22 Burst results for "Jacob Margolis"

"jacob margolis" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on WBUR

"President Biden says covert cases air falling in all 50 states for the first time, and because of that, he says, the U. S will share more vaccines with the world by the end of June. Biden says the U. S will send 20 million doses in addition to the 60 million doses of AstraZeneca, it already agreed to send. Speaking at the White House today, Biden said 60% of Americans have received at least one shot as he urged those not vaccinated to do so. If the unvaccinated get vaccinated. You'll protect themselves and other unvaccinated people around them. If they do not. States with low vaccination rates may see those rates go up may see this progress reversed. And as the mask debate rages on after the CDC issued new guidance, saying fully vaccinated, people don't eat a mask and most indoor and outdoor situations. Biden also urged people to respect those who choose to wear them. Secretary of State Antony Blinken says Israel has a special responsibility to protect civilians, including journalists, as it defends itself against Hamas rockets is NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. The comments come after an Israeli airstrike destroyed a building in Gaza that house journalists According to the secretary of the U. S. Asked Israel for evidence that Hamas was operating in that building. Blanken says he personally hasn't seen the intelligence and doesn't wanna weigh in on questions about that. But he says he's reminded Israel that it has a special responsibility. I was relieved that No one from the journalist impunity and that strike was hurt. And people were able to leave the building safely. He says He's been working the phones to try to appeal for calm and would support negotiations for a cease fire if the two sides decide to seek one Michele Kelemen NPR news traveling with the secretary in Copenhagen, For four days Now, people in Los Angeles have been choking on smoke as a wildfire continues to burn in the nearby mountains as Jacob Margolis from member station KPCC reports. 1300 acres have burned. So far, hundreds of people have been ordered to evacuate. It's not unusual for an area like this near L. A to catch on fire. It's covered in brush that hasn't burned in 50 plus years, meaning there's a lot of fuel. It's been exceedingly dry, so the plants are ready to burn early in the year, and it's mountainous. So it's hard for firefighters to access on foot. What is unusual is that two people were detained in connection with possibly starting the fire, though the first was later released L. A city fire chief Ralph Terrazas, the second person was arrested and is in custody. I cannot give you any.

Michele Kelemen Jacob Margolis Los Angeles 60% Copenhagen 1300 acres Ralph Terrazas Gaza L. A Blanken NPR two people KPCC President Hamas 50 plus years end of June CDC today second person
"jacob margolis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"S portrays civilians is combatants. Those stories next. But first the news Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Jack Spear. As expected tonight, their Senate is well on its way to confirming Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney Barrett. Senate Republicans have the votes they need to overcome a democratic opposition to bear it, who was President Donald Trump's third Supreme Court appointment? And a majority leader, Mitch McConnell, touting Barrett's credentials. Fifth Is one of the most brilliant Admired. And well qualified qualified nominees. In our lifetime. But Democratic Minority leader Chuck Schumer criticized his GOP colleagues for ramming through the Barrett nomination just days before the election, let the record show Tonight. Republican Senate majority decided to thwart the will of the people. And confirm a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court in the middle of a presidential election. After more than 60 million Americans have voted. The White House has said it plans an outdoor swearing in for the Justice Knight and the final vote count is now in Beirut approved by vote of 52 to 43. A fast moving wildfire has broken out in Southern California, growing to more than 2000 acres in just a matter of hours. Silverado fire is threatening homes and forcing tens of thousands of people to evacuate in Orange County. Number station KPCC in Los Angeles, Jacob Margolis has more It's unclear what started the fire, but because of strong dry Santa Ana winds, it's moving very quickly more than 500. Fire fighters have been dispatched to deal with the blaze, but wind gusts upwards of 70 MPH have forced aircraft to be grounded intermittently. That's a concern because there's some of the most effective fire fighting tools available, sometimes releasing thousands of gallons of fire retardant or water in a single drop. California is now squarely in the middle of what's typically the worst part of its wildfire season with winds like these remaining a threat until some sort of major rain shows up, hopefully in the next few months. For NPR News. I'm Jacob Margolis in Los Angeles. Uber is facing a new federal lawsuit alleging its star rating system for drivers.

Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Senate NPR News Jacob Margolis Los Angeles Southern California Chuck Schumer Donald Trump Jack Spear Mitch McConnell GOP S KPCC Orange County Silverado President Justice Knight
Sweltering heat wave bakes the western United States

All Things Considered

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Sweltering heat wave bakes the western United States

"The Western U. S. Is sweltering and a record breaking heat wave that moved in over the weekend. Almost a third of the nation, including all of California is under heat and fire warnings. Jacob Margolis of member Station KPCC in Southern California says The heat is drying out vegetation, making it more likely to combust and it's taking a toll on firefighters have been on fire for weeks. Now. Exhaustion is very riel. They need a break 121 degrees. I can tell you is very hot, Margolis says. Santa Ana winds are expected to roll through tomorrow with gusts of up to 50 miles an hour. And further fuel the fires.

Jacob Margolis Santa Ana California Southern California
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What could be weeks of disaster and recovery. It's the takeaway Xena Vega Jacob Margolis is a science reporter at KPCC covering Disasters in California. Jacob Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. How do you put these fires in context Jacob compared to other fires in California that we've seen over the past few years. 2019 was the respite last year was I mean, 2017, 2018 and now 2020 are some of our worst fire years on record. They've certainly produced some of the largest fires we've ever had. Two fires that are burning right now in northern California have already there not even beyond 25% contained and they've already climbed to the top. I think they're at two and three on that biggest fire ever list. So I would say that these are extremely concerning scary, made only possible by climate change and going forward. You know, Californians definitely have to decide how we want to tackle this sort of thing. Because Clearly fires of this size are going to keep happening and we don't have the resources to continue fighting them on this scale. You mentioned climate change. I was going to ask you. What do we think is is spurring the intensity of these fires this year? Is it climate change? Specifically? Is it human activity? Do we know What may have caused this initial fire. That's now become hundreds of fires. Yeah, Eso climate change has made all of this possible in that we're experiencing extreme heat. We're experiencing drought across or drought conditions across much of Northern California, and that sets the stage for then. Fires to burn through these areas that are particularly Virdon up in that northern California area. The fuels are very large, you have very large trees that are ready to burn. On top of that, yes, The answer is also that we are We have a housing problem in this in the state and people are continuing to build more and more out into wilderness on DH That makes people more and more vulnerable, especially as fires become more and more common. There was a stat from the fourth national climate Assessment. Ah, that was released in 2018 that's said in the western US we've had double the amount of fires that we otherwise would have had if climate change were not a factor, so it's definitely something that we're contending with here and something that's having disastrous consequences. Jacob. It's also record temperatures have California over the past couple of weeks that can't be helping at all. No, absolutely not. I mean, not only do you have I think about all of the people, especially in Northern California right now. And this is true for a lot of folks throughout the state, especially people who maybe can't afford to have air conditioning. Maybe don't have you know there are options for some toe hunker down at home, seal off their doors and windows and run the air conditioning. And hopefully, you know the fire doesn't come towards them. But then there are plenty of people that don't have that option you have on house people, your people that just live in Northern California That doesn't don't usually need air conditioning. And so they're having to choose between you know, opening the windows being inundated with smoke and trying to cool things down, which is obviously not going to work or keeping things close to keeping their lungs their families. What, not healthy. It's a really awful situation to be in and then also you, of course, and you know, we have to mention people that don't have the option to hunker down period and have to go out and work. You have a lot of farm workers right now throughout California that provide the nation with a whole lot of produce were very important who are not being provided with proper pp. We're out in the fields, working, working through all of this, and that's really scary for them, too. An interesting point there because I'm wondering, I recall when we recovering other fires last year, I think they can't fire another's. There were real interesting Jacob breakdowns in terms of which communities were affected which communities could afford to hire their own private firefighters. And which communities particularly low income communities were, you know seeking shelter where they could sew a couple questions for you? Are we seeing these fires hitting certain communities harder than others are poorer communities being hit harder? In wealthier communities. And if so, what are the recovery efforts looking like so far? Um, you know, Wildfire insurance is quite expensive in the state. There was a piece of me was even legislation or California Insurance Commissioner passed something last year that that stopped insurance companies from dropping people in high high risk zones for wildfires. You know, the plain truth is that Even after these fires move through, people spend it could be could spend years picking their lives back up. And there was a fire earlier this summer that you know we were one of the few outlets that covered it. Calm down in an island, which is an imperial valley and particularly low income area. It burned through this one town. A lot of homes, trailer homes burned down and As of a couple of weeks ago, I was still reaching out to people who were living in hotels. But if into hotels by the Red Cross and for people like that, that don't have fire insurance that Are going to try to get some federal aid. But oftentimes that federal aid takes a really long time to come through. If you're able to get it at all, you know, people have to kind of move and start doing stuff on their own. And that might mean leaving the community altogether. And for a community like Nyland down in Imperial Valley, very tight knit community. That's really sad. But the truth is that a lot of communities don't recover from these fires, and not everybody can afford to rebuild. Jacob. We're dealing nationally and globally with a Koven 19 Corona virus pandemic, which has tohave complicated recovery efforts and shelters. And exacerbated the situation down there, particularly because covered 19 is a respiratory illness, primarily, so how is that affecting where people can shelter and their overall health?.

California Jacob Margolis Northern California Imperial Valley KPCC US Wildfire insurance reporter Red Cross Commissioner
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's Emily Fang, reporting from Beijing. This is NPR. Vice president. Pence flies to Iowa today for campaign events, but he's likely to see storm damage from this week's deadly Deray choe that swept through the Midwest with hurricane strength winds. Two people were killed as much as 1/3 of Iowa's cropland may be affected. I was governor has declared a disaster and Mohr than 20 counties. California Fire officials say a new wildfire that erupted yesterday north of Los Angeles has burned more than 15 square miles. Officials have started to order evacuations ahead of the lake fire. Remember station kpcc Jacob Margolis has more. It's been dry and hot, with temperatures approaching triple digits, so it wasn't surprising when a wildfire broke out. What was surprising was how fast it spread through the steep mountainous terrain as trees and brush burned a column of smoke or so large that it was visible from at least 100 miles away. Four different fire agencies responded quickly with ground crews, air tankers and helicopters. The good news is it's not too windy currently, so hopefully that will give them a fighting chance. The bad news is that there's a lot of fuel to burn in that area and the fire weather is expected to continue as temperatures hover around the low one hundred's through the next week. For NPR News. I'm Jacob Margolis in Los Angeles. The Labor Department releases its weekly report on unemployment claims this morning. Last week, nearly 1.2 million people filed for.

NPR Jacob Margolis Los Angeles Iowa NPR News Pence Emily Fang Vice president California Fire Beijing Deray choe Mohr Midwest Labor Department
Los Angeles Earthquake: Magnitude 4.2 Rattles San Fernando Valley

1A

01:05 min | 1 year ago

Los Angeles Earthquake: Magnitude 4.2 Rattles San Fernando Valley

"Angelenos were awoken by a 4.2 magnitude earthquake centered in the San Fernando Valley near Pacoima. KPCC science reporter Jacob Margolis lives nearby, and he has more 4.2 Isn't all that big. But since it was right beneath us, it hit harder than any recent earthquake. I know. I remember. I woke up because I felt like a truck hit my house. If you didn't feel it, it may be because of how far you were from the epicenter. The good news is there was no significant damage reported. Remember, All of this is totally normal for our area. The shaking could continue as aftershocks rolled through. There's even a chance that a bigger one could be on the way, which is a totally unsettling thought. But and I know that, like none of us can handle this emotionally. Right now. You can prepare for the next quake by getting your emergency kit and an emergency plan together. Covering science. I'm Jacob Margolis. If you'd like to figure out how to better prepare for the next earthquake, you can also download our podcast. The big one. You're survival guide wherever you get your podcasts. Los Angeles County

Jacob Margolis San Fernando Valley Pacoima Los Angeles County Reporter
COVID-19 pandemic forcing firefighters to make changes heading into wildfire season

The Frame

01:10 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 pandemic forcing firefighters to make changes heading into wildfire season

"Its peak of fire season, so get ready now was one of the big takeaways from today's Wildfire season Update. I'm Governor Gavin Newsom. KPCC science reporter Jacob Margolis has more. This has been an active fire year. We've had about 160% Mohr fire so far this year than an average year, but fewer total acres have burned that on average. That's because of heavy fire fighting efforts and late rains, keeping things a bit wet that said, Now it's dry enough and hard enough that things were really getting started. Cal Fire director chief Tom Porter That means that fires aren't going to just go out. As the sun goes down, they're going to start burning through the night. They're going to start burning into the chaperone or brush covered landscape. They're going to start burning into the forest. This is the time of year where fire start to get bigger and more difficult to control. Because of covert. There are fewer firefighters, especially inmate crews to tackle blazes on the ranks could be further thin by outbreaks. In response, the state is hiring more full time and seasonal firefighters, but the expectation is that will likely not reached full fire fighting capacity. So make sure you clear brush and don't start any fires

Governor Gavin Newsom Jacob Margolis Tom Porter Reporter Director
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Some to leave their homes and leaving other stuck in their cars for hours as it jumped over a freeway. The fire is in a remote spot between Santa Clarita and Palmdale, and it's unclear how it started for NPR news. I'm Jacob Margolis, developers of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline say they're scrapping the natural gas project. NPR's Joel Rose says they cite ongoing delays and rising costs. The Atlantic Coast pipeline was supposed to carry natural gas across 600 miles West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina just last month. The developers want a victory at the U. S. Supreme Court over a critical permit needed to tunnel under the Appalachian Trail. But the company's pulled the plug anyway, blaming uncertainty and delays around the project. The pipeline was opposed by environmental groups and was expected to cost at least $8 billion. This is NPR news from Washington. Live from KTVT News. I'm Ted Goldberg. Uber is buying Postmates. San Francisco companies announced the deal this morning. They say Uber will acquire Postmates, a restaurant delivery service for $2.6 billion in an all staff in an all stock transaction. The boards of both firms have approved the deal, which now needs approvals from government. Government regulators, a new study finds almost half of Bay Area school districts have at least one building with some degree of lead contamination in their drinking water. Nina Thorson reports, a law passed in 2017 required all schools in the state to test their water for lead. The California public Interest group. Cal PIRG has compiled the results and says 270 public and private schools in the Bay Area detected lead in their drinking water. Although the state only requires schools to share results if let exceeds five parts per 1,000,000,000. Salberg says there is no safe level of lead and kids are especially vulnerable to until effects. The state Department of Education says it's working with the water resource is control board. Help schools remedy the contamination. I'm Nina Thorson Committee News SAN Francisco Police say they're investigating a shooting that killed a six year old boy over the weekend. Police say the incident took place on Angle Street in the city's Bayview district Saturday night. They say officers arrived on the scene to find an unidentified unidentified boy with a gunshot wound. He was taken to a hospital where he died. An injured man found nearby was also hospitalized. Police say his wounds were not life threatening. I'm Ted Gilbert MediaNews Support for NPR comes from Duck Duck Go! Ah Privacy company committed to raising the standard of trust online used by millions..

Atlantic Coast Pipeline NPR Francisco Police Nina Thorson Postmates Jacob Margolis Ted Goldberg San Francisco U. S. Supreme Court Santa Clarita Joel Rose Ted Gilbert Palmdale Bay Area Virginia Cal PIRG Appalachian Trail KTVT News
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

"Science reporter Jacob Margolis that declines especially worrying for us because southern California gets about a quarter of its water from the river the major culprit is rising temperatures in the Colorado River basin they've increased by about two and a half degrees over the past one hundred years as a result snow more often falls as rain and as things get hotter all that water evaporates faster heading up into the atmosphere instead of running downstream to us as for the future it depends on how much we can curb emissions but scientists estimate we can lose another thirty percent of our Colorado River water between now and twenty fifty covering science I'm Jacob Margolis well we're not going to fill up the Colorado River like this it's the middle of winter but it feels like summer Santa Ana winds today highs in the eighties a record high for this date in Anaheim eighty six degrees today so the combination of high pressure aloft building and plus the Los Atlanta winds developing that just helps to really clean up the area posted on the coast in the coastal valleys that's National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan seven oh two you can help raise an extra twenty thousand dollars for KPCC's primary elections coverage by donating now B. one of five hundred members to stand for the facts and you'll unlock a twenty thousand dollar challenge from a group of KPCC members your support goes a long way especially during this important election year give now before our spring member drive starts to maximize your impact on trustworthy independent journalism donate now at KPCC dot org thanks welcome to the frame I'm John horn there's news today that Bob Eiger is stepping down immediately as CEO of the Walt Disney company to make room for his successor and that is Bob JPEG.

John horn KPCC dot National Weather Service reporter Bob JPEG Walt Disney company CEO Bob Eiger Jacob Margolis KPCC Curt Kaplan Los Atlanta Anaheim Colorado River Colorado River basin California
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

"Dot EDU. from the most broadcast center at KPCC this is the frame on John horn yes it is true of the cost of going to see live music is skyrocketing we're gonna tell you why and Grammy winning classical guitarist Sharon is been talks about how she became a child prodigy pretty much by accident my parents from my brother for the interview and as soon as he realized it was classical he said no way I want to be Elvis Presley you never took a lesson and I volunteered to take his place and we remember Robert Frank photographer and music video director all that coming up on the frame. from KPCC news I'm Nick Roman with the stories we're covering it seven oh one of thirty say they've confirmed the identities of five victims all from California who died in the dive boat fire of Santa Cruz island on Labor Day the Santa Barbara county sheriff's office says thirty three of the thirty four victims have been recovered now twenty seven of those people have been identified through DNA they used a rapid DNA tests to confirm the ID's faster also the share of says divers have resumed the search for the last person still missing the search had been halted over the weekend and was halted again yesterday because of high winds state lawmakers have approved approved a bill to stop new oil and gas wells in California's national parks now on the governor's desk KPCC Jacob Margolis says it's part of a push back against the trump administration's desire to increase drilling in federally protected areas earlier this year the federal government announced a plan to allow fracking on more than a million acres of public and private land in central California the new bill eighty three four two aims to stop that happening on federally protected land like national parks and wilderness areas. oil and gas companies from building pipelines and other infrastructure that will cross nearby state lands it's similar to a law signed by governor Jerry Brown last year barring new offshore oil drilling I restricting the infrastructure needed to move the oil on shore under the bill oil and gas companies can still enter the leases to build infrastructure I'm privately held plant covering science I'm Jacob Margolis eight seven oh two KPCC.

Santa Cruz island Santa Barbara county Robert Frank Jerry Brown federal government Jacob Margolis Dot EDU. California Nick Roman director Elvis Presley Sharon John horn KPCC million acres
Californian earthquake

Correspondents Report

03:55 min | 2 years ago

Californian earthquake

"Earlier this month southern California was rocked by two of the largest earthquakes. The region has experienced in twenty years for one man Jacob Margolis. All is the aftermath of the six point four and seven point. One magnitude tremors was a rare opportunity. It was a chance to remind fellow. Los Angeles residents about seismic seismic safety because few Californians a prepaid for a much bigger catastrophic quake which seismologists say is on the way his North America correspondent James Glen Day out in the middle of the desert one hundred and sixty miles away from where you're standing. There are two enormous tectonic plates that have been trying to slide past ask each other for millions of years but they're stuck today. They slept. That's Jacob Margolis describing a moment many in Los Angeles have buried somewhere way deep in the back of their minds the start of a massive earthquake. That's long being dubbed the big war. There's a huge quake on the San Andreas Fault in southern California. Every hundred years or so we haven't had one for about one hundred sixty early the see the journalists did K._p._C._C. Radio released this podcast on how to survive the coming catastrophe and right now he's in high demand interest in the big one has spiked following recent strong tremors that rattled the region in GonNa take probably nobly I think forty eight seventy two hours is good asking it probably closer to seventy two for outside help to get in and so you'll see roads severed train lines will be severed heard about eighteen hundred people will also die some from the inevitable building collapses some will burn you have a number of both electrical and gas fires that break <music> out and when those fires break out spread very very fast and we do not have enough emergency responders to respond to all the problems that will break out all those fires and the even the mayor of Los Angeles says that's one of his greatest fears and if it hit in like September or October when it's hot and it's like when he <hes> you know just like our hills like neighborhoods. Neighborhoods are going to burn and the water pipes will probably be cracked. Some roads will be impossible and so putting the FIS out could be tough but for the vast majority of people the biggest challenges will come in the weeks afterwards. I mean there's certain things like people won't have like people don't have access to <hes> hospitals. Possibles will be overrun. There's many hospitals in the state eight that are actually not seismically okay <hes> and in addition to that like you won't have access to emergency services for a period of time after the quake they're going to have to be self sufficient and and that's really scary to getting a badly crippled southern. California through such a challenging period requires preparation like bookcases screwed to wolves glass objects removed from key walkways in buildings a few weeks of water and food per household not to mention basic medical supplies so nowhere near enough people already. I I think people struggle and my this is myself included. I lived through the nineteen ninety-four Earthquakes Northridge Earthquake here in Los Angeles. That was supremely destructive. People died. I was out of my home with the kids and. And I still didn't have any of my resources ready. When I started this podcast and breezy it because you don't know and that's coming and so people kind of push it off shirow pressured off the problem with this it can literally happen at any time it can happen while we're recording this right now. It didn't obviously and it might not for decades but on the fourth of July ally when the earth started to shake into magnitude seven point one tremor struck Mr Montgelas felt calm and prepaid. He knew he'd be okay and in this fleeting period of heightened fear in the region. He's urging everyone to get ready now. It cost me fifty bucks to go out and buy enough water for two and a half weeks for a family of three and like if you don't have that kind of money I think it might be worth saving and making that best friend because it's your him so much better off if you have those basic things and that report from a North America correspondent James Glendale.

Los Angeles California Jacob Margolis Mr Montgelas Tremors San Andreas Fault James Glen Earthquake North America Possibles James Glendale Forty Eight Seventy Two Hours Hundred Years Twenty Years
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

"Alive with color residents are certainly thankful for the vegetation that springtime rain is brought but they may be sorry come next wildfire season. When those virgin tales once again, turn into kindling that is how much fuel does a super green spring, eventually add to the fire. Jacob Margolis science reporter KPCC set out to try and into that very question. I jacob. Hey. So this is quite interesting. We've talked before about a strong rainy season in California. Does it offer protection against a bad wildfire season we found out? Maybe it does. Not. Yes. So like we won a lotta rain. Right. We want to reservoirs to fill up and with a lotta rain that that those landscapes that really dried out especially during that drought. They start to recover, especially the bigger fuels, the bad news is that along as you said along with all that rain comes growth of really fast growing fuels like Rastas. And those actually dry out very quickly. They're ready to burn their good fuels, burn burn hot. And they burn fast, and there's even differences in northern California versus southern California, right? Hugely diverse here and in northern California. You know, they have to worry about the grasses to but when grasses aren't enough on their own to fuel huge wildfires you need bigger fuels, so northern California. The big concern are the blurred swath of dead trees that they have and the fire is really hard to fight. When those grasses catch the trees, eventually catch on fire, and that fire travels across the top of the trees firefighters told me, you know, it's pretty tough to fight here in southern California. It's a bit different though. Like, our bigger fuel concern is largely with chaperone and brush, lower lying plants in those naturally. Swing back and forth between moist and dry. The thing is, you know, since we're coming off all these drought years with only a couple of years in between. It means that any of that recovery that we had that could possibly lower the fire risk it could possibly go away. Like, a call the national inter Interagency Fire Center spoke to Jessica Gardell spokesperson there. This is what she told me the overall vegetate. In other California has recovered because of this moisture, but one good year of rain does not basically erase years of drought. So if we do get those high increase temperatures for a long period of time without rain to mitigate them those fuel such shopper L could dry out and be ready to burn. So Jacob defy fighters know, which areas will be vulnerable based on vegetation that grew the spring. Yeah. You know, they don't necessarily. I mean, they're watching everywhere, but second they don't necessarily con there are certain areas that are more susceptible. Those are going to be the areas that have had a lot of old growth that's been around for a long time that hasn't burned because of fire management practices, or maybe just a fire hasn't started in that place. That's what happened with Thomas fire in twenty seventeen which was at the time the largest firing say history, we'll just have to watch. And wait and have you back. Jake, Jake, Jake Margolis science reporter and host of the podcast the big one your survival guide. From KPCC. We're gonna take a break Kentucky about why AT and T decided to build a climate change map for the fear of what the future holds. And how they need to be ready for it. Stay with us right back after this break. Plato. This is science Friday from WNYC.

California Jacob Margolis reporter national inter Interagency Fir Jake Margolis WNYC AT Jessica Gardell Kentucky Thomas
"jacob margolis" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on Science Friday

"Hills are alive with color residents are certainly thankful for the vegetation that springtime rain is brought but they maybe sorry come next wildfire season. When those Verdon tales once again, turn into kindling that is how much fuel does a super green spring eventually and to the fire. Jacob Margolis signed to Puerto KPCC set out to try and end to that very question. I jacob. Hey. So this is quite interesting. We've talked before about a strong rainy season in California. Does it offer protection against a bad wildfire season, we found that? If may maybe it does not. Yes. So like we won a lot of rain, right? Like, we want to reservoirs to fill up and with a lot of rain that that does landscapes that really dried out especially during that drought. They start to recover, especially the bigger fuels the bad news is that along as you said along with. All that rain comes growth of really fast growing fuels like grasses and those actually dry out very quickly. They're ready to burn their good fuels to burn. They burn hot. And they burn fast, and there's even differences in northern California versus southern California. Right. Oh my God. That is hugely diverse here and in northern California, you know, they have to worry about the grasses to. But when grasses aren't enough on their own to fuel huge, wildland fires you need bigger fuels. So in northern California. The big concern are the blurred swath of dead trees that they have and the fire is really hard to fight. When those grasses catch the trees, eventually catch on fire, and that fire travels across the top of the trees firefighters told me, that's you know, it's pretty tough to fight here in southern California. It's a bit different though. Like, our bigger fuel concern is largely with chaperone and brush, lower lying plants and those naturally swing back and forth between moist and dry. The thing is, you know, since we're coming off all these drought years with only a couple of wet years in between. It means that any of that. Recovery that we had that could possibly lower the fire risk it could possibly go away. Like a called the national inter Interagency Fire Center and spoke to Jessica Guardado, a spokesperson there, this is what she told me the overall the vegetation in southern California has recovered because of this moisture, but one good year of rain does not basically erase years of drought. So if we do get those high increase temperatures for a long period of time without rain to mitigate them those fuels such shopper L could dry out and be ready to burn. So Jacob defy fighters know, which areas will be vulnerable based on the vegetation that grew the spring. Yeah. You know, they don't necessarily. I mean, they're watching everywhere I off but second they don't necessarily con there are certain areas that are more susceptible, and those are going to be the areas that have had a lot of old growth that's been around for a long time that hasn't burned because a fire management, practices or. He just a fire hasn't started around in that place. That's what happened with Thomas fire in two thousand seventeen which was at the time the largest firing history. All right. We'll just have to watch and wait and have you back. Jacob Jake, Jake Margolis science reporter and host of the podcast the big one your survival guide from KPCC, we're gonna take a break and talk about why AT and T decided to build a climate change map for the fear of what.

California Jacob Margolis Jacob Puerto KPCC national inter Interagency Fir Jacob Jake AT Jessica Guardado Jake Margolis Thomas reporter
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hills are alive with color residents are certainly thankful for the vegetation that springtime rain is brought but they maybe sorry come next wildfire season. When those virgin tales once again, turn into kindling that is how much fuel does a super green spring eventually and to the fire. Jacob Margolis scientist, Puerto KPCC set out to try and answer that very question. I jacob. Hey. So this is quite interesting. We've talked before about a strong rainy season in California. Does it offer protection against a bad wildfire season, we found that may maybe it does not. Yes. So we won a lot of rain, right? Like, we wanna reservoirs to fill up and with a lot of rain that does landscapes that really dried out especially during that drought. They start to recover, especially the bigger fuels, the bad news is that along as. You said along with all that rain comes growth of really fast growing fuels like grasses and those actually dry out very quickly. They're ready to burn their good fuels to burn burn hot and neighbor in fast, and there's even differences in northern California versus southern California. Right. Oh my God. Is hugely diverse here and in northern California. You know, they have to worry about the grasses to. But when grasses aren't enough on their own to fuel huge, wildland fires you need bigger fuels. So in northern California. The big concern are the blurred swath of dead trees that they have and the fire is really hard to fight. When those grasses catch the trees, eventually catch on fire, and that fire travels across the top of the trees firefighters told me that know, it's pretty tough to fight here in southern California. It's a bit different though. Like, our bigger fuel concern is largely with chaperone and brush, lower lying plants and those naturally swing back and forth between moist and dry. The thing is, you know, since we're coming off all these drought years with only a couple of years in between. It means. Is that any of that recovery that we had that could possibly lower the fire is it could possibly go away. I called the National Interagency Fire center and spoke to Jessica Guardado, a spokesperson there, this is what she told me. I do know the overall the vegetation in southern California has recovered because of this moisture, but one good year of rain does not basically erase years of drought. So if we do get those high increase temperatures for a long period of time without rain to mitigate them those fuels such chaperone, I'll could dry out and be ready to burn. So Jacob defy fighters know, which areas will be vulnerable based on vegetation that grew the spring. Yeah. You know, they don't necessarily. I mean, they're watching everywhere for but second they don't necessarily. There are certain areas that are more susceptible, and those are going to be the areas that have had a lot of old growth that's been around for a long time that hasn't burned because a fire management practices, or maybe just a fire hasn't started around in that place. That's what happened with Thomas fire in two thousand seventeen which was at the time the largest firing history. All right. We'll just have to watch and wait and have you back. Jacob Jacob Schick Margallo science reporter and host of the podcast, the big one your survival guide from KPCC, we're gonna take a break and.

California Jacob Jacob Schick Margallo Jacob Margolis Puerto KPCC National Interagency Fire cent scientist Jessica Guardado Thomas reporter
Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:05 min | 3 years ago

Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox ING and instead of closing this holiday. The UPS store is doing another ING altogether. Opening the UPS store every ING for small business. And of course, shipping probably should not project human traits onto machines. But if you spend a lot of time with a mechanism talk to it, wait to hear from it and worry about it. Even scientists begin to see personality in machinery when the opportunity Mars exploration Rover ended its mission this week after more than five thousand Martian days, NASA, scientists warned this is a hard day opportunities project manager, John Kelly told reporters, even though it's a machine, and we're saying goodbye, it's still very hard and very poignant opportunity in its cousin Rovers spirit both landed on Mars in January of two thousand four they were supposed to carry. On for just three months scratching and scouring for less than a mile over the Martian landscape, but spirit Rome for almost five miles and lasted six years. Oppy scientists began to call the opportunity Rover rolled over Mars for twenty eight miles and stayed on the job for more than fourteen years transmitted, two hundred seventeen five hundred ninety four thousand images, including a selfie spirit an opportunity helped establish that there was once liquid water on Mars is doesn't mean there will soon be beach resorts on Mars, but it does confirm that some of the elements of life may have once existed they're on a world that now looks pretty dry, lifeless and cold. It's a reminder not to judge too much by appearance planets and people have histories Oppy got stuck in a dune in two thousand five but NASA scientists working over a distance of millions of miles were able to free their Rover Oppy also suffered from recurrent wheel. Robotic arm problems for most of his her its life, but kept on rolling searching digging and sending back information a dust storm envelope. Much of Mars last June Oppy foundered in a gully on the western rim of the endeavour crater in a gully, the scientists called perseverance valley. The storm robbed UPI of the solar power to recharge batteries NASA. Scientists Senate more than eight hundred and thirty rescue commands they beamed music to Oppy to try to awaken their Martian explorer, David Bowie's life on Mars, Gloria Gaynor's, I will survive. Here comes the sun by you know, Oppy was too depleted to reply their overdid send a last image of a dark world cloaked in dust. Jacob Margolis a science reporter for KPCC in Pasadena made a poetic translation of the digital burst bites and squeaks up. He sent out before going silent. My battery is low and it's getting dark. I am. I'd all hope for such a gentle in to a useful life. This on. Ziggy stardust, and you're listening to NPR news support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

Oppy Nasa Comcast David Bowie NPR Endeavour Crater Rome Rovers Jacob Margolis Gloria Gaynor Project Manager John Kelly Pasadena Kpcc Reporter Fourteen Years
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KCRW

"Recover what we lose so seven point eight verses six point seven, which is what we saw north ridge. We're talking about forty four times stronger than back in one thousand nine hundred forty four times. I mean, she said disrupting the lives of people for years, but I mean, we're talking about almost destroying much of Los Angeles. It's going to take a lot to recover anymore. Looking at possibly eighteen hundred people could die thousands could be injured big buildings could collapse roads in and out of the area. Could be impassable. We could suffer losses in the hundreds of billions. And the most scary to me are the fires that are gonna be caused by electrical and gas problems, which could spread just across the cities. And it's gonna take forty eight to seventy two hours to get outside help in. There will not be enough emergency responders to fight all those fires and to help all the people that need help. And so that period of time to me is one of the scariest. Well, I guess the real question Jacob is how ready is Los Angeles for something. Like that to did. They learn a lot of good lessons from Northridge. They did. I mean, there's new building codes for hospitals for freeways for certain apartment buildings as well as retrofit programs, and they're also working on improving really important things like our water system, which will crack and break when the big one rolls through most likely that said we have a long way to go and overall I think especially on the individual level people are very unprepared. KPCC's Jacob Margolis is hosted the new podcast the big one your survival guide. Jacob. Thanks. Thanks so much having courage. Doesn't mean that you're fearless. It means that you overcome your fears are member station WNYC has been asking people to name their fears and we're sharing. Some today we hear from sa- mean Nasrat, she's the Iranian American food writer behind the influential book salt fat acid, heat, and here are some of her fears. That the color of my skin will bring harm upon me. I've always been aware of being different. But I wasn't really aware of any sort of threat to my physical person because of the way I look until September two thousand one at that time I used to wear this agate necklace, and it had the Arabic names of like the five main prophets of Islam on there. And so I remember I got a flat tire few days later and the guy who is changing my tire was black. And he was like, oh, what's on your necklace, and I told him and he like you got to put that away. It's not safe to look like you look anymore..

Jacob Margolis Los Angeles north ridge Nasrat WNYC Northridge seventy two hours
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KCRW

"Twenty five years ago today here in Los Angeles at four thirty in the morning. The six point seven magnitude Northridge earthquake hit fifty seven people died as this area. Went dark freeways were destroyed buildings collapsed. It was one of the costliest disasters in US history causing over forty billion dollars in damages. Los Angeles was caught unprepared. And decades later there are still questions being asked about whether they are ready for the next one KPCC's Jacob Margolis has been looking into this for a new podcast called the big one year survival guide, which is supposed to do what it suggests it is to help people in southern California. Get ready for the big one and also show how people might not be as prepared as they think. Jacob welcome. Hey, thanks for having me. Let's just dig into this moment. Looking back twenty five years ago for people who are not familiar with LA. I mean, can you just put in context how big a deal Northridge was? Yes. So imagine you're laying in your bed. It's four thirty in the morning, presumably, you're sound asleep. And all of a sudden this random force of nature that no one had predicted just rips you from it you head outside. You see your neighbors milling about in kind of the dawn light as it starts to break. And they look like looks like a scenario from the Walking Dead. And as the sun comes up, you can actually start to survey the damage I talked to my dad about it. Because I was a bit young at the time and asked him what he saw that day. And he actually let me know I remember driving down one of the main streets, and there were broken gas lines as well as broken water lines. There were also flames coming out of the water, very surreal, you know,.

Jacob Margolis Los Angeles Northridge US California forty billion dollars Twenty five years twenty five years one year
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:59 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But I'm curious what knowledge of earthquakes we can apply to the NASA. Insight Lander currently on Mars laundering for Mars quakes. KPCC's? Jacob Margolis might be able to answer this one. And what insight could potentially teach us about quakes here on earth. Chickens. Jacob. It's amazing how much earthquakes or a size. Is kind of connected to the very very cutting edge of science. Oh, yeah. I mean, the insight Lander is so cool. I went over to JPL to actually see how the little hammer that they used to send tool down into the Martian surface, actually, work a Nesta's upholstered laboratory. Yeah. Sorry, right down the street from where we are right now. And it was so neat and what they're basically doing with that is they were reading those signals from that hammer using these really sensitive seismometers as well. As those seismometers also pick up all of these different like strikes, meteor strikes and stuff like that on the planet, and they use those waves to map the interior of the planet that is so cool because waves travel differently through different kinds of materials inside the planet. And as for what we're going to learn based on Mars and how we can apply here. I'm actually not quite sure, but I do know that the size that besides monitor that they're using there is so sensitive that if you placed it in the middle of the United States. States you could detect waves on the west coast. That's how sensitive it is. So they'll have a massive amount of data go through to be able to kind of figure out what's inside the red planet. I have never seen anyone as excited about anything as man. You will you're in good company because we got a lot of folks in our audience just like that before we bring in one more guest and gets us. Some more your questions and thoughts, I wonder if we could go back to Sandy's comment who wrote on Facebook about moving to Cincinnati having a home that was made earthquake resistant. She wrote in part, my designer and builder have always longed for a tornado or earthquake to see how the house performs. I'm not sure I would wish that on her home. But what is your sense of how Californians are doing in terms of protecting their homes against earthquakes? I remember from San Francisco that the majority of San Franciscans are renters rather than owners and a lot of their homes are on those like like single like where the soft story building where the first floor is almost on stilts with parking. And it presents a massive challenge with retrofitting select on here down here. It's it's similar. We have a lot of soft story apartment buildings which are basically like you said elevated apartment buildings with carports underneath and there is a mandatory retrofit for those in Los Angeles to keep them safe. When it comes to houses there are different programs. That you know for under a thousand dollars you can brace your house if it's on like a race foundation. But you really do that if you are the owner of the property when it comes to renters, it's a lot more difficult more difficult to tell if you are in a safe building. But while there are some programs here that do promote retrofits. You know, I asked a lot we asked a lot of people for this podcast. Like, okay. So is your is your home safe? Is it ready for the big one or even even a smaller one and a lot of people just didn't know? And so I would say that there are good programs in place. However, a lot of people still live in Ingraham's fat. Speaking of that podcast. We are speaking Jacob Margolis science reporter here KABC and the host of the podcast the big one your survival guide. Also joining us here in studio now is the podcast lead producer. Michele yousef. Michelle, welcome to one A. Hi, thanks for having me. How did the podcast come about? So we were Interbrew where we were taking pitches from the newsroom and Jacob came in. And we started talking about earthquakes and decided that it was a great time to put together a narrative show about the big one because nothing like it had been made before. And because it was about to be the twenty fifth anniversary of the Northridge quake, which happened in one thousand nine hundred four was kind of the last big earthquake. Californian's remember? And once we started working on it. We became aware of the shakeout report and realize that there was a lot of information out there that needed to be disseminated in an accessible way to people in California and outside the shakeout report. Yeah. So yeah. We're obsessed with a got. So it's a two thousand eight document that Dr Lucie Jones, actually, spearheaded and several seismologists structural engineers. Psychologists three hundred different scientists contributed to it. There is a large group of people, and essentially they predicted what would happen on within southern California. If an earthquake happened on the southern San Andreas fault about a seven point eight magnitude on a clear day. And so that is the information that we have been using to model the fiction scenarios in the podcast. There are an infinite number of scenarios that when it comes to earthquakes how they break where they break which false they break on and southern California has over three hundred different faults. Right. That's a lot. So we chose the southern San Andreas because it is one of the most studied because the shakeout report, and because they go into gruesome detail about what this what quake like this a quake this size will be like if and when it hits what's your sense of how people are viewing the threat of these quakes Michel whether or not know. The the audience for KBC and beyond because podcasts are international really one. Even talk about earthquakes. I mean, this isn't the kind of thing that most people like to think about want to think about I don't think many Americans think about an earthquake unless they're in one or like the Loma Prieta earthquake which is thirty years ago, this Tober, whether it interrupts the World Series is this something people want to talk about I think there is a vast array of responses we've gotten so they're the people who are really excited to start talking about earthquakes and to start preparing and have started building the community around it. And we've heard from a lot of those people, especially parents, young podcast listeners. But then there are those who who don't want to be talking about earthquakes, and a lot of people have felt that this is too scary thing to be talking about in its gruesome reality. And I think we have seen some of those people come around as you know, they've listened to the. At the sewed or maybe read a little bit more about earthquakes. But I do think on the whole people are very fascinated with earth moving the two thousand fifteen yorker article that went viral the really really big wine. That did go viral reason, I think people are interested in preparing for large says Astor's, and and this podcast. I have to because I know there's a lot of people outside of LA, maybe people that don't live in earthquake zones listening to this. It's not just about it. Our focus is the big quake. But it's also about disaster preparedness it's also about what it's going to be like after you, maybe lose power. Maybe you don't have access to water and with a number of natural disasters that we see in the US it's relevant to people with regards to the disaster. Preparedness peace mission, give a sense of some of the things that that the podcast is trying to get people to do to prepare for this apparently inevitable big one other one or two aspects of disaster preparedness that tend to get overlooked that might take people by surprise that. They should be keeping in mind. Yeah. So at the end of every episode we have three to five practical tips for people. So listen all the way through the through to the end. A couple of things that I think apply to all disasters. Not just the big earthquake in southern California. Are you know, have your gas tank always above Mt? Above empty, definitely. But above half, you never know when you might need to evacuate, and when a disaster might make it so that you can't access gas stations or they're not open. So that's a very easy one. I think having a printed copy of a map of your city. So that you know, where you're going even when GPS down or internet might be down or you may not have access to left wants to figure out where you're going water one one gallon per person per day is what FEMA says and you should plan for up to two weeks. At least when it comes to a big earthquake and food is a huge one too and some sort of shelter tent, maybe. And then I think speaking of FEMA everyone should download the FEMA app. Now, it's you don't have to wait for disaster in order to familiarize yourself with the resources that. Fema has available and having that accessible on your phone at any point. I think makes you more prepared for a disaster. Although as I understand it Jacob it's worth noting that FEMA, obviously their jobs to help with disasters yet in any disaster that I've ever covered whether it was a hurricane or tornado or anything. The understanding is that for the first three days, you need to be ready to survive on your own those first seventy two hours after the disaster has pretty much passed. You should be as self reliant as possible. And that is absolutely one hundred percent true for a big earthquake here as well. We talked to the we talked to the city of LA, we talked to the director of emergency services for California, and we talked to FEMA and all of them said that people need to be ready to survive on their own for a couple of days. That's because it's gonna take forty eight to seventy two hours if we're lucky for resources to start to roll into this area with ten to twenty million people. I mean, that's a lot of people that you're gonna have to serve. So even if help does come in it won't be enough help immediately with regards to be able to fend for yourself. Jacob. There's there's kind of this. You know, if if you've watched too many, Kurt Russell movies from the eighties that Los Angeles becomes this lawless place after dark, and that after a disaster like, you know. Did society falls apart the social contract disintegrates Sanad Maksimir? It's totally Mad Max, except it's an LA instead of Australia. You did research for the podcast about this was that borne out by the research in terms of what is expected to happen socially after the big one. No, it's not we've had a lot of people come to me and say like I feel like a chef motorcycle with gas cans and at a gun across my back and the truth matter is people especially when it comes to natural disasters want to help one. Another people want to make sure that everyone around them survive. I mean, you'll end up helping the person right next to you. If you're when the earthquake does hit, and so we we spoke to Joe trainer who's the director of disaster science and management at the university of Delaware. And he specifically talked about how post major disasters we see the most altruistic side of people and a sense of community starts to build. So that was really optimistic for find out. And we are a lot of people ask. Guns and guns are something that we address in this podcast as well. And I had a debate with my friend over whether he should get a gun. He's very stuck on that idea. He thinks that you know, people are gonna come steal all his resources. He's defend his family. That's not what we've seen. That's not what the science has played out and people like Lucy argue that by getting a gun. You're also setting yourself up to be in a situation where you know, maybe you react to in a way that you would react if you didn't have a gun, maybe rather than diffusing the situation you'll end up exacerbating it, and that's really scary. And that's the scary part. The people think that their neighbors won't help them in there, all alone, especially in LA, or perhaps you have a gun as part of your disaster kid weapon, which you never fire and have no working relationship one hundred percent. And then when you're adrenaline is running and you're jacked up and freaked out and someone comes up for help write a bump in the night. And then that's your first rounder his parents shot through the door when he was a kid because they thought an intruder was in their house, and it wasn't and it could have been one of them. I wonder a by the way, another resource that might be of use is ready dot gov, which is the federal government's website for all kinds of emergencies. A lot of the same tips for earthquakes apply to just about every kind of disaster, especially being prepared for.

earthquake Jacob Margolis Los Angeles California FEMA United States KPCC JPL Lander NASA San Andreas San Francisco Nesta Michelle San Franciscans director Facebook Loma Prieta Cincinnati
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:59 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Get a hold of your mom and dad your sister. Anyone you love. The shaking starts again. There will be aftershocks beginning before the main shock is even over. It doesn't feel like it ever stops. You will feel continuous motion for minutes, we will speak with a team behind that podcast later in the program will ask for your help on another big story. That's just getting underway here in Los Angeles. The teacher strikes now underway. I how do scientists know California's risk of a deadlier costlier stronger quake, the Northridge if it struck right now, how ready would Californians be and what can the rest of the nation. Learn about surviving natural disasters. Joining us here at KPCC's headquarters in Pasadena is the renowned seismologist Lucy Jones, the founder of the doctor Lucie Jones center for science and society, Lucy. Welcome to one thanks for having me. Also with us in studio is the host of the podcast big one KPCC science reporter Jacob Margolis. Jacob welcome. Hey, thanks now. You lived through the Northridge earthquake that struck. California on January seventeenth nineteen Ninety-four about twenty five years ago. Here's a little bit of the coverage from after the quake. Here's some of NBC's, Tom Brokaw covering the aftermath. Listen and then major damage throughout the Los Angeles basin. It was six point six on the Richter scale five major highways have been cut water supply, threaten gas-mains have exploded a half dozen communities have exploded in flames and the death toll has been going up all day long. Jacob give us a sense of what your experience of north ridge was like what did that do to you to your community to your family? What was that? Yeah. For myself. It's actually one of my earliest memories. I mean at the time I was about five and what I remember was basically being ripped from my bed by my parents and taken into a dark hallway. There were no lights. It was shaking, and I presume those were the aftershocks has the main quake was not that was not that long. And whatever remember after that was that throughout. Day, you know, as Don started to break because it hit four thirty in the morning. We actually walked out into the street. Remember seeing like silhouettes of all my neighbors and almost like a Walking Dead scenario in the morning light. And later on we ended up kind of displaced from our home for a while we had to stay in a trailer in our backyard, we had some family we could say with because everyone's from here. But I know that Lucy remembers it even more clearly than I. What was it? Like, I was seismologist the USGS and Caltech at the time west geological surveys the federal agency that registers earthquakes US Geological Survey, and we monitor across the globe. But here in California, we do it with Caltech. So I'm shaking and bad. Actually, my husband was out of town. He's a seismologist. He was furious at missing it. And my both of our kids had crawled into bed with me during the night. So I just held onto my kids. Got it through jumped out of bed. Started throwing on clothes and our older. Son, completely freaked out mommy's gonna go to work and not come home. And he was so afraid of losing me. I said he could come with me. But it'd be really boring, and he did and we got into the lab within probably ten minutes of the earthquake happening and all our computers were shut down. They were overloaded by the data. So we actually couldn't get our data and do with it and people are calling us and screaming and the aftershocks coming through. And I actually does. Don't remember that day. Very clearly I have isolated snippets of memory this press conference answering this question talking with my husband on the plane is he tried to get back to California. And but most of the day is a blur. Because it was just too busy. It's probably just a little bit too much sensory input for one day to remember everything. Let's talk a little bit about earthquakes and what actually happens during an earthquake. The we hear a lot about faultlines. Dr Jones explain what an earthquake is as it relates to what faultlines do. Okay. So false are not lines their planes the line. You see on a map is the intersection of the plane of the earthquake with the plane of the earth's surface. And when an earthquake happens one side moves with respect to the other and releases shaking as one of its effects, just like when you snap your fingers, you move your fingers past each other. And and vibrations are released that make the air vibrate. And if the fault could open up you wouldn't be able to. Purdue shaking, you wouldn't. You can't snap your fingers when they're not touching each other. Right. So it's not an open fault. It's a slip on the fault. And what you're feeling is one of these effects and the waves then travel out getting smaller very quickly. Dislike think of hearing music down the street. You don't hear it? Very clearly. So when you're right on top of the earthquake. It's extremely strong shaking not much distance away. It's it's not much damage at all. We heard Tom Brokaw mentioned that that quake was a six point seven on the Richter scale. Okay. So the Rick Charlie Richter was here at Caltech and developed a scale he was trying to get people to understand that. There was one size to an earthquake. That was not what you felt because what you felt depends on where you are with respect to the earthquake. We don't actually use the same technique anymore. His was empirical we've developed a way to calculate the energy. And then we recreating equivalent magnitude actually at north ridge was one of the crises times where. The different ways of doing magnitude people got fighting about it was just like what? But people were so scared. They wanted absolute information, and if one person says six point six and another one is six point eight something's wrong. They don't understand. But as it stands. Now, the magnitudes of quakes it's worth noting like they're not linear like one two three four H. Order of magnitude is exponentially stronger than the each order. One unit of magnitude is thirty two times more energy. So when we talk about an eight on the Senate or seven point eight on the San Andreas it's going to be about forty times as much energy released as released in the Northridge earthquake. So just for sake of clarity. And then I want to come back to you Jacob when we are just for clarity. When we are talking about the big one is that an abstraction in our culture is that something that there's a rough scientific definition of what we would consider to be the big one. What does that even mean? Okay here in southern California. The big win is a psychological concept. That's what disrupts us in southern California. We usually use it to mean an earthquake on the San Andreas fault because it's the length of a fault that determines the magnitude Northridge was ten miles across the San Andreas is eight hundred miles long. We don't think it'll all go at once, but two to three hundred miles of it are likely to go and one earthquake and that's going to be close to magnitude eight and the difference about it is not so much much. Worse shaking as a much larger area receiving the shake and the Senate race fault runs out from the Pacific Ocean. As I understand it runs from the Pacific Ocean under San Francisco under much of like the peninsula northern California. It's very it's basically runs the length of the state of California. And it goes from Cape Mendocino in the north just offshore of San Francisco comes on shore. Just south of San Francisco helps create the mountains to the north of Los Angeles. Because there's a Bendon it that the mountains are pushed up trying to get around that band, and then goes down by Palm Springs and down to all it stops. Just north of the next. Border. We're speaking to Lucy Jones, founder of the doctor Lucie Jones center for science and society and key PCC science. Reporter Jacob Margolis. We'd love to hear from you. If you're in a part of the country that deals with earthquakes, what's your experience has been particularly with preparedness for earthquakes, or whether you have just kind of resigned yourself to the reality that an earthquake is going to happen. And you may not feel there is much you can do or if you have questions about the nature of earthquakes to science of them. How we prepare for them. What the impacts might be. Now's a good time to ask. So E mail us one a ads W A M U dot org. Comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at one eight Jacob this idea that the big one is a psychological construct really does kinda hit at the heart of I think how many Californians with earthquakes I mean, I remember. There was a clip from the comedy special by the late Robin Williams, where he talks about the idea of a major quake hitting California. Here's part of what he said. And they always talk about the big one. I was in. Seven point five earthquake. That was a moment that was. That was not the big one. Really? Well, what was the big one be well in the big one? If there is a big earthquake Nevada will be wine country number one. And when will the big one be where we have a window of opportunity? What will it be could be tomorrow? Ten thousand years now part of the comedy special from Robin Williams. Give us a sense Jacob before you have to pause how people in California these days deal with the concept of the big one. Yeah, I think people have a really tough time with it. You know, we've had comments even before our podcast came out that were screaming fearmongering. And I think that mongering fearmongering they hadn't heard anything from the podcast yet. It was right. When I went up, but the majority of people that we actually speak with that. We have a chance to explain hey, we know that an event like this can happen. There is solid science behind it. They then go, okay. I understand. That's a possibility. I don't really wanna think all that much about it because it's really really terrifying. And that's what we've seen kind of across the board when we're trying to communicate with people about this. And so we try to kind of adjust address out of it with the podcast. I wanna talk more about how you're addressing that. With a podcast when we continue KPCC's Jacob Margolis and with Lucy Jones, the founder of the doctor Lucie Jones center for science and society. Glad to get some of your comments as well about dealing with earthquakes. Love jeopardy tweeted. I remember when an earthquake struck DC in twenty eleven and no one was prepared. We probably shouldn't expect earthquakes only in California because plate tectonics are complex and can be unpredictable. Let's create protocols. Dr Jones is nodding in agreement as we speak, and we'll talk to more about what some of those protocols should be. We'll get some more of your questions in stories in just a moment. I'm Joshua Johnson. Glad to be with you. You're listening to one A from WMU and NPR. Support for kqed comes from good eggs, delivering fresh groceries and meal kits to the bay area. Good eggs, sources.

California Jacob Margolis Lucy Jones Lucie Jones Northridge Lucy KPCC founder San Andreas Los Angeles Tom Brokaw Caltech reporter north ridge Senate Robin Williams San Francisco NBC Pasadena
"jacob margolis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

12:00 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"But I'm curious what knowledge of earthquakes we can apply to the NASA. Insight Lander currently on Mars Eilon entering for Mars quakes KPCC's Jacob Margolis might be able to answer this one. And what insight could potentially teach us about quakes here on earth shaking. Jacob. It's amazing how much earthquakes or. Seismology is kind of connected to the very very cutting edge of science. Oh, yeah. I mean, the insight Lander is so cool. I went over to JPL to actually see how the little hammer that they used to send a tool down into the Martian surface, actually, work JPL, NASA Jet, Propulsion Laboratory. Yes. Sorry, right down the street from where we are right now. And it was so neat, and what they're basically doing with that is they were reading those signals from that hammer using these really sensitive seismometers as well as those seismometers also, you know, pick up all of these different lake strikes. Meteor strikes and stuff like that on the planet, and they use those waves to map the interior of the planet that is so cool because waves travel differently through different kinds of materials inside the planet. And as for what we're going to learn based on Mars and how we can apply here. I'm actually not quite sure, but I do know that the size that the seismometers that they're using there is so sensitive that if you placed it in the middle of the United. States you could detect waves on the west coast. That's how sensitive it is. So they'll have a massive amount of dated go through to be able to kind of figure out what's inside the red planet. I have never seen anyone as excited about anything as. Man. I love science. You're in good company because we got a lot of folks that our audience just like that before we bring in one more guest and gets some more your questions and thoughts, I wonder if we could go back to Sandy's comment who wrote on Facebook about moving to Cincinnati having a home that was made earthquake resistant. She wrote in part, my designer and builder have always longed for a tornado or earthquake to see how the house performs. I'm not sure I would wish that on your home. But what is your sense of how Californians are doing in terms of protecting their homes against earthquakes? I remember from San Francisco that the majority of San Franciscans are renters rather than owners and a lot of their homes are on those like like single like we're the soft story building where the first floor is almost on stilts with parking. And it presents a massive challenge with retrofitting down here down here. It's it's similar. We have a lot of soft story apartment buildings which are basically like you said elevated apartment buildings with carports underneath and there is a mandatory retrofit for those in Los Angeles to keep them safe. When it comes to houses there. Our different programs that you know, for under a thousand dollars you can brace your house if it's on a like a race foundation. But you really do that if you are the owner of the property when it comes to renters, it's a lot more difficult more difficult to tell if you are in a safe building. But while there are some programs here that do promote retrofits. You know, I ask a lot. We asked a lot of people for this podcast. Like, okay. So is your is your home safe? Is it ready for the big one? Even even a smaller one and a lot of people just didn't know. And so I would say that there are good programs in place. However, a lot of people still live in Ingraham's. Founded speaking of that podcast. We are speaking to Jacob Margolis science reporter here KPCC and the host of the podcast the big one your survival guide. Also joining us here in studio now is a podcast lead producer. Michele yousef. Michelle, welcome to one A. Hi, thanks for having me. How did the podcast come about? So we were in. Where we were taking pitches from the newsroom and Jacob came in. And we started talking about earthquakes and decided that it was a great time to put together a narrative show about the big one because nothing like it had been made before. And because it was about to be the twenty fifth anniversary of the Northridge quake, which happened in one thousand nine hundred four was kind of the last big earthquake that Californians remember, and once we started working on it. We became aware of the shakeout report and realized that there was a lot of information out there that needed to be disseminated in an accessible way to people in California and a outside the shakeout report. Yeah. So yeah, we're obsessively shakeout. So it's a two thousand eight document that Dr Lucie Jones, actually spearheaded and several seismologists structural engineers psychologists three hundred different scientists contributed to it. There is a large group of people, and essentially they predicted what would happen on. Within southern California. If an earthquake happened other southern San Andreas fault about a seven point eight magnitude on clear day and said that is the information that we have been using to model the fiction scenarios in the podcast earn an infinite number of scenarios that when it comes to earthquakes how they break where they break which false daybreak on and southern California has over three hundred different faults. Right. That's a lot. So we chose the southern San Andreas because it is one of the most studied because the shakeout report, and because they go into gruesome detail about what this what a quake like this quake, this size will be like if and when it hits what's your sense of how people are viewing the the threat of these quakes Michel whether or not, you know, the the audience for. KABC C N beyond because podcasts are international really one. Even talk about earthquakes. I mean, this isn't the kind of thing that most people like to think about want to think about I think many Americans think about an earthquake unless they're in one or like the Loma Prieta earthquake which is thirty years ago this October, whether it interrupts the World Series is this something people want to talk about I think there is a vast array of responses we've gotten so they're the people who are really excited to start talking about earthquakes and to start preparing and have started building a community around it. And we've heard from a lot of those people, especially parents, young podcast listeners. But then there are those who who don't want to be talking about earthquakes, and a lot of people have, you know, felt that this is too scary thing to be talking about in its gruesome reality. And I think we have seen some of those people come around as you know, they've listened to the first episode or maybe read. A little bit more about earthquakes. But I do think on the whole people are very fascinated with earth moving the twenty-fifth New Yorker article that went viral the really really big wine. That did go viral for a reason I think people are interested in preparing for large disasters. And and this podcast. I have to because I know there's a lot of people outside of LA, maybe people that don't live in earthquake zones listening to this. It's not just about our focus is the big quake. But it's also about disaster preparedness it's also about what it's going to be like after you, maybe lose power. Maybe you don't have access to water and with a number of natural disasters that we see in the US, you know, it's things relevant to a lot of people with regards to the disaster. Preparedness peace mission, give us a sense of some of the things that that the podcast is trying to get people to do to prepare for this apparently inevitable big one other one or two aspects of disaster preparedness that tend to get overlooked that might take people by surprise that. They should be keeping in mind. Yeah. So at the end of every episode we have three to five practical tips for people. So listen all the way through through to the end a couple of things. I think apply to all disasters. Not just the big earthquake in southern California. Are you know, have your gas tank always above Mt? Above empty, definitely. But above half, you never know when you might need to evacuate, and when a disaster might make it so that you can't access gas stations or they're not open. So that's a very easy one. I think having a printed copy of a map of your city. So that you know, where you're going even when GPS is down or internet might be down or you may not have access to left wants to figure out where you're going water one one gallon per person per day is what FEMA says and you should plan for up to two weeks. At least when it comes to a big earthquake and food is a huge one too and some sort of shelter tent. Maybe. And then I think speaking of FEMA everyone should download the app now, it's you don't have to wait for a disaster. In order to familiarize yourself with the resources that FEMA has available and having that accessible on your phone at any point. I think makes you more prepared for a disaster. Although as I understand it Jacob it's worth noting that, you know, FEMA, obviously their job is to help with disasters yet in any disaster that I've ever covered whether it was a hurricane or tornado or anything the understanding is that for the first three days, you need to be ready to survive on your own those first seventy two hours after the disaster has pretty much passed. You should be as self reliant as possible. And that is absolutely one hundred percent true for a big earthquake here as well. We talked to we talked to the city of LA, we talked to the director of emergency services for California, and we talked to FEMA and all of them said that people need to be ready to survive on their own for a couple of days. That's because it's gonna take forty eight to seventy two hours for lucky for resources to start to roll into this area with ten to twenty million people. I mean, that's a lot of people that you're gonna have to serve. So even if help does come in it won't be enough help immediately with regards to being able to fend for yourself. Jacob. There's there's kind of this. You know, if if you've watched too many, Kurt Russell movies from the eighties that Los Angeles becomes this lawless place after dark, and that after a disaster like, you know. Did society falls apart the social contract disintegrates Sanad max, it's it's totally madman except it's an LA instead of Australia. You did research for the podcast about this was that borne out by the research in terms of what is expected to happen socially after the big one. No, it's not we've had a lot of people. Come. I had someone come up to me and say like I feel like I should have a motorcycle with gas cans and at a gun across my back and the truth matter is people especially when it comes natural disasters want to help one. Another people want to make sure that everyone around them survive. I mean, you'll end up helping the person right next to you. If you're when the earthquake does hit, and so we spoke to Joe trainer, who's the director of disaster science and management at the university of Delaware. And he specifically talked about how post major disasters we see the most altruistic side of people and a sense of community starts to build. So that was really optimistic for to find out. And we are a lot of people ask about. Guns and guns are something that we address in this podcast as well. And I had a debate with my friend over whether he should get a gun. He's very stuck on that idea. He thinks that you know, people are gonna come steal all his resources to defend his family. That's not what we've seen. That's not what the science has played out and people like Lucy argue that by getting a gun. You're also setting yourself up to be in a situation where you know, maybe you react to in a way that you wouldn't react. You didn't have a gun. Maybe rather than diffusing the situation you'll end up exacerbating it, and that's really scary. And that's the scary part. The people think that their neighbors won't help them in there, all alone, especially in LA, or perhaps you have a gun as part of your disaster kit a weapon, which you never fire and have no working relationship hundred percent. And then when you're adrenaline is running and you're jacked up and freaked out and someone comes up for help write a bump in the night. And then that's your first rounder his parents shot through the door when he was a kid because they thought an intruder was in their house, and it wasn't and it could have been one of them. I wonder by the way, another resource that might be of use is ready dot gov, which is the federal government's website for all kinds of emergencies. A lot of the same tips for earthquakes applied to just about every kind of disaster, especially being prepared for seventy two hours after.

earthquake Jacob Margolis Los Angeles California FEMA San Andreas JPL NASA Lander Mars Eilon San Francisco Michelle San Franciscans director Facebook Propulsion Laboratory US Cincinnati Michele yousef
"jacob margolis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Five earthquake. That was me moment. That was not the big one. Really? Well, what was the big one be well in the big one? If there is the big earthquake Nevada will be wine country number one. Well, we have a window of opportunity. What will it be could be tomorrow? Ten thousand years from now part of the comedy special from Robin Williams. Give us a sense Jacob before you have to pause how people in California these days deal with the concept of the big one. Yeah, I think people have a really tough time with it. You know, we've had comments even before our podcast came out that were screaming fearmongering. And I think that mongering fearmongering they hadn't heard anything from the podcast yet. It was right. When I went up, but the majority of people that we actually speak with that. We have a chance to explain hey, we know that an event like this can happen. There is solid science behind it. They then go. Okay. I I understand. That's a possibility. I don't really wanna think all that much about it because it's really really terrifying. And that's what we've seen kind of across the board when we're trying to communicate with people about this. And so we try to kind of adjust address out of it with the podcast. I wanna talk more about how your addressing that with a podcast when we continue with KPCC's Jacob Margolis and with Lucy Joe. Owns the founder of the doctor Lucie Jones center for science and society. Glad to get some of your con- convents as well about dealing with earthquakes. Love jeopardy tweeted. I remember when an earthquake struck DC in twenty eleven and no one was prepared. We probably shouldn't expect earthquakes only in California because plate tectonics are complex and can be unpredictable. Let's create protocols. Dr Jones is nodding in agreement as we speak, and we'll talk to her more about what some of those protocols should be. And we'll get some more of your questions in stories in just a moment. I'm Joshua Johnson. Glad to be with you. You're listening to one A from W A, M, U and NPR. Tide of plastic waste is contaminating the oceans if companies dumping all of this.

Jacob Margolis California Nevada Joshua Johnson KPCC Robin Williams Lucie Jones Dr Jones founder Lucy Joe Ten thousand years
"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"jacob margolis" Discussed on KPCC

"You probably know what to do when an earthquake hits right drop cover. Definitely. There will be the perception that the ground is literally waving in front of you. What about after the quake is over? Water be safety drink. There will be a boil water notice issued going through all of southern California. Probably. If your apartment is damaged is rent still do rent would not be do because one of the basic tenants of being a landlord is that your unit has to be habitable. So if the unit is not considered habitable for living than they are not able to collect rent, can you tell road is safe to drive on doesn't look safe. And it doesn't need an engineer necessarily senior. I'm Jacob Margolis. Keep science reporter and host of the new podcast the big one survival guide. Listen an apple podcasts. This is science Friday on my reflection. We're talking with David Ludwig. He is a professor at Harvard and an expert in nutrition we're talking about the dining that people are going through. So what is your recommendation in a few minutes? I have left with what is your recommendation for people who said, I've gotta change my way of eating I wanna to lose weight. But I want to keep it in a plan that lasts me for a lifetime. Right. Well, I think the focus keep the focus on quality over quantity. I think we we now really clearly understand that when you go on a conventional low calorie diet hunger goes up, that's the very first thing that happens, and you hunger is in a fleeting feeling it's a primal biological signal that your body wants calories. And even if you could ignore it, which most people can't even for one day. Your body would fight back in other ways with slowing metabolism. We need to figure out how to eat the doesn't. Exacerbate the this body pushback in that battle between minded metabolism metabolism tends to to win. So this is the big debate does the relative amounts of protein fat and carbohydrate or other aspects of our diet matter there, I think. You might Pinon is that the process carbs, the or the main problem here, they they drive up insulin insulin, you can call it the miracle grow for your fat cells it programs, your fat cells to store extra calories. It may be a subtle effect. But over weeks months and years, I think there's a plausible case to be made. That's underlying a good part of the obesity epidemic. So we can focus on cutting back the process carbs that flooded our diet during the low fat years white bread white rice potato products added sugar replaced that with unprocessed car- carbohydrates whole fruits and. Minimally, processed, grains, the way that grandparents used to eat it and not fear. Fat fat is makes food tasty. And it slows down digestion doesn't raise insulin. So in my view, fat should be encouraged not feared in a weight loss plan sound very much like the Michael pollen, which a grandmother shop on the.

David Ludwig Pinon Jacob Margolis California obesity Harvard apple engineer reporter one day