5 Burst results for "Jackson Cantrell"

"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:19 min | 2 years ago

"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

"General store at Kennedy meadows, people applaud every hiker as they arrive at this place. A tiny town of twenty eight people in just a few businesses and due to the growing popularity of the Pacific crest trail, more hikers will hear that applause every year. The movie wild might have played a role Reese, Witherspoon starred in the out of tation of the bestselling memoir, by Cheryl strayed about her epoch hike along the T in twenty thirteen the year before it came out the Pacific crest trail association issued fewer than a thousand permits to hikers by twenty eighteen that number exploded to forty five hundred. And the Reisen hikers is great for business in Kennedy meadows. The trail is the economic lifeblood here, especially to the store here. Yep. Been source of it. That's she's the head, chef of the general store, and we have spaghetti dinners for the hikers. We have movies every Saturday night, and we want to make their stay here pleasurable this year. There's more hikers here than ever. Because about thirty miles up the trail. The snowdrifts start people aren't just here to resupply. They're deciding whether to continue at all. Or wait for the snow to melt the grounds around the store feel like a summer camp. There's a small amphitheater in eating area outside on a large wooden deck, and they are campsites dozens of them. But instead of homesick kids, you see smelly adults. They load up on cheeseburgers. Look over waterproof maps, and explode their gear out over the lunch tables. There are a lot of chores to do as well laundry shower, which is a tour. We had a ton of packages, we just like organizing our new gear and trying to figure out how it fits in our pack that extra gear like an ice axe and snow. Spikes are critical for the mountains up ahead. For many of these hikers is more than a really super extra-long twenty six hundred fifty mile trail. It's a massive life uprooting undertaking to pull this off. Many of these folks planned far in advance. They saved up money and sent packages of food to themselves along resupply point. The track will take five or even six months, so many left behind jobs. John Schwartz took it a step further. He completed the P C T last year turned right around and height back to Mexico and he's not done yet. Yeah. All the great western move next year. Full PT six hundred miles of the Pacific northwest trail, the full divide trail full grand champion, Arizona. And then you had to walk in the Grand Canyon over to Palm Springs. But most PC, tears, aren't these crazy hiker types, at least not yet, they're normal people from everywhere, young and old had been dreaming about it for three or four years in couldn't pass it up. I just came right out of high school. So for me digging gap here and a jumped on it. Retired early. And, and now I moved out of my place, so I'm not going back to Portland. I'm just going to travel for the foreseeable future. And so I'm really know. Man. The trail has its own culture, when you meet someone. It's a fist bump only know touching hands. You get an undue the handshake we're dirtiest clean right now. But yeah. And everyone gets a nickname of their own to a trail me. What pecker tortilla? I'm wild Turkey from Richmond, Virginia might have his piddle because I take forever to do anything ziplock. They come in the old bag. So I tried to make it a little softer high crime Kenyan nomadic bear. Seven tried to call me condom toe, because I cut my toe before the hot springs. So I put a condom on my toe, which worked really well. Surprisingly. John Turner runs an outdoor shop sixty miles north and has met thousands of tears. He said, most people hike to move on from something this stood out to him after the two thousand eight financial crash, and you suddenly had these kids who just walked away from big screen TV's. They walked away from real jobs and everything we're like, I don't know. My buddy said, we walked blocked Canada. And I felt that that was a great opportunity for them to truly live with less and figuring how to have everything that own in eighteen to thirty five pounds and have a long term relationship with people who don't know except for their walking buddies. It's so powerful for people who've been come so detached from community, many people, I talked to spoke about trying to find something more authentic. Here's pneumatic bear. Company got taken over by much larger corporation culture changes weren't working for me. And I looked at my savings, and I was okay to live a modest lifestyle for the foreseeable future. Then there is the Rodriguez. For those of you who are hearing me right now. You can't really see me. But I'm the guy that's six feet tall about three hundred and five pounds hike in the PC t-. What about fifty five fifty five pound pack it's pretty tough because it's a lot of weight on my legs like sometimes it's a little difficult doesn't. I can't really travel as quick as others. But I'm slowly building up there, a couple months ago. Rodriguez was homeless living on Sunset Boulevard where he slept behind an L poi- local drive-thru menu now woke up to people ordering food. I was weird. I was like how going to get out of this, what I look in weird, you know, like a guy just emerged from behind the actual food menu. That's weird man. You know. I've dreamed about doing the PC to you have to find it on YouTube about two years ago. So I kind of us now the PC has push come to move on from homelessness and transmit myself into a better, better future Rodriguez noticed that people. Treat them differently on the trail than in Hollywood. Yes, major, it's a major shift in paradigm when you come to like being treated in a certain way, you know. You know, people kind of look at you weird and that kind of like pass you by now coming out here, though. Now it's different because, like in a way, I'm homeless, but I'm not because I have a tent, you know, so nobody really sees many different. That's actually tell them. I'm homeless Rodriguez plans to stay in Kennedy meadows for five days. He's hiking around town to acclimate to the altitude and wait out some of this snow after that who knows. I don't have a plan, I go as I go as I go, that's the way I've lived the last four years. You know, our Mondo is enthusiastic, but it's not a good idea to wing it in the snow right up above Kennedy meadows that afternoon. Sun makes the snowpack soft so hikers can slip with every step as Zach Mancelle found out the hard way, the snow fell beneath my feet and I started going down and it was really scary. And I grabbed onto a pine branch, maybe about fifteen feet after falling, but our friends Sam, she is going towards a cliff and the same thing. She grabbed to a branch that saved her life. Again. She hiked the last year. He's now in Kennedy meadows to help hikers prepare for what's up ahead interest on snow is REBA critics and was the stream will is high. It's not negotiable. So my number on the vice the don't cross the street by yourself. Here's Paolo Ferri, who just hide sixty five miles north through snow from Kennedy meadows to the next stop north, the town of lone, pine the slows down it becomes miserable. Because you're, you know, if every step, you're, you're slipping all over the place and your muscles are working twice as hard to compensate. You beat the slippery snow by getting out at two AM hiking in the morning. But certain sections of the trail are exposed, where icy shoots, mean one misstep could send you sliding off a cliff. Once you get there. There's like five different trails at all to the same place and. None of them are easy but still offers encouragement for hikers who go for it. It's worth it every corner. You turn every mile like you're just wild. It's kind of blending in together with the desert section. But, like, once we got here. Yeah. Every mile has something that is just like jaw-dropping as everybody says it high hike your own hike, a lot of hikers fair yet, are taking their chances on the snow and heading up the trail after all, it's hard to wait, it out when the snow is so deep in some places could last until July or KCRW. I'm Jackson Cantrell. That was reporter Jackson Cantrell along the Pacific crest trail. Just ahead. Longshore workers valve big fight after the harbor commission votes to allow automation at the ports. A little later, how to deal with a world of robots and a world of poverty, when there's less work and people with less money. The idea of universal basic income is gaining a little traction in one city here in California. You're listening to greater LA on art w. Looking for an escape make Morocco tap into centuries of ancient energy on the streets of Marrakech in dance under African skies the away. Suspenseful sweepstakes is your shot at experiencing the best of electronic music, plus art food and culture. All courtesy of KCRW see acts like four Tet Dixon.

Kennedy meadows Rodriguez Pacific crest trail Pacific crest trail associatio Jackson Cantrell Reisen John Schwartz Arizona John Turner Portland Reese LA Morocco Cheryl Canada California YouTube
"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

"State is where dozens of people have been charged with joining ISIS more than anywhere else in the country is also where a follower of the Sri Lanka attack's mastermind was recently, arrested allegedly planning a suicide attack. It's actually a beautiful area with Swain palm trees, white sand beaches, and huge villas people say, for every mansion here, there's someone working in the Gulf, and sending home money on the porch of one such mansion Abdul Rodman, Param bonds slumps in a plastic chair in the med. In school the way, we'll mighty describes how a man who spent time in the Gulf, and Sri Lanka radicalized, his two sons and then took them to Afghanistan. One of the sons has since been killed in a US drone strike. Their Indian authorities say the recruiter had been kicked out of college in Sri Lanka for advocating violent jihad intelligence agencies have been tracking his Llamas links like these between tree Lanka and south India, political scientist, ST Mooney says ISIS is trying to recruit in both places as it loses territory. Elsewhere this, maybe a message also abide Islamic state saying that looked we are still alive and kicking. If you're pushing out from Syria, we are very much alive in Sri Lanka. We are very much alive in South Asia. Isis has radicalized people all over the world, but heartbreaking stories from parents like these have been very rare in India. Because even with nearly two hundred million Muslims. India had very few cases of radicalization, politically, culturally, Indian Muslims are indicated into the Indian mainstream. But no. But now says political scientist, Ashraf catechal. He knew nationalists are in power and Muslims. Feel disenfranchised ISIS. Recruitment has not been concentrated in northern India, though, where most Muslims live, it's happening in the south, which has stronger labor ties with the Gulf Kottakal notes. They work in Middle Eastern region, and they come back with a new perspective. They consider the environment is not Islamic here. You see the faces of women cinema dance drama, everybody that may be changing, though, in at least one Carolina town called pod. Donna where many women now wear full face veils, the Gulf influence is apparent iron shore. You ago four years old, most from on a driving. Tour local politician points out more than. Two dozen mosques in a town of about thirty seven hundred families. Some of the mosques are salary preaching a strict Saudi strain of Islam. This is similar to the tree Lankan town where the ringleader of the Easter attacks grew up booth areas are flush with Gulf, money, and ideas, and that may make them fertile ground for the Islamic state's new recruitment drive. Lauren fryer, NPR news in Pudong Carola. India. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This KCRW Larry parole statistics have shown the kids from wealthy families generally score much higher on standardized tests than kids for poor families while the college board. That's the company that creates the SAT is trying to do something to address this bias in its test. It's known as the adversity index. What it does. There's places students SAT score in the context of that suits environment without using any personal information generates an index from data about the students, high school and neighborhood number of students eligible for free or reduced lunch. The number of students that go onto college. The number of single parent households the neighborhood crime rate as well. The college board says it's been testing the new scoring system with fifty colleges, and we'll be rolling it out to others this year and next. Well with recent revelations of wealthy families paint to get their kids into prestigious programs and ongoing fights over affirmative action. College applications have become a touchy subject, and the new SAT scoring system has gotten some mixed reviews but. What about local high school students? What do they think about the idea? Reporter Jackson Cantrell, talked to a few of them in areas with incomes, low anti all around LA. Here are some high school student, voices featured on KCRW's newest show, greater LA. Honestly, it just like man for some kids, a struggle, you know, they don't have like tutors. They don't have all the things all the resources that other students would have had, you know, so it's sort of like an advantage at the other students would have had it while compared to like stay myself or other students. Here's effort onto high like it's difficult for us because we don't damn I wish I had this. I wish I had that like one more one on one time with the teacher individually. My family is not well educated. They didn't even finish grade school. And they're actually immigrants from Guatemala. So like school is school. When I once I get home schooling environment is over. It's just like like a home environment of versus those people who have like they're educated family. They already know like the system. They know how like things like that work. So they do have a higher chance of opportunity. I mean, I think it's pretty smart because obviously, like we have.

India Sri Lanka Isis ISIS Gulf scientist US LA Swain palm Afghanistan South Asia Abdul Rodman NPR Middle Eastern ST Mooney Pudong Carola
"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

"But statistics show that kids from wealthy families generally score much higher on standardized tests than kids from poorer families. And as a result, quite a few colleges have stopped requiring the test at all while the college board. That's the company that created the SAT is trying to do something to address that bias in its test. And it's been trying out something. It calls the environmental context dashboard. Yeah, it's a mouthful. So it is becoming known as the adversity index and what it does is it places a student's SAT score in the context of that students environment without using any personal information at generates this index from data about the students high school in the neighborhood and number of students eligible for free or reduced lunch. The number of students go on to college. The number of single parent households in the neighborhood crime rate. You get the idea. The college board says it's been testing that new scoring. System with fifty colleges, it'll be rolling it out to others this year, and next, and with recent revelations of wealthy families paying to get their kids into prestigious programs an ongoing fights over affirmative action college applications become a pretty touchy subject, and the new SAT scoring system has received mixed reviews. But what about local high school students? What did they think about the idea? Reporter Jackson Cantrell, talked to a few of them in areas with incomes low and high all across greater LA, honestly, just like man for some kids, a struggle, you know, they don't have like tutors. They have all the things all the resources that other students would have had, you know, so it's sort of like an advantage at the other students would have had while compared to like myself or other students. Here's effort high like it's difficult for us because we damn I wish I had this I wish I had that like one more one on one time with the teacher individually. My family is not well educated. They didn't even finish grade school. And they're actually immigrants from Guatemala. So like school is school. When I once I get home schooling environment is over. It's just like like a home environment of versus those people who have educated family. They already know like the system. They know how like things like that work. So they do have a higher chance opportunity. I mean, I think it's pretty smart because obviously, like we have the resources.

Jackson Cantrell Guatemala Reporter LA
"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

"Raised in San Pedro Forty-six years here. And this town is giving me everything I've coach high school basketball. I put both my kids do the public school system here, and I've put them off to college. I love this. There's nothing like it. And that's why I will fight to the end for my community. Reporter Jackson Cantrell has been following automated at the port of Los Angeles. He's with us here today. Jackson. Hey, Steve what what kind of job losses? Are we talking about when it comes to automation in this big behemoth terminal? Remember this stacking things that you heard about over a tray pack that was one hundred fifty to two hundred jobs lost estimated, but APM Mirsky a much larger terminal. So here we could expect to see up to twelve hundred jobs. So we're talking like ten almost ten times. Yeah. Exactly. And do these jobs just disappear. I mean what happens in a situation like this? Did they go poof? Well, it's not exactly layoffs, but it chips away at the work. That's available for everyone. So pretty much. Everyone's our get cut, especially the temp workers who get the last pick of the shifts. So it's kind of like a domino effect. Yes. Exactly. So longshore work is is well known for being among the last jobs, right where you don't necessarily need a. A college degree, but you can still make a decent living. Exactly. These are some of the last well, paying blue collar jobs in the area. I mean, the some of these longshore workers about half of them make over one hundred thousand dollars, and if you're a clerk or for menu make even more so the the people I spoke to you know, they have money to send off their kids to college. They can donate to fines. You know and support local businesses in San Pedro. So obviously, there's a lot at stake for these workers. And there's certainly a lot at stake for the union. It is I guess a symbol of what's been happening in the economy overall right that people are being replaced, by automation by artificial intelligence things. Like that. I mean, that's certainly how.

San Pedro Jackson Cantrell APM Mirsky basketball Los Angeles Reporter Steve one hundred thousand dollars Forty-six years
"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"jackson cantrell" Discussed on KCRW

"Commissioners will decide by this Wednesday whether Merce can replace its workers with robots and Harare says he is ready for battle. I'm a born and raised in San Pedro Forty-six years here. And this town is giving me everything I've coach high school basketball. I put both my kids do the public school system here, and I've put them off to college. I love this talent. There's nothing like it. And that's why I will fight to the end for my community. And reporter Jackson Cantrell has been following automation at the port of Los Angeles. He's with us here today high Jackson. Hey, steve. So what what kind of job losses? Are we talking about when it comes to automation, and this big behemoth terminal remember, those stacking things that you heard about over a tray Pac man, well that was one hundred fifty to two hundred jobs lost estimated, but APM Mirsky is a much larger terminal. So here we could expect to see up to twelve hundred jobs. So we're talking like ten almost ten times. Yeah. Exactly. And do these jobs just disappear. I mean what happens in a situation like this? Did they just go poof? Well, it's not exactly layoffs, but it chips away at the work. That's available for everyone. So pretty much everyone's our skate cut, especially the temp workers who get the last pick of the shifts. So it's kind of like a domino effect. Yes. Exactly. So long work is is well known for being among the last jobs, right where you don't necessarily need a. A college degree, but you can still make decent living. Exactly. These are some of the last well, paying blue collar jobs in the area. I mean, the some of these longshore workers about half of them make over one hundred thousand dollars, and if you're a clerk or foremen, you make even more. So the the people I spoke to you know, they have money to send off their kids to college. They can donate to TSA fines, you know. And support local businesses in San Pedro. So obviously, there's a lot at stake for these workers. And there's certainly a lot at stake for the union. It is I guess a symbol of what's been happening in the economy overall right that people are being replaced, by automation by artificial intelligence things. Like that. I mean, that's certainly.

San Pedro Jackson Cantrell Merce APM Mirsky Harare basketball Los Angeles reporter TSA steve one hundred thousand dollars Forty-six years