7 Burst results for "Jackie Kay"

"jackie kay" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"jackie kay" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"It got me thinking about the origin of the word iron, both as a verb and a noun, and whether there was any relation to the same named element. Your joyfully Pamela Wright, what's the answer? From the fire give address. So, do you remember the abbreviation for iron in the periodic table? No. FE FE. Oh, if he has in ferrous metal, FE versus yes, I do. I was attached was obviously had lots of meanings, but it's been attached to various handheld implements with a flat base used to heat and smooth fabric or clothes. Since the 19th century at least. And in this sense, it goes back to the idea that, well, the reality that these implements were made of RN and they were heated originally by being placed in a fire, or by being filled with hot coals or other material. And you often find them with other words like steam iron smoothing iron flat iron, et cetera. But yes, they've been around for a while, but they were generally made with iron and with that metal and then they were heated up on the fire. Very good. Thank you for that. If you have got queries, just send them into us. It's a purple at something else dot com. Susie, every week you give us three intriguing unusual, genuine words that you feel deserve greater currency. What is in your trio this week? I'm going to start with the word that if you want to dismiss someone but kindly without being overtly satirical or insulting, you can say that someone is a bit retired. So you might say, oh my goodness, your hair is just so retarded. And it sounds quite nice, but actually it means behind the times. So it comes to the French meaning late. So, yes, ritual tear, you are so behind the times. But it's a bit like another word that I introduced you to ages ago, which was Chris quilles, meaning rubbish, and I always think quiz quill sounds absolutely beautiful, but that's what it means rubbish. So that's retired chair. Then you have the rye area. If I told you this one before. Under the nose. Yes. It's the hairless and slightly moist nose of many animals, including dogs, of course. The Rhine area. I get that because of rhinoceros because that's to do with the nose of the right. It is, it means nose horn. Yes. Very good. Okay. So once more. Ryan area. So RH, AR IU, M and the third one is grip a, and skip it means all your baggage and personal belongings or your stuff. So after Christmas when you're gathering, hopefully some presents, et cetera, if you've been to stay with relatives, you gather your skip and then you've so Scripps, your baggage and personal belongings. Three fascinating words, and one short poem from me. Yes, please. Every week I try to end with a poem that may be appropriate to the time of year or some of the things we've been talking about. This one comes from my anthology of perjury to learn by heart, and it certainly is short enough to learn by art. The book's called dancing by the light of the moon, and this year, I'm hoping to learn just one poem a month. And this would be a lovely one to learn at the beginning of the year. It's by the Scottish laureate Jackie Kay, the prime is simply called promise. Remember, the time of year, when the future appears, like a blank sheet of paper, clean calendar, a new chance on thick, white snow, you.

Pamela Wright Chris quilles FE Susie Scripps Ryan Jackie Kay
"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

"Bessie Smith, singing, give me.

"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

"I'm Michael silver blanc. This is bookworm, and I'm talking with Jackie K about her new book, Bessie Smith, a poet's biography of a blues legend. Its a polyphonic text, the combines, history, poetry, personal narrative, memoir, and biography. Lives of those people who took work songs and spirituals, and combined them into the new form that became known as the blues. A form that influenced all of the popular music that followed it. And this was a generation of women. The men were dressed in a manner that showed their poverty, but the women like Bessie Smith were dressed in plumes was given a red dress to addition in by her later to be thieving and impossible husband, but her color was red and her manner of singing was clarion. This was not a whispery blues. This was knowing the blues as a way of life. Now tell me, did you go back when you were listening to bessie, to the spirituals and the work songs and the church songs that informed her? Yeah, I did. And I just immersed myself in the work songs and the lyrics of them and the ones that I could find. Immersive myself in all of their recordings. You know, 160 different songs. And in all her contemporaries, you know, Clara Smith, Laura Smith, ma Rainey, a better hunter. I just listened to Louis Armstrong and listen to all the people that were around at the time over and over and over again. And I really, I like the idea of the kind of etymology of the blues that if we listen to contemporary jazz music, for instance, we will find the ancestral voice of the blues in it. I like chasing the blues bloodline back to its former back to its roots. And the work song and the sleeve song and the spiritual all influenced the blues and bessie herself went to church. That would have influenced the way that she sang as well and the way that she hung on to notes. I really became completely naturally fascinated when I was writing the book with the idea that people had these blues women had a story to tell and that women would come in their tens of thousands to see their Smiths and she had this audience before she was ever even recorded. The story that she told was real to them, she was telling the story of their life. She was like, I imagine they chronicler. She was explaining their lives back to them and people took her songs very personally. Those blues they told of no good new kind men, but they told them death they'd all have been haunted. They told the money problems of floods of depression of crashes. They were a woman loving women in the blues. It was women being upset with men in the business. There's women finding men irresistible in the blues. I want to be sure that we end hearing Bessie Smith's voice and you mention that she runs the range from the broken hearted to the celebratory and raucous. If you were to choose between nobody knows you when you're down and out, a heartbroken song, and give me a pig foot. Which one would you choose? To represent bessie with. I think it's really really hard that's a hard choice. I think we should choose today, because of this conversation that we're having right now. And we're trying to remember trying to capture the people that listen to your program, the idea that bessie was she was flawed, she had a temper, but she was defiant. She had a real sense of herself as a working class back woman who was proud to be herself and had a great sense of style, who liked dressing up and who liked to tell it like it is. And so I think, yeah, let's go out with give me a pig foot because I think knocking back that middle lightning and eating a pig foot. When she was an improvement she used to cook, you know, for her whole crew. And she'd mix Jews, pig feet, stews, so yeah, I like to think of her on a train cooking singing and drinking gin. When I finally heard bessie, singing that song which I already knew, it changed my life. Jackie K I want to thank you very deeply. This last week's I have been spending with your work, and I intend to read still more of it and I intend to talk to you again in the future as you write more of it. This book published by vintage is a beautiful book, but it took 20 years for it to appear in America. Why was that do you think? I think it's interesting, you know, sometimes books have their time when it was published in the UK, 20 years ago. It got no attention really. I think it had one review and a thousand of the work printed. And then it just disappeared. And it's only been republished now because of serendipity really Alexis that works at Faber who published it in the UK, happened to find a copy of the old book in the secondhand book chop. And so she took it home and she said that that night just read it from cover to cover in one sitting. And she got in touch with me and said, you know, why hasn't this gotten more attention? I didn't even know you'd written it. So they published it here with favor and the huge amount of attention 20 odd years later. Maybe suddenly it was the right time. Maybe that mixture of memoir biography was too much for people to have maybe the book itself in the form of it. And was ahead of its time, all I know is that books have their moments and it's really interesting to me that sometimes books come into their time. Well, Jackie, I believe just as you say that Bessie Smith was a performer of her time perfect for her time and a perfect voice to meet uy Armstrong's horn, and I think that your book Bessie Smith a poet's biography of abuse legend is absolutely a book of this time. We may have waited 20 years for it, but I think it's a great book. Thank you for it. And here's.

Bessie Smith bessie Michael silver blanc Clara Smith Jackie Laura Smith ma Rainey Louis Armstrong depression UK Faber Alexis America uy Armstrong
"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

"Finally knew as yours. Yeah, that's a lovely, really lovely way to put it almost like a poem. But yeah, as a kid, I was fascinated with her face because I grew up in an old white part of Glasgow and I didn't have any teachers that were any teachers at all that like me. I didn't have any friends that looked like me. My parents didn't like me. And so I kind of made an imaginary family up for myself, really. And the mastering family that had Brian and black people in it and the best he was in that family. And it was really great to try and engage in that way. There was lots of things that happened that nobody understood and it was quite isolating. And we did my brother and I did get beaten up and Billie's quite a lot. So I did kind of make this other world that was a positive world and the world had the blues. And the blues spoke to me directly. And so when I was writing this book, I was trying to first of all, remember, that exact feeling as a child when you felt like you found a friend for life and that friend would stand up for you. She wouldn't run away when people shout out his names. You company. And I thought, you know, she'd kept me company in so many different ways in my life. I wanted to find a way to write about that process of becoming how much the people that we love, whether they be writers or artists or singers, how much they become part of our own identity, particularly if we felt isolated alone, misunderstood, but we can really fasten on to people and they become part of us. And that's not something that's often written about. You know, listening to your program, I get really reminded of that often just how intimate the relationship is between writer and reader and how much it matters. And yes, so for me, ambassador blues, little authentic, real stories and some of these stories, I could imagine picture myself in afternoons to try and imagine being around in a Pullman. I didn't know that a Pullman was actually a train, then I thought it was a wagon. I imagined myself queens in the wagon and having sex with other women in the road and I was like 1415 when I first read anything about her. I read that she had sex with women in the pool. Oh, my God. That sounds so exciting. Yes, her Pullman car was famous. Was it young with green letters or green with yellow? It was yellow with green letters. And she went everywhere with the niece of her husband traveling with her at first it was possible that this niece was spying on bessie for her husband who was one of bessie's famous no good men. But it turned out that Sarah loved her and go to be with her and found her powerful and found her singing beautiful, in fact, this niece wanted to be Bessie Smith and bessie had to prevent her from too much imitation because bessie was never going to be anything but her own woman. You know, she is the breaker of crowds. People assemble around her. Her voice is so piercing and powerful that she makes way in the room for herself. Now I'm talking to the wonderful Jackie K, who is a Scottish poet, Jackie, do you happen to have the book with you? Yes, I do, Michael, I have it right here. Wonderful. Would you read the poem that begins at the red graveyard to us? Yes, with pleasure, thank you. The red graveyard, I wrote because I was thinking of all the violent relationships that bessie had with various different violent men. And in this point, I imagine they're all collected together in the same grave out, which was quite a kind of pleasing image, the red graveyard. There are some stones that open in the night like flowers down in the red graveyard where besse haunts her lovers. There are stones that Sheik and weep in the heart of night down in the red graveyard where bessie haunts her lovers. My daily member the blues, I'm 5 or 6 or 7 in the back garden, the window is wide open. Her voice is slow, motion through the heavy summer air, jelly roll, kitchen man. Sausage roll, bang pan. Inside the house, but I used to be myself. Her voice claims the rooms in the best room even something has changed the shape of my silence. Why do they remember her voice and not my own mothers? Why do I remember the blues? My mother's voice. What was it like? A flat stone for skitting, an old rock, long, long grass, as felt, wind, hill, cotton, linen, salt, treacle. I think it was a peach. I heard it dying to the ripped stone. I'm coming down the stairs and my parents house. I am 5 or 6 or 7. There is fat thick wallpaper, I always caress bumping flour into flour. He is singing. Did he play anyone else ever? My father's feet tap a shiny beat to the floor. Placed my father says some voice she's got. I pick up the record cover, and now this is so motion. My hands, swoops, glides, swoops, again. I pick up the cover in my fingers are all over her face. Her black face, her magnificent black face, that some voice issues dancing on the floor. There are some stones that open in the night like flowers down in the red graveyard where Betsy haunts her lovers. There are stones that shake and weep in the heart of night, down in the red graveyard where bessie haunts her lovers. That was the poem, the red graveyard by my guest, Jackie K it serves as an introduction to her biography of Bessie Smith, but it is in one of her books of poetry as well, knowing Michael silver blood in your listening to cases abuse bookworm, Jackie Kay has republished her book Bessie Smith the poet's biography of a bruise legend. The book was published originally 20 years ago, and finally here it is published in America in paperback by vintage, will continue after this short break. Case RW sponsors include Sony Pictures classics presenting Julia, a new film from the directors of the Academy Award nominated RBG Julie Cohen and Betsy west about Julia Child. The legendary cooking author who changed the way Americans think about television, food, and women. With never before seen archival footage and personal photos. Now playing everywhere. Dive into the underground of the 80s with one of its most passionate voices. I'm JoJo o'donoghue host of this thing called snap every Monday Wednesday and Thursday night between ten p.m. and midnight saves my life and I hope it does use some good too. I kind of get the impression that it does. Casey RW presents bent by nature. Listen now, at KCRW dot com slash bent by nature or wherever you get your podcasts..

bessie Jackie K Bessie Smith Billie besse Glasgow Pullman Brian Sheik Jackie Sarah Michael silver Jackie Kay Michael Betsy Julie Cohen Betsy west Sony Pictures Julia Child
"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"jackie kay" Discussed on Bookworm

"Of Bessie Smith? Oh, I like that the singing show. I think I first encountered her when I was 12 years old, my dad bought me any woman's blues, double album, and it was my 12th birthday. So that was just so exciting. I mean, it was such a great birthday present. I loved the two faces of her on that album, because in the front, she looked quite sad and in the back she was smiling and laughing. And there was always this kind of doubleness right away and that album cover. And I loved the stories that were in the blues. I didn't understand a lot of them back then. In the sense that I hear something like kitchen man, and he's very nice and sweet. And I think that, you know, she had a man that was cooking her nice things to eat. And it was great some time before I cut onto the Juventus. But yeah, it's fascinating when you love somebody from that age just grew up with them. They started hearing Bessie Smith when Columbia, which was the label she very first recorded where they issued a 160 of her sides and from the time that she was very popular, the Empress of the blues till she reaches the point where she is down and out, and she already knows very well that nobody knows you when you're down and out, now tell me you were adopted. Your parents are leftists, radicals, and so they were able to do this, tell me about them. Oh, they really fantastic. People are called John and Helen. They have actually trouble being accepted by an adoption agency because they weren't particularly religious. They were political inevitably believed in peace and also something. But they weren't particularly religious and they wouldn't lying about not being religious. They had trouble being accepted by an adoption agency in the first place, but they really were and the most remarkable people. I see aware because they both have died in the last year. So I'm kind of heartbroken, but sorry. Thank you. I just have the kind of experience and with them, if I had to choose them and rather than nature it was me, I would have chosen them. They were really, really fantastic and fun. And wonderful people and had a great sense of humor and a great sense of what was right and what was wrong in the world. And my dad absolutely loved the blis. But remember when they got my brother first year adopted my brother who is the same color as me, but not my he's not my biological brother. And my mom said to the adoption agency, the accepted them. And she said to them, by the way, we don't mind what color the child is. They said, oh, really? Well, in that case, we've got a baby for you. And that was my brother who was in an orphanage. My mom couldn't get away with that. You know, she kind of repeat that story over and over to and then she told the adoption agency that she wanted another child his color. One day, about two and a half years later, they formed up and said, we've got a woman coming down from the highlands and the father of the baby from Nigeria. And then my mom said, they'll have that baby. So she always said it was the closest she could get to giving birth herself. She didn't know if I'd be a boy or a girl or healthy or unhealthy. And actually when I was born, I was born very ill and they told my mom to pick another baby, but she absolutely wouldn't because she'd got completely attached to the idea of well, during the last month I've read nearly all of Jackie case poetry, which I think is quite beautiful. You get a specimen of it at the beginning sort of the prologue to Bessie Smith, the biography. And I have to tell my listeners that I've come in the process to love Jackie Kay. She has also written novels and children's books, children's poetry and plays, and I wonder not so much what is the role of people of color in Scotland, what is the role of an artist of color? Oh, it's lovely, lovely question. It's interesting, you know, because as you said, I was the macer, the national boys of Scotland up until March this year. It was an extraordinary thing. We asked to be the matter, but also was particularly extraordinary for me because it felt like the first time I ever properly belonged to my country. I lost my country, but it was like people were always saying to you, Betty from because they couldn't hear your scholarship and because they're too busy seeing your face. So people always assume that I was American or from the Dominican Republic or whatever, even though I'm speaking to you like this. So it was the first time that I felt like I probably had a back Scottish writer that I felt like I properly belonged to my country and that they took pride in me and they knew that I was Scottish that I didn't have to keep explaining and giving different stories. And that was felt quite a healing process, but you know, I'm gonna be 60, so it was late coming. This becomes a part of Bessie Smith's story as well. First she singing by the age of 12 on the streets, and she joins traveling vaudeville shows in tents, but she's not among the first people to be asked to record her blues because it was said of her that her skin color was too Brown and that her manner was too rough and that people wouldn't want to hear a normal black housewife, singing the blues until it turned out that she had an audience following her before she even recorded that was in the millions that and her very first set of albums released by the then new Columbia Records 5 records. They saw three quarters of a million copies within the first 6 months, and the other blues, singers, like ma Rainey, who was very, very famous, and bisexual were accused of singing a whispery blues. Bessie Smith's blues are practically shouted, her heartbrokenness comes from the heart, and her raucous qualities come from genuine inebriation and crazy deep mouth. In this book, you describe what it was like to hold her face on the record cover against your own, and to see something that you.

Bessie Smith Juventus Jackie Kay Helen Columbia Scotland Nigeria John Jackie Dominican Republic Betty new Columbia Records ma Rainey Brown
"jackie kay" Discussed on Lured Up - A Pokémon GO Podcast

Lured Up - A Pokémon GO Podcast

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"jackie kay" Discussed on Lured Up - A Pokémon GO Podcast

"Not gonna worry about it. One day i might get it one day. They might lower it to rank ten or whatever would however they did with pika to like made me wanna battle because it was a lower commitment than i had to make but i still had to sort of grind for it. You know now. They did a good job with the pitcher libra because they they brought it down. There was two seasons where you where it was unobtainable for many many trainers because you had to get to rank ten then when they changed it to you know the the ranked ten based just on wins it was still a challenge and a grind for people but it was much easier but the people that weren't the typical ranked ten battler able to achieve it and still felt super accomplished. Yeah getting it yup. That was it was like the perfect balance. It was really cool so you know. Maybe we'll see something happened with season seven or season eight gb l. Where for alicia will be you know brought down a couple of years. We'll have to see this. Next one from gopher big fudge says they could try and at least give a few days off between events say event starts at six pm. Local time on thursday goes to monday. Say nine pm. Local time gives three days off. If you don't wanna hit spotlight our or raid. How hard so that makes sense. Because there's there's typically a weekend event and now we have spotlight our tuesday and rate our wednesday. It's there's always something going on it. I'm telling you it's hard to find a balance right now. Jackie kay says fomo plays out very differently when you pay twelve dollars event and don't even know if you're going to get to play because of the weather Because the weather's been so badly. Not help that. I only bought the tickets before i was certain i could play them because community daughter community day. Preorder bonus you had to. The weather is really fucked right now. So it sucks if people were like really planning on going out and playing this event and then the weather is going to keep them inside. That sucks that really really. Yeah we're supposed to get a bad storm on friday so dude it's supposed to start here. Four am tomorrow and we'll it's actually an en- four hours from right now because we just past midnight here in jersey so in four hours. It's going to start snowing and it's not gonna stop until friday ten. Am so shit. I i have you know thirty hours of snow coming my way starting very very soon socks but but saturday partly cloudy and a cool. Thirty four degrees. So i'll be out there fucking plane. Josh owens win says i love their being events on It makes the game exciting. Obviously like you said on the show. I do appreciate some vanilla spawns from time to time. Sometimes i miss being a week where we can all play casually without the pressure..

Josh owens monday thirty hours Jackie kay nine pm thursday friday saturday tuesday twelve dollars wednesday alicia Thirty four degrees six pm two seasons friday ten rank ten season seven one day three days
Secret Service unearths overseas fraud ring stealing millions in unemployment benefits

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Secret Service unearths overseas fraud ring stealing millions in unemployment benefits

"A sophisticated international crime ring stealing hundreds of millions in unemployment benefits intended for Americans who have lost jobs during the pandemic U. S. authorities say many victims of the fraud or first responders government workers and school employees more from CBS news correspondent Jackie Kay's let's Stephanie there Kohli applied for unemployment in Florida on April thirteenth pop up appeared on the government website saying this social security number was already used to file a claim I never filed for unemployment before so I was thinking okay maybe someone did fraudulently use my social to try and claim benefits out of me

Fraud Jackie Kay Kohli Florida CBS