3 Burst results for "Jackson Haley"

"jackson haley" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"jackson haley" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Winning. Doing for his but Bill is back. So let's check out your traffic right now. Traffic on the fives Bill. Yes. Sorry. Totally my full of blame it on a sticky. Switch going on around you. I'm doing my best traffic sponsored by Wyndham hotels and resorts six thirty five eastbound at forest lane. Looks like something still in the way, they're an accident of the HOV lane. Eastbound at Miller Roby accidents been cleared also trying to get one cleared out of the way westbound at plano road. And new problem for six thirty five westbound at web chapel two right lanes blocked by that accident heading into downtown. I thirty east bound approaching riverfront boulevard the collisions been cleared. It's slow going at from Fort Worth avenue at an early tonight. Twenty eastbound at Cooper, a wreck blocks the left lane that's backed up yet to to eighty seven with more than six thousand hotels across the country, including Lakisha days in super eight a great hotel by Wyndham is closer than you think. Find one near you and book directed window motels dot com with kale I f traffic on the fives. I'm Bill Jackson. Haley of news time is now eight seven back on track now on Thursday garland police received a tip on the possible location of a minivan thought to be involved in a hit and run accident two thousand six. Choi Toyota Sienna was located and confirmed to be the vehicle involved. Additionally formation led investigators to the suspect identified as thirty five year old Miguel Castro resident of Dallas has her was arrested in Richardson Thursday night is now in the garland jail charges of failing to stop and render aid serious bodily injury and possession of methamphetamine group paid to promote tourism for the city of Dallas is named an interim CA CEO..

Bill Jackson Wyndham HOV lane Dallas Toyota Sienna Miller Roby Fort Worth Miguel Castro garland Haley methamphetamine CEO Richardson CA thirty five year
"jackson haley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:37 min | 3 years ago

"jackson haley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it on WNYC. My guests are Neri ward and Gary carry on their Yari. We're talking about the new museum exhibit Nari ward. We the people it's open now open until may twenty six Mary. You must like history. Yeah. I think history. I like the fact that history is is always being made up. Right. The idea of revisionism is inherent in his sheet. Should always be revised. It should always be updated. And I and I like that. I think all artists earn some ways historians. They kind of what they're dealing with on a formal level. Maybe it's the history of material. But on a social political level is it's a history of how we think and relate to each other. So I feel like there's so much room to to add to the narrative that exists. So in other words, like everything's starting with history. Everything is a kind of molding of history. So I like to play with the expectation of history. My guests are now award and Gary carry on Murari, we're talking about Norwich's retrospective. We the people which is at the new museum. It's open now. And we'll be on until may twenty six Gary the show is called we the people as referring this big piece of work that we walk in. And we see we the people everybody used to seeing it. And then as you get closer, you realize that the material it shoelaces, what are the dimensions? Do offhand of the dimensions of the piece the dimensions. That piece off hand. It's probably something like twenty five. Thirty in in length changes, according to the space. We you know, it is possible to adjust it. But I did always wanted to be lives like, you know, human scale than the idea of how Brinda body back into the conversation was really important. And that does that, you know, in a way people recognize it as shoelace connected back to their experiences of tieing shoes or body in some way. But I did want it to. An all of the works about two body dinos about how in the early works were were modular things that I was collecting and creating the environment for the body to move around the the viewer to move around and experience it, and then breathing pounds of later works some reference to the body through the imprints on the the copper panels themselves. So that's always the starting revolving point for me. When you and I I'm sure this is purposeful. But when you come out of the elevator and the elevator doors open, we the people the first thing you see it's almost like an unveiling like a production. Every time the elevator doors open. Edison name of the show. Why? Well, I think from an installation standpoint, we do tend to like architecture lens to these kind of dramatic moments. But we we didn't have a long conversation with with Mary about we the people as a title, and we had a lot of back and forth about it. You know, I think that floor in particular that works installed kind of. For us of makes the case why the show is titled that that way. Because in many ways, we think about areas and artists who is very much rooted in in Harlem in that community. We also think about him, you know, even in like, art art, historically, as a figure who really kind of represents a generation who kind of emerged on the international stage. He's done works all around the world. And by any ills and residencies and his work. I think does. Speak to lots of different kinds of cultural experiences. And we the people I think kind of gets at how he's able to work in both of those ways how he is able to instill be an artist too. You know, who is an important part of what is happening in Harlem and also an artist who can work on the international stage because he's asking questions about, you know, who we are as a community, and you know, what kinds of communities do we belong to and how are those communities defined at? How can we use objects in sculptures and artworks to kind of talk about those relationships in in some ways, you know, make those relationships stronger. So for us it made a lot of sense to title, the show that way and actually have that piece of the heart of the show. One of your pieces deals with immigration, but it's a piece from two thousand four when you think about that piece. Now, the naturalisation drawing table did it did it when you met it again like you said. Did it feel different to you? Lot of the pieces. We the people also is a very early peace now has the whole nother read and resonance, and I think the same happens with naturalization drawing table, I was it was a personal. It all starts a personal space. It was about applying for my citizenship. And wanting to figure out how to make that into an art experience as well and complicated. And so that the entire mortgage for that piece was coming from that personal space that now when it's activated. I think there is a real. Oh, there's a much more of an initiative to think about the current political climate, which I could never predict it, you know. So it's it's unfortunately timely piece in a way, you did you one piece specifically for this show. Correct. Yes. What is up? He's well, it was a piece that. It was actually it was actually inspired by something. I've found across from my studio. There's there's the male Jackson school PS one twenty three hundred and forty first street, and I remember picking up this small plastic. Medallion of Martin Luther King that was discarded. I had it on my my studio door for give might some demand for these four or five years, and it's just I guess the current climate. I felt like there was something about Dr king's sort of selflessness that I felt would an inspiration that that was really necessary. And so I wanted to do something with this medallion. And so when they were showing me the small space in the museum, I said, you know, I think I have an idea that I want to do here. And so there's a piece is called take my hand. And it's it's the the medallions behind the scrim. And then there's a sound component with Mahalia Jackson because the school's name was male Jackson. Haley actually the gospel singers sung at Dr king's wake. So I wanted to bring in. Exodus song was purchase Lor take my hand. So that's very title comes from. So there's an instrumental component of that within a piece so you can't really seeds kind of semi hidden is kind of like using his you can't really see the medallion. But behind you as you're looking at this installation. Be behind you Simone inflation. There is a framed version of one or two of the medallion and over covered with the particular kind of plexiglas, and it's called the king mission that particular piece, and that piece is a piece that I'm hoping that people will want to purchase because all the proceeds of its of the purchasing of it goes to the about remission than the streets are really wanted to idea of how to use this image of king and have it become using a kind of social Justice cause. And that's also just that's great with where the new museum is. I mean in a way it's located in New York math. I witnessed couple Sundays ago. And I was walking all the way up from downtown. And it's really. Interesting. How that area has changed so much the ICP's down there. And it's that trying to. Sort of celebrate the neighborhood, but also recognize its issues and problems. I think that's an interesting choice that you may have go towards the Barry mission. What did you think when you heard that idea? I mean, we thought it was a fantastic idea. I mean, you know, we've been neighbors with the mission for over ten years now, and you know, as much as the neighborhood has changed and the new museum has been part of the neighbor changing the need for the mission hasn't changed in the work. They've been in existence for over one hundred years, and we do, you know? You know, we do value value that relationship we have with them. So usually once a year, we do kind of coat drive with them, and we get free mission for that. But when Mary had this idea without it was a really wonderful way to take what I think he does I think naturally with you know, he's done a lot of projects, and Lenin places that engage with the local community, but to do something in our neighborhood was really special. So and it's a it's a beautiful piece too. So. There's one piece I stood in front of for a long time. It was iron heavens. Oh, yeah. So it's I there's something about a lot of something. Also. That's so it's baseball bats. And they are charged right charged is that. Yeah. Okay. And then so they're sort of at an angle, and then almost like a headboard of a bed only, huge up a wall, our racks and grills from oven. Yeah. Why those two together I love it. I don't want, you know, question all of my, you know, I think the emphasis is is trying to create a kind of visual intensity and energy and a fire of us fire and fire hose as a way is sort of. I guess frame that out that that notion of the nation for the viewer. And so that that beats piece actually started out as a two part piece. I was thinking about loss and the oven pans became a framework for thinking about loss because I remember in grade school the teacher talking about the stars the light from the stars when you look up in the night sky, but a time those that light has gotten to the planet earth. They no longer exists. And so I never saw two stars the same way always felt kind of melancholy beauty about it. But also sadness, and that sort of sense of the beauty of loss, maybe came out and that he's and then there's the the bat, which is this kind of primal club. And so the idea was to try to take this thing about violence and put a notion of transform it into something about curing or caring for. So if you look carefully. Discharged Baxter's dirty this'll cotton's elements took a picture right now. Yes. So each one has these little contacts that they're like ironed cotton. That's that's on nailed on that. And so his idea of like, dressing, a wound. Right. So they're distressing wound that they they I wanted to scribe to it. So they're they're they're being transformed, and they're also being conjured with this this element of loss. Okay. Now, I can look at it differently. Now that I know the mischievous part of that is you know, like baseball is all American sport. And it's also talking about the sort of maybe kind of the violence of the birth of this country through the native Americans, and and slavery as well. Yeah. I thought I thought with with the burning of the bats and the oven. I thought it like sort of a loss of something or a transformation of something that's sort of normal and in our everyday life into something else. Right. Right. Part of what I like about that piece. And also to those that, you know, there's a lot of room for you to kind of find a narrative within a lot of the pieces, you know, especially with something like amazing grace to you know, depending on how you relate to those materials. But also, I think that is like it's very beautiful on like, even though it's like, she pans like it has this does create this sort of celestial sky for you. So there's a certain language of like almost abstraction that I think about when you think about painting that Nari brings to like sculpture, which I think is really, and I think Aaron heavens is a really wonderful example elegant too. I remember I I was at the Whitney when it was first shown and this gentleman came up to me and he's year two artists in those. Yes, he goes. I know what you're doing a know it. I know what you're saying really know what I'm saying. And he goes Shengambo. It's Sango the the the sort of the of war and so for him it may and I am looking at him like, you're right. This is van go. So there's a lot of room culturally for other. Hopefully says about Uruguayan wizards a friend of ours who in the Cadillac he mentions like coming from Africa. He reads it as a shrine like immediately that forms is a shrine Bush. I don't really necessarily my background doesn't mean I read it that way..

new museum Martin Luther King Gary Harlem baseball Mary Mahalia Jackson Nari ward Neri ward Africa ICP New York Edison Nari Jackson school Barry mission Shengambo Murari Aaron heavens
"jackson haley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:50 min | 3 years ago

"jackson haley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it on WNYC. My guests are narrower award and Gary carry on their Yari. We're talking about the new museum exhibit narrow award read the people it's open now open until may twenty six Mary. You must like history. Yeah. I think history. I like the fact that his tree is is always being made up the idea of revisionism is inherent in his should always be revised. It should always be updated. And I and I like that. I think all artists earn some ways historians. The kind of they're dealing with on a formal level. Maybe it's the history of material. But on a social political level is it's a history of how we think and relate to each other. So I feel like there's so much room to to to add to the narrative that exists. So in other words, like everything's starting with history. Everything is a kind of molding of history. So I like to play with the expectation of history. My guess are now award and Gary Carey, I'm Marie Yari. We're talking about Norwich's retrospective. We the people which is at the new museum. It's open now. And we'll be on until may twenty six Gary the show is called we the people as referring this big piece of work that we walk in. And we see we the people as people are used to seeing it. And then as you get closer, you realize that the material it's shoelaces, what are the dimensions? Do offhand of the dimensions of the Pedo know the dimensions that piece off hand. It's probably something like twenty five. Thirty in in length changes, according to the space. We you know, it is possible to adjust it. But I did always wanted to be live like human scale, then the idea of how Brinda body back into the conversation was really important, and the shoelaces that does that, you know, in a way people recognize it as shoelace connected back to their experiences of tieing shoes or divide in some way. But I did want it to. All of the works about body about how in the early works were modular things that was collecting and creating the environment for the body to move around in the viewer to move around and experience it, and then breathing pounds later works some reference to the body through the imprints on the copper panels themselves. So that's always the starting revolving point for me when you and I I'm sure this is purposeful. But when you come out of the elevator and the elevator doors open. We the people is the first thing you see it's almost like an unveiling like a production. Every time the elevator doors open. Edison him of the show. Why? I think from an installation standpoint, we do tend to like our architecture lens to these kind of dramatic moments. But we we didn't have a long conversation with Mary about we the people as a title. We had a lot of back and forth about it. You know, I think that floor in particular that works installed kind of. For us. Kind of makes the case why the show is titled that that way. Because in many ways, you know, we think about areas and artist who is very much rooted in in Harlem in that community. We also think about him, you know, even in like, art art, historically, as a figure who really kind of represents a generation who kind of emerged on the international stage. He's done works all around the world. And by any ills and residencies and his work. I think does. Speak to lots of different kinds of cultural experiences. And we the people I think kind of gets at how he's able to work in both of those as how he is able to instill be an artist too. You know, who's important part of what is happening in Harlem and also an artist who can work on this international stage because he's asking questions about who we are as a community, and you know, what kinds of communities do we belong to and how are those communities defined, and how can we use objects and sculptures and artworks to kind of talk about those relationships in some ways, you know, make those relationships stronger. So for us it made a lot of sense to title, the chair that way and actually have that piece of part of the show. One of your pieces deals with immigration, but it's a piece from two thousand four when you think about that piece. Now, the naturalization drawing table did it did it when you met it again like you said. Did it feel different to you? Love the pieces. We the people also is a very early peace now has a whole nother read and residents, and I think the same happens with naturalization drawing table, I was it was a personal. It all starts a very personal space. Zayed's about applying for my citizenship. And wanting to figure out how to make that into an art experience as well and complicated. And so that the entire more for that piece was coming from that personal space that now when it's activated. I think there's a real. There's a much more of an initiative to think about the current political climate, which I could never predict it, you know. So it's it's unfortunately timely piece in a way, you did you one piece specifically for this show. Correct. Yes. What is that? Well, it was a piece that. It was actually it was actually inspired by something. I've found across from my studio. There's there's the Mahalia Jackson school PS one twenty three hundred and forty first street, and I remember picking up this small plastic medallion of. Martin Luther King that was discarded, and I had it on my my studio door for give my demand for these new four or five years, and it's just the current climate. I felt like there was something about Dr king's sort of selflessness that I felt would an inspiration that felt was really necessary. And so I wanted to do something with this medallion. And so when they were showing me this small space in the museum. I said, you know, I think I have an idea that I want to do here. And so there's a piece is called take my hand. And it's. It's the medallions behind the scrim. And then there's a sound component with Mahalia Jackson because the school's name was male Jackson. Haley actually the gospel singers sung at Dr king's wake. So I wanted to bring in extra to song was purchase Lor take my hand. So that's very title comes from. So as an instrumental component of that within a piece, so you can't really seeds their semi hidden is kind of like using his you can't really see medallion. But behind you as you're looking at this installation behind you smallest relation. There is a framed version of one or two of the medallion and over covered with the particular kind of plexiglas, and it's called a king mission that particular piece, and that piece is a piece that I'm hoping that people will want to purchase because all the proceeds of its of the purchasing of it goes to the about our mission vanished. Streets are really wanted to idea of how to use this image of king and have it become using a kind of social Justice cause. And that's also just that's great with where the new museum is. I mean, in a way it's located in New York I witnessed couple Sundays ago. And I was walking all the way up from downtown. And it's really interesting how that area has changed so much the new ICP's down there. And it's that trying to. Sort of celebrate the neighborhood. But also recognize it's issues and problems. I think that's an interesting choice that you may have go towards the Barry mission. What did you think when you heard that idea? I mean, we thought it was a fantastic idea. I mean, you know, we've been neighbors with the mission for over ten years now, and you know, as much as the neighborhood has changed and the new museum has been part of the neighbor changing the need for the mission hasn't changed and the work. You know, they've been in existence for over one hundred years, and we do. You know, we do value value that relationship we have with them. So usually once a year, we do kind of a coat drive with them and get free admission for that. But when we had this idea, we thought it was a really wonderful way to take what I think he does. I think that's you know, he's done a lot of projects and let 'em places that engage with local community. But to do something in our neighborhood was really special. So and it's a it's a beautiful piece too. So. There's one piece I stood in front of for a long time. It was iron heavens. Oh, yeah. So it's I there's something about a lot of something. Also. That's so it's baseball bats. And they are charged right? Is that? Yeah. Okay. And then so they're sort of at an angle, and then almost like a headboard of a bed only, huge up a wall, our racks and grills from Penns. Yeah. Been pan. Why those two together I love it. I don't you know, you know. No question, all of my. I think the emphasis is trying to create a kind of visual intensity and energy and a fire of us fire and fire hose as a way to sort of. I guess frame that out that that notion at a immagination for the viewer. And so that that beats piece actually started out as a two part piece. I was thinking about loss and the oven pans became a framework for thinking about loss because I remember in grade school the teacher talking about the stars the light from the stars when you look up in the night sky, but a time those that light has gotten to the planet earth. They no longer exists inside never saw two stars the same. We always felt kind of melancholy beauty about it. But also sadness, and that sort of sense of the beauty of loss, maybe came out that he's and then there's the the bat, which is this kind of primal club. And so the idea was to try to take this thing about violence and put a notion of transform it into something about curing or caring for. So if you look carefully. Undischarged Baxter's dirty this little cotton's elements took a picture right now. Yes. So each one has these little contacts that they're like ironed cotton. That's that's on nailed on that. And so his idea of dressing a wound. Right. So they're distressing wound that they I wanted to describe to it. So they're they're they're being transformed, and they're also being conjured with this this element of loss. Okay. Now, I can look at it differently. Now that I know of the mischievous part of that is like baseball is all American sport. It's also talking about the sort of maybe a kind of the violence of the birth of this country through the native Americans, and and slavery as well. Yeah. I thought I thought with with the burning of the bats and the oven. I thought like sort of a loss of something or a transformation of something that's sort of normal and in our everyday life into something else. Right. What I what I like about that piece. Also narrative of those that, you know, there's a lot of room for you to kind of find a a narrative within a lot of the pieces, you know, especially with something like amazing grace to you know, depending on how you relate to those materials. But also, I think that pieces look very it's beautiful on like, even though it's like, she pans like it has this does create this sort of celestial sky for you. So there's a certain language of almost abstraction that I think about when I think about painting that Nari brings to like sculpture, which I think is really. And I think our inheritance is a really wonderful example elegant too. I remember I I was at the Whitney when it was first shown and this gentleman came up to me and he's year two artists. Yes. And he goes, I know what you're doing. I know it. I know what you're saying. Really know what I'm saying? And he goes Shangahi, it's Sango the, you know, the the sort of the of war and so for him it may looking at him like, you're right. This is fan go. So there's a lot of room culturally for other. Hopefully says about the reserves a friend of ours who in the Cadillac, you mentioned like coming from Africa. He reads it as a shrine like immediately like that forum is a shrine, which I don't necessarily my background doesn't mean I read it that way. But I think it does operate on these different levels depending on where you're coming from. But isn't that interesting? Your people bring themselves to the piece of work. I was thinking about with Manila Jackson thought people would know that song certain people would know what that is right away..

new museum Martin Luther King Mahalia Jackson Gary Carey Harlem baseball Mahalia Jackson school Africa New York ICP Norwich Edison Mary Zayed Nari Barry mission Shangahi Marie Yari Haley