24 Burst results for "Jacob Weisberg"

Being Victimized by Scams is Solvable [Test]

Solvable

04:38 min | 5 months ago

Being Victimized by Scams is Solvable [Test]

"Episodes are out every friday. This is solvable. I'm jacob weisberg there. Only a few real cons that exist and the bones of the story are the same and they've been the same for centuries also maria conaco. Vince would writing about these number of years book. The confidence game explores stories of con-artists opportunists people who build up our trust and then take everything we have think bernie madoff the late investors who destroyed countless lives with false promises and financial theft but before we pledged to fight to abolish scams. Remember this another side to those familiar. Stories to the flip side of our vulnerability to cons is human connection and trust and all the good stuff. So how do we protect our loved ones in ourselves. We'll scams being enduring part of society forever because we refuse or are unable to learn from our mistakes rather than admitting i was dumb. I felt for a scam you say. Oh no no cure all of the mitigating circumstances and it probably wasn't even a scam. So i think that it takes a strong person. It's embarrassing So can scams be solved. Rea- konakov thanks so being victimized by a scam is actually a solvable problem. Maria has gone from investigating the lies. We tell ourselves to mastering the bluff herself by learning to play poker at a world class level and writing about that too so i started by asking her why she so hooked on these concepts of big and small manipulations. My first book was about sherlock holmes. So i've traveled this gamut from you know. How do you be detective to okay. What are the what are the bad guys doing to kind of being the bad guy myself but within a game right so so so there are rules And one of the reasons that i've that it's been such a passion of mine is that i hate to see in re in reality. Not in a game. I hate to see people being taken advantage of. And how often that happens. And how scammers often will target the most vulnerable parts of our population the most vulnerable people and then we as a society target again by blaming them and by saying oh well. You're just stupid. You were just greedy. You were just dumb. You shouldn't have fallen for it. I wouldn't have fallen for it and that just gets me. Yeah well i was going to ask you because of your longstanding interest. I mean this personal for you in any way of you've been scammed yourself or people close to you been victims of scams. I personally have not been scammed. That i know of but one point i always make is that you know. The scams are ones that you're probably not aware of so i. i'm sure i've been scammed on small things and when you're about to get on the subway someone stops you and says hey you know. I'm so sorry. I lost my wallet. Do you have the fair for the subway for the bus for the train. I need to get back to my family. And there's so many excuses and you can do one of two things you can say. I think you're con artist. I'm not going to give you any money on. Walk on you feel shitty. You feel like a bad person because they actually needed you. I've lost my wallet. I've needed help in the past. And i think we bought we probably been on the other side of that and so the trade off is yom maybe get scammed. But i'd rather take the risk of being the victim of scammer in that particular instance and. I'm sure i've been scammed that way. Well that's interesting. I mean i have experienced instill sticks with me from high school. I remember in chicago where i was growing up walking through lincoln park and there was a guy kinda ragged looking walking with a gas can and he stopped me and told me this whole sad story about how he was trying to get back to florida to see a family card run out of gas and he needed the money for gas. Now was probably fifteen years old or something like that. I think i gave him ten dollars. Which would have been a lot of money to me. At the time and i felt good about myself for doing that and then a week later i was walking through the park and there was the same guy looking around with this gas can And it just it sticks with

Jacob Weisberg Maria Conaco Bernie Madoff Vince REA Sherlock Holmes Maria Lincoln Park Chicago Florida
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

04:06 min | 7 months ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Solvable

"So nathan. tell me what's an algorithm algorithms can be thought of as a recipe. A series of steps often programmed into a computer that determine how machine behaves but the challenge as any cook often fines. Is that when you put them out into the world especially something of sufficient complexity. They often behave in ways. That are different from what we expect. Can you just take a minute to explain how that's problematic. And why why should we care. That algorithms are deciding which piece of content you see on facebook or which which video you're being recommended on. Youtube algorithms happen at all levels from exactly how the electrons go from one point to another on the internet to the much more high level things that we think about in our direct experience for example an algorithm determines what your email inbox decides is spam an on twitter decides which faces to show when it's displaying a photo and algorithms also and critically make decisions about what information to prioritize when showing us feeds on facebook on twitter when determining which adds we see which adds we don't and those are often some of the uses of algorithms that people worry about in society and policy circles. Youtube makes a recommendation system to help us find the videos. We like and suddenly were worrying about recommendations of extremism. Microsoft makes fun chattan that will have interesting conversations with you and now we're worrying about it learning racism and hatred so we find that although we have these simple building blocks of an algorithm that an engineer can imagine they often grow to be something larger than we might admit initially imagine i've written and others have written about the problem of algorithms on facebook favorite is ing or preferring content and posts that are emotional that are negatives that are divisive. There's been an argument. That that's one of the reasons why we have so much division and polarization in our societies that we are being fed more and or excitable an angry content because the algorithm tests and guesses that. That's what we're gonna wanna see or anyway. That's what's going to keep us online or keep us using facebook. Is it accurate. Is that how they work. We do live in a world where many of the systems that determined what we see. And to give our attention to our learning from our behavior our preferences and from the collective behavior of many others some of who are paying some of them have motivated coordinated campaigns to influence those our them's and they're adapting in real time and so because we've never really faced a situation like this at such scale. People have a lot of concerns about how those algorithms are behaving and what they're doing to society one of the fundamental challenges. I think scientists are still wrestling with. Is this challenge of influence. Typically if a car crashes because there's say a faulty drivetrain we can point to the engineering and say there's a problem with this system. With these adaptive systems they're reacting and learning and responding to human society and human behavior and we're still developing the scientific tools to understand what it means to have those feedback loops and in the meantime we have to live in a world where these things very real power

jacob weisberg
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Solvable

"I wanted to star. . With a really dumb obvious question, , which is, , can you describe to me all the ways in which you can look for the presence of virus that you would be? ? Well, , that's not an obvious question at all. . Within each virus viruses just like. . Any other thing they have a genetic code, , and then they have a bunch of proteins and the genetic code of a virus is Arnie, , which is akin to a human's DNA, , and so the same way that you could do a forensic investigation of a crime scene and use DNA defined if there was a human specific human at the crime scene, , you can do a forensic investigation to look for Ra to know if there was an inside of a person so. That's . one way and that's this tool that these molecular tools that we call PCR, , and then there's a different way instead of using the genetic makeup and the Arna to look for the virus. . In this case, , you could actually look for the proteins that make up the virus and that's where these antigen tests really shine. . So you can either look for the genetic code or you could look for the proteins I like to call these rapid antigen tests, , transmission indicating tests. . There's one other major way which is a quickly and that's to. . Look for the immunological response to the virus, , because humans are good at making immune response to viruses. . So it's a different way and that's antibody based detection but that's I put it in a whole different category because it usually comes after infection. . Yeah. . So the first way looking for the aren a is the kind of gold standard that's exactly right and so if I go to the hospital and get a today, , get a Cova test, , the looking for giving me the using to see if I have fires in my system that's right and what's the cheapest that a PC tests could produce result that actual price of tests can be done for about six bucks maybe. . Even less so it can be really cheap, , but the differences, , the whole infrastructure around PCR test they have to be done in labs. . So you have logistics of transport you have all of the people working in the lab robots and and so generally, , it really drives the cost up and as we've seen the average test costs anywhere from thirty dollars at the absolute low end up to one hundred and fifty dollars for some labs that are charging in contrast be CR, , two antigen tests. . How do engine chess? ? What do they look like? ? What's their cost in time profile they? ? They look like a pregnancy test and they work like a pregnancy test actually they can be made. . A little piece of paper generally speaking. . You put some of the sample whether that be some swab that's been mixed with some saline solution or saliva onto a paper strip, , and it shows up with a line turns either for example, , red if it's positive or blue, , it's negative and those can be made in the in huge numbers. . They don't require instruments they don't usually require. . There's a few on the market right now that to get the. . Sensitivity at the FDA wanted they have some instrumentation associated but in reality, , these are used for malaria strep for all these different infections they've been around for very long time and they can be done just on a piece of paper and five minutes and they could get down to you can produce them for fractions of a dollar and they might be sold to the public or built by the government for. . A dollar apiece or something along those lines. . So you're you've been a the perhaps the leading public proponent public health proponent of. . Using Antigen, tests , much more broadly to fight this. . Derek and I wanted to the first time I. . Heard you give this argument you convince me about two minutes. . And I still don't understand why why don't we have this system because I can imagine a world where if it's this if they're cheaper easy, , then you know every kid before they went to school in the morning. . Would take one of these fifty cents or one dollar tests, , and if they were positive, , they would say home in their negative we would know that could go to school like. . If, , I want to go to a restaurant, , why can't I just sat stand investable the restaurant take test and wait for my response and if I'M If I'm negative I get to go to the restaurant it just strikes me as. . This is a way to get going again. . Why are we not doing this? ? Can you explain that I can I have a few theories I. . mean they're not just theories. . They're they're. . In the middle of this. . So these tests because of this whole sensitivity issue early in March or really in January the world decided that was the gold standard for these tests and I don't think and I that this will maybe come. . We'll come across wrong for some people but there hasn't been enough thought place into what exactly does the PR test mean, , and is it the right gold standard? ? The only pathway that we have to evaluate tests like this in the United States are medical diagnostic pathways there pathways designed specifically to ensure that a physician like a detective is getting all of the information they need to diagnose a sick person in front of them so it's really been. . First and foremost a regulatory hurdle we have so devalued and de funded public health across our country and really across the world. . That we actually didn't, , we don't have a regulatory pathway to approve test whose primary objective is is one of stopping an epidemic verses one of diagnosing sick person and that has really led. . That's everything up all of the companies that could be producing these these really rapid tests in the millions and millions they have been sitting on these tests trying to hone them trying to get them just a little bit better just a little bit better so that the so that they can pass FDA standards as a medical diagnostic. . It's not just slowing down their approval and getting them out to the public. . It's actually bottle necking the company's into creating tests that are not going to be as scalable because they're having to use more expensive reagents they're starting to put them with instruments and package them more. . They have to actually become more expensive, , highly manufactured tests. . When in reality, , they're just these little pieces of paper. . That if we can do the cheap version of they can be made very fast, , but they just won't get through the FDA at the moment

Jacob Weisberg Michael Minin Kobe malaria Pushkin.
Election Security is (mostly) Solvable

Solvable

05:00 min | 1 year ago

Election Security is (mostly) Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. So you can talk about fake news and propaganda and ASTROTURF ING. All of those things hacked the greater process that conversation around the election. Election meddling undermines with sits at the foundation of American. Democracy confidence in our voting system. Whether hacking takes the form of masking the original source of a campaign message to make it seem like it comes from the grass roots, so called ASTROTURF. For disseminating intentionally false. It all leads Americans to question the legitimacy of the democratic process. In Two thousand sixteen, we discovered russian-backed hackers will responsible for disinformation campaigns in response Congress directed three hundred eighty million dollars to the fifty states to boost election security, but did it really help. Is it useful to compare electoral outcomes to poll results? You're not gonNA believe it right. The problem of voting as opposed to any other computer security mechanism. Is that after the fact? It's part. Is there a problem with the expectation? We have then that the a winner of election ought to be declared immediately, so yes, a slower process would enable us to do more checking before announcing anything. The American people don't like that. Even going to sleep before knowing is bad. With increasingly long election fees I'd sleep better on election hearing the Mike candidate one, but wouldn't we all sleep better knowing that whatever the result it was guaranteed to be accurate. The tech is real tech assault. None of what you've described is exotic or untried. Why is it been so difficult to convince other states to to put in place some of these already available voting techniques. Cause the problems are not technical, the problems or political. Elections security is mostly solvable. Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologists. He teaches cybersecurity at the Harvard Kennedy School. I Co host Malcolm Bradwell talked with Schneier about the threats that loom over the vote this fall when we talk about elections being hacked. What does that mean I'm assuming that there are fifty different things that fall into that category. So we'll talk about the hacking the voting process. It's a process by which you cast your vote. We also talk about hacking the broader electoral process so when the Hack Democratic National Committee and posted a dump a lot of information online. They weren't hacking the vote. They were hacking the overall election process, so you can talk about fake news and propaganda and Astroturf, and those things hacked the greater process that conversation around the election. And that's one very separate branch, the other branches hacking the vote itself or the process by which you and I go to vote and there you have four places where you can affect things sort of affect the outcome. The first registration process. And we've read about and seen different hacks on the voting rolls so that when you go to vote, you can't at that point. This particular kind of hacking. Is it really about taking people off the rolls? A couple of things in California some years ago, people had their party. Affiliation changed from Republican to Democrat. You can change the address of somebody, so they go to vote. And they were told to go to a different Pole, and some of these are easy. Many states have. Online systems to change your registration aren't well indicated. Others is to Pull people off the voting rolls. Others are to erase the voting rolls. What happens if we get to election day? In a certain state in the voting rolls don't work, and we don't know why, so a lot of things against the voting rolls. The second is the thing we talk about all the time. which is vote itself. Is Your vote recorded accurately? The third. Is the tabulation process matter how you vote? There's this sort of automated sort of manual process by which the numbers out of each machine get increasingly aggregated the numbers in the the building the numbers in the precinct, the numbers in the town of the city, the state all the way up to the national, if if that matters. And then the last which I think people don't think about a lot is the reporting process and we have seen, and this was something that we think was thwarted in in twenty eighteen. Erroneous reporting. where the number right, but the press release says the opposite.

Bruce Schneier Astroturf Jacob Weisberg Harvard Kennedy School Hack Democratic National Commi Congress Assault Mike Malcolm Bradwell California
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Solvable

"Kristen Clark is the president and Executive Director of the national lawyers. Committee for Civil Rights under law. The committee was established in Nineteen, sixty, three at the request of president. John F Kennedy to target in particular the inequities confronting African Americans and other minorities. Clark sees the disenfranchisement of millions of American voters central to her work. Here's our conversation. Voter suppression solvable. And we can do it by restoring the Voting Rights Act. And resisting efforts made to deny people access to vote by mail in the midst of the pandemic. You know I think our listeners have at least some familiarity with the old voter suppression the Jim Crow Era. Poll taxes literacy requirements all those things that were supposed to be ended by the Voting Rights Act. But. There's a new voter suppression that we're dealing with. How is it different from the old voter suppression? There like cousins of the old tactics from the Jim Crow. Era, <hes>, long gone are the days of literacy tests and understanding clauses and. Instead what we see today are equally nefarious efforts to make it harder for vulnerable communities to vote polling place consolidations, a literally efforts to shut down the vast majority of polling sites in a community under the guise of wanting to save money or save expense, but in ways that will make literally harder for people to vote on election day we see purging of the voter registration rolls, and it'll be packaged as we're just cleaning up <hes> the roles, but often when you dig D- what you find our efforts to remove African American and Latinos from the Registration Rolls People who are legitimately registered exercise that right and have every right to be there. So why do these kinds of procedural changes rule changes disproportionately affect Black Latino and other minority voters. Our country has a long and sordid history of efforts to deny African Americans access to the franchise. In nineteen, sixty, five on bloody Sunday when peaceful demonstrators including John Lewis were brutally assaulted while crossing the Edmund Pettus bridge in search of in the quest for the right to vote those horrible events gave rise to passage of the voting. Rights Act today that racial histories still looms heavy, and we continue to see states that have built into their DNA this desire, this unfortunate to oppress <hes> people of Color African Americans, and Latinos are growing in number in many parts of the country, and there is a correlation. We often find that it is in those very communities where. People seek to maintain and preserve the status quo <hes> to resist the change in demographics shifts that may be happening in their communities, so this ugly racial history is something that we have to confront that we to air out when we talk about voter suppression, and when we talk about exactly why we need to restore the voting, rights act in have in place once again. It's full protections.

Jacob Weisberg America Pushkin
Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

Solvable

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. There is a lack of accountability for police, violence and one part of. Solving that is to give federal prosecutors more tools, so they can actually prosecute this cases. Approximately a thousand people killed during police encounters in the United States every year. And in fact, that number is held steady for nearly twenty years. Around half of those killed or white. Black Americans are more than twice as likely to die at the hands of police. They are killed disproportionately to their overall representation in the population. I'm thinking about. Say The shooting of Philander Castille. CAPLESS Tamir Rice twelve year, old boy, who was shot and killed by an officer when playing in a park in Cleveland. How do we achieve racial justice while protecting public safety? Lawyer Cheer Baynes believes the federal. Government has a key role to play. What exactly would you like to see? Happen there for Congress to lower the intense standard from willfulness recklessness, so that it would be a federal crime recklessly deprive someone of their rights under color of law to recklessly use excessive force for all the Americans who died during police encounters in less than two percent of cases, does an officer end up being charged with a crime? When you were at Doj how many times did specific language of willful thwart possible prosecution of of an officer? You think you felt a done something wrong. Routinely, that was the biggest barrier. It was always the central concern. Kira. Who's devoted his career to ending impunity for officers who commit crimes against citizens thinks we can fix this. The problem of lack of accountability for police violence is solvable. Cheering Baines is the director of Legal Strategies de Moth a racial justice organization before that he worked at the US Department of Justice, serving a senior counsel to the head the civil. Rights Division, that's the division that investigated. Ferguson Missouri and sued the city for unconstitutional policing and court practices. Baynes Co wrote the Ferguson report. Malcolm Bradwell spoke to Baynes about what needs to be done to solve the persistent problem of police impunity at the national level. To critical components are lowering the intense standard for the federal government to prosecute active excessive force criminally and using federal consent decrees to address systemic misconduct. You've been working on this question of how to make police better for quite some time right? Yes, actually. It's been an issue that's been. An issue that I've been distressed by want to do something about since I was a young kid. Actually the Rodney King case happened in the beating of Rodney King. One thousand, nine, hundred, one I was ten years old, and there are a lot of high profile incidents in the hundred ninety s with I'm dirty, yellow Louima and many other high profile cases of police violence police killings. Finish cared about as a high schooler for sure I can remember that were you in high school Chelmsford High School? It's a small town in Massachusetts next to the city of Lowell, maybe about thirty thousand thirty five thousand people. It wasn't like you were. LIVING IN LA or living in the Bronx where Ahmadou was shot, it was you were these were instance miles away. That nonetheless caught your attention. Absolutely these are national stories and I was very interested in. Civil Rights history even civil rights law. The role of lawyers in the civil rights movement. I think maybe juxtaposed that history and the principles underlying that movement with what I was seeing. Play out in terms of police violence in the country. At that time, and actually can remember. An organization called the stolen lives project that would collect information about the people who have been killed by police, disproportionately young black man. That is something that I recall, so. It's something I've. been working on for a long time ended up working on that some more in law school, focusing on it, and then it on my first job after clerking for a federal judge was to actually prosecute police misconduct cases including police violence. How early on you decide that? You wanted to become a lawyer depressingly early? Han actually I think I thought in high school. That would become a lawyer. What did you think of that decision? Well I'm an Indian kid and the child immigrants and so. I think a lot of people in that boat might relate. My mother wanted me to be a doctor. That would million other Indian children. Yeah Yeah. It's a common refrain and. Short of being a doctor, a lawyer was pretty good, so. But you know my family wasn't focused on these issues. These weren't the issues that they confronted him and they cared about it. In the sense research, generally aware my grandmother used to describe all this work as a community service or volunteer work and I'd have to actually get paid to do this job.

Officer Chelmsford High School Cheer Baynes DOJ Rodney King Jacob Weisberg Rights Division United States Baynes Co Philander Castille Ferguson Missouri Baines Congress Tamir Rice Massachusetts Cleveland Kira LA
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"Two of my oldest friends. Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business Malcolm Jake or now. The CO founders of Pushkin Industries the company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way Pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like Malcolm Zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with Dr Lori. Santos I've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as Malcolm and Jacob started the company so I was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause I don't actually know the story so I would love to know how you decided to start Pushkin shake right it was Jacob's doing star. Well I'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate But as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought I was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started was revisionist history With Malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under a CEO. I'd hired who I thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that I said. Hey maybe it's time. That doc nice started our own company and only do what we WANNA do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where I was somewhere in your Italy. Admittedly and Jacob in some I think if I can tell the truth truly horrible live the villain said and he said he said on that he he summoned and instead we do something crucial need to talk about says I. You don't drove halfway across Italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he re like sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said I want to start a company that began. What did you say yes right away? Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that Jacob has been. I've known Jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say Jacob. I don't know why you want the journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. If you just became a business be you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jamir forgotten. It's but I always worry that if I said that I was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was doing a bad writer and I thought it'd be an even better business fan so I remember you saying this thirty years ago And so. Jake is a wonderful journalist but agreed it. He's they sort of a natural for this sort of thing. He's got the temperament for it. Unlike your do but you know what would surprise me. The thing that can take you back even a little further. It surprised me that you to went off on this podcast jagged first place you both had very happy successful careers in the world. Why did you decide that you wanted to do something different? You know Michael. I'd gotten the bug really in the early days of podcasting at slate were sort of because of a random connection with an NPR show. Slate had been working on. We started making some of the first podcast. Anybody listened to and everybody at slate all the journalists love doing them and there was this little audience small at first but growing that. Just love them and the giveaway was that everybody at slate who didn't have a podcast one of the podcast and they were just a joy to do. So you know. I'm a little evangelical about things I get excited about and I tried to talk Malcolm into doing one and I tried to talk you into doing what and Ultimately talk both of you into doing it. I talked to at first and then I think The fact that he was doing it may have helped to persuade you. It was worse than that. You Got Malcolm to lie to me and say it was easy. You lied but that's all right. We'll I forgive you so you're too old friends. Go into business together. How's it working out? Like how do you find working with each other? You surprised by anything. You finding things out about each other that you didn't know that you wish you didn't know we'll I I. I'm reminded of years ago. I wrote a piece. That was a really about my friendship with Jacob and it was about the idea that I'm what's called Collective memory which is that we outsource a lot of the things we know to our friends and family and I was reading about this. Because the Jacob Jacob who respect and trust so much that significant parts of my knowledge and cognition are simply outsource to Jacob. I was saying I knew longer. Read anything about politics or try and figure out simply ask Jacob what he thinks and adopt those ideas as my own. That was my position and I was sort of joke but it's actually true. It's just a way better way to live your life to make to appoint experts in your friendship circle and outsource everything to them. I do the same thing with my brother and wine and this so this is in business. I've just applied this principle. Which is just let him do all the things that I know. He's better at me. And since that's a rattle longlist means my life is very easy so this is that. True Jacob is there. Are you basically running the business in Malcolm's decoration? No I wouldn't say that I mean I handle more of the day to day. Say but Honestly at this point more the ideas come from Malcolm. And that's that's a bit of an adjustment because I've always thought of myself as the idea person but I'm like a good idea week person. Malcolm's like a five good idea. Day person and so big part of my job now is just like being. Malcolm's filtered try to talk him out of some of the ideas and then try to figure out how some of the others can can happen But these are ideas for shows these ideas for shows these are ideas for new businesses Malcolm. A lot of ideas and the typical day is you know at about eleven. Am He'll call me and say this is so much fun we really don't WanNa get too big too fast. Let's keep it just like it is and I say Malcolm I totally agree with that. This is the good parts. Let's not grow too fast. And then after lunch he'll call me and he said all right. I've got three ideas and each of them would involve like adding like ten new staff members and so if we if we pursued all ideas we'd have six hundred people right now instead of twenty five and that's kind of tension. There's not attention in that. Malcolm I disagree about. I think we're both pulled in both directions liking having a small business. Where were we know everybody? And it's sort of close like a family and we control everything but then all this opportunity and all these good ideas we want to pursue. I'm in these conversations that are you able to see the possibility of a really big business or everything is naturally better as a small business. You you've hit on the the hard part you know. I think we see that we do see the opportunity to be big. I mean I don't know you know when you say really big I mean now it's not. I don't think it's I don't think it's Google did. I don't think facebook big. But in the world of podcasting I think it has the potential to be really pay-setting and dominant But we also want to really really choosy and have everything we make really represent what we're interested in and the quality level. We've set so far so you know I think it's just kind of working out of those. Two things will result in the right size. I honestly don't know what the right size is. We're going to get bigger. It's just a question of how fast we'RE GONNA get bigger Malcolm. Yeah I think would occur to. I think all of us very quickly in this project is experiment. Is that We're not really in the PODCAST business. We're you know it's a cliche. We're in the storytelling business. And we happen to want us to tell stories to audio but that means you can compete against all kinds of like we re. There's no reason why we can't behave like a book publisher in many respects Is just that our books are on our audio not on page but once you realize that well look at book. Publishers there really big I mean. They have thousands of employees. They have so you know concede that way. If you think of yourself being into podcast world you you might think of yourself as being pretty small but if you think of yourself is just as using a different medium to tell stories that there's no reason why you can't be really big so to all appearances. This thing has been an incredible success. And it's been really fun to make a podcast for you I'm curious what troubles you've had especially like Given the pandemic how you had to adjust and respond and and How much difficulty is introduced into Your Business? Well we're we've all been improvising in various ways. I think we feel very lucky in that. What we make is is make a ball. Under these circumstances people set up recording studios at home and we have meetings virtually. I don't know that we could have done this with the digital tools that existed ten or fifteen years ago I mean things like zoom and then Slack and Google hangouts and shared drives Seem so essential to long distance. Collaboration in a way they've arrived just in time and it's sort of the moment for those tools we can make our shows and luckily we work with writers of caliber. Starting with you and Malcolm who can use their writing to adapt with what they're doing if there's an interview that you were going to do for your season this year Michael and you can't do it. You can write your way out of it That's not a position. A TV producer is usually in. I mean if you have physical production that requires people to be in a group and a place. It's just gotTa be suspended. Podcast we can. We can still make it. It's not Albanesi but people have been incredibly flexible and Nimble about how we're still going to get the show's done with this new challenge. So it's funny I'm about to. I've got five of my seven episodes for this sue. The the second season done. But I've got I've got one that really did require me. I thought require me to go out onto the road and I'm not able to do it and you said to me you know you can write your way around this and this weekend. I'm about to find out whether Dan and and I'm kind of wondering if you think that's really true. I mean what do you think? I what I'm thinking is just generally when you're thrown this kind of This kind of curve ball Look her ball and you hit it that you that you try to turn it into a strength and you see what you can do given that given the constraints but but there's apartment here in my voice. The podcast producer saying we need scenes. We need scenes and now you can't really get those scenes D does it for trouble that trouble you at all. You think..

Malcolm Jacob Jacob Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jake Malcolm Zone Jacob Slate writer Google Pushkin Pushkin Industries Michael CEO Santos Italy Dr Lori facebook producer
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Regard as your core principles and you remember fun. Which tells you lebel. Who's her executive producer and has been the executive producer of malcolm show since the beginning. She's someone who came with us. From from the old company Is very important person and establishing our culture but she talks a lot about kindness as a as a principle of the company and It's really it's really true. And i think she's been the kind of guardian of it but it's the way people think about working together and how they help each other and support each other and the ties into i think a bunch of other ethical principles not just about integrity journalistic integrity business integrity But you know Diversity the kind of workplace we want to create the kind of society. We wanna see bottled in the company. So people have a lot of feelings about it. And when you have a young workforce those getting that stuff right and having that all relevant meaningful people to people. is crucial in recruitment and retention. Because you've got not just be a place where people can do interesting work. I think you've got to be a place where people want to work. How do you get across your values to someone who's coming into thinking of working for you. I think they have to. I think that they don't hear from this. I'm hopefully they do hear it from the ceo. But i think people only believe when they hear it from peers and see that peers are having that kind of experience in the place they work and kind of. I can't hide. You can't hide who you are especially as a company. Right is a person so maybe a little bit but as a company you know word will spread and what it's like their values come they they do come through and i think it's especially true with start up companies because they grow up so quickly that they end up being kind of projections of the values and beliefs of the of the founders. And you know. I think that's trick facebook and one way uber another way but it's it's even more true at a smaller business. Everything that you you believe gets reflected in some way in the in the company. Thanks again to jacob weisberg and malcolm glad well of pushkin industries you can hear more of dell small business pod by searching dell technologies small business pot fronts on radio dot com spotify or apple podcasts special. Thanks to emily. Ross dhec carly migliori. Julia barton heather fain and jason gambro. I'm michael lewis..

executive producer malcolm dell facebook carly migliori jacob weisberg Julia barton michael lewis emily ceo jason gambro Ross pushkin industries apple
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate <hes>. but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history <hes>. With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under <hes>. Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

publisher
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

podnews

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Duolingo make a dual French/English podcast

"Duo, lingo launched today. What the company claims is the first of its kind ever knew and welcome to the dueling. Go French podcast, it's a jewel podcast in French and English aims to help people understand French using compelling stories. It's presented by, and Goffin and Bhutto Boya a journalist, lawyer and podcast producer based in New York City in France guest a group of online publishers has set up a distribution of podcasts, working group to quote put in place. The necessary agreements with rights holders and to define best practice. The group mentions indexing of our assess feats, editorial presentation access to statistics respect for the integrity of the content and more about complete well Jacob Weisberg. Pushkin industries have released their latest podcast making a killing as new premium podcast on luminary this week conviction and new book by Denise Mina. Stars, a strong female protagonist who's obsessed by true crime podcasts and decides one day to investigate one of the unsolved crimes herself. It gets a positive review in the Washington Post one of the benefits of the open technical infrastructure of real podcast is that you can use the app, you want rather than a publishes app. The could have all kinds of other code in it like the app from Spanish football league alita, which listened to your microphone and worked out your location to discover bars that we using pirated video stream. Host read ads best or can you use a pre produced spot at instead, the sonic truth covers data from megaphones, Ken Lagaan ah, in an episode that we linked to today from our show notes, and our newsletter as he says, in an accompanying article some campaigns may require the power of an influence edge, just laying out the reasons why they love a product others may be better suited to a pre produced spot with an orchestral swell halfway through the ad and some campaigns may even require both. Editor spoke at podcast day last week. That's me with three podcasts that everyone can learn from we linked to what he said in podcast form, from our episode notes and our newsletter. Australia's at pro 'em costs offers a special. Podcasting music license is it at last away of licensing music for podcasts? We wrote an article on that. You'll find it links from our episode notes and our newsletter. Quick answer year. Nah, Spotify watch your editor has now been given the new interface, which gives parody for music, and podcasts, which is nice short. Howard points out that the ability to advertise podcast listeners, which we reported on yesterday is only available to large corporate advertisers for now. And we linked to Gustav soda Strom, the chief are indeed officer from the company giving a forty minute presentation on the company's history. I used to have a soda Strom, but I got bored filling up the gas bottles in podcast. Today. CNN films have launched Apollo eleven beyond the moon podcasts. Commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo eleven lunar mission, your episodes of the true crime podcast. The lady vanishes have themselves vanished after two and a half million episodes. The podcast is following up new leads the football history dude, looks at the hundred years of the NFL that football. This is uncomfortable is a new weekly podcast about life in your twenties, and thirties, and how money Metis with it, and spectacular failures launches today, a ten episode season of the most spectacular business failures of all

Editor Football France Gustav Soda Strom Jacob Weisberg New York City Denise Mina Washington Post Ken Lagaan Pushkin Industries NFL Australia CNN Goffin Bhutto Boya Howard Producer Officer Hundred Years
How should we replace the Apple Podcasts Chart?

podnews

01:47 min | 3 years ago

How should we replace the Apple Podcasts Chart?

"In the latest poll news. Spotify has announced sound up bootcamp, Australia for aspiring podcasters who identifies aboriginal or Torres Strait islanders to take part in a four day residential podcasting workshop to be held in Sydney in November, signed up, bootcamp, US received over eighteen thousand applications. Earlier this year, mid roll has released the newest version of the company's listener survey, Eighty-one percent of minerals. Listeners, pay attention to podcast ads, seventy two percent of people who've listened to podcasts for more than four years have bought from podcast advertises as lots more data. Jacob Weisberg is leaving slate probably best known to podcast listeners as the co host of Trump cast. He's off to work with Malcolm plant wells, new audio venture kost podcasts. Now valuable for distribution on Spotify. The company has announced we understand that Acosta ads will benefit from pass through so acoss can still use dynamic. Ads in that content rather than Spotify cashing all of their audience. The apple podcast shot is screwed. How should we replace it as the title of an editorial from pod news is editor James Cridland. That's me highlighting some recent activity around manipulation of the chart, including a Twitter threat from Kevin Goldberg. The question I say is whether we can get a truly global replacement for the apple podcast chart. One less susceptible to being cheated one more Representative of the industry as a whole, a one that is just as acceptable for passion podcasters as for the backs podcast publishes

Spotify United States Donald Trump Torres Strait James Cridland Apple Jacob Weisberg Sydney Kevin Goldberg Twitter Acosta Pod News Representative Australia Malcolm Editor Seventy Two Percent Eighty-One Percent Four Years Four Day
Panoply suddenly closes its podcast content division

podnews

01:55 min | 3 years ago

Panoply suddenly closes its podcast content division

"From Brisbane apple, the latest pod news panoply has announced that it's letting go of its entire editorial staff and is no longer developing new podcasts or handling direct sales. It's focusing on megaphone. It's podcast hosting platform which powers eight percent of the US top four hundred podcasts and which the company calls the clear leader in podcasting technology and advertising services, Jacob Weisberg, chair and editor in chief of panoply. Zona slate group is also leaving the company. He's an ounce. He's launching a new audio company with Malcolm clad well, flatter a company which has been handling micro payments for bloggers for eight years is now handling podcast contributions. It's mobile, I and works regardless of what apple podcast service you use according to Lintas Alsan he told pod news, they'll be supporting the radicals payments emerging standard. Shortly yesterday we repeated the guardians claim that they were about to launch their first daily news. Podcast, John Dennis tweeted that he presented daily news podcast from the guardian for five years between two thousand and five and twenty ten has soon. We forget in an open letter to all podcast apps in early August, Jared, Santo notes that overcast gives the total subscribe account every time it checks your RSS feed and asks for other podcast apps to do the same and many apps have already started to do this. We're seeing feed been breaker. Overcast news, blur in our logs seems like a good idea. It's the first birthday a podcast, one in Australia, grants, Todt hill. The units boss is interviewed him being t, meanwhile, Tyler, moody from turn podcast is interviewed and add exchanger. Molly Beck who runs messy. FM podcast host is profiled by Northeastern University

Zona Slate Lintas Alsan John Dennis Jacob Weisberg Molly Beck Apple Editor In Chief United States Northeastern University Malcolm Tyler Todt Hill Jared Australia Santo Eight Percent Eight Years Five Years
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

27:52 min | 3 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"It seems to capture our entire moment in all its mendacity and all its engineered confusion and and he goes through some examples of uh kind of intentional dishonesty or you know taking taken a story taken out of context using it to gain advantage and i think we do see this by a lot of actors in the marketplace of ideas in the media marketplace but i see it a lot on sean hannity show for example you know he's concocted this alternative reality to try to explain the world number president trump is the victim of a deep state plot and your point about the treason quotes really tell him that president trump to use this term as you know seemingly joking as he say newlyseized laughing as he's saying it but it's something that's profoundly inappropriate to say from the presidential podium and then the next day were told it was tongue in cheek it was just a joke that he was just kidding right uh i mean another to another term for in a way bad faith is a euphemism for propaganda intentionally leading and deceiving people and that is a prevalent phenomenon in media now watch by a lot of people i think it's a bad faith the trickier proposition in politics because it presumes that the base line is good faith and i'm not sure the baseline in politics is good favor mean i think there is a lot of genuine belief and the a lot of politicians have real and integrity but you know a you don't wanna get into a mindset where because you imbue bad faith to your opponents mitchell with which may well be justified you impute good faith to your side moore yourself because i'm not sure liberals and democrats are so perfect either i don't think they've ever behaved in my experience at the level trump and for a sean hannity are um but you know liberals they're not paragon of of intellectual integrity virtue uh perfection and lots of ways so i think you have to be careful of sort of a puting virtue to yourself when you're criticising others one of my favorite features on slate is a today in conservative media you will try to recap what has happened on any given day why do you and and and julia the editor slate why are you up and that's important to to try to understand what's happening over there i think we'll frisco.

sean hannity president julia editor frisco
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"To challenge and make uncomfortable people on the left whose who is automatic assumption is whatever obama did was good or whatever trump is doing its bad but were in the most partisan political moment i've ever experienced and it's very hard to be a contrarian voice right now because the contrary and point is it in many cases just wrong i mean trump is a terrible president and uh of violating norms and the rule of law and it is crucial to call that out but you don't want to be the fifth article people read that day calling the same thing out in the same way so i think the challenge for slade has been to retain its its approach in this very very partisan moment where would you say you're you're trying to write for liberals but also reached the occasional trump voter we want to reach everybody i mean we weep slate tries to be a voice of reason entrust beaver explanatory mincu when people ask all kind of journalism it his it it's not news and it is not opinion were very interested in the space between those two things which to my mind consist very heavily of analysis an explanation when say as a terrible president sat opinion what i'd look certainly it's an opinion but it's a it's a i wouldn't i wouldn't i wouldn't take the position that that's a does need to be debated as herb objective fact and i think the difference in slight is we would be open to an interesting argument that that view with wrong right right and the problem is it's so hard to find well i was up in canada recently an interview by a couple of of canadian networks and the interviewers kept going back to this idea of news verses opinion and they were they were trying and i think up there is a little bit different lot of governmentfunded media there are stricter guidelines about how far you can go as a television anchor call him things out and i kept trying to make the case that what you're seeing on television is not more.

obama trump president slade canada
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Against that because this memo i mean the newness memo is is garbage right it's it's it's a it's a could it say it's concocted as a conspiracy theory that doesn't even make sense on its own terms i mean just the basic things about it or implausible the fbi which is very well known to be heavily conservative republican that there was a conspiracy on the fbi to try to deny the election to donald trump but that this conspiracy with activated by a giving a warrant a few days before the election would it could have had no possible fact and see sort of look at this thing he said the whole theory doesn't even make any basic sense and i think on the one hand you can't ignore it it's news the the republicans in congress are are running with this there they're showing i think in a tremendous cowardice and how they're dealing with uh this phenomenon in their own party but ignoring it isn't an option but i don't think if you read quality media or watched quality meat media you came away with the idea hey this nets romo seems like it's really big deal how do you define slade what were you place late on this spectrum of media higher lowquality or or in terms of partisanship uh liberal conservative somewhere in the metal highquality low partisanship but i think what the with slate is most comfortable doing is challenging people's assumptions and very often in normal times that it takes the form of challenging liberals uh from a generally liberalminded perspective of a we have writers who are conservative and had many of them over the years very good example of a classic sleigh pieces one that went up today which is a retrospective critique very tough of obama's mideast policy and it says that you know obama may really have gone things very wrong with his focus on iran and that a lot of other things in the in the mideast really went to hell while he was so fixated on that issue that's a classic slate piece that sort of design.

fbi congress romo slade obama donald trump iran one hand
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Trumpcast

"And here with the release of this memo we know what his motives are because he's been clear about a he's telegraph publicly and he said to a number of aids privately that he wanted this them are released because he sees it as a pretext to move on rod rosenstein potentially to fire him we don't know if they'll do it again are not again but that's clearly what he hopes to accomplish through doing us a number of my colleagues are very trouble i think there will be a backlash against this breach of protocol today the number three senate republican called on house republicans to listen and key the fbi's warning what we're seeing is obstruction of justice unfolding in real time right before us hello and welcome to trump cast i'm jacob weisberg joining me in the studio today fleets legal correspondent dahlia lift wake high dahlia hijacked we both spent most of the day in a slate retreat we can call it an offside because it's an on flight in our brooklyn office but we were waiting to get our hot little hands on this newness memo and it came out a little after lunchtime and what with your first reaction to it i think it was my reaction was the same reaction as most people which was really this this is what you have this is these some milking gum it's gonna blow the lid off washington like it was a pretty even for a disappointing effort it was a really disappointing disappointing effort they could have done much better to won't were they trying to do this this is devon newness and the trump supporting republicans on the this house committee on intelligence and they've they've created what read like a little fox news.

rod rosenstein senate fbi jacob weisberg washington legal correspondent brooklyn
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Trying to act like someone who is outraged because nothing in it is true right right and part of what he's doing is he's bringing it up and you kinda think intuitively well if he was guilty he wouldn't be bringing it up he would want the topic to go away however i think if you look at certain past episodes i mean look for example at the trump university scandal right in which i think trump was guilty certainly 888 value milliondollar settlement which was for him you know a huge amount of money to pay actually pay never pit would never pay anything in settlements he is behavior with very similar his level of outrage and indignant over how abused and mistreated he was with exactly the same and then when it came time he quietly settled and drop the top and this is i think the most important point that the reason the dossier seem so important is that what we know of the muller investigation it's who we know i think we know a lot of who he's talked to and we know that this dossier has informed his investigation but i think i think the providence of the dossier facts around the dossier is essentially like debating the iceberg and it's likely that he has access to the glacier this is just the part that we say and even if some of the dossier never gets proved that might not tell us much about the muller investigation there's a lot that is not in the dossier the trump tower meeting the some some of what we now know about manafort have been there are a lot of different threads and that's part of what is confusing and frustrating about the russian investigation we first of all we don't know what muller's got i don't think muller's leaking at all so we're just putting together scraps based on what other people are guessing or are saying based on interviews that he might might have done but there are different there different threads any of which could be true possibly none of which could ultimately be borne out or all of them could be true in different ways has it flynn is it carter page manafort is is the trump tower meeting the trump family.

trump muller flynn milliondollar
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"I guess that's what donald trump will say is similar to the meeting that his son had and contracting with steel and i think that it's probably just an asterisk that steel was or is british i mean the analogy for me would be what you can't hire britain to cut a campaign ad of a totally different will you could the brit can contribute to the american candidate but the burke can be hired by an american campaigned oregon the campaign that's not the that's not against law so as i look at the the smokescreens that trump has put up and in some cases the witch hunts that he's set off consistently there are hundred eighty degrees from the truth when he says the obama or the fbi wiretap me in trump tower or when he says or when the republicans in the house launch an investigation into the clinton foundation and uranium mines one is a y one is irrelevant so often you have examples of you know trump's arguments that just don't hold any water at all when trump says hillary was behind this document much of which hasn't been proven that is being used against may i think it holds more water than some of his past hissy fit it's a point worth knowing the valid point however trump's hole behavior in relation to the dossier i mean it's interesting how does trump behave when he's innocent and how does he behave when he's guilty because trump reserves read this dossier presumably young knows whether then he thinks true in it right and he's.

britain burke oregon obama trump tower clinton foundation hillary donald trump fbi the house hundred eighty degrees
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Any material from a foreign source affecting a federal election us maybe that's the difference that the clinton team paid for it and that the trump team was seeking to accept it for free so again i'll go back to the question when donald trump makes that point what's the difference what's the answer conspiring with an enemy power but they're not an enemy power i mean they're not we're not at war with them but they're in russia than enemy power russia is not officially designated as such that will be a violation of the law will but just it there in our their enemy they acted their enemy in this election they're trying to subvert our election they've they're they're spreading propaganda and fraudulent news on social media because they want to screw up our country and use whatever term you want strong antagonised there are enemy you shouldn't be doing business with them at all about anything around an american election and if you know that they have any it that they are making any subterranean effort to influence the election you have a legal and moral responsibility to go to the fbi and thirty foot that just based on what we know and that meeting in trump tower trump and his family and his top campaign people behaved abominably now separate from that aapo research as they call it is a kind of sleazy part of political campaigning and more often you know you're looking for damaging personal information somebody has a drinking problem somebody made a path at somebody somebody th having an affair and a lot of the methods used to get that information nerve are morally compromised in all sorts of ways its dirty amend the less the less a people have to deal with it in general the better but it's in a different category altogether from allegations of collusion with a hostile power hostile powers that better than enemy can we the hostile yeah no i think just legally that if there if this was a sanction than classified enemy of the united states are be different legal consequences so let me read from from the law at stake no person shall knowingly solicit or accept from a foreign national any contribution to a campaign of an item of value.

donald trump russia social media fbi united states clinton thirty foot
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"These still dossier it's not just the name that i'm going to take for all my acting gigs it is the document that was assembled by the former british intelligence officer christopher steal tracing down leads about connections that donald trump may have had with the russians this was printed by buzzfeed soon after the election too much consternation the allegations that got the most attention were about donald trump in a russian hotel room with prostitutes urinating on a bad supposedly slept in by barack obama that has not been confirmed but there are other parts of the dossier that have been confirmed and we're going to get into them the latest on this is that the washington post broke a story answering one of the unanswered questions about the dossier who funded it originally it was thought that republicans were behind the funding of the dossier during the primaries and then christopher steel himself was brought on during the general election when a hillary clinton lawyer top hillary clinton lawyer mark elias was involved in contracting with steel to put together this document how much does that revelation fact where the investigation is going to go what we think of the quality of the information in the dossier join me now is jacob iceberg who is my boss and the host of trump cast which is the boss of trump podcast hello jacob how are you i hate mike i'm here strictly incapacity as your guest you're the loss for the next several men a follow my lead here jacob so.

christopher steal buzzfeed donald trump barack obama washington post christopher steel mark elias mike jacob officer hillary clinton
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Slate Money

"So the incentive so that they just change a couple of digits in the address at the instead of people sending their money to coin dash they were sending their money to the hackers and they wound up and they wound up sending forty three thousand four hundred thirty eight point four five five ether to these hackers and got nothing in return friends don't let friends investor nice here has jumped one piece investment rice for you i know we're gonna get so many angry at all i are every time we talk about ice or does like we've libertarian hate yet you guys are still listening apparently and please do we love you lucky louis thank you yes thank you listeners even even you bitcoin fateful out there for listening to live and i feel screaming in the middle of the street right now say no i see over the best ben stop screaming because people can hear you and june in next week where we promised not to talk about it going i mean unless we unless we find it unless we dale reid usa we know what are you gonna do we had the opportunity to talk about you know the dark web in bitcoin and stuff this we can we didn't you should as how much we re we respect you people you people people people uh anyway many thanks to you all for listening do subscribe also subscribe to trump cost because obviously that's in a if you don't get enough trump aum's late money than you can get all trump all the time on trump cost which is jacob weisberg and ginny happening and djamila bui just talking about trump on mondays wednesdays and fridays there's a lot of trump to go round that's also port to you by the good people at panoply on keep on rising west the email is sleep money as late dot com many thanks to dinesh rated for producing and we will talk to you next week on sleep.

jacob weisberg ginny djamila bui dale reid
"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"jacob weisberg" Discussed on Kickass News

"A new iteens reviews about me being a snowflake and that sort of thing and known as soon as i publicize eight as much a onestar reviews of people who clearly having heard the show you know like my people like jump on it and give fivestar via so you know like it's okay like they can they can have that it's not it is not meant for everybody but um the intent of it is really quite pure and i hope that even the worst of the trolls can yeah now let give me a pass on that one well you've left this sort of openended um in terms of how long you're going to run this podcast i'm i had this conversation with jacob weisberg the host of trump cast about a year ago and he said the same thing uh you know he hopes the was going to get a break uh once trump lost the election now he stuck with it dea fear that you might get sick of your subject i mean all i'm sure sick at trump i won't get sick of the komal porn unlike it's really like today i mean you mentioned like this my wife get annoyed me deal like spouting of about zeindi details today it's more likely in a conversation i will bore you with some aspects of constitutional law so i'm really like in the honeymoon stage with the subject material just because it's also new to me and i don't know anything about it and so it's it's really enjoyable for me um so right now i like it um it's more you know we we told advertizes redo ten um i'm gonna take a little break and see in a like.

jacob weisberg constitutional law advertizes