus and publicly received his first dose in January, according to a statement that Jackson's are being treated at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.

Covid Jacqueline Jackson Northwestern Memorial Hospital Chicago
Police Officers Deliver Emotional Testimony About Violent Day at Capitol

Forum

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Police Officers Deliver Emotional Testimony About Violent Day at Capitol

"D. C. Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Finnegan yesterday, describing what he encountered as he tried to protect the U. S Capital on January 6th. On that day I participated in the defense of the United States Capitol from an armed mob, an armed mob of thousands determined to get inside. Because I was among the vastly outnumbered group of law enforcement officers protecting the capital and the people inside it. I was grabbed, beaten, taste all while being called a traitor to my country. Was at risk of being stripped of and killed with my own firearm as I heard chance of kill him with his own gun. I could still hear those words in my head today via known was one of four officers who testified yesterday during the public first public hearing of the House Select Committee tasked with investigating the attack on the capital. D C Officer Daniel Hodges and Capitol Police officers Harry Dunn and Sergeant Jacqueline Logan. L also gave emotional testimony about the physical and verbal abuse. They suffered statements that are difficult to hear. No one had ever ever called me and while wearing the uniform of the Capitol police officer In the days following the attempted insurrection. Other black officers shared with me their own stories of racial abuse on January six. One officer told me he had never And his entire 40 years of life. Been called in to his face. And that streak ended on January six, a

D. C. Metropolitan Police Michael Finnegan House Select Committee Daniel Hodges U. Harry Dunn Sergeant Jacqueline Logan Capitol Police United States
"jacqueline" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Children that in an instant changes in an instant and we have to be responsible and cautious and thoughtful of that. I'm sure that was hard very hard. So feel so good for you hugged. It's okay not worried about it. So i hear there's one thing that you say you wish you could have done differently. In that is well. My son was eighteen and he had taken full responsibility for himself. This this was his action his decision in his move and his regret but in raising reggie i was so i was always a very strong willed. And it's writer it's wrong there's no in between it's black or white and drinking was not allowed and youth do drink and they do test and they always find a way and i simply said no. It's not acceptable. If i could do something different. I would give him. I tell him don't do it. But if you do find yourself in that circumstance call me. i promise i won't have monisha. I won't speak about. Just come and get you. Just call me. He didn't feel he had that option with me. I didn't give him. That option. And i would pray every parent remember to do that. No matter what your other thoughts are be sure. They have the option to call you and they won't be hesitant. Thank you gene. thank you we know. Many people could never find it in their heart to forgive someone for ruining their life. Listen to how. Jackie feels about. Your son did this to her for giving us a important for the soul for my own soul. You know to live in peace. When i was i able to meet with jacqueline and the other victims. They walked in and greeted me as a human being. They gave me a hug and jacqueline said that. I don't hate you. And that was a life changing moment. This person that i caused so much pain and change their life so many way. I know that our spirit wasn't taken away. I know that she is one of the most beautiful people inside and our compassion that she is shown to me and will to see something good. Come out of this. That helps me deal with it..

monisha reggie jacqueline Jackie
"jacqueline" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

"I want women to be the very best people. Women are so necessary for men. And that's why women were created last so that all of the finest ingredients. That may have missed when you were being composed purpose for the lord. Thought about not stop rest. It said when he looked at man a. I need a little help. And he's going to need some help and god sat down and thought about it and created this second draft. I'm amara that was twenty years ago. I would not do that my wife. I really didn't take me i. I'd be loss. I couldn't survive. That's the reverend jesse jackson and jacqueline jackson. It's amazing their hard work for justice and their long partnership at been part of american history. They certainly have. And i've got to say it was fun to be back in chicago again. Yup just like the old days. Until next time. I'm phil donahue and marlo thomas have really thank you and it was. Delightful was terrific. Double date is a production of pushkin industries. The show was created by us and produced by sarah lilly. Michael bahari is associate producer. Musical adaptations of it had to be you. Buy sell wagon symphony marlow. And i are -secutive producers along with me alot bell. An lethal mola from pushkin special things to jacob weisberg malcolm glad will heather fain josh. Nour's carly bigly ori- eric sandler. Emily rustic jason gambrill. Paul williams and.

jacqueline jackson amara jesse jackson marlo thomas sarah lilly phil donahue Michael bahari chicago jacob weisberg malcolm heather fain carly bigly ori eric sandler Nour Emily rustic josh jason gambrill Paul williams
"jacqueline" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

"It was a bitter cold november morning. When we got to the airport we were heading out to chicago. My old stomping grounds to visit reverend. Jesse jackson and jacqueline jackson not only are these two civil rights icons his work with martin luther king her lifelong activism. But they've been married throughout all yearly sixty years. I was really looking forward to it only problem. Our flight from new york was severely delayed and we were five hours late for our date. It was awful. I really hate being late for anything but even though it was already evening by the time we landed. They said come on over anyway. I've known them for decades and that's the kind of generous people. They are The children well. They all still talk to me. That's a good side. Jesse was diagnosed with parkinson's disease several years ago but despite his condition his spirits were lively and jackie. She's always full of life. As we settled in jesse began to recall their early days in college. She was a into modern dance and she had been librar- and beautiful begun. Measure parents versus freaked on her bills. A-plus all the time though the pluses so you beginning you say wait. What would values you share. The foundation was marriages. Don't last long as they have. No the norwich told free. Russa's deep is larussa foundation when the wind blows can't take it as i see what roles without roots. It cannot grow right over. How lucky you were to find. Jackie i mean other women would have run out the door because you were never home. I love you. I was lucky. I told him because he was going and going and going and then he wouldn't inform me. I went to him. And i said reverend. You're supposed to make me abbey. And i was. I mean because i really felt a man is supposed to make you happy. That's his

parkinson's disease larussa foundation roumain Russa jesse norwich Jesse jackie Theological seminary Jackie king dr king marissa frank dr king rockefeller foundation trish matthew illinois chicago greenville
On a Date With Reverend Jesse and Jacqueline Jackson

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

02:27 min | 1 year ago

On a Date With Reverend Jesse and Jacqueline Jackson

"It was a bitter cold november morning. When we got to the airport we were heading out to chicago. My old stomping grounds to visit reverend. Jesse jackson and jacqueline jackson not only are these two civil rights icons his work with martin luther king her lifelong activism. But they've been married throughout all yearly sixty years. I was really looking forward to it only problem. Our flight from new york was severely delayed and we were five hours late for our date. It was awful. I really hate being late for anything but even though it was already evening by the time we landed. They said come on over anyway. I've known them for decades and that's the kind of generous people. They are The children well. They all still talk to me. That's a good side. Jesse was diagnosed with parkinson's disease several years ago but despite his condition his spirits were lively and jackie. She's always full of life. As we settled in jesse began to recall their early days in college. She was a into modern dance and she had been librar- and beautiful begun. Measure parents versus freaked on her bills. A-plus all the time though the pluses so you beginning you say wait. What would values you share. The foundation was marriages. Don't last long as they have. No the norwich told free. Russa's deep is larussa foundation when the wind blows can't take it as i see what roles without roots. It cannot grow right over. How lucky you were to find. Jackie i mean other women would have run out the door because you were never home. I love you. I was lucky. I told him because he was going and going and going and then he wouldn't inform me. I went to him. And i said reverend. You're supposed to make me abbey. And i was. I mean because i really felt a man is supposed to make you happy. That's his

Jacqueline Jackson Parkinson's Disease Jesse Jackson Martin Luther King Chicago Larussa Foundation Jesse Jackie New York Russa Norwich
"jacqueline" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"Perhaps they're not quite so different from each other are Explicitly explode later in the novel. Wears a bit more implicit for this young girl. Rudy holds the key to solving alice's murder. And this makes an interesting so detective thrilla. But it's not. There are clues in the story which we're not gonna give away but you have lovely image with a camera the you use which shows how these two forces like life and death like alice and ruby. Come together and it's when you look through the viewfinder and bring the two images together into focus a very powerful image. You've got the ice and so glad that on that resonated with you because it was hot. That was a hard earned metaphor. Because i actually have no skill whatsoever Really kind of understand l. photography through the extraordinary work that they are from radically respect if they that really plays me because it was a bit of work but yet from the perspective of ellison ruby technically they never meet but they are as close as two people can bay by the by the end of the novel through the extraordinary connection of really being the one to to discover ellison's body at that time she has with her before the police arrive when the detective before becomes a story I always imagined it to be just the most intimate and obviously terrifying but There's an intimacy to that ten minutes. They had just the two of them together. But you also have ruby experiencing all living through alice's last moments in her imagination. I think imagination is a good word is up to the raider. And i'm not gonna tell them whether or not some of the things that ruby experiences happen or whether they are actually part of her desire to know. Ls into to understand what happened to her I gently as a writer. Have a mile answers to that. How but if you want to want to expand certain scenes as yeah as metaphors or airs ruby sort of taking over the narrative. That would be okay. we'll jacqueline. It's an intriguing novel. Not the least of which because alice the person who is killed his new writing the story even after this. We have those connections between allison ruby and that whole discussion about life and death and the influence of one on the other but the bookies before you need my nine the author jacqueline move. Let's ended some allen an unreleased jecklin. Thank you very much for talking with me today. David you've just been listening to publish own not on three c..

alice ruby ellison ruby Rudy ellison allison ruby jacqueline jacqueline move allen David
African Fashion and Fabric With Jacqueline Shaw

Stitch Please

02:27 min | 1 year ago

African Fashion and Fabric With Jacqueline Shaw

"So jacqueline i am so glad that you are here. Welcome to the stitch please. Podcast thank you lisa. I two weeks i eight. And it's an honor to be has effectively for whites and thank you so much for navigating the time change to speak with me from london. This is very generous. And i never forget. This is an absolute time difference. And you have to be five hours at a different time than i am. So thank you very much. How did you get started. Do you have a sewing story. Did you start with sewing and design. When did you get the message. That i loved to create and this is something i would like to do. Rows la. I can put me guy from eddie memories. I never remember how old i was by do. Remember maybe i was around simple something like that and i received as a gift for my mother. The fashion world so this was a toy that in spun the wheel and the with helping to draw and designs to gang up on portfolio designs again. And i remember having that toy and also is so in claims for my teddy banks and people with love to talk about it. We didn't have done latvian. Ms phosa teddy level so to say things by hand as a child and ways creating things. I talk about how i created pingpong gains. We've lay a pink from gay with an old cereal box. I can cool flakes or something i. He's my elastic band. Mabul was my main octane. Gave therapy. how did these thing so always creating ways. Neither i'm not to the idea of putting something for nothing and from the with the fashion wheel and just a love for textiles with right. Context textiles franson kinds of things. Like that as a child amused to a new area which we knew school my mate my first time the mostly being around carribean which is where my family from in era was festive than meet. Erin it was like the asian community. Miss asian mean not pakistani indian bangaladeshi that community. And we also have my my jared and ganay inference and i saw to become friends with these different groups of people and go to some weddings. Bents might love coach. And i would learn much Tomorrow we'll textiles and then fed up with african takes more and that was part of my journey

Ms Phosa Jacqueline Lisa Eddie Franson London LA Erin Jared Bents
"jacqueline" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"jacqueline" Discussed on KTOK

"Jacqueline Scott, about four minutes away with another update on the news Right now, though, we're talking with the stars of Netflix's reality show. Love is blind, and they've written about their experience in the book Leap of Faith. Finding Love the Modern Way, Lawrence Speed and Cameron Hamilton met fell in love and married on that show, and they're joining me Now on news radio 1000 Katie, Okay? Let's start with what brought you to the show in the first place. Because Lauren even your dad said on camera. This is not the way Ah, we go about finding a wife. Yes, Absolutely. Um, yeah. I mean, I would definitely say the way that we found love is very unconventional, to say the least. And my dad was definitely you know, he said, I'm a daddy's girls. He was definitely pretty protective. And I don't think that any of us really expected to go into a situation like an experience like Lib. Come out really married and really in love. But here we are, You know, three years later, still going strong writing books together, you know, so we're continuing to grow and flourish and it's beautiful. Cameron. What brought you to the series in the first place? What made you say? You know, I'm gonna give this a world You know, testing reached out to me. Somehow They got ahold of my contact info and gave me a call. And at first I thought the premise was utterly crazy. But I thought Hey, this could be a fun adventure. You know, I was deep into my corporate life. Aboard. My relationships weren't really working out the way I was hoping they would. So I was like, what's what's the worst could happen. I was and so I just got more and more enthralled with this idea of Going on this fun adventure, and it turned out to be way more than that way way more than Love is blind is the series that they participated in. And now they write about their marriage and leap of faith. Finding love the modern way. When what was your biggest surprise? This is for both of you. What was your biggest surprise when you realized you were in love? Yeah, it was like the floor was falling out underneath. I mean, as I said, went on to thinking this is going to be a fun two week adventure, you know? Just kind of cool to do. And then when Lauren and I connected, I'm like this is going to change my entire life I realized Right there. I mean, it's probably day four. Something like that. Uh, I was ready to day four or five. I was ready to proposed. Yeah, Like I said on the show. I mean, it was petrifying for me because it was just like I'm really feeling the real emotions that I've Never experienced a level of of love and and, um You know, towards someone that I had just met so quickly. It was terrifying. I felt so vulnerable. I felt like is this really happening? Said I thought my feelings or should I run towards the light and, you know, Thank goodness. I decided to run towards the light and take that lease space in here We are. Neither one of you have television background, So this was completely new for both of you. Yeah, Yeah. I mean, we have maybe done a little bit of extra. Yeah, definitely. No reality T v. I mean, I never even picture that I would do reality TV and let alone uh, find love and get married on reality TV. So this was definitely a whole new experience for the both of us. As you all were going through the process in the show. Did the producers hoppin and I mean, did you? Did you go to any of the producer and say I think this is the real thing? I mean, this is this is not an act. Oh, yeah, Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, we definitely had moments. You know each day where we would, you know, check in and have these conversations just really talk about how we were feeling. And, uh, yeah, I pretty much express that I can't believe this. Y'all, but I'm really falling in love with With Cameron. And of course they were, Uh, later There was so happy. They're like, Oh, friend, Smudgy girl, you know, keep going. So, um but, yeah. Definitely a crazy experience, Lauren Speed and Cameron Hamilton Spoiler alert. They fell in love. They got married. And now they've written about it in leap of faith. Finding love the modern way I will share with you the biggest experience that I had with my first few weeks of marriage with my lovely wife. And that was the the movie Love Story was full of Kaka. This love I love you means never. I love you means never having to say I'm sorry I thought was the biggest load of crap. Because you always have to say you're sorry Do you was there Was there a big aha moment in your first few weeks of marriage? Mm. I would say for me, it definitely was. I mean, and I talk about this a lot in the book, but being you know, I'm in my authorities and I have really got used to being by myself. So me moving in with Cameron and having this whole new life was a partner. So suddenly, you know, I really had to learn how to be in a partnership. I was so used to doing things on my own and and being rock solid, So it's time Kim actually even had to You know, heightening mentally and emotionally to get me to kind of relax and really accept them as a partner realized I don't have to do everything on my own. So for me, that was a moment of growth. And I'm happy that Cam was patient with me during that time. Absolutely. And Lauren and I are both very much you know, we have a very stubborn basically, We're both very stubborn. We have a very That way that we like to do things very methodical, self. Having to people like that. It can be tough and and really finding ways to compromise where neither of us feels like. We're conceding something that is Integral to who we are. You know, It's been tough at times, but I think we're in a great spot right now. Lauren Speed and Cameron Hamilton and the name of the book is leap of faith. Finding love the modern way available everywhere and more of my conversation can be heard on the later with Lee Matthews Podcast. Find that at Katie okay dot com and the I Heart radio app download it for free. Action at the State Capitol..

Jacqueline Scott Lauren Speed Lawrence Speed Leap of Faith Lauren Cameron two week Lee Netflix Cameron Hamilton both five Kim Finding Love the Modern Way three years later Cam State Capitol Love is blind I Heart radio first few weeks
How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

08:10 min | 1 year ago

How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

"Hi it's bryce dallas howard guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from an incredible ted fellow and the stem educator brittany young a community leader tackling national issues by turning passions into opportunities for stem education and career development. Hey ted talks daily listeners. I'm adam grant. I hosted another podcast. From the ted audio collective called work life and it's about the science of making work not suck next time the number of protests targeting firms. Today it's on the order of sixty times. The numbers that you would see and early tens employees activism is on the rise. But how can we use our voices effectively. And how can leaders manage all those voices find. Work life on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen. I show people all around. Dc antiquites my guests engaged. I liked sprinkle in a fun factor to net. Stop dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet then just have to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has been you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial. That's od co dot com slash. Ted i want you to take this journey with me. Let's set the stage. Is a sunday in baltimore in a park. We endure a hill watching dirt bike. Riders go pash do tricks. Willies do stunts zipping. He hit the engines revving. Smell the gasoline. You could see the join excitement. Netface someone's probably learning how to fix the dirt bike way too expensive to buy. Then they can go to school. They can get a pop quiz or a test teacher. You'll account we all heard. And we've all hated train as leaving new york to cleveland. But they're here in baltimore. How does this relate. They don't get it. They fail the test and now they can hate then now. World can turned upside down. They can get on facebook instagram. Get a call or text. They can watch as their friend can become a hashtag. A kid in the wrong place wrong time lost to the streets loss of the system lost a gun violence or kick that could be arrested for dirt bike. Because of my city it can be a misdemeanor. Possession of dirk like this can be elected story for black kids across the country. And he's like miami. Cleveland atlanta philly. Whatever please had the dirt bike task force now. Acts yourself if the thing you used to relieve your stress if it was demonized would you still do it if it was criminal us. The answer is yes. That's the reality black people across the us right now. They've watched as we made room in. Cities escape borders bicycles in any other sport. They can watch tv in seattle games olympics on. Espn the style and stain ad campaigns and films but in baltimore would they have looked forward to would do. Right is get from all of it. No space no outlet just typical narrative. Like i said this is a communist story. I was a kid in the park. I wanted to be just like the big crowd is but i hate the fall. Instead i became like bill nye the science guy i was doing all kinds of experiments blown out burrows off glowing people to the chair and i may or may not have made stink bombs at school. They would describe me as a bad kid. Where they didn't see was all my jeans. My talent my voice was not hurt. Then i became that black girl from west baltimore working stem my first position. I was confused for the secretary was pissed but liquefying soon get more people in industry and it's one eight hundred. That's what i start doing. Working small groups for kids students teach them some activities then and twenty fourteen. I lost my little brother to the prison system. In twenty fifteen. I lost all faith. In system period. The world watched following a freddie gray uprising as possible burn. I wondered people go and listen. Where would it solutions. And where was investment into my community and twenty sixteen. I broke the system and became the founder and ceo of beat through sixty carbonell. I went back to my experience in park. I thought about the kids bikes those scales. People use to pay the bills just like mechanics mechanical news. We lane in system s sights the sign's behind popping best willie playing in dirt bike. It's home o'clock is busy quesion technology. The technology needed to get the best radio tires. So you don't have the channel asphalt engineering. The engineers needed to fix peg dirt bike. But the also get the best mac mac. 'em mathematics the math needed for the guests to oriole ratio. So you dirt. Bike does not explode then also gonna step further. I thought about the rights new only way to have programming solutions was ahead of them at because the people closest to the problem onto solution i thought about. Mike says he was six. He's rendered by geez when he seventeen graduating high school. He didn't know what you wanted to do but he knew he loved everything about their bikes and started working with us and beat through sixty. He's helped us. Educate kids trained by gratis and x twenty one. He's our lead instructor. He's created mates showed them across the country and he really represents the best to be three sixty at the corvallis. Work is constantly thinking about what people like. Like one for mike. He was a space. Basically work of students on our curriculum space. Keep training more. Riders and growing a skill sets a space where he no longer has skating but he has something his own city for him with your support and it's of more cities we can make this reality since two thousand seventeen. We've saved the city of baltimore about two hundred thirty three million dollars by dorm programming over seven thousand students. We saved the city of baltimore. One million dollars by growing workforce opportunities for people. Just like mike. That's less people that could possibly go to jail. Less money spent on dollars and cents of incarceration and more money going and saw black communities our leaders our culture and our voices. We don't need to black squares. We don't need your campaigns but will we do need as your dollars and cents behind us to make roach. We need more people like you and cities to believe in invest in our model of growing the people. What will you choose to be an ally being impact be the revolution be three sixty. Thank you hello there. I'm chris anderson. The guy lucky enough to run. Ted now has a podcast called the ted interview and this week on the show. I took someone really special name me. The woman married to jacqueline nova 'grats. She's been that he is learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the ted interview. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

TED Apple Brittany Young Adam Grant Baltimore Pash Netface Bryce Dallas Howard Bill Nye West Baltimore Cleveland Carbonell Espn Olympics Miami Atlanta Seattle Facebook
The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

07:39 min | 1 year ago

The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack [TEST]

"Hi neil degrasse. Tyson here guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from a ted fellow and fellow. Astrophysicist katie mac. She's a thought leader. Who's trying to make sense out of the complicated and theoretical issues related to the future of the universe. Wait wait actually. Her specialty is the end of the universe. That's where she's coming from or at least that's where she's going or that's where she's going to take us. Check it out. hello then. i'm chris hansen. The guy lucky enough to run ted now host a podcast called the ted interview and this on the show. I talked to someone really special name. The woman i'm married to jacqueline nova grads. She's been thirty years. Learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty. We got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the tudent. Few wherever you listen to costs. I showed people all around dc antiquites. My guests engaged. I liked his sprinkle in a fun. Factor to next off dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet than just tap to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks. Daily comes from odu dues suite of business. Apps has everything you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial that's od show dot com slash ted. I the universe. The vastness the mystery the astonishing beauty of the stars. I love everything about it. And i devoted my life to studying it from adam's two galaxies from beginning to end but lately i've gotten stuck on that last bit the fact that the universe is dying. I know this may come as a shock. I mean it's the universe it's everything it's supposed to be eternal right but it isn't. We know the universe had a beginning and everything that begins and the start of the story is familiar one. In the beginning there was light. We know that because we can see it. Directly the cosmos today is filled with low energy background radiation leftover from a time when the whole universe was an all encompassing inferno in its first three hundred and eighty thousand years space or dark. it was thick. With a churning humming plasma it was hot and dense it was loud but it was also expanding over time the fire dissipated and space cooled clouds of gas pulled together by their own gravity form stars and galaxies and planets and us and one day astronomers using a microwave receiver detected a bit of static coming from every direction the sky the leftover radiation from that promote. He'll fire we can know map out the cosmos to the farthest reaches of the observable universe. We can see distant galaxies whose light has taken billions of years to reach us so by looking at them. We're looking deep into the past. We can watch how the expansion of the universe has slowed down since that hot early phase. Thirteen point eight billion years ago we can see collisions of entire galaxies. And watch the star formation the result from the sudden conflagration of all that cosmic hydrogen and we can see that these collisions are happening. Less and less. The expansion of the universe isn't slowing down anymore. A few billion years ago. It started speeding up. Distant galaxies are getting farther apart faster and faster star formation has slowed in fact we can calculate exactly how much and when we do we find something shocking of all the stars that have ever been born or that ever will be around ninety percent have already come into being from now until the end of time the universes were he'll just that last ten percent the end of the universe is coming. There are few ways that could happen but the most likely is called the heat death and in agonizing slow languishing of the cosmos stars. Burn out leaves smoldering ash. Galaxies become increasingly isolated in their own dimples of light particles decay even black holes evaporate into the void. Of course we still have some time. The heat is so far in the future. We hardly have words to describe it long. Past a billion years when the sun expands and boils off the oceans of the earth long past one hundred billion years we lose the ability to see distant galaxies and that faint trace of big bang light long after we are left alone in the darkness watching the milky way. Fade it's okay to be sad about it even if it is trillions of years in the future. No one wants to think about something. They love coming to an end as disconnected as it may be us here now. It is somehow more profound than personal death. We have strategies for accepting the ability of that. After all we tell ourselves something of us will live on. Maybe it will be our great works. Maybe it will be our children carrying on our genetic material or perhaps our basic outlook on life. Maybe it will be some idea worth spreading humanity might venture out into the stars and evolve and change but something of us will survive but the universe ends at some point. We have no legacy. There will come a time when in a very real sense our existence will not have mattered. The slate will be wiped clean completely. Why should we spend our lives seeking answers to the ultimate question of reality. If eventually there will be no one left to tell. Why build a sandcastle when you can see that the tide is coming in. I've asked a dozen other cosmologists. And they all had different answers to some. The death of the cosmos seems right. It's freeing to know that we are temporary. I very much like our glibness one told me to others. The question itself motivates the search for some alternative theory. There must be some way to carry on the slow fade to black. Just cannot be our story ends. One found comfort in the possibility of the multi vers. It's not all about us. He said personally. I feel lucky our cosmos existed for billions of years before us and it will carry on long after. We are gone

TED Neil Degrasse Katie Mac Jacqueline Nova Apple Chris Hansen ODU Tyson Adam
Star Wars: Episode III  Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

"Is the movie jacqueline that we all were so excited to see if for no other reason because we thought it was our last venture into the galaxy far far away on the big screen and i have a simple question. And i'm glad it's your job not mine in under five seconds in a minute. What is revenge of the sixth about. Yeah okay so. This is definitely going to be breezy synopsis. But basically revenge takes place three years after the events of the clone. Wars advocate has been about his mission. People don't know these mary to pad may and one of the first things i ask him to do is to rescue the chancellor been given power over the senate and therefore the republic and he's been kidnapped and so then Anikin has to go and rescue him and during that same time one is on a different mission against general grievous. But it's during this time. That anna can become very close to senator pal patine before we eventually realized that he is the sieff lord that has been the puppet master behind all the events that led up to this moment as he wants to take control over the republic and turned it into what will eventually become the empire. During this time. There are various players. Folks are beginning to suspect palpitations motives and because of it. They ask anikin kim to spy on him but they do this. They tell him. They're not gonna make magenta jedi master. Because again he's gotten very close to them and basically the people who are supposed to be in the know kind of get in the know very late but him and pad may still in love. They share some kisses here and there and she reveals to him that he's pregnant. Sort of sending him into this tailspin which basically makes him believe that he's going to have a hard time. Protecting his child ends up having all these nightmares Through the course of things we eventually figure out again. Palestine is window and him a fight. I mace windu

Anikin Senator Pal Patine Anikin Kim Mary Senate Anna Palestine