4 Burst results for "Jacob Levinson"

"jacob levinson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"jacob levinson" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome, , back to the outcome rocket podcasts for re chat with today's most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders really wish that you could visit us at outcomes rockets dot health slash reviews where you can rate and review today's episode. . We have an amazing guest. . His name is Jacob Levinson he's the CEO at map help management. . Jacobs. . Extensive career is focused on being very dialed into the healthcare center. . He's member of board of Directors Levinson. . Foundation privately funded Philanthropic Organization Charter to really develop, , manage, , and fund diverse portfolio and humanitarian activities around the world. . He's a member try private capital. . He's just done so many things in realm of just contributing to this humanitarian. . Capacity that his fit in health care makes so much sense and you guys all hear the passionate voice when we dive deeper. . But what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Jacob. . So he could fill in the gaps in the introduction Jacob Welcome to the PODCAST. . Thanks for having me excited to be on with you know get good job introduction nothing to add looking forward to next forty five minutes or so of of hitting some of these were topics absolutely in so Jacob why did you decide to get into the medical sector? ? You could have done so many things, , but you decided to land here. . Why asked myself that often? ? It's like a Greek tragedy. . For your run from it, , the more you run into it. . So I grew up around a lot of active substance use disorder in my house it. . Oh, , child of the late eighties nineties KINDA GROPE UNSEEN KINDA staff and Watch family members struggle, , and the last thing I ever wanted to do was a line my professional career with anything that had to do with addiction or substance use disorder. . So of course, , that's exactly what happened. . It wasn't by choice it was I I don't know some sort of gravitational pull maybe back to what I knew. . So I it's no I don't think it's any secret that you grow up kind of around substance use disorder, , and then someone like me ends up involved in writing algorithms to detect active substance use I. . Mean I've been doing it too right. . So I don't know if there's a coherent explanation but I was born. . Into the addiction world in that sense. . Yeah. . It was woven into your fiber as as kid and it was sorta like something you've been doing. . So why not continue to do it? ? There's a lot of work that needs to be done in this space out there and I felt like that we had an opportunity to make some change and we need to put our best foot forward go do something. . So yeah, , it's exciting time and really pivotal Kinda critical juncture in history we're watching so many things transformed are going to drive this for the next generation to generation. . So kind of having a a front seat of somebody that's really exciting. . Yeah that's super exciting and so for the listeners, , maybe you could dive in a little bit on what some of the work that you guys do and how it's relevant to the space shirt. . So I'll try to keep it simple. . We focus predominantly on individuals who have a substance use disorder diagnosis. . What we call addiction is to kind of put that some staggering terms twenty two and a half twenty, , three, , million Americans fit the criteria for substance use disorder, , which is a big number of that high. . High, , and this year to bigger number mind blowing than national economic impact of substance abuse a little bit different than substance use disorder but substance abuse is about seven hundred, , forty, , billion dollars annually. . So that's almost in line with our national defense budget. . But that's things work lost productivity. . That's every dollar that is extended. . If you will as a result of substance abuse sweeping up glass after you I rex everything. . So and trump a couple of weeks ago declared this a public health emergency, , a public emergency. . We have a public health crisis opioid crisis, , which is grabbing headlines Yes, , but it's by far not the number one cost driver, , nor is it the number one kind of killer in Dash Ud world if you will out well, , let's set tobacco aside but alcohol far kills more people than opiates still to this day just doesn't do it in a headline grabbing away like a fictional overdose but to jump to question quickly, , we managed people who have a sense use disorder diagnosis using peers, , I mean people. . Who are in successful recovery but what we do the truly interesting we tech enable them and we date enable them. . So we put a lot of tech and other tools at their fingertips that help them identify people who are struggling, , make better decisions and helping them ultimately, , the whole game here is to improve outcomes for people, , substance use disorder, , and chip away at that seven hundred, , forty billion dollars that were emerging as a nation. .

Jacob disorder Philanthropic Organization Cha Foundation WanNa Bekker Europe Lotta Hills
A Curious Way to Improve Outcomes in Substance Use Disorder Space

Outcomes Rocket

04:47 min | 2 months ago

A Curious Way to Improve Outcomes in Substance Use Disorder Space

"Welcome, back to the outcome rocket podcasts for re chat with today's most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders really wish that you could visit us at outcomes rockets dot health slash reviews where you can rate and review today's episode. We have an amazing guest. His name is Jacob Levinson he's the CEO at map help management. Jacobs. Extensive career is focused on being very dialed into the healthcare center. He's member of board of Directors Levinson. Foundation privately funded Philanthropic Organization Charter to really develop, manage, and fund diverse portfolio and humanitarian activities around the world. He's a member try private capital. He's just done so many things in realm of just contributing to this humanitarian. Capacity that his fit in health care makes so much sense and you guys all hear the passionate voice when we dive deeper. But what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Jacob. So he could fill in the gaps in the introduction Jacob Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me excited to be on with you know get good job introduction nothing to add looking forward to next forty five minutes or so of of hitting some of these were topics absolutely in so Jacob why did you decide to get into the medical sector? You could have done so many things, but you decided to land here. Why asked myself that often? It's like a Greek tragedy. For your run from it, the more you run into it. So I grew up around a lot of active substance use disorder in my house it. Oh, child of the late eighties nineties KINDA GROPE UNSEEN KINDA staff and Watch family members struggle, and the last thing I ever wanted to do was a line my professional career with anything that had to do with addiction or substance use disorder. So of course, that's exactly what happened. It wasn't by choice it was I I don't know some sort of gravitational pull maybe back to what I knew. So I it's no I don't think it's any secret that you grow up kind of around substance use disorder, and then someone like me ends up involved in writing algorithms to detect active substance use I. Mean I've been doing it too right. So I don't know if there's a coherent explanation but I was born. Into the addiction world in that sense. Yeah. It was woven into your fiber as as kid and it was sorta like something you've been doing. So why not continue to do it? There's a lot of work that needs to be done in this space out there and I felt like that we had an opportunity to make some change and we need to put our best foot forward go do something. So yeah, it's exciting time and really pivotal Kinda critical juncture in history we're watching so many things transformed are going to drive this for the next generation to generation. So kind of having a a front seat of somebody that's really exciting. Yeah that's super exciting and so for the listeners, maybe you could dive in a little bit on what some of the work that you guys do and how it's relevant to the space shirt. So I'll try to keep it simple. We focus predominantly on individuals who have a substance use disorder diagnosis. What we call addiction is to kind of put that some staggering terms twenty two and a half twenty, three, million Americans fit the criteria for substance use disorder, which is a big number of that high. High, and this year to bigger number mind blowing than national economic impact of substance abuse a little bit different than substance use disorder but substance abuse is about seven hundred, forty, billion dollars annually. So that's almost in line with our national defense budget. But that's things work lost productivity. That's every dollar that is extended. If you will as a result of substance abuse sweeping up glass after you I rex everything. So and trump a couple of weeks ago declared this a public health emergency, a public emergency. We have a public health crisis opioid crisis, which is grabbing headlines Yes, but it's by far not the number one cost driver, nor is it the number one kind of killer in Dash Ud world if you will out well, let's set tobacco aside but alcohol far kills more people than opiates still to this day just doesn't do it in a headline grabbing away like a fictional overdose but to jump to question quickly, we managed people who have a sense use disorder diagnosis using peers, I mean people. Who are in successful recovery but what we do the truly interesting we tech enable them and we date enable them. So we put a lot of tech and other tools at their fingertips that help them identify people who are struggling, make better decisions and helping them ultimately, the whole game here is to improve outcomes for people, substance use disorder, and chip away at that seven hundred, forty billion dollars that were emerging as a nation.

Jacob Levinson Disorder Directors Levinson Philanthropic Organization Cha Foundation Jacobs
"jacob levinson" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"jacob levinson" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"This nineteen eighty-four hit was recorded by the supergroup manned aid how super nobody special. Just David Bowie Duran grander and cool. And the gang. Sir Paul McCartney Phil Collins Spandau Ballet Staying U2 and win and that's only about half of the unsolvable. The whole thing was the brainchild brainchild of singer. Songwriter and activist Paul Geldof irish-born Geldof had a Jewish grandfather. So while I wouldn't go as far as to call him Jewish songwriter. Let's just say. He was grandfathered in the song. Sold over two million copies around the globe and raised more than twenty four million dollars like an action hero returning when he is needed. Do they know it's Christmas. Has Been Re recorded three times in eighty nine and two thousand four for famine relief and in two thousand fourteen to raise funds to help combat Ebola in terms of fundraiser songs. The only thing to top it was Elton. John's candle in the wind. Nineteen Ninety Ninety seven to honor the late Princess Diana by raising money for the charities she championed Oh and to answer the question. Do they know it's Christmas Ethiopia. PROPIA is over sixty percent Christian. So I'M GONNA go out on a limb and say yes. Yes they do the composers. Were talking about today today. Have names that are less familiar than they were. Two generations ago though a few like Mel Torme and Urban Berlin still have some cachet many of if these nearly forgotten names were also pen names owing to the age old habit of changing your name to sound more American and less ethnic. It's the most wonderful wonderful time of the year was written by George. Wyle born Bernard Weissman and Eddie Pola was originally Sydney Polacek. While got his start playing playing piano in the catskills before moving to la to write and conduct music for the Alan Young Radio Show. His other great claim to fame is writing the music to the theme song for the TV show. Oh Gilligan's island. Musical talent must run in their family while grandson. Is Adam Levy who plays guitar in Norah Jones's banded is also a composer Jay Livingston who co wrote Silver Bells was born as thoroughly Jewish. Sounding Jacob Levinson. The song was written for the nineteen fifty one. Bob Hope. Hope movie the Lemon Drop Kid. The song was originally tinkle bells. which is a legitimate choice of words to describe bells ringing? And then his wife informed him of what the word tinkle means to little children and people who can only use childish euphemisms to describe natural bodily functions so he changed it. The songs lyricist assist Ray Evans was also Jewish. The two formed a songwriting partnership in nineteen thirty seven that endured until Livingston's death in two thousand one bonus fact according to the American Society for Composers Authors and publishers. I the most popular version of Jingle Bells. Is the one by saxophonist. Kenny g you also as you said it's going to turn out like a long form version of Adam Sandler's Hanukkah song and I only wish I thought of it early enough to set it to music in the best selling single of all time is also a Christmas Carol written by Jew the Bing crosby recording of white Christmas by Irving Berlin.

Silver Bells Paul Geldof Ninety Ninety Jay Livingston Sir Paul McCartney David Bowie Duran Princess Diana Mel Torme Ray Evans Phil Collins American Society for Composers Adam Levy Bob Hope Adam Sandler Ebola Ethiopia Irving Berlin Bing crosby Urban Berlin
"jacob levinson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"jacob levinson" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"To you by the Commonwealth of Virginia. Yeah. For Larry and John indicate K radio morning. News says their back the first year view and me until then John shell Kaczynski today for the final half hour of the show. He is odd mysterious and fascinating history of Pittsburgh are very special Christmas edition, and I'm sorry. If you missed out, the number of great topics we've discussed already, but there's still more talk about this. Interesting fascinating curious aspect about how this connection with Pittsburgh and Christmas going back. All my goodness. As we talked about earlier one hundred fifty years, maybe even more yet to the very very very beginning. I mean, it's Pittsburgh always was looking out for their for their pit their fellow Pittsburghers and Christmas, really, you know, is about giving and it's about not expecting anything in return and the true meaning of Christmas comes through these old news articles, and these old facts. You find and and see that the Christmas spirit in a nonreligious sense. The spirit the spirit of the holiday really shine through especially in Pittsburgh. That's I'm sure many cities, but because of all the industry and all the all the people coming here the influx of people all bringing their own traditions kinda create this giant melting pot of holiday happiness, and whether how to do with, you know, whatever your beliefs were it was just a matter of a coming together units. One big happy, Pittsburgh family and making sure that everybody is taken care of. Okay. And it's a just a it's a fascinating to see how that message always wrong. True and still rings true to this day where you have secret. Santa's are people just paying off KMart layaway, and these things stole exist. You know, they always say that say better to, you know, it's always better to give you know, like, you know, the size. Your Walt means nothing unless you can give it away Andrew Carnegie, for example. One of Pittsburgh's many Santa clauses true and gave away ninety percent of his entire fortune before he died made sure that most of it was giving away and became a basis for all future billionaires to follow where he preached about peace and trying to get us out of actually out of wars. This is what he spent a majority of his last of his life doing was trying to spread the message of peace, and what do you think about how much money he gave away? Yeah. Considering he sold his steel interests for around four hundred fifty million dollars. It would have been in the hundreds of billions of dollars in today's money. Yes. All the J P Morgan. All people for for would they quivalent of billions and billions and billions of dollars and then decided to give all of that ninety percent of it. I just give it away. Just the Pittsburgh better to everyone around the world people think Carnegie, libraries, just like a Pittsburgh thing. There's Carnegie libraries in over seventy countries seventy country, not know that there's ones in Africa, Australia. Okay. London. You know, all over the world. I mean, this is really the gift of giving realizing that little he had when he was a boy here in Pittsburgh because he was a little boy in Pittsburgh wasn't like he came over here in his thirties. You came over here. What he was a little boy like seven eight years old and inexperienced hardships. And really was Europe. The Pitta me of working your way up the ladder. And just kind of, you know, do, you know, seeing how to do it and very inspiring? But what he did later in life is the most inspiring giving back, and it's an important lesson to be learned by all. Of course, what are you? Have when it comes to the Christmas connection expert. What he so some people might know of of never heard of Jacob Levinson. But some people might have heard of Jay Livingston now. Jay Livingston was a songwriter. Okay. Is born nineteen fifteen nearby McDonald PA allegany county went to McDonald high school and soon afterwards, he grant graduated college. And he moved to New York City where he became a songwriter and started writing songs for movies new Bob Hope movie was coming out called the lemon drop kid. And there's a scene in there where Bob Hope is dressed as a Santa Claus. And as like a Salvation Army person that sits outside the ringing the bell. And and occurred to them that there was never really a modern day Christmas song at that time and most role talking about, you know, riding in one ozone orbin slaves or or their traditional items, you know, this was a new. Inspiration where he's talking about. Let's talk about the bells of the city the city sidewalks, busy sidewalks stopping. Jingle Bells all the church bells. You know, the the army people. So it was a about the. Yeah, he does Jay Livingston and his partner wrote the song. Which later is. Of course, a huge it today. And it's the song silver bells. And that was written by a Pittsburgh. I guess you could say nice Jay Livingston. Also, the little tidbit about that actual song is after he wrote it he was so excited. He came home showed his wife and played it. And he called a tinkle bells. His wife was hysterical. He's like, what's the matter? Why why are you laughing at my song? You know? It's a beautiful talk. You can't call tinkle. Bells. So they changed the name to silver bells. And today, we know, but Jay Livingston also wrote the theme song to bonanza and mister, Ed. He was a Pittsburgh is his brother you may. You were talking about how up to that point. They were all older song. Yes. And it's interesting that people of different eras the songs that mean, the most are some of the ones that you can really relate backwards to. But is everyone comes forward as new songs? Come on. Yeah. Then there's that. I remember when a kid hearing that song and the new ones that are coming out. Now, we'll have real significance. I'm a huge twenty forty years down the road, huge fan of music trivia in even one hit wonder trivia, and if you look into the history of Christmas songs, it's very fascinating. In fact, I was thinking about even just doing a separate thing the odd mysterious fascinating history of Christmas songs because they have interesting origins. Were they come from how they were written. Why were written star guy? Jingle Bells is crazy, but the or songs like white Christmas. My Christmas wasn't around till the nineteen forties now or Rudolph the red nose reindeer wasn't produced till the nineteen forties. So I can only think my grandparents were born. There was no such song as Rudolph the retinues reindeer and just didn't exist. There was no white Christmas. It's it really boggles your mind. Christmas holiday there's been green sleeves which is traditional song. You know? But modern day Christmas songs are not even one hundred years old. It is John Shokalsky once again, the odd mysterious and fascinating history of Pittsburgh, and you can find out so much more on Facebook. Right. Facebook and Twitter search for odd. Pittsburgh you got.

Pittsburgh Jay Livingston John shell Kaczynski Jingle Bells Virginia Andrew Carnegie Bob Hope Facebook J P Morgan Salvation Army Larry McDonald PA allegany county New York City London Europe Africa Rudolph Australia Santa