26 Burst results for "Jacobsen"

Seattle's Mercer Island considers camping ban on public property

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Seattle's Mercer Island considers camping ban on public property

"Island City Council is expected to vote tonight on a measure that would ban camping on city streets and parks come most Charlie harder reports the ordinance would make it difficult for homeless people to spend the night on public property. Instead, the city of Mercer Island would make an arrangement to take people to shelters in other cities. On the East Side, Council member Jake Jacobsen is a batter of the proposal. People to places where they can't help it. If people don't want to get help, and say I'm not going any shelter than they have made a decision, the up into the justice system Now some people in Mercer Island and the CL U of Washington say this is just a way to criminalize homelessness. And it doesn't address its causes. Mercer Island Police say there are fewer than a dozen homeless people they regularly come into contact with

Island City Council Charlie Harder Mercer Island Jake Jacobsen East Side Mercer Island Police Washington
Is the pandemic an opportunity for more personalized learning?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:52 min | 6 months ago

Is the pandemic an opportunity for more personalized learning?

"Every Monday. This fall, we've been taking a look at how schools are using technology during the pandemic for some. It's an opportunity to make changes to teaching and learning that have been in the works for a long time specifically personalized learning the idea that kids all learn at different paces and in different ways, and that curriculums can be tailored to a child's learning style these days that's using artificial intelligence to monitor their progress and modify lessons on the Fly Sheldon H. Jacobsen is a professor of computer science at the University of Illinois at her body champagne he says, it's a good time for. An experiment but we don't know for sure if it works what students are doing is is they are given an individualized curriculum and by having that individualized curriculum based on how they learn the level that they're at as well as how they will progress. It enables the students to work at their own pace advancing with the appropriate feedback that they're in a situation that they're maximizing the retention of knowledge and learning. So this is a great idea in many ways and covert nineteen is accelerate needed and making it possible. This is an idea that in fact has its time in the tournament now. We've talked think for years decades about attempting to personalize education and it sort of seems like one of those problems that doesn't scale easily it's hard for one teacher to manage an individualized curriculum for twenty eight students. How do these programs make it scalable? Well, what they use our expert systems artificial intelligence to understand where the student is in the process by moving them forward. In this process, it enables them to, in fact, keep at a pace that is commensurate with their retention of the information. So a teacher now has in some sense manage multiple students simultaneously, but the software, the artificial intelligence, the algorithms help facilitate that. So it's a much more smooth delivery. Are there disadvantages. We're also putting a lot of faith in in Ai to track progress, which you know can have its downsides. I would imagine. One of the big downsides I see it is that when you look at the fact that in a more traditional education setting all the students are basically in front of an instructor, a teacher and listening and their all absorbing in their own way. But from a very single point of view, now it's going to be individualized. One of the disadvantages I see it his epitaph, these students who are given in some sense, the education product in their own. individualize way they may, in fact, not be able to adapt when after they've graduated and have jobs since they've been in some sense given an optimal learning process, they may not be able to adapt other processes as easily and that the it's not clear how that's going to impact their their life learning process because education is all about learning how to learn for the rest of your life. And then what is the uptake look like for schools who have struggled to implement in some cases even zoom well, one of the big questions of course has connectivity because if the students are remote, do they have the necessary bandwidth connectivity to be able to engage in this kind of program? What we don't want to do is use programs like this so that the students who are already doing well do even better which is good but we'd want the gap in some sense to close and it's not clear if the individualized personalized education process will close the gap or simply move everybody forward. That itself is good but the difficulty is, can we close that gap and and I'm not sure we know yet been talking about the achievement gap and the technology will help move everybody forward but it's not clear if it will actually close the gap of education and accomplishment. That's what we're really trying to do here. Bring everybody up. Up to hopefully a much higher level. In some ways it seems like education has been pretty frozen and covid nineteen is is pushing district's teachers and students and parents in all kinds of directions. In some ways, there's a part of me that things maybe this is not such a great time to experiment and yet it also could be wet and I just wonder where you fall in like what should what should we be taking advantage right now? We'll crisis an opportunity and unfortunately quite often the opportunities present themselves. When we are under a crisis under strain and covid nineteen eighteen is creating that situation for us. The question is, would what would have been the impetus to do this massive change in educational thinking without a crisis like Cova nineteen and quite often people get comfortable in the way they do things I like to say that education changes over a glacial timescale because it takes generations of teachers and instructors to embrace a new idea and this doesn't happen overnight obviously, it requires time and people to be educated in thought in a different way when they're in fact delivering education. It's a now it's funny sounds like you're describing what teachers were would have been able to do if they only had ten kids That's why it's personalized. It's much more focused around a smaller group in some sense, a group of one, and that's a great education process to individualize a teacher to an individual student is very difficult. But with the software and artificial intelligence, you can facilitate that and that's where we're heading and the thing to remember this is just the beginning. This is not the end product yet there'll be more organizations and companies who will invest in this kind of idea technology and it will eventually grow. We don't know the full ramifications and benefits that will accrue overtime Sheldon H Jacobsen is a professor of computer science at the University of Illinois at our Bond

Sheldon H. Jacobsen Professor Of Computer Science University Of Illinois AI Instructor Cova
Supervolcanoes: KABOOMY BOOM

Science Vs

05:07 min | 6 months ago

Supervolcanoes: KABOOMY BOOM

"Hi I'm Wendy took him in and yet listening to science versus from Gimblett this is the show that pits facts against fiery mountains. Out Story begins with Christian Jacobsen. It's one thousand, nine hundred and he lives in Redmond. Washington. So that was twelve. I was a I was a rocker kid. One morning Christian woke up early he was eating cheerios raisin bran he liked to mix them half and half. Everything was quiet. When suddenly? I heard like a door slam downstairs and I thought hang on. I thought I was the only person up you want. But something else had woken up. Now Saint Helen's snowcapped mountain just a few hours south of Christians. House. It had been rumbling a months, a mixture of how do we rock gold magma was building and building inside it. then. On May Eighteenth nineteen eighty. It finally blew its top. Downstairs was the sound of the eruption that I heard Mount Saint Helen's shook, but it's most violent eruption in one hundred, twenty, three years. The volcanoes blasts have come with a vengeance today. The conical shapes top of the mountain is now gone eruption Shaw Ash fifteen miles into the sky and that ash spread all across the state when Christian his door step outside it was like Dorothy stepping over the threshold into technical ause. Only, in reverse. Walked out on the deck and I looked at my mom's planters there where she had these puppies growing pink poppies. They were covered in a fine dust and I just touched it really lightly and I just came off my fingers. It was like as fine as chuck dust from like a chalkboard. And as I looked away from the flowers. I saw it was just on everything freaking everywhere in neighboring towns. The ash got so thick that it made the sky turn black day was like night and for Christian the ash found its way into his eyes throat felt the grit in my teeth and from when you breathe it in, it just gets in your mouth kind of like if it was a hyper fine sand and like breathing in sand or something. The volcanoes blast also created this massive wave of heat that flattened everything for miles Christian. Remember seeing a forest of huge pine trees just on the ground all the trees are laid down in pointing in one direction. They are completely stripped of all the branches and everything they're just the trunk of the tree laid down. Like a giant has been playing with pickup sticks but the thing that really shocked Christian was when he realized that the eruption had created a giant mud flow that hot rock and gas had melted all the ice at the top of the mountain. Causing like an eight lane highway of. Rocks and trees and superheated mud coming hurtling down. Crashing in and taking out every single bridge that it touched railroad bridges and freeways and everything I mean when you see something like that that's that's something that. Knowing there's something that powerful that much bigger than you is scary. The mounts Helen's eruption killed fifty seven people. The Mountain Helen's. It isn't even close to the most deadly volcano out there. Just five years later, a volcano erupted in Columbia creating a landslide that killed twenty, four thousand people, and in the past even volcanoes erupted. So called Super. Volcanoes. The one we hear about here in the US yellowstone. And that's where a lot of people are looking to right now because there are rumblings that yellowstone is about to blow, and if that happens, it would be catastrophic. Christian has heard these rumors to the yellowstone will make Mount Saint. Helen's look like a pimple. That's that's not gonna be interruption like anything we've. We've seen in written history I. Don't think that's just going to open up a hole. Where everything that's underneath? This is gonNA come out and it's going to come out in a terrible terrible way everything from the Pacific. Ocean to you know Minnesota is gone. And on top of all that there are stories that a yellowstone blast could change the climate howling us into a new ice age. So today on the show we're asking. Is that even possible just how scary Ken Volcanoes get? When it comes to volcanoes, there's a lot of blame. But then. There's science.

Christian Jacobsen Saint Helen Ken Volcanoes Yellowstone Mount Saint Helen Washington Wendy Gimblett Redmond Minnesota United States Dorothy Pacific Columbia Mount Saint
Copenhagen's Palads Teatret

Monocle 24: Section D

01:06 min | 6 months ago

Copenhagen's Palads Teatret

"If you were to ask Copenhagen Irs. About plaster this Pastel colored eye catching cinema located in the heart of the city. Just a stone's throw from Arne Jacobsen conic. Sas. Royal Hotel. They will likely describe it as for key fun and charming building a site that has for years made up a unique and special part of the cityscape the building dates back just over a century and was the city's former train station. Yet as demand grew and passenger numbers increased a new bigger station was built close by and palace went onto become Scandinavia's biggest entertainment center at the time. Counting roughly three thousand seats and space for thirty man orchestra. And after years of renovations and adjustments, the space turned into the seventeen screen cinema it is today. It took its distinctive look in the eighties when Danish artist Paul Gann coated the building's facade with a vivid mix of Pastel, hued blues and pinks. Turning the site from architectural landmark into a piece of art.

Arne Jacobsen Royal Hotel Copenhagen IRS SAS Scandinavia Paul Gann
Justin Jacobson - The E-sports Observer

The Business of Esports

09:49 min | 8 months ago

Justin Jacobson - The E-sports Observer

"We have just Jacobsen on the podcast he's an e sports and entertainment attorney in New York City who works with professional athletes, gamers, musicians among other creative talents He was also recently appointed, and this is where we talked about or at least his company the manager of Ford models newly formed E. Sports and gaming. Talent Division. Justin. Welcome to the PODCAST. And the things we said about four miles although I don't think we said anything bad. We just wanted to get signed to Ford models. Yeah. I. I'm still waiting just I hope that's why you came on the podcast is well, you know you're trending in the right direction shirt you're wearing a nice presentation going on. Yeah I brushed my hair for this. I'm not gonNA live like species I. figured I figured it was time to show up in my best so Are you implying that Williams the better looking one between the two of us because I'm about to be wearing. Dressed up for me. now, Justin look I know our listeners actually the question I get from my students actually recently has been all about talent agencies in that part of the business I'd love for you to tell our listeners a bit what you do how you got into East sports what you're doing at Ford models now just some of the background. We as been an entertainment attorney for over a decade working primarily in music and sports and fashion, or than about five years ago I kind of really transitioned working the East sports in gaming world started working with a bunch of different East sports, town agencies, both in house an outhouse the really familiarize myself with the different players in the team's how the deals are structured and how you kind of engage in. That and for the last few years I've kind of just been doing that on my own helping different players and teams and brands as well as other management firms. kind of would their legals, trademarks, copyrights contracts also do some visa and immigration work for players. So really just kind of all the legal and business side of the industry and you know, as you mentioned Ford, they're pretty established town agency. Primarily in kind of the model in high fashion world but in other markets including in Latin America they had a very strong more traditional talent platform representing musicians and professional athletes, and we just kind of good looking people and obviously in light of what's going on in the world, they're kind of more shifting toward Damore global platform they already had an established digital. influencer division where they had you know beauty and fitness and wellness models and really were able to kind of expand that into the sports and gaming world and you know as I said, I worked with many of the top teams I've done deals and overwatch really call do pro-lee fortnight's he has go halo of these big major games all the major teams across. The industry and from there I was really able to kind of have my own connections with different brand representatives and really kind of take this approach that I learned from the more traditional entertainment and sports agents that I've worked with and kind of apply to this bigger sports and gaming world. So now we signed initially ten talent and kind of looking at some other ones and really try to have a bunch of different people across the board who really what we're looking at is people that kind of transcended they weren't just gamers. They'd had other things going on whether they were coach for a team or they were caster or they really like sneakers and fashion or you. Know. They also just had this really his unique history or known hip hop game where he's really being hot ninety seven's world kind of on the red carpet interviewing these celebrities and you know really kind of having all these musicians and athletes actors gaming with him like almost every day of the week. So really kind of look for unique talent that we can kind of takes Ford's existing ecosystem and the brand even decades and really start offering you know unique Colin. That may be you know has his gaming know fortnight stream or are they play warzone there to touquet player, but they also have other things going on and we can start integrating some of their products into what? You know these sports players have been doing. I mean so you basically just described me and William. So I'm doubly doubly offended now and I would put my sneaker collection up against anyone's Now I. Know You maybe on my radar now? Jet. Mentally, Paul has a poppin sneaker collection. But here's the question like maybe you could talk to a couple of the the initial players you signed and what you know truly was sort of the thesis in your mind why you sign them and more importantly. Like what the future how do you develop these guys? How do you know how do you monetize them? How do you look at the next two to five years for them? We you know we kind of have like a really big take top gaming creator and someone who's kind of a coach also has his own podcast and really trying to figure out new ways that are maybe not solely related to streaming or you know like this is what I do extreme all day I'm going to compete in tournaments like how do we build these other avenues? So like we're helping them setup merge and finding unique designers to kind of give them their own kind of brand identity beside think that you know what I Learned from the more music world and some of the athletes it's all about kind of finding what's unique and highlighting it, and we have some talks with some brands that kind of are looking to get into the space. So we're really kind of focused on more than non endemic ones I see there's you know some of them are starting to come in when you have Lori L. Prod or Louis the con- but you know there's just a ton of more from you know more hair care products and face care products and you know. Even the high end luxury brands that are maybe looking at it, but don't really know how to go about it, and maybe they don't. WanNa. Spend a lot of money and do the wrong thing and it come off bed because as we know, that's not what you do. That's how you lose the market instantly. So it's you know hoping a familiar face in Ford that they kind of know the level that they come from and kind of someone like me who's really understand how you activate properly how you kind of find the unique. Stories. Like we sign this female Gamer who you know one of the best go players in the world and we're kind of figuring out ways to maybe develop you know training camps or interactive ways where she can have these how to get better female. She go camps to K. Coaches, kind of teaching than youth in how you kind of the next generation. So we're trying to look at how we can build around what their interests are and bring them some unique opportunities that you know maybe some of the other people in the world. Town Industry. Kinda can get do. You wanted to ask something. Yeah I'm just curious about like. So do you see the Ford Models Niche? Basically as there are a lot of talent agencies that represent Tammy, sports today right and you know I put many of the minute category, which is like Gamer I write basically their job is they represent people who are great gamers get on top pro teams. They got them a good salary on that team, etc right and those tend to historically those have been smaller East sports bespoke agencies have grown up from the community. Now that's changed quite a lot and you have other major talent agencies coming in like a and others that are taking really active role so and I kind of put those other. Than another category as well. Sort of these larger more established players. So given that ecosystem, right? He kind of sports specialists, some of the bigger agencies is it right to say you think Ford's models benefit is to connect with the classic fashion brands. So I'm going to sign with Ford models versus CAA because you can get me Louis Vuitton sponsorship because you can get me the you know what's Mascara Company, L'OREAL or revelry Al f you can get me the revlon like eyeliner deal is that really the value add is in the traditional fa or Did you see it as a broader piece of I. Think kind of is both I think that you know we're able to help some of four traditional models and other high in fashion influencers. Kinda come into the space maybe kind of acted properly, and then we really can be the bridge with some of these high fashion brands. But now also approaching it from the traditional one talking with hyper accessing the G. Fuels and no. As I said, I've been doing these deals with these teams. You know about once a week for the last couple of months. And years. So it's like I'm very familiar with them and it's really kind of being able to find talent who compete at this high level but also have other things that we can build around and you know the the C as in the UTA's in a one thing I've noticed. Yeah. You can have like fifty, one hundred however many players but can you really spend the amount of time servicing them and giving them the proper attention and you know it's great if you have fifty overwatch players but unless you're the top three or four or five. or You really spending your day pushing deals for the number fifty, number forty two and you know. So it's like we're looking at finding people that we can really focus on and develop because ultimately that's how you give them staying power and longevity and much more where it's not just based on how well the game goes I mean like you mentioned someone like cloister who you know champion one day and dropped the next like that's pretty tough and you know if you don't have other avenues and don't have other things going on and you know like. Tabs was about not expansion in the league aren't him anymore teams and everyone's dropping a player if you know supply and demand. We just don't have room for all these kids that compete at this high level and. Going to do now, you go to another game you so don't revalorised. You know you try to do content creations like we're trying to create these other avenues. The way, a traditional age in the other

Ford Talent Division Justin Attorney New York City Jacobsen Latin America Williams Wanna William Town Industry Paul Louis Vuitton Lori L. Prod Tammy Colin CAA G. Fuels Mascara Company Louis
"jacobsen" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

04:46 min | 9 months ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"I, think I think we're talking about. The same thing, but different things to so. On the one hand we're talking about. Can we deeply hospitable to people who are in a different place spiritual than we are? Should, we feel like we have to make them into our image so that we can feel comfortable. That's one thing we're talking about in what I hear you saying way in I agree with this. No no, we don't have to do that. That's that's up to them and God. And Waking create the space where people can be welcomed with us, and we can weaken. Walk Together as friends. Even though we're in very different places in some cases, whole contradictory views about things, so that's one thing. But at a different thing we're talking about is structural sin. Call structural sin. And structural injustice where it takes us working together with a group of people to say no to injustice for a whole bunch of people. And, so that is not so that we can make them all become Christians life ourselves, but that is so that we can. Love Mercy! Do Justice in walk humbling with our together. That's different thing related, but it's different so in that case when we engage for example in refugee rights. Advocacy for refugee rights and we're. we get involved to make sure there's a safehouse were battered, people or whatever it is the thing that were involved with. It's not so that we can make them all. The Christians that made me hope. They come to know the love. Jesus some of them already do know the low Jesus. But it's so that we can make him love mercy, do Justice Walk Humbly with our autism community for the for the sake of our neighborhood, so can flourish more. Agree with, that yeah. Well. This has been a ridiculously. Wonderful, our and I wish I blacked out like to make this my next series listen to. Lane talk to each other. I JUST WANNA. Say How thankful I am for both of you and the ways that you model so well speaking appreciatively to one another and drawing out one, another's deep wisdom and listening and asking good questions, this has just been a tremendous gift and I think in many ways has really built on the conversations that I both had. With you as well so thank you, thank you for taking this time to to talk. I think this is gonNA. Be just a tremendous blessing to those who listen as well I wanted to close by inviting each of you to offer a blessing to to the other person so elaine. We'll will start with you I i. want to bless you the name of father. Son Holy Spirit is you are engaged In. The spirit important, ministry with spiritual refugees, people who can't be in church for one reason or another for people who? Are. Fraught across your path day. I pray that God would. Keep expanding your heart. And giving you wisdom as you. Speak to people as you do life together and I pray that you would keep being surprised at how got comes to you through these unlikely neighbours. Man. You. We'll. Elaine. Made, the love of Jesus continue to fill your life and heart. May those you love and those communities that you're engaged with helping people. A different thing continued to flourish in that life and love. And continue to grow and to continue to honor each other. And may the issues that you're concerned about in this country the things that affect the well being of fellow. Humanity, fellow brothers and sisters you continue to find voice and opportunity to speak change and justice into a world that's broken. May you continue to find ways to equip people to join you in that process, and May his light and life continue to unfold in you and everyday surprising you as well with insight. And opportunities that astound you and leave you on your bed at night incredibly grateful for what God poured into your life on this day..

Elaine Lane
"jacobsen" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

07:43 min | 9 months ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"ITY, which is core tract of our spirituality is so ecumenical, and people can have any religion in no religion in common have with their guard space globalist vegetables from back home. So that group. Getting started in April. We've already had our preliminary meetings and made our plans and our work in Dallas that we did with refugees preparedness very well to be able to do this. So, there's that group and then a couple of other groups like that so every every one of these little subgroups. is about neighboring well? They're all daughter community in connecting with people and helping our neighborhoods flourish once a month, the leaders of the different groups gathered together the Francis be end we gather. We pray together. Talk about what's happening in our ministries. We encourage and support each other. Problems together. and. That group is the group that follows the rule of life together to comments at a spiritual practices, which were a group is is four things. That's prayer, work, table and neighbor. So, we have conversation about. How we're experiencing those four things where we live in our day to day lives, it's very supportive. Then Once a quarter we invite all the groups together to have a campfire potluck dinner. Fun for the kids some time to learn together in so that's what that's. Let the churches frigging forest is. It's United Methodist Walk. In your book, you mentioned this overtime. Institutions inevitably come rigid, and inwardly focused entombing the. They're meant to protect, and then this from chapter six. It is crucial that we do not underestimate our sinful to passively to use religious tool. I think religious structures as a tool, so you guys are going through. All this stuff. Are you aware that this might provide fodder for a second generation to do the same thing that we've always seen with these institutions and how getting that, are you? Are You thinking through? Yeah Yeah. I've thought about that a lot of thought about that for years that no matter what we do is human beings. We become lately. Pick something. It has been meaningful to us whether it's our favorite set of songs. Way Found Jesus. or it's a structure for our GONNA. Do Worship, or it's how structure denominate. Yeah, whatever it is something that was life giving and we re apply it. We look at that as it becomes God to us, it becomes. Essential to us. We can't know God without in at that point. Thomas Merton says it's it's. It's no longer than moon. It's our finger pointing at the moon, but we think our finger is the moon so. This is this is inevitable to us. It's inevitable in house churches you. You found in your experience that after Wiley, House. Church kind of falls into a rotten. These things happen. So. The challenge for all of us whatever whatever it as an expression of church. People gathered around Jesus in his with us. We're always having to Tell ourselves the truth. Tell each other's truth that We're always in need of renewal. We never quite arrive tracked. Always in need of renewal. No back in the seventies and the Jesus People Movement that end up in a lot of these kinds of arrangements and because. The original people all choosing it with great vision. They're all personally invested at a spiritual level. A call to pass that onto either second generation of this their kids growing up and. In different expressions or People came in from the outside. Who just wanted to exploit the tool? That was there for some personal need, but didn't want to become a contributor to it. and. As I've talked to a number of people who've come. Grouping including the shepherding movement, then you talked about before which was all intended to do good for people, and then using power in a way that was exploited of people, because it was not the controlling authority you talk about you had to have approval to change jobs approval to move your house approval. But it was also this tithing money thing that float upward so you had this oppressive authority going downward. You had people tithing to the level ahead of them People of income, and it just became worse and worse and I saw one of the things I've always kind of thinking of. How do we long the longevity of things? That have certain structures around them for which I think. Even you're very aware in your own book that these structures in time become the they become a prison, instead of like. Yeah, they're just bones that are helping support this living organisms living. At some point, the bone seem to always takeover. People come in who want the bones to be the thing instead of no structure to support life, the neath right? Right it's true in Jesus name that they talked about wine skins skins that had reached their capacity for expansion, and now we're in. They simply couldn't hold anything new. So Are you aware of this? There's a movement now called the Inter Spirituality Movement view encounter this. It's A. Quieter riot, wide range of people. There's a book by. Roaring Makati in Adam Bucko called the new monasticism a contemporary. And Interest Spiritual Manifesto of living. Anyway so they're talking about this phenomenon, and what it is at, be very curious about your thoughts on it. It's people who have come out of religion most of the people there citing in their book, they're working with at come out of Christianity, but people are also coming out of Judaism Islam and other major religions. And coming out of no religion, and these are people who have become pretty candidates that religion has run its course for humankind that as a whole religion has run its course. It's done everything it can do. That's helpful and now all it can do really is key people stop. And in a worst-case scenario, it's violet in the best case scenario. It's it. Stop defying right. So now on this movement is going on, and they talk in this book about intentional communities of one kind or another form that are not based on a particular religion, but have that share common values to be good and do good in the world. So. You'll find these communities that are focused on environmental care. Working with the poor on various kinds of things. So I have I just run rented a number of people there in the inner spirituality movement from research in work that I do. Wonder Sometimes Where that will go where that will, because it's kind of like. What you're talking about, you know not having a religion, not having. The structures and all that kind.

Jesus People Movement Inter Spirituality Movement Dallas Francis Thomas Merton United Methodist Walk Makati Wiley Adam Bucko
"jacobsen" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

09:01 min | 9 months ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"Of that family in their party. Your family, you know, tell me which one of these things is going to really shake, does child. So I can ask that question I. Get asked the doctrine question. But where we are now and Diana, Bass writes about this in her book Christianity after religion. people need to belong first, and then see you behaving and behave with you, and then come to believe so the belief emerges of life together where there's integrity of life together, and where people are already welcome. They don't have to agree to a set of propositions I. Yeah, it's it's really the the way of the ancient church. It's what people respond to now. So! I can tell you a little bit about what we're doing right now. With Churches Spring Forest, which is the one we started a a new. They call these fresh expressions. You've probably heard that started in the UK, subject chiefly talk specifically about do these people only then participate in these alternative community? Do they also attend to more traditional fellowship somewhere else in their life? Sometimes Lily I started at some Sullivan. Did on that had a lot of students because I started these communities to help students learn how to do church in new way in an ancient future way because they experienced a call. Got To go do something beyond the walls of the Church didn't know how to do it. And they ran into trouble with the ordaining the ordination system because they are called to didn't fit in that box. So I said to them after noticing this happening over narcis Let's go ahead and start some communities and you know we'll figure it out together, and then we'll have something that we can talk about with your board of Ordained Ministry. Explain what we're doing. This is actually. Very much like early is right somewhere. So, so that's what we did. And at that time most of those students had to be attached to a regular church to this is one of the reasons. We had our meetings on Sunday night, so we wouldn't compete with Sunday morning partly for the students they had to go to church. Do some work there and partly, because when you start something like this, it can feel threatening to the established. People, right that the clergy and so on so this is our thinking. So. Yeah, so that's what we did. Yes, okay, so for years now so we start all those communities in Texas. This would be an L.. Let's see for. Twelve years ago or something ten. And Began Dreaming Of. Starting. A decentralized mission church. With by vocational leadership teams that were in the neighborhood that were were the the least amount of time was spit at Church meetings. And the most amount of time was spent people being among their neighbors and helping the neighborhoods to fluoridation. Actually the sort of thing. You're talking about what you are practicing. So I was imagining this and. Wanting very much to develop something like that within methodism, which was a dilemma because of our structures, right? But I really felt called in that direction so now all times gone by. been working on this all these years in writing books developing. Classes and all the stuff that I have been blessed to do. Now last summer. Well, we bought a little farm a year almost two years ago and We worked with our bishop, and we brought a former student of mine. WHO's a seasoned organic farmer? He's from Kenya Ns wife. And Children, and he was my research assistant in Texas, and so we he was part of all experimental communities, and he also was as a former minister in Kenya, so he had exactly the right mix of things. If we were hoping for, so we worked with archbishop in his bishop, everybody had to work with and brought him in family moved here last summer. We started rehabbing this old farm. Our goal was to develop. An alternative form of rural ministry that would include a new monastic community following a rule of life together in a living on site together. We have two houses on the property and And, then so the things that features of new monasticism with characterize sort of a core group. And then we would also start dinner church that when me. Ultimately meeting on Saturday night that and then we would also develop Ministries. Among our neighbours where our gifts in experiences connected with our neighbours, gifts and experiences in needs, and we would develop. Give ourselves time to figure that out together because you need to do that, you need to know your context while before you decide what neighborhoods evaporate, so. And then became as a lot of people. Come to see us in have done for years to learn more about living in community of things like that. We felt that this new. Thing we were gonNA. Do would be a laboratory for people to come and learn from us. They learn from our mistakes. They learned from things we figured out. So, so we started all that last summer and We just multiplied into six different. Michigan communities in February. So. So the Dinner Church that not on Saturday night doesn't mean on Saturday night anymore. Because the people who were attracted to this already had strong gifts and a heart for this kind of thing, and some of them are clergy. Get are now working by vocationally. Some of them are just lay people that are drawn to the sort of ministry. So every one of our. Micro groups meet somewhere else except for two of them. Meet here at our farm and forest. One of them works with the border crisis in educating churches in this area across the Carolinas they educate just how to get involved in immigrant rights, especially with the border issues with children cages in this sort of thing, so they have expertise in political activism and the Theological Training Foundation for it as well. That group is led by three United Methodist Deacon is's. Church now. Okay, so that's what they do, and then there. They've got a the other. Involve Inter Subgroup. We have a contemporary groups that needs once a month. Call three that meets here at the. Forest House. With my husband. And the people who are coming out there about ten people coming in and these are people who are already spiritually deep. And already doing a lot of good in the world, but needed a place to gather at have pierce worked in pray and how the? Comfort of being together and all of that, so we meet once a month. We take turns offering leadership. We have soup and bread, and it's a beautiful thing. We're just getting ready to start. A group called forest kids as eagles spirituality for kids and We have a a multicultural group of kids that are ready to go with that one. That are from five to eighteen years old, figuring out how we're going to structure that, so they'll learn all kinds of great things. There's there are two groups working with refugees. One of them is our farmer that came with his wife. Leave connected with refugee services in Durham. And we're developing a program with our land where they can come in. We'll have a community garden. They can raise their own vegetables. Francis will help them know how to raise the vegetables from back home that they allow core how to raise them here in North Carolina. And they can grow them on this land. We have the land for that and we're hoping to be able to add a goat and chicken collective. And in the process as we connect with these refugees leave made it very explicit. We are not. Requiring them to become Christians. There's they don't have to go to church. This is about hospital. ITY, which is core tract of our spirituality is so ecumenical, and people can have any religion in no religion in common have with their guard.

Church Dinner Church Texas Churches Spring Forest UK Diana Ordained Ministry Kenya Ns Lily I Kenya North Carolina Forest House research assistant Bass Inter Subgroup Francis Michigan Carolinas United Methodist Durham
Sen. Richard Burr Faces Lawsuit Over Timing Of Stock Sale

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Sen. Richard Burr Faces Lawsuit Over Timing Of Stock Sale

"Water members of Congress going to do about stock trading by themselves. Revelations about Senator Richard. Burr raised this question. Our colleague Tim. Mack revealed that Senator Burr gave dire warnings about the pandemic to an exclusive group. A month ago that was a time when the president was downplaying the threat then propublica revealed that Burr also sold a lot of stock before the market crashed. Npr's Tim Mack still on this story. Tim Good Morning. Hey Good morning should lawmakers be trading in stocks at all well some lawmakers believe that they should be allowed to do that at all at lawmakers in the House of introduced what they call the band conflicted trading act. Now that's a bill. I championed by Jeff Merkley of Oregon in the Senate. It would prohibit lawmakers from trading individual stocks so along with Congressman Joanna Goose and Congresswoman Alexandria. Cossio Cortez Congressman Raja Krishna. More `they is one of the lead sponsors of the legislation. I think it's time that the public knows that their members of Congress are not profiteering. Off of you know information. They gained through their public service. It's not fair and it's not right. Democrats are the initial co-sponsors to the legislation but given the bipartisan outrage at Burr's actions they have some hope that Republicans will join them and to be clear this is telling lawmakers you can still have money. You can still try. A Mutual Fund Index Fund not individual stocks. Could PROFIT OFF OF INSIDE INFORMATION? Now this is not going to apply to Senator Booker if it becomes law. Because he's done what he's done but he's being sued isn't it? That's right Allan Allan Jacobsen of California was a shareholder in Wyndham hotels and resorts one of the stocks that bursts sold. And he's alleging that Senator Burr exploited information available to him as a senator for personal gain. Thomas O'Brien is lawyer representing Jacobson. And he said that they are trying to take the lead holding burr accountable. Back there. We're not waiting. For the Federal Government Regulatory Agencies. Were moving forward to remedy the wrong. With senator straight against are not I should note. I reset senator. Burs office for comment for the story but received no response Previously. He said that he relied only on public news stories to make his decision to dump stocks. He's also asked the Senate ethics committee to open an investigation into his own. Actions could face other scrutiny. Well the big question is whether the Justice Department and or the Securities and Exchange Commission will open up an investigation based on the facts. We already know in the public domain so to answer that I tried to ask around to people who had some experience in this manner. I spoke to Katie Goldstein. Who used to hold who used to lead these sorts of investigations in the US Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York? When I first read the allegations the thought that crossed my mind was it seems likely to me that there will be a grand jury investigation of this conduct. The circumstances were such that. I thought it was likely that. Us Attorneys Office. Perhaps the southern district of New York would open an investigation. So that's her view and her estimation but to be clear there's no evidence to the actual investigation has started. I also reached out to the Justice Department and the SEC. And they had no comment so a couple of things going on people saying there. Oughta be a law and also maybe impressions about whether Burr broke an existing law. Tim thanks so

Senator Burr Tim Mack Senator Senator Richard Senator Booker Allan Allan Jacobsen Cossio Cortez Congressman Raja Congress Securities And Exchange Commis Justice Department Senate Congressman Joanna Goose Jeff Merkley New York President Trump NPR Katie Goldstein Federal Government Regulatory Propublica Oregon
A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

B&H Photography Podcast

11:27 min | 1 year ago

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

"Today. We're GONNA be talking sheriff about photography. So let's get into it Sherry. Welcome to our show. It's so great having Jose here so you have grown up around cameras now as a little kid all my life cameras aimed at you most again. Your Dad was Trenton Center. He was big deal. Back in the fifties sixties seventies. He broke down a lot of walls. Again everybody's familiar with his music and his acting and everything else. So you're smiling laughing about so. I was very hyperactive. Attention deficit as a child. I still lamb a little curtail with certain things now making native American blood you know wearing a bright orange camp right now you WanNa talk about it. Yeah Orange there you go. There's fast on. Go ahead I'm sorry. My Grandmother gave me my first Brownie camera. Now that's how far back I with the fan flash that you put the light bulb shit so I had that one. I was four years old. How many megapixel was and you would get this little tiny roll of film that you would put inside that Yummy and That was my first foray into being behind the camera and then instamatic semantic when I was I think I had a funny little polaroid camera that we had them all And my first legitimate camera was a pentax when I was eleven years old. Okay I was in boarding school by Matic or h three the it was. You know I can't remember I just. It was a thirty five millimeter Pentax Camera. That was dad's I know. Dad had a SPA top. Any passed it down to me so my entire high school was spent in the dark room. I smell like smoke. That was really attractive. Smell coming out of the yellow fingernails sitting in the dark. You Know Rolling and Rolling Rolling Rolling and then you know praying that you could put it in the CAN. It would come out and it wasn't all crumpled and you know so. Yeah I spent a good part of my earlier years behind the camera. And then of course like you said being Harry's daughter you know when we when he was on tour somewhere and there's Paparazzi or people taking pictures of us all the time and then Harry took pictures of us all the time that we never saw and it was the biggest joke because he was he always got get over there. Get OVER THERE. Get over there. Stop Stop Standards There. Hundreds and hundreds of pictures that were taken by. Harry and we've never seen a single one single. And why do you think that's the case? He just too busy to Kinda know if he ever developed and I don't know if there was even filmed the camera I think he had these Lycos and he just you know he just kept shooting once in a while. We saw him because he would. When he was a touring he would have these The program with this and it was always the big color program that would come with new. Buy A ticket and there would be pictures of us you know in there and we go to dad. Shoot that picture around. The house was photography kind of a respected medium. Was it an art to be an art. He did have a darkroom which he never went into. He just had it in the back next his recording studio but he did use a recording studio. Did use the recording. But Yeah we always have been shutterbugs. I think the whole definitely me more so than I think my siblings but Harry was definitely behind the camera. He was into like us us a very like a like like like scandal. And what about the Paparazzi and stuff? Maybe it wasn't. I can't even say that it wasn't like it is now because Paparazzi but was it A pain in the bud. Was it something that you guys so I was so used to? You know because what happened is my hair Harry. In Marguerite. My mom was marguerite. She passed away a few years go but they divorced. When I was very young actually separated woman was pregnant with me so there was always that kind of people trying to take pictures of that that was going on but there was a little more of a sense of decency for lack of better words with authorizing I mean. Now it's like Oh goes the there were lines. That were not crossed back then. I mean chances and stuff like that and they they definitely probably got onto your skin right probably worse today and usually think it was more of a magazine would come in. Ebony magazine would come in and say you know. Can we shoot you at home or and you know there was a story that was behind it and maybe the attorneys would go yet. It's good idea. Let's let's push that you know. Yeah we've always been around cameras for yourself. It's often family. What kind of things interested you would sort of you know? In the days I was in boarding school in Massachusetts so I I've always been a fan of black and white. I never learned how to process color and of course slides for the first things. You sort of learned. I never learned how to process but I was always into the dynamic of black and white so with the snow in Massachusetts. There was always the lights and shadows and you can stream you know falling through the ice no save. The camera saved the camera. Shot landscapes mostly landscapes. And then I shot everything and then as I got older and could start a fording stuff. I actually stopped shooting for a while and then when Sam. I got married thirty five years ago. Sam gave me my first Yoeskamnoer. I had by then already onto Canon cameras. But you know hey a one and the that great but then Sam gave me my first Kammer after maybe not shooting for ten years and we went on our honeymoon to Italy and I just shot like crazy like bags and bags film was carrying at the time. Kodak made what was called recording fill in the recording. Four seventy five four and as soon as you develop it would turn into a corkscrew that you can never hold flat that I didn't know because by then I wasn't processing okay but Three hundred you could you. Could you could set the The whatever you wanted I mean you couldn't with any film but this was if you decided to shoot at or if you wanted to shoot one hundred thirty two hundred or sixty four hundred. Just remember what you shot that at and you'd process it like if I shot four hundred three sixty I process it at four hundred by shoot at three sixty and I mean the detail was. It's crazy it's like mega pixels eight thousand and I just fell in love with that and then when Kodak stopped making it because they said well you know nobody's buying it because it was twelve dollars a roll and I know buying it. No please keep making and then shortly after you know film just kind of went by the wayside and now it's coming back. Is it coming back to us? Sales were up twenty percent last year. So you now actually have to try and find a film camera. I still actually have a rebel. Okay okay isn't it rebel? Originally rebels were killed. What was called the digital rebel? No megapixel but I did have for the Canon thirty and I was started shooting movies of Friends of mine. Who were directors said? Would you shoot stills movie and I remember get going into get a sound blimp made for my digital camera and the guys in you and Steven Spielberg's guy or the only people that have blimps for you. These eight thirty eight sixty. Whatever I add albertson blimp. Right Jacobsen Jacobsen recently closed down. There's no need for any other. No ex- exactly. I've got this this whole box downstairs in the garage is because like don't need the blimp. Next time lenses by the I worked on a movie as recently as Twenty fifteen and with a digital camera and they recorded a blimp ahead to go rent one. I mean even even that little clique. If you're onset now we have an issue thousand frames so that one was especially digital you shoot so fast. The first movie I did shoot I had asked me me. Leaders a friend of mine and she also is the executive producer and director of the morning. Show but at the time going back. You know fifteen twenty years. Whenever it was that I was shooting this I said to her. You know this is the first time shooting for a movie. What she's just keeps shooting shoot. Shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot so I did. I shot eight thousand seven hundred and seventy eight frames and thought okay. You know. I'm their mom. Put them all and give them. And then oh no we just need your best hundred. It took me like three weeks to go through every single one of those because I really looked like I was shooting movie. Everything was so slightly different. They know what would you take away from that experience? Really get an editor back to that five role mentality you know. They'll have a budget for three to five roles. And that's what you did shooting digital change anything when you when you shoot because obviously it did change a lot for a lot of people in this idea of shooting maybe too much or a lot or just the freedom they can give you. Some really changed a lot of people's now you know everything is it cyclical now. I've barely picked up my camera now. Also have a Sony seven hours and shooting with my Samsung Galaxy's the galaxy the first galaxy thing. I had a four note for one of the earlier. Ones the best pictures I've ever seen. I went on my God. Look at these pictures that I'm getting on my phone and now I have a lot of my family's mostly apple. Nothing you know not against apple but galaxies have much better pictures you know the Samsung just really has the better technology shooting with your phone and I know friends of mine even say your pictures are so much better than mine. Why is that slow data Samsung if Samsung only made and take get another phone? Get Your Samsung Stolz. But I still like I still like the weight of having a camera and shooting the cameras a different different animal. But now you know. There's a difference for photographers. I never was would call professional photography gallery shows and stuff but I'm not like Greg Gorman. Who was a friend of mine? I didn't shoot and I'm not making money like that as a photographer. And right now so many you can take so many pictures. I mean anybody can get good picture with their phone. You know you can. It's easier to get good pictures now than it used to be. You know you'd have to have a professional photographer do that. Well now I you know people take headshots their phones movies with your eyes. You can do anything. Us forces us to kind of rethink what I should be taking pictures of. And how many pictures should be taking reassessed kind of the nature of it and that's happening. I think you know this return to film. We're seeing people kind of wanting to slow back down a little bit trying to figure out what what's the basis of it. That's really what it is. It's it's a medium. It's like if you're an oil painter if you're into acrylics or if you're doing you know pencil drawings if you're into sculpture it's a it's all worthy it's just a matter of what your taste isn't what it is that you're shooting at that

Samsung Harry Canon SAM Massachusetts Sherry Apple Kodak Trenton Center Director Ebony Magazine Jose Lycos Greg Gorman United States Matic Jacobsen Jacobsen Steven Spielberg
"jacobsen" Discussed on No Laying Up

No Laying Up

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on No Laying Up

"Here's our interview with Peter Jacobsen. You were talking about how you can't believe you don't feel like one of the older guys. I feel like one of the older guys I started at age. Twenty two back back in seventy seven and forty four years. It's it's ridiculous how it's flown by have been so lucky to have played with all the great players in the game have been around embiid in got gotten to know them all as good friends and I look on their accomplishments with with great admiration sure management but getting to know them as well as I have is the fun part. It's still I don't feel like an old guy. Well it's I one of the questions I have for you. This will start right off the bat that you get the benefit of hindsight now for your whole career was something you wish you knew what you would you would have done differently. Something maybe figured out late in life but if you had a chance to change something Gulf wise about your career what would you change. I would have worked harder my short game coming out of Portland Portland. Oregon grew up in Portland Played University of Oregon. But I only worried about ball striking. I worried about him all the fairway eating Greens and my didn't work my short org game enough and only in the later part of my career. Did I really focus on my short game. Pitching chipping bunker play putting. I think I would've live. I think I would have had a probably a few more wins in a better career. Had I worked on my short game in fact whenever I do clinic amateurs and juniors. I'm always stressing. Go Go work on your short game. Because it's going to save you some of the greatest players in the history of the Game Tiger Phil Sevi- styles mid crenshaw..

The energy efficiency industry is growing

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

The energy efficiency industry is growing

"In twenty eighteen almost two and a half are they are well paid domestic jobs nair in every town every state and their jobs that are not going to go away Leeza Jacobsen is president of the Business Council for sustainable energy she says the efficiency industry continues to expand according to the US energy and employment report more than seventy five thousand new energy efficiency jobs were added last year with even faster growth projected this year. Jacobson says that growth has come with a wider range of opportunities for job seekers the energy sector jobs are very different now they're very integrated with computer science and the very systems oriented. did they require everything from engineers to installers and there's an opportunity for everybody so she says it's important that young people be prepared I think it's really important that our education system start early and encourage all levels of interest in energy

Leeza Jacobsen Jacobson United States Business Council President Trump
"jacobsen" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Thirty Jacobsen is out on assignment in DC navy's involved. More got teaching the class somewhere. He's probably having a good time. Hopefully, you staying warm but today with me on the show. I have John O'Donnell, which is awesome. We just had a great segment where John was actually able to spend a little bit of time. We're talking about multiple directions inside of the market sort of how to generate consistent income whether the markets are going up whether the markets are going down, and what was that direction? Again, John sideways rather than the markets are going sideways, if you're just tuning in your first time listener, maybe you've been with us for the whole show get excited the best is yet to come. And John a lot of our listeners are looking to replace their income with trading and investing and a lot are looking to upgrade the lifestyle right where it's almost time for those New Year's resolutions. Right. Some are just looking to supplement their income, and I've even had students come out to half day class. I'm sure you've had this before too. You've taught a ton of them and they've come out, and they said, you know, their goal is to fire their boss, and really when I hear somebody say that I just think that means they want to really be one hundred percent in control of their their choices. And their their their time. I guess in life. Now, what are some of the things when you're out of the half day class, or when you're working with students, whether they are brand new students whether they've been with us for for for years and years, what are the some of the things that you really focus on with people who are looking to generate more income, and and maybe touch on the passive income side of things she started on that a little bit in our last segment, and then even under the active income side of things what are some of those key points for people who want to generate more income. Well, the biggest thing we're seeing in our seminars. So he's the one percent at Ryan is that robotics is having a big impact on the formation of jobs. Now, we've heard that our unemployment rate today is about three and a half percent. The problem is is the people in the workforce have dropped out. And therefore, the denominator has changed. And therefore, it looks pretty good. But the problem is McKenzie. Did a study on this is that it's estimated over the next twenty years Ryan that as much as fifty percent of the job unit. As we know them defined today will disappear due to robotics or mechanization. They make I thought was kind of a tongue in cheek joke. But it really isn't. If you think about it. I think you'll like this. They say the factory that future will have three things a dog a man and a robot. Now, the robot Saturday do all the work. The man is there to feed the dog. And of course, the dog is there to keep the man away from the robot. Yep. So at the end of the day, if you think about this what I'm finding in our classes, the primary motivation of people turning to learn to engage in the capital markets shoot trading and investing either actively or passively is they want mobility. They want the opportunity to participate in bull and bear markets or even flat markets, but they want the ability to pack this onto a laptop or in some cases, even a little ipad and be mobile, and because many of these markets trade twenty four hours a day seven days a week, and you can be highly productive which just a little bit of bandwidth that you might pick up using. A Cup of coffee from Starbucks on a nice long weekend, and you can be outrageously productive and produce supplemental. Art, maybe even evolved to primary source of income. But don't give up your primary source of income right now. Learn these skills use them to complement your lifestyle and build diversified. Streams have been come. That's what people wanted today's economic environment. Yeah. Absolutely. And that the whole thought of hanging onto your primary source of income. You know, when when we when we do research on multiple streams of income. I mean, heck when you do research on on millionaires in the average millionaire out there, you see that they have at least five streams of income on average some have more. Right. So when you look at what your what your job is which is your primary source of income, then you can have trading. You can have different different ways of generating come inside of trading, passive income opportunities active income opportunities derivatives dividends there's all sorts of ways where we can generate income there. Now, you can build multiple streams of income very very quickly. The thing that I completely agree with you on. There is is don't just cut one of those income streams, right? One of the things that we've noticed from from some of our students coming in just looking to add that extra stream of income is even they didn't like their job so much. But now that they don't have to have that job. They pick a job that they actually really liked because they're not solely reliant on that job for their income. 'cause they have multiple streams of income. It's all about it's all about doing the things that we love rather than just doing the things that we have to do. It's one of the reasons why job J O.

John O'Donnell Ryan Jacobsen Starbucks J O one hundred percent twenty four hours fifty percent twenty years one percent seven days
"jacobsen" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Power trading radio. Now back to the show. Welcome back, if you're just tuning in, you miss, Johnny. Oh, that's right. I've got the rainmaker with me today. Very Jacobsen is out on assignment in DC. Maybe he's involved more. I don't know. I know he's out teaching a class somewhere. He's probably having a good time. Hopefully, you staying warm but today with me on the show. I have John O'Donnell, which is awesome. We just had a great segment where John was actually able to spend a little bit of time. We're talking about multiple directions inside of the market as far as how to generate consistent income, whether the markets are going up whether the markets are going down, and what was that third direction? Again, John rather than the markets are going sideways if you're just tuning in. Maybe your first time listener, maybe you've been with us for the whole show get excited the best is yet to come and John a lot of our listeners are looking to replace their income with trading investing and a lot are looking to upgrade the lifestyle right where it's almost time for those New Year's resolutions. Right. And some are just looking to supplement their income, and I've even had students come out to a half day class. I'm sure you've had this before too. You've taught a ton of them and they've come out, and they said, you know, their goal is to fire their boss, and really when I hear somebody say that I just think. That means they want to really be one hundred percent in control of their their choices and their time. I guess in life. Now, what are some of the things when you're out at a half day class, or when you're working with students, whether their brand new students whether they've been with us for for for years and years, what are the some of the things that you really focus on with people who are looking to generate more income, and maybe touch on the passive income side of things you started on that a little bit in our last segment, and then even onto the active income side of things what are some of those key points for people who want to generate more income. Well, the biggest thing we're seeing in our seminars. So he's the one percent at Ryan is that robotics is having a big impact on the formation of jobs. Now, we've heard that our unemployment rate today is about three and a half percent. The problem is is the people in the workforce have dropped out. And therefore, the denominator has changed. And therefore, it looks pretty good. But the problem is McKenzie. Did a study on this is that. It's estimated over the next twenty years Ryan that as much as fifty percent of the job units, as we know them defined today will disappear due to robotics or mechanization. They make I thought was kind of a tongue in cheek joke. But it really isn't. If you think about it. I think you'll like this. They say the factory the future will have three things a dog a man and a robot. Now, the robot Saturday do all the work. The man is there to feed the dog. And of course, the dog is there to keep the man away from the robot. Yep. So at the end of the day, if you think about this what I'm finding in our classes, the primary motivation of people turning to learn to engage in the capital markets who trading and investing either actively or passively is they want mobility. They want the opportunity to participate in bull and bear markets are even flat markets, but they want the ability to pack this onto a laptop or in some cases, even a little ipad and be mobile, and because many of these. Markets trade twenty four hours a day seven days a week, and you can be highly productive which just a little bit of bandwidth that you might pick up using a Cup of coffee from Starbucks on a nice long weekend, and you can be outrageously productive and produce supplemental. Art, maybe even evolved to primary source of income, but don't give up your primary source of income right now. Learn these skills use them to complement your lifestyle and build diversified. Streams have been come. That's what people wanted today's economic environment. Yeah. Absolutely. And the whole thought of hanging onto your primary source of income. You know, when when we when we do research on multiple streams of income. I mean, heck when you do research on on millionaires, and the average millionaire out there, you see that they have at least five streams of income on average some have more, right? So when you look at what your what your job is which is your primary source of income, then you can have trading different different ways of generating income side of trading, passive income opportunities, active income opportunities. Derivatives dividends. There's all sorts of ways where we can generate income there, you can build multiple streams of income very very quickly. The thing that I completely agree with you on. There is is just cut one of those income streams right one of the things that we've noticed from from some of our students coming in just looking to add that extra stream of income is even they didn't like their jobs so much. But now that they don't have to have that job. They pick a job that they actually really like because they're not solely reliant on that job for their income because they have multiple streams of income. It's all about it's all about doing the things that we love rather than just doing the things that we have to do. And one of the reasons why job J O Stanford just.

John O'Donnell Ryan Johnny Jacobsen Starbucks DC Stanford one hundred percent twenty four hours fifty percent twenty years one percent seven days
Fed, Bloomberg and Phillips discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

00:13 sec | 2 years ago

Fed, Bloomberg and Phillips discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Radio a source says Toyota Motor is expanding an alliance with Uber technologies through a new investment and. A plan to get self driving cars, on the road the Japanese automaker is investing about five. Hundred million dollars in

FED Bloomberg Phillips United States Chief Economist Catherine Rooney Vera Head Of Research Charlie Pellett Baltic Government Megan Mexico Meghan Green Brian Jacobsen Wells Fargo White House David Morgan Stanley
"jacobsen" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"You got you win when you go back on the road again back to the bay area i think if they don't win obviously thursday night that's you will here's just really cooking casey jacobsen played in the nba is now a college analyst but he really first team all american stanford i will say this again i think he's the only first team all america in stanford basketball history i can't think of it wasn't a first team or now known that college hoop is a little bit more loaded back then what the hell is that what settle left field casey are there we don't do a lot of this guy in here with me got it sir of talk radio with the other guy are you thinking more on you i'm going to have a stipulation written in my contract i only have to do four days a week with you you're so exactly like one guy when you're talking sports is so puts barter than everybody else you're the godfather god a godfather whoever you are anybody calls themselves with godfather's officially jackass what did you say yeah especially if your basically.

casey jacobsen nba analyst stanford basketball four days
"jacobsen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Well we have a little bit of a traffic problem by hitting down towards the kate we also have joe stapleton its duty to tell us what's gone on nato either one of the five south on her first stop here right by exit two that's routes 58 in wareham we have some wires apparently down across the highway and the highway has been shut down as one of the five south of exa to that's route fifty eight in wareham so if you stuck in that backup can off at route fifty eight than you would take route 28 southbound the one 195 north we could rejoin route forty five on route twenty five northbound at the accident scene some wires of there as well two left lanes were blocked off in that spot so again both directions route 25 expect delays are trying to avoid the wareham area any could be awhile it may be ah i joe thanks very much coming in and cuban us up to date joe we'll have another traffic report coming up at eleven on three three you betcha all right we're going to get to phone calls now for my guest professor william jacobsen he is a law professor at cornell and he has been really chronicling the the career of our senior senator from massachusetts and obviously professor i think she's doing this in anticipation of her run in 2020 and to kind of get the issue out of the way but i didn't find her speech on wednesday particularly persuasive i just i just uh i wanted to hear a more fulsome explanation and adjusted do it from makes let's see what frank an aaron others have to say frank in air you are next first this hour nights side professor william jacobs go ahead friday thank you.

joe stapleton wareham exa william jacobsen cornell senator massachusetts william jacobs professor frank
"jacobsen" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

Hollywood And Crime

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

"Greg jacobsen had been impressed by charlie manson though his musical gifts might still have been raw he was a charismatic figure with his own brand of philosophy the lyrics to his often spontaneously improvise songs were original even compelling the police were interested in talking to the talent scout because he had been the one to introduce manson to record producer terri melchor who owned the c l o dr property when la pd sergeant frank patchett ask jacobsen if he knew a family member named charles tex montgomery jacobsen nodded but taxes last name wasn't montgomerie it was watson on november 30th deputy d a bully olshey ran a check and discovered that a charles denton watson had been arrested in van nuys on a drug charge on april 23rd when watson's fingerprints taken at the time of his booking matched one of the leighton's found at the tate residence it was the first piece of physical evidence tying a manson family member to the murders teams of detectives were sent out to watson's former addresses with no luck in but when they checked his hometown of mckinney texas sheriff tom montgomery told them watson was living in a small apartment downtown in fact the sheriff was well acquainted with charles watson they were second cousins montgomery being a family name text sometimes used rather than sending officers to pick up the murder suspect sheriff montgomery called texas uncle maurice who picked up his nephew and delivered him to the local jail later that same sunday sorry.

Greg jacobsen charlie manson jacobsen charles denton watson van nuys leighton tate residence sheriff montgomery producer terri melchor frank patchett charles tex montgomery jacobse mckinney texas murder texas
"jacobsen" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"Now jacobsen writes in a peace and this is why titled the show this today i put this a gone tissues me title shows what happened last night i put it in the show notes that eight other article which is brilliant one are we in the middle of a constitutional crisis and its its core focuses this piece by jacobsen where he lists out four or five bullet points that make a pretty strong case joe the we're in the middle of a very serious crisis in the republic right now and i don't i don't know i don't understand how the democrats want to proceed forward i mean what what's their next step arresting the political opposition i mean i'm serious if this rock thing is real and there was some plan or path forward to interrupt the trump election based on fbi leadership in their management of two cases making the clinton email investigation go away in the trump bogus trump russia investigation heat up we have a serious problem now he points out a couple things here is his points about how we're in a constitutional crisis right now number one he says the apparent set up of the incoming administration on a phony logan act violation folks this is something we've talked about over and over and over again it appears based on writings i've seen by byron york at washingtonexaminer based on the evidence out there the logan act which says that private citizens cannot conduct foreign affairs which foreign governments it is a nonsense ridiculous tre it is folks listen to me the logan act has never been successfully charged ever in the history of the republic ever ever to anyone.

jacobsen joe byron york washingtonexaminer fbi clinton russia logan
"jacobsen" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"Now jacobsen writes in a peace and this is why titled the show this today i put this a gone tissues me title shows what happened last night i put it in the show notes that eight other article which is brilliant one are we in the middle of a constitutional crisis and its its core focuses this piece by jacobsen where he lists out four or five bullet points that make a pretty strong case joe the we're in the middle of a very serious crisis in the republic right now and i don't i don't know i don't understand how the democrats want to proceed forward i mean what what's their next step arresting the political opposition i mean i'm serious if this rock thing is real and there was some plan or path forward to interrupt the trump election based on fbi leadership in their management of two cases making the clinton email investigation go away in the trump bogus trump russia investigation heat up we have a serious problem now he points out a couple things here is his points about how we're in a constitutional crisis right now number one he says the apparent set up of the incoming administration on a phony logan act violation folks this is something we've talked about over and over and over again it appears based on writings i've seen by byron york at washingtonexaminer based on the evidence out there the logan act which says that private citizens cannot conduct foreign affairs which foreign governments it is a nonsense ridiculous tre it is folks listen to me the logan act has never been successfully charged ever in the history of the republic ever ever to anyone.

jacobsen joe byron york washingtonexaminer fbi clinton russia logan
"jacobsen" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

"Greg jacobsen had been impressed by charlie manson though his musical gifts might still have been raw he was a charismatic figure with his own brand of philosophy the lyrics to his often spontaneously improvise songs were original even compelling the police were interested in talking to the talent scout because he had been the one to introduce manson to record producer terri melchor who owned the c l o dr property when la pd sergeant frank patch it asked jacobsen if he knew a family member named charles tex montgomery jacobsen nodded but taxes last name wasn't montgomerie it was watson on november 30th deputy de a bully olshey ran a check and discovered that a charles and denton watson had been arrested in van nuys on a drug charge on april 23rd when watson's fingerprints taken at the time of his booking matched one of the leighton's found at the tate residence it was the first piece of physical evidence tying a manson family member to the murders teams of detectives were sent out to watson's former addresses with no luck in but when they checked his hometown of mckinney texas sheriff tom montgomery told them watson was living in a small apartment downtown in fact the sheriff was well acquainted with charles watson they were second cousins montgomery being a family name tech sometimes used rather than sending officers to pick up the murder suspect sheriff montgomery called texas uncle maurice who picked up his nephew and delivered him to the local jail later that same sunday sorry.

sheriff montgomery texas murder mckinney texas denton watson charles tex montgomery jacobse jacobsen terri melchor producer Greg jacobsen charles watson tate residence leighton watson van nuys charles charlie manson
"jacobsen" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"I don't care where you stand on this issue this should bother you bothers me on i think it's consistent with the way jacobsen has approach the entire debate over 100 percent renewables if you disagree with them you blache his aau he questions your integrity and funding or he blocks you on twitter and this is an issue that belongs in the pages of academic journals not in a courtroom we just had this conversation at the beginning of the show about the threat that scientists are facing and when a you know a wellknown researcher has to resort to this kind of lawsuit because of a well argued peerreviewed critique of his work again whether you agree with or not we should be equally alarmed i think mark jacobsen has become the donald trump of our industry i i think that that that is a fairer characterization didn't he didn't donald trump's sue bill maher for calling in a rang at tang yeah and you know he threatened a lot of journalists and from what i understand one of the only journalist he's ever sued was a person who claimed that his net worth was lower than he said so he's taken a beating in you know journalists have found out all sorts of salacious things about him in his career and he's never followed through the lawsuit and must someone has actually questioned how much he's worth the though i just i i feel bad i think mark jacobsen's a good man and i i certainly have worked collaboratively with them in the past but i think his actions after this paper have just been mystifying to me i think he literally did nothing like life which is go on.

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"jacobsen" Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Fore Play

"Dollar shave club is the smarter choice get a great shave at agape great price conveniently delivered right to your door it's an awesome life back in a no brainer choice he no longer have to slept to the store to buy a cheap disposal raised that can give you a cheap shave or spend a fortune enraged with gimmicky shaving tech you don't need and when i use my dollar shave club executive razor with their doctor carvers shea butter the blades gently glides giving me such a smooth shave their doctor carver shea butter is transparent for more precise shave helps prevent ingrown harrison fights razor bums you too can make a smarter choice by joining dollar shave club for a limited time new members get their first month of the executive razor with the two of their doctor cover shea butter for only five dollars with free shipping after that razor just a few bucks a month that's a fifteen dollars value for only five bucks in your first month box you get an awesome weighty handle a focus at a four cartridges and a tube of their shave butter after your first month replacement cartridges ship automatically at the recco regular price they're no hidden fees no commitments cancel anytime you like you can only give this offer exclusively at dollarshaveclub dot com slash four f o r e that's dollarshaveclub dot com slash four f o r e go get your razors we are now joined by peter jacobsen for those of you don't know he is of course a tower analysts for nbc sports is coverage of the pga tour going to be a big part of the coverage for the remainder the fedex cup playoffs we got the deltec analogies chamionship the bmw of course the door chamionship uh also it'll be big part of the presidents cup coming up at the end of the month which were all pumped about you can find him this weekend he'll be out of tpc boston friday saturday on golf channel sunday and monday on nbc mr jacob's in how are you sir i'm good how are you guys today we're doing really well we digits put you on hold so we very much apologize for that that says that's are bad.

peter jacobsen boston mr jacob executive harrison nbc fifteen dollars five dollars
"jacobsen" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"See originally screen test with syria but serra was unavailable in new york so i came back to read with our producers brad simpson a nina jacobsen in los angeles and had you find out you got it of simone the lot for a while while they were talking amongst themselves read after the dish ran after the also whenever you would go in for the call yet for the call backer i dunno if it's to test or what how right but i'm looking around the see what other people they brought in for this use the three or four people and i'm sitting in the lobby i'm looking at every brother the walks by some light scan cats these dudes with dr mike other really thinking outside of the eyewitness shaved my head larry i knew they were going to any so open but basically those are just dues working and fox i was the only person that they called back allow so they come out and they talk to me for a while and the one thing that being a mouse angeles's has taught me is that as soon as you enter the space you had a character because there's this real desire to find the guy out he was just him like there was no acting it was just ten night in new york you can sort of show them my guy this is what i've worked on tell me what you think like oh man it's beautiful you transition in and out of sterling to whatever it is that you're doing i just tried to show is darden and make them think that sterling was done and they talked me for like a half hour about my time at stanford when the trial was happening in my experience of it and then so i go okay you want to read samples lecture let's go read read the scenes and brad would give me direction and then we'd read the scene again and nina would be sitting on the couch looking at it and the whole time nina were just rock back and forth and.

syria new york nina jacobsen los angeles larry stanford serra brad simpson simone fox darden
"jacobsen" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:31 min | 4 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And and those of winning only voice fitzgerald rick kogan shattered walter jacobsen golan would the trace icl suicide the news tony in india he will be back on is my great pleasure to have alone my old friend a terrific singer producer and darryl nitz i'm going to call you now in impresario do you mind if i think get badly learn debt yeah you work your way into it in an august ten 1958 ella fitzgerald recorded ele at mr kelly's of an elderly years they called them in those days it is taken on darrell a the look the status of legendary has it not yet so much bad of others they they wouldn't about this conflict there is a recording if people do break don't like forget elite mall hours of the morning was going little is like only recorded toys your career in the first time she recorded her cross on the alamo air and because carlos was also the first time that she did a tanker your gary lauck club yeah it done in all lied punctured with big or struggled but you know they they they did this which is the trio yeah well here at length when she wouldn't it was her ninetieth birthday backing of a d o oh two thousand suddenly relief like an extended you know he di with things that were never on the lp colleague lately did with the judy carnegie hall way leading when did you get darrell nitz the notion to do as you are doing a show next sunday at seven thirty at these gochi theater which is a fine fine venue l alive at missed your recreating the concert i will live and mr kelly's antennas celebration concert for elephants shared when did this idea come to you and how'd you pull it together okay so i've been doing conscious like built in two thousand four first thing ever did was a judy garland recreation when they when it kinda remains jimbo it just think dan i've only done showed that might eat a hundred birthday laura i did a john lennon 75 you know but there's actually a lot of people that.

rick kogan walter jacobsen golan darryl nitz mr kelly carlos gochi theater judy garland recreation john lennon producer ella fitzgerald judy carnegie hall dan
"jacobsen" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"jacobsen" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Does influence decisions that you make on what you deploy and you need to figure out know do we want what's the vision for your future do we want as zero carbon future and then what are the policies we have to put into place in jacobsen's list of policies are you know are pretty much standard codes and standards incentivizing landlord investment in efficiency promoting incentives municipal incentives for if energy efficiency energy supply measures like rpii says production tax credits incentivizing energy storage utility planning an incentive structures and then transportation in an industrial processes i mean teo you rates these are not outside the box really policies so if someone were to take his paper and say i wonder what the policies are that i could put in a place to really start me moving down this path his policies are not really outrageous the one thing he doesn't have in here the interestingly was that there would none of his policies increase research and development so that peace is not in here and in if you really want to get to some of these technologies and have them work like hab ccs work or have some of this advanced nuclear work you really need to focus on the rd piece of it why also think the that this sort of libertarian approach to policy is in a sort of belies what has worked and when you look it for instance in massachusetts where they had the massachusetts technology collaborative which legislation passed 1980 eight rob was basically anti solar for most of his tenure and so none of the money was used because none of the other technologies rushie prepared to.

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