17 Burst results for "Jackie Cochran"

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Jackie cochran died in nineteen eighty in at that time. According to the national aviation hall of fame he held more speed altitude and distance records than anyone in the world male or female but she never saw an american woman. Make it into space. She also never explained. What made her testify against the loveless program. We figured it might be because she was not going to be allowed in it. I have heard from others that they heard. Jackie had made the statement in later years that she regretted what she had done at the congressional hearings but we felt like she sabotaged just after the hearings. Congress sided with nasa nasa said astronauts had to be military jet test. Pilots in only men could be jet pilots. Well that's just the way things were in that man. There was no need for the levels program. Nasa ultimately decided they were not going to make the access and the funding available to continue the project. And that pretty much. Shut the door and women being able to pursue any hopes of being in the astronaut corps. I was greatly disappointed that we did not go on. I had already quit my job. I kept hoping for the best that the program would be reinstated. I just you know for every door that closes two more will open. So i just went on with my life and another door did open just not for the americans. Unfortunately for the us what happened next is soviet speed us to the punch of anti nanterre cova in nineteen sixty three which was not long after the program had died became the first woman to space. Unlike the women love was tested. Valentina tereshkova hadn't spent thousands of hours in a cockpit the soviets had heard about the lowest program and they wanted to be the first to send a woman into space so they trained her to fly and mater cosmonaut. We were very happy for her. We were sorry that it was not an american woman but we were happy that a woman finally made it into space but nasa hardly noticed the. Us was headed for the moon. Nasa spent all of its money and resources to reach that goal in. There wasn't room for anything else. It was decades before an american woman blasted off into space. So nineteen seventy eight now so recruited its first new set of astronauts since nineteen sixty nine first african americans to be recruited to the program first asian americans to be recruited to the program and notably six women including sally ride who then became the first american woman in space in nineteen ninety-three by then nasa had changed the requirements. The astronauts didn't all have to be military pilots. Sally ride she was a scientist. We were happy for sally. Ride to who went up as a mission specialist. The we were pilots. We wanted to sit up front and we want to sit in the left seat. The pilots it would take another decade for an american woman to sit there in nineteen ninety five. Eileen collins became the first woman to pilot the space shuttle and a few years later she was the first female commander of a shuttle mission. Wally phone sir. Rally both went to her launches when the rockets lifting off i was yelling out into the crowd go go for all of us and so when i lean collins went up we felt that we had been redeemed. What we had done had not been in vain that maybe we put the bug in. Someone's ear that we can crack this glass ceiling in crack it. They did but it still hasn't been shattered. Nasa has sent of men into space but only about fifty women and a woman never walked on the moon not yet anyway today nasa embraces the lowest testing program as part of its history photos of some of the women pilots can be found on the nasa website and nasa has acknowledged that these women pave the way for future astronauts. But that's far from the message. Nasa was sent into women at the time. I like to think you know this. It didn't work out and that's a shame but this was a moment of them being able to say. Hey look. there's somebody who is going to advocate for us. They're women who were going to advocate for each other and there is now scientific proof that were just as capable and i think that's very inspirational and continues to be very inspirational. Even now after nasa. Shut down the loveless program sir. Radley became an accountant that pay the bills so she could keep flying for fun at eighty five years young. Sarah still flies and she still gets questions about the lowest program recently interest. She met some college aged pilots. Several the girls had to me. You were my role model. Thought me a role model. I think it's the idea of being a pioneer of trying to do something different to bring a better life and a bit more hopes two more women. I think that's why they still onto the story because women weren't doing things like that in those days in someone had to lead the way because for sarah radley and the other women. There's only ever been one way to go up more space stories. You can read victoria. Jags essay about the future of space tourism. Also check out why some scientists think the future of spaceflight should be female. You can also see a brief history of human space in photos if you like what you hear and want to support more content like this. Please consider a national geographic subscription. Go to nat. Go dot com slash explore to subscribe. Today overheard at national geographic is produced by jacob. Pinter emily oxen schlager christian clark. Brian gutierrez and robin miniature. Our editors are ibi caputo. Casey minor hunstville sue composed our theme music and engineers are episodes with additional. Help from nick. Anderson jerry buscher early seaver and interface media group special. Thanks to pineapple street media and marker wider camp. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson manages our podcast team and susan. Goldberg is our editorial director. I'm your host peter gwen. Thanks for listening and see all next week..

Jackie cochran national aviation hall of fame Nasa Sally ride nanterre Valentina tereshkova Eileen collins Jackie Congress Us Wally sally collins sarah radley Radley Sarah Pinter emily oxen schlager chr Brian gutierrez robin miniature ibi caputo
"jackie cochran" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

08:45 min | 3 months ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Conflicts inside the tank. It's so isolating that after a while. Most people start to hallucinate. When nasa deprived the male candidates of their senses. The test was ended after three hours. But when wally took her test i stayed there. And i turn off my brain. And i took it up to the heavens and i thought about my time to go into space and so then after a long time again. He said wally what we're gonna do is turn on the lights. Get on your Towel very gently. Be careful how you come out of the pool. Come down the steps so then the doctors and so forth took me aside and said you know how long you stated i said. I don't have a clue. And he said you stayed in ten hours and thirty five venice kin hours and thirty five minutes longer than anyone else loveless tested and it wasn't just wally who did better than the men. Women had shown better results with cardiopulmonary function. They shown better results in Eyesight so it was seeming very promising and and he was releasing some of these results at scientific conferences. Saying hey look women can do this too. And in some elements perhaps they may be better than the men at handling these rigors. Newspapers and magazines started to run stories about the women pilots. But a lot of them treated the loveless program is a mere curiosity at least one profile listed the bus size of the pilot and some articles mused about what women astronauts should be called astra net astronaut trix. How about space girl. Women all had top notch aviation resumes and now hard data showing they could handle spaceflight. But this wasn't an official nasa program it was privately funded and most of the money came from an aviation legend. Jackie cochran jackie. Cochran is one of the pioneering women aviators of her age and she was actually really good friends with randy loveless and she knew about his program designing these tests and was one of the people who sort of influential in him thinking. Maybe i wanna see how women are going to fair at astronaut fitness ratings. Well jackie had become famous by winning air. Races and shattering speed records nineteen fifty-three she managed to borrow jet from the canadian air force and became the first woman to break the sound barrier now. She was looking forward to being part of a woman program. In the astronaut corps that was still forming at the time. Most importantly for randy loveless. Jackie cochran had money. Her husband was extremely wealthy. Businessmen and also chairman of the loveless foundation which facilitated the tests. But there was a catch. Jackie cochran also wanted to go to space so loveless tested her to jackie. Cochran was coming there right after me and he said she will be very disappointed because she cannot go into space. And when i walked down the hall. I heard her screaming at him when he told her that she had not passed. Jackie was in her fifties much older than the rest of the women and she had some medical problems. But even though she hadn't passed levels who still depending on her to fund the next phase of the program. after we pass a physical at albuquerque. We were supposed to go on to pensacola to get our jet training and further testing to go to space. The women needed access to something. More powerful than propeller points so loveless told them. Meet me at the navy base. In pensacola florida. He helped them out with a travel. Stipend paid for by. Jackie cochran but sarah radley still had her day job. I needed more time to go to pensacola. And they could not give me any more time off. Because we we're on over time as it was so i had to quit my job. I mean i guess that means you thought you had a pretty good shot right of joining the program. If you were willing to quit quit a good job like that yes. We are very much encouraged. And we had the feeling that we were going to go on with the program at the time. Or i had a feeling that we were gonna go on with program and the way it was explained to me love lakes. We were going on with the program as part of that program. The women would fly fighter jets for the first time in pensacola. They'd be squished into their seats. From chief forces several times stronger than gravity in a brain monitor measure their reaction. If they pass the test it would prove without a doubt that they were just as capable as male astronauts and they could go to space too. But that's not what happened. We received telegram saying the program had been cancelled. Nasa never heard of it and they told the navy to cancel the program. Nasa hadn't heard of it officially loveless was pretty well connected and he arranged the testing directly with the pensacola naval base but when some higher ups in washington. Dc found out they squashed the program. Nasa had ambitions. That didn't include women in so loveless was out of luck. He couldn't get into the facilities that he needed In part because kennedy had come along and said right. We need to take a bold step in our space flight program. We need to get to the moon and we need to do it in a hurry. And that meant we had to really tightly. Focus our efforts and our resources on getting a man to the moon and that did not bode well for being able to do these. Basically non-sanctioned tests on women because nasa knew they had no interest in women going to the moon and they had no interest in women joining the astronaut corps at the time. And so what was the point. Basically so without nasa support the program ended. They said no. No you can't learn to fly a fighter jet and no. you can't be an astronaut. There's no point spaces and arena for men. But the women they wanted to change nasr's mind they underwent physical tests psychological tests and now a bureaucratic test. Fortunately a few of the women had connections in washington. One was even married to a senator so they started pulling strings and two of the women pilots were able to set up a meeting with vice. President lyndon johnson who had been key to nasr's creation. Johnson was cordial during the meeting but a letter in his file showed that his mind was set before them. Women even got there at the bottom of the letter. he put. Stop this now. In other words lyndon johnson was very opposed to women going into space. But the women didn't give up several months later. They got the attention of a congressman from new york. Victor and few so was on the house space committee and he led a subcommittee hearing on gender discrimination at nasa. This was the moment where they said. Look you've canceled our program. But we've got this abundant data saying hey women can do this to. Why won't you reconsider at the thome. Tv and radio coverage wasn't allowed in the house so all we have are the transcripts. Two of the women pilots made the case that they contribute just as well as male astronauts but not. everyone agreed to of nasr's astronauts testified including john glenn who had just become the first american to orbit the earth that made him a national hero and the country was ready to listen to whatever he had to say. John glenn was up there saying women do not belong in space. John glenn said it's matter of our social order. Men go off to fight the wars and women stay at home and that's the way it was at that time women were just stay home and be protected. Johnson's testimony was disappointing. But maybe not surprising. Sarah rally in the other women new nasa was a boys club. But what really hurt was when. Jackie cochran testified. Well we felt that. Jackie cochran turned against as in. What did she say exactly. She said why train women because although do is get married and have children and go home. That was part of what she said. Jackie also told congress that the loveless program was moving too quickly. She said of course nasa should send women to space eventually but not now and not with these women..

Jackie cochran loveless randy loveless wally pensacola nasa Jackie cochran jackie Cochran loveless foundation jackie sarah radley canadian air force astra nasr navy Jackie albuquerque President lyndon johnson washington John glenn
"jackie cochran" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

06:54 min | 4 months ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"It's babies live on somewhere in the area. Somewhere else Things we talked about this week was harriet. Quimby yep Who as we mentioned appeared in the in the show before but just one part of four in an episode. And i was like. Oh they're so much good stuff about her life. She needs her own. Yeah there are a few a few. Prior hosts episodes that incorporate multiple people to at some specific facet of something It's not exactly like the six impossible episodes series that we've done but you know that one is about four specific flights that were done by female. Aviators this is the second time that one of those aviators then made another appearance on the show because one of them is also. Jackie cochran and i resisted doing a full episode on jackie. Cochran for a really long time because she had already been in that earlier thing but that earlier thing really is like five minutes on her. Yeah and both. Jackie cochran harry certainly worthy of more discussion than that. We talked about it some in the episode. But i really like. I said i really did. Want to make sure we highlighted. How much like she gets called an aviator all the time but really journalism was driving the bus in here. He had slept. That was that was the whole reason. She even went to watch a plane. Flight demonstration for the first time was like. Oh i can write about that right you know. If she hasn't been a journalist she would not have have ended up their being captivated by all things new and exciting as she tended to be. I will say this if you look at her articles. She was not a brief writer like she would write very lengthy really well written articles but like they were. They were not short. She tended to write long form articles. One of which i stumbled across. And i didn't really use it as a source because it wasn't really germane to the the story but like she read this whole article at one point about the importance of starting art schools in the united states And how we needed our own art tradition that was supported by a really strong and well thought out curriculum for people that were coming up and wanted to be artists and to celebrate the culture that we already had as a melting pot and it was quite quite fun to read. Yes she also wrote a great article that i stumbled across about where she kind of turns the table on Gender roles in acting where there were already so many articles about Starlets who were just. You know lured by by the magic of potentially being famous in a being unscreened and she wrote it's all about like young and upcoming actors and she kind of talks about them in the same language which is pretty funny even says at the top of the article. I know what you're about to read. You would normally think was about women but it's about guys very you see how she was able to really ride that line of being a little bit cheeky and challenging her readers but also being so charming and winsome in the way that she wrote that people were like of course we should talk about this She didn't seem to ever have a lot of backlash even when she did rates. Pretty challenging articles Which is interesting and not something that gets talked about much at all. I will say this. I'm completely captivated by that purple in jumpsuit. Yeah hello future. Halloween outfits their of its. It's darling a yeah. It's one of those things where there are some descriptions. You'll read of her. You know kind of getting to the airfield particularly if they were local to new york and you know driving up in her car and getting out and just kind of looking like this sort of unusual completely original fashion plate and and being it reminded me a little bit of we talked about katie sandina. Who is this woman who was the opposite of diminutive you know she was a tall woman very strong but also always like dressed to the nines in her nails are always done. And it's kind of like that like here's a woman who is challenging everything you think about. What a woman's role is but she also knows how to stay within people's perceptions of what a woman should be just enough that she didn't make anybody angry about it and there was a level of acceptance there which seemed to be her entire. Ethos like in saying oh no. I'm not a feminist. And i believe in that of course women should vote and have equal rights. But i'm not a feminist tone. Then once you get mad about it Which is just an interesting thing to unplug. You will hear similar things today. Like i feel like the idea of of of people saying i'm not a feminist but and then having all of the same perspectives as like mainstream feminism. Like that's still happened. Yes yes hundred. Percent i one hundred percent for sure said that when i was in college same same same same same we did not get into john lewis on but he's another one that could be an episode on his own because there's some there's a lot to unpack. They're like where his money came from. And his life which was involved with revolutions and all kinds of things before his untimely death. I feel like all of the people it seems in early aviation also have a whole other back story Of being sort of remarkable which is probably what led them to embrace this sort of dangerous and completely new and untested area There's like a personality typing that you could probably do if you wanted to make a big grid about it but yes again. A great great halloween costume idea that purple wool lined jumpsuit. He had nice and warm for cool weather halloween. You oh yeah. That's another thing that comes up. That's funny Is the the ways that people tried to help her. Make sure she was warm enough on her flights particularly english channel flight. Where they're like. she's wearing the jumpsuit. But she has two coats on top of it and some of us stuff some newspapers around her and also we put a water bottle in her lap. A hot water bottle. Because we don't know if she's going to be able to handle the cold weather up there 'cause again imagine open cockpit. Yeah no like no one could probably without a little bit of help handle that. Kind of temperature change So but again. I hope my fingers are crossed. My fingers toes hair follicles etc. That.

new york katie sandina five minutes harriet two coats six impossible episodes today both john lewis this week Halloween Quimby united states hundred Cochran second time one hundred percent first time Jackie cochran four
"jackie cochran" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

03:44 min | 9 months ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Want to begin this hour talking about marjorie taylor green. The jews have a space laser. Run by rothschild inc and it was fired from space to start the wildfires in california. At least that is something that merger taylor green believes. I'm sorry who believes this stuff. Several years ago. I had moved my old website to a platform and it was. It was abundantly clear that The platform was not all it had was made out to be an. I needed to move it away. And the ceo of the company called me and it was genuinely the m- the most bizarre was a second knows. the most. I once title eighty when i was practicing law. Who believed that. The free masons Were and marta freemasons and marta up atlanta. Yes the the the Master as atlanta that the freemasons in marta in conjunction with her together to have her thrown in jail and that they had murdered johnny cochran. I genuinely have this conversation with the woman who believed they had hacked wbtv And they were sending a fake feed wbtv tv into her house. That was feeding her information. that she was a marta bus driver and she was set up and she was put in jail They claim that she had a gun on her when she went to jail which she did but she said that the sheriff who was a freemason had told her to go through the metal detector not worry about it she didn't need to take it out and then they threw her jail and it was the freemasons and mar that had done it to her and she went to jackie cochran or johnny cochran. Johnny cochran was gonna help her and She went to the office and she met him and then she went back to the office later and it was a different office and it was a different person. And it wasn't johnny cochran the practically to be johnny cochran and then she saw the real. Johnny cochran was dead and the freemasons done murder. Johnny cochran i kid you not. That was a true story and it was the craziest craziest thing that ever happened to me. There was a lawyer in macon who referred the case to my law firm My law firm decided. I should meet with her. She wanted to file a discrimination suit against marta. Does yeltsin wanted to sue the freemasons. She left that part out. We didn't take the case so folks. This is unbelievable. Yes if you're confused with what's happening so am i. I'm telling you. About the freemasons having hijacked the wsb feed and the bilderberg rothschild's jewish space laser and all the power in our building. Just went pouf. The whole thing went out. That never happened before. I've worked at this place for a decade and it took everything off the air. We had to jump to a best of god for jim. He sprung an action in played the best of here. I was about to tell you guys. Craziest story about the rothschild jewish space laser and marjorie taylor green and in the whole thing crapped out on us because they apparently the freemasons build burgers..

johnny cochran jackie cochran california taylor green Johnny cochran marjorie taylor Were marjorie taylor green Several years ago jim yeltsin marta rothschild inc atlanta jewish title eighty marta freemasons macon bilderberg jews
"jackie cochran" Discussed on Z104

Z104

13:31 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Z104

"A bunch of individual women with very different ideas of what was going on and a reporter examines the psychological impacts of climate change I'm Allison Dunne and this is fifty one percent let me think of space flight our minds may drum up the name's Alan Shepard or John Glenn rarely are women like Jackie Cochran Jerry Cobb spotlighted in her new book fighting for space to pilots and their historic battle for female space flight author and historian Amy title does shine that spotlight through the lives of two women trailblazers a generation apart title introduces readers to the fight for women in space she spoke with fifty one percent Elizabeth Hale sang the fight for women in space really was Jackie Cochran story because she had a hand in everything Jackie Cochran is a really interesting historical figure that a lot of people have never heard of which is why I was so excited to really bring her story to light in this book she was but she was a pilot she was one of the if not the best most notable pilots a for era when she died in nineteen eighty she held more records than anyone flying bar not your male female American international she led the women's airforce service how old were so she's sort of started this movement proved that women could fly as well as men she also was the first woman to fly supersonic did sound barrier with her body check your daughter outside yet because she just kind of knew everybody she is good friends are hard to save his life one day in nineteen forty eight like you do Eisenhower was a close personal friend so he wrote his memoirs hello she also started a cosmetics company the Jacqueline Cochran cosmetics company and that that was one of the few luxury brands in the country and one point was second only to Elizabeth Arden which you know if your cosmetics person that's a that's a big name yeah she she just kind of did everything like she she wanted to be the best she could possibly be and she just mailed it in every way and it helps that she was married to Floyd Odlum who is not a very ad not a very common name either but he was one of like the robber barons actually need money he off the depression so he was one of like the ten richest man in the country at the time when they got married so between the two of them they knew everybody and like built America I mean power couples and all power couples here yeah among many of her record she broke the sound barrier in nineteen fifty three yes but it wasn't until nineteen eighty three when Sally ride went to space as the first American woman why was it so long before an American woman made it to space it took American women a long time to get into space because the way NASA was set up at the time and the way it was recruiting for astronauts women couldn't meet the basic qualifications so Jackie was kind of this really interesting rare case in in the sixties verging on senior citizen ship she was still one of the only women in the country who had worked as a test pilot objectives should say and had extensive job experience which for NASA at the time of the Apollo era being a jet test pilots one of its base requirements the idea being everything in space was so new and no one really knew what was gonna happen so the Cadia was protects them from certain death by getting the best qualified men possible and hope they die little as possible really sketchy in the sixties and a lot of ways so the base requirements women could not fly for the Air Force women could not be jet test pilots so women just didn't have what NASA needed and its astronauts at the time and you know when you're talking about going to the middle like just sticking with what they knew what the agency knew was jet test pilots as astronauts was kind of like taking out one variable it was in nineteen seventy eight that NASA's realizing okay we've got we've got the test pilot thing done we know how to live and work in space now we need to start doing science in space and we need actual scientists and that opens the astronaut corps to the distinction between pilot astronaut and mission specialist mission specialist be anybody who had an expertise that was needed in space and that opened it up to win so there were six women shows in that first class with mission specialist and Sally ride was among them and in enter Jerry Cobb with Jackie Cochran for mercury thirteen what was mercury thirteen all mercury thirteen was a name for a group of women that a Hollywood producer made up in the nineteen nineties it was not a real country so the story goes that there was this group of women at thirteen women even the one actually withdrew her name from contention from all the records I found so is actually twelve the name is not even a real thing who took the medical tests that the mercury astronauts took in the nineteen indeed meant to get nineteen fifty nine the women to get in nineteen sixty nineteen sixty one these women felt that by virtue of passing medical tests that they were as qualified as the man to fly in space and took on NASA for what they thought was their fair shot at a space flight and it kind of becomes an active mass of people fighting for what they believe is right and what they individual wants and read the end of the day you know it a medical test in nineteen sixty does not mean you are qualified for spaceflight so they really kind of took this on for reasons that were very in some cases quite quite selfish in some cases just because it was a curiosity in some cases they didn't have any inclination that it was going to be a real program so the book really kind of dives into this idea of like what what happened with the story because cool story of women taking announces like such a great feminist epic but in reality it was a bunch of individual women with very different ideas of what was going on Kabul is one of the first women to undergo these tests and kind of became the face of that fight which turned into congressional hearings in nineteen sixty two who is Jerry Cobb Jerry Cobb was a pilot she was she can't she's a generation younger than Jack and she grew up in a very different world where it wasn't it wasn't common but it wasn't unheard of for a woman to learn to fly young and Jerry actually learn to fly with her dad when she was a teenager so she was what kind of in the first iteration of women to really make a living and a name for herself as a pilot and she gets supporters off as a pilot but she the most important thing in the story is that she all of her you know she had a few records yourself and it'll you know did some really good flying she was exclusively flying propeller planes which I try to kind of make the make the analogy for people because not everyone flies I don't either it would be like taking your daily commuter car feeling like you're really good at dodging traffic and then deciding that that means you can do NASCAR so the difference between the propeller planes and jet planes is significant and Jerry was very adept I let but she threw in some way and I I deliberately introduced some evidence in the end of the book in the epilogue that calls into question she managed to take the medical test of the astronaut steps first and by merger being person her name came out in the media and she's kind of spearheaded it was one of the people kind of spearheading the idea that this would be a real program and you know much the same way that that today you see so you know as a scientist will release the paper of there's new evidence for the existence of past water on Mars and then all news outlets are like there's water on Mars and they're still not media in nineteen sixty heard woman passes tests given to astronauts and then right there's a woman astronaut and Jerry really wanted it to be true so she didn't contradict it and she kind of ran with her own inflated publicity and she kind of she really kind of took on this role as like a space smarter almost willing to sacrifice herself to be the first woman in space and was really interesting and reading all the letters that she wrote that other people are writing that they were writing to each other all these women because I I was able to use an amazing amount of primary sources to write this book her tone changes as she becomes more desperate so at first she talks about it like she wants to do what's right for women she wants to open the door to space for women and then by nineteen sixty three nineteen sixty four she's using I language I want to be the first woman it's my personal goal this is my god given purpose and it becomes this really interesting thing where the woman who's always kind of the hero of the story becomes the villain currently there's a villain in the story but you kind of start to see her in a different light when you see her desperation really bleeding and everything she does now both Jerry and Jackie testified in the congressional hearings and where is Jerry was more for women in space Jackie came out and affected police stated that it would be a waste of time and money to introduce women into the program why do you think she testified to this effect I think Jackie is testimony is coming from a lot based on her own experience with the wasps in the second World War she she knew that it took a lot of work to get a female program off the ground and space flight in nineteen in the early nineteen sixties was akin to aviation in the forties it was still knew it was still really hard for women to be taken seriously I think she knew the reality that if something went wrong with a launch and John Glenn died you know there are exist copies of speeches that both Kennedy and LBJ would give in the event of his death is all about how the technology is horror in space is this daring new frontier but if a woman died it would be seen as well the woman's not good enough she did something wrong and that would have the effect of pushing women's progress back years if not decades so what Jackie was actually advocating pushing for it was a really big research program in two women as astra and this would be gathering all the medical data all the flight due to having all the testing done such that as soon as NASA said we need women astronauts she could hand over the report and say you can start immediately because I've done all of your life work and I think that that's what she's saying to all the people before the hearing and in the hearing I think she kind of got angry and there's a lot of things that are being said it's like you're not making the best argument but if you read the letters she sent before the hearing that's really what she's advocating for and I think she's I think a lot of it is just coming from that position of wanting to get it done right so it's done right and I think there might have been some some jealousy in there as well you should also says and letters that she would give her right eye to be the first woman in space she was however medically unfit and she even though she was arguably the most qualified so I think there's a mix of wanting to get it done properly but a little bit of ego in there that kind of made her testify what she did in that hearing take me through their lives after these congressional hearings and how they pushed forward with female space flight well after the hearing it's it's interesting how both of our our leading ladies kind of reacted differently to those kind of sudden end of the story and the hearing was cut short a day early and Jerry describes it as like losing the love of her life a second time she just kind of falls into a deep depression and ends up largely leaving the country concerts flying as a missionary pilot between Florida and South America and continues to define herself as a fallen astronaut there's that there's a story I put this in the apple I she she rescues a girl from the Amazonian jungle and I'm getting the whole story but she tells the girl you don't have to worry when you fly with me I was the first woman trained as an astronaut which was not true but she continued to really let that be her defining narrative when John Glenn went up again in nineteen ninety eight she tried again to get a space flight so if NASA's getting data on one senior citizen space why not you to the point where when she died in two thousand nineteen her obituaries for a hole about the first women change the natural lights and it was still not true for Jackie it was like well that's done I'm going to go breaks more records and she went right back to flying high speed jets doing test flights for the main manufacturers of fighter jets at the time and they both reacted to extremely differently because it meant something different to both of them I was wondering I asked you before the time difference between when Jackie broke the sound barrier and Sally ride went into space but it wasn't until nineteen ninety five that the first female American pilot went into space that was Eileen Collins and Eileen Collins four years later in ninety nine was the first female mission commander which was kind of the big one of one of the last big steps for for women in space or not not the last big steps I should say but you know that was a major a major thing for women women astronauts of women everywhere that is largely because the the.

reporter Allison Dunne Alan Shepard Jackie John Glenn
"jackie cochran" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"That's when you first started getting drafted nineteen twenty six evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson disappeared in Venice California here's a couple of movies about her too eight ten nineteen thirty three the new deal president Franklin Roosevelt signed an act creating the Tennessee Valley Authority nineteen fifty movie about that too nineteen fifty three Jackie Cochran became the first woman to break the sound barrier she must talk real fast let's get a move on this in nineteen eighty mount St Helens erupted in Washington state killing fifty seven people and causing three billion in damage I remember that twenty eighteen school shooting at Santa Fe high school in Texas killed ten people N. finally here in eighteen ninety five west Tampa incorporated with a population of two thousand eight hundred fifteen people goes west hamper used to be a separate city from Tampa or separate town from Tampa and it wasn't until nineteen twenty five that the city of west Tampa was annexed by the city of Tampa and they're all part of the same city now it's seven forty six and we go to the news German Chris trackman fitness centers today will join Florida's returned to normal gyms are allowed to re open at fifty percent capacity and precautions will be taken to ensure staff and members are safe those include requiring masks for staff and separating equipment to comply with social distancing guidelines critics of the re opening say the moisture and heavy breathing engines make them ideal for spreading coronavirus an arrest in Pinellas county could bring an end to a three year old murder case St Petersburg police arrested Jerry Peterson this weekend for a deadly shooting in twenty seventeen police say Peterson shot and killed forty two year old lament Lisbon during an argument outside a club on eighteenth Avenue south the thirty five year old Peterson is charged with second degree murder tiger King fans have a new way to stay safe and show support for the show big cat rescue founder Carole Baskin of Hillsborough County who is part of the popular Netflix series started selling covert nineteen masks and they come in black or in leopard print money raised from the sales will go to cat rescue operations and first responders hi Chris Trenton newsradio WFLA knowledge exports from the ninety five three W. D. A. at AM six twenty SportsCenter Ameren Jacobson Buffalo Bills defensive lineman ed Oliver was arrested on Saturday night in Houston on charges of driving while intoxicated and unlawfully carrying a weapon the twenty two year old Oliver had an open beer between his legs and was determined to be impaired after a field sobriety test UFC president Dana white said late Saturday night that the promotion can hold its may thirtieth event in Vegas the card will take place in Arizona combat sports remains suspended indefinitely in Nevada but Arizona governor Doug Ducey said Tuesday sports could return to his state beginning on Saturday Phyllis George the former Miss America who became a female sportscasting pioneer on CBS the NFL today it served as the first city of Kentucky has passed away she was seventy years old for more on these stories is in the Tampa Bay sports radio ninety five three W. D. A. N. A. M. six twenty we could check out the Pat and Aaron show starting at noon news every fifteen minutes top bottom fifteen.

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Z104

Z104

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Z104

"On this week's fifty one percent we hear about the leading ladies of spaceflight typical story of women taking my mouse is like such a great feminist epic but in reality it was a bunch of individual women with very different ideas of what was going on and a reporter examines the psychological impacts of climate change I'm Allison Dunne and this is fifty one percent let me think of space flight our minds may drum up the name's Alan Shepard or John Glenn rarely are women like Jackie Cochran Jerry Cobb spotlighted in her new book fighting for space to pilots and their historic battle for female space flight author and historian Amy title does shine that spotlight through the lives of two women trailblazers a generation apart title introduces readers to the fight for women in space she spoke with fifty one percent Elizabeth Hale sang the fight for women in space really was Jackie Cochran story because she had a hand in everything Jackie Cochran is a really interesting historical figure that a lot of people have never heard of which is why I was so excited to really bring her story to light in this book she was but she was a pilot she was one of the if not the best and most notable pilots a for era when she died in nineteen eighty she held more records than anyone flying bar not your male female American international she led the women's airforce service how old were so she's sort of started this movement proves that women could fly as well as men she also was the first woman to fly supersonic did sound barrier with her buddy check your daughter outside yet because she just kind of knew everybody she is good friends are hard to save his life one day in nineteen forty eight like we do Eisenhower was a close personal friend so he wrote his memoirs hello she also started a cosmetics company the Jacqueline Cochran cosmetics company and that that was one of the few luxury brands in the country and one point was second only to Elizabeth Arden which you know if your cosmetics person that's a that's a big name yeah she is she just kind of did everything like she she wanted to be the best she could possibly be and she just mailed it in every way that helps that she was married to Floyd Odlum who is not a very not a very common name either but he was one of like the robber barons who actually need money off the depression so he was one of like the ten richest man in the country at the time when they got married so between the two of them they knew everybody and like built America I mean power couples and all power couples here yeah among many of her record she broke the sound barrier in nineteen fifty three yes but it wasn't until nineteen eighty three when Sally ride went to space as the first American woman why was it so long before an American woman made it to space it took American women a long time to get into space because the way NASA was set up at the time and the way it was recruiting for astronauts women couldn't meet the basic qualifications so Jackie was kind of this really interesting rare case in in the sixties verging on senior citizen ship she was still one of the only women in the country who had worked as a test pilot a jet test pilots should say and had extensive job experience which for NASA at the time of the Apollo era being a jet test pilots one of its base requirements the idea being everything in space was so new no one really knew what was gonna happen so the Cadia was protects them from certain death by getting the best qualified men possible and hope they die little as possible really sketchy in the sixties and a lot of ways so the base requirements women could not fly for the Air Force women could not be jet test pilots so women just didn't have what NASA needed and its astronauts at the time and you know when you're talking about going to the middle like just sticking with what they knew what the agency knew was jet test pilots as astronauts was kind of like taking out one variable it was in nineteen seventy eight that NASA's realizing okay we've got we've got the test pilot thing done we know how to live and work in space now we need to start doing science in space and we need actual scientists and that opens the astronaut corps to the distinction between pilot astronaut and mission specialist mission specialist be anybody who had an expertise that was needed in space and that opened it up to what so there were six women chosen that first class with mission specialist and Sally ride was among them and in enter Jerry Cobb with Jackie Cochran for mercury thirteen what was mercury thirteen mercury thirteen was a name for a group of women that a Hollywood producer made up in the nineteen nineties it was not a real country so the story goes that there was this group of women at thirteen women even the one actually withdrew her name from contention from all the records I found so is actually twelve the name is not even a real thing who took the medical tests that the mercury astronauts took in the nineteen indeed the magic at nineteen fifty nine the women to get in nineteen sixty nineteen sixty one these women felt that by virtue of passing medical tests that they were as qualified as the man to fly in space and took on NASA for what they thought was their fair shot at a space flight and it kind of becomes an epic mess people fighting for what they believe is right and what date individual wants and read the end of the day you know it a medical test in nineteen sixty does not mean you are qualified for spaceflight so they really kind of took this on for reasons that were very in some cases quite quite selfish in some cases just because it was a curiosity in some cases they didn't have any inclination that it was going to be a real program so the book really kind of dives into this idea of like what what happened with the story because local story of women taking announces like such a great feminist epic but in reality it was a bunch of individual women with very different ideas of what was going on Cobb was one of the first women to undergo these tests and kind of became the face of that fight which turned into congressional hearings in nineteen sixty two who is Jerry Cobb Jerry Cobb was a pilot she was she can't she's a generation younger than Jack and so she grew up in a very different world where it wasn't it wasn't common but it wasn't unheard of for a woman to learn to fly young and Jerry actually learn to fly with her dad when she was a teenager so she was what kind of in the first international women's to really make a living and a name for herself as a pilot and she gets supporters off as a pilot but she the most important thing in the story is that she all of her you know she had a few records yourself and it'll you know did some really good flying she was exclusively flying propeller planes which I try to kind of make the make the analogy for people because not everyone flies I don't either it would be like taking your daily commuter car feeling like you're really good at dodging traffic and then deciding that that means you can do NASCAR so the difference between the propeller planes and jet planes is significant and Gerry was a very adept I let but she threw some way and I I deliberately introduced some evidence in the end of the book in the epilogue that calls into question she managed to take the medical test of the astronaut steps first and by virtue of being person her name came out in the media and she's kind of spearheaded it was one of the people kind of spearheading the idea that this would be a real program and you know much the same way that that today you see so you know as a scientist will release the paper of there's new evidence for the existence of past water on Mars and then all news outlets are like there's water on Mars and they're still not media in nineteen sixty heard woman passes tests given to astronauts and then right there's a woman astronaut and Jerry really wanted it to be true so she didn't contradict it and she kind of ran with her own inflated publicity and she kind of she really kind of took on this role as like a space murder almost willing to sacrifice herself to be the first woman in space and was really interesting and reading all the letters that she wrote that other people are writing that they were writing to each other all these women because I I was able to use an amazing amount of primary sources to write this book her tone changes as she becomes more desperate so at first she talks about it like she wants to do what's right for women she wants to open the door to space for women and then by nineteen sixty three nineteen sixty four she's using I language I want to be the first woman it's my personal goal this is my god given purpose and it becomes this really interesting thing where the woman who's always kind of the hero of the story becomes the villain because I don't really think there's a villain in the story but you kind of start to see her in a different light when you see her desperation really bleeding into everything she does now both Jerry and Jackie testified in the congressional hearings and where is Jerry was more for women in space Jackie came out and affected police stated that it would be a waste of time and money to introduce women into the program why do you think she testified to this effect I think Jackie is testimony is coming from a lot based on her own experience with the wasps in the second World War she she knew that it took a lot of work to get a female program off the ground and space flight in nineteen in the early nineteen sixties was akin to aviation in the forties it was still knew it was still really hard for women to be taken seriously I think she knew the reality that if something went wrong with a launch and John Glenn died you know there are exist copies of speeches that both Kennedy and LBJ would yeah in the event of his death is all about how the technology is horror in space is this daring new frontier but if a woman died it would be seen as well the woman's not good enough she did something wrong and that would have the effect of pushing women's progress back years if not decades so what Jackie was actually advocating pushing for it was a really big research program in two women as astronauts and this would be gathering all the medical data all the flight due to having all the testing done such that as soon as NASA said we need women astronauts she could hand over the report and say you can start immediately because I've done all of your life work and I think that that's what she's saying to all the people before the hearing and in the hearing I think she kind of got angry and there's a lot of things that are being fed it's like you're not making the best arguments but if you read the letters she sent before the hearing that's really what she's advocating for and I think she's I think a lot of it is just coming from that position of wanting to get it done right so it's done right and I think there might have been some some jealousy in there as well you should also says they letters that she would give her right eye to be the first woman in space she was however medically unfit and she even though she was arguably the most qualified so I think there's a mix of wanting to get it done properly but a little bit of ego in there that kind of made her testify what she did in that hearing take me through their lives after these congressional hearings and how they pushed forward with female space flight well after the hearing it's it's interesting how both of our our leading ladies kind of reacted differently to those kind of sudden end of the story and the hearing was cut short a day early and Jerry describes it as like losing the love of her life a second time she just kind of falls into a deep depression and ends up largely leaving the country concerts flying as a missionary pilot between Florida and South America and continues to define herself as a fallen astronaut there's that there's a story I put this in the apple I she she rescues a girl from the Amazonian jungle and I'm getting the whole story but she tells the girl you don't have to worry when you fly with me I was the first woman trained as an astronaut which was not true but she continued to really let that be her defining narrative when John Glenn went up again in nineteen ninety eight she tried to get a space flight so if NASA's getting data on one senior citizen space why not to to the point where when she died in two thousand nineteen her obituaries for a hole about the first women change the natural lights and it was still not true Jackie it was like well that's done I'm going to go breaks more records and she went right back to flying high speed jets doing test flights for the main manufacturers of fighter jets five minutes they both reacted to extremely differently because it meant something different to both of I was wondering I asked you before the time difference between when Jackie broke the sound barrier and Sally ride went into space but it wasn't until nineteen ninety five that the first female American pilot went into space that was Eileen Collins and Eileen Collins four years later in ninety nine was the first female mission commander which was kind of the big one of one of the last big steps for for women in space or not not the last big steps I shouldn't say but you know that was a major a major thing for women women astronauts of women everywhere that is largely because the the change in requirements right I said NASA changes requirements to allow for pilot astronauts and mission specialist in the seventies it still had to happen at the military level that women could be test pilots that women can get the experience to qualify as astronaut so all of this has happened kind of on levels that were before him beneath NASA in terms of like the astronaut change so once that shift started to happen it was kind of inevitable that it would there would be a female pilot in space and that the timing worked out that Eileen Collins was the first one to get.

reporter Allison Dunne
"jackie cochran" Discussed on Z104

Z104

10:22 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Z104

"Think of space flight our minds may drum up the name's Alan Shepard or John Glenn rarely are women like Jackie Cochran Jerry Cobb spotlighted in her new book fighting for space to pilots and their historic battle for female space flight author and historian Amy title does shine that spotlight through the lives of two women trailblazers a generation apart title introduces readers to the fight for women in space she spoke with fifty one percent Elizabeth Hale sang the fight for women in space really was Jackie Cochran story because she had a hand in everything Jackie Cochran is a really interesting historical figure that a lot of people have never heard of which is why I was so excited to really bring her story to light in this book she was but she was a pilot she was one of the if not the best and most notable pilots a for era when she died in nineteen eighty she held more records than anyone flying bar not your male female American international she led the women's airforce service how old were so she's sort of started this movement proves that women could fly as well as men she also was the first woman to fly supersonic did sound barrier with her buddy check your daughter live chat she just kind of knew everybody she is good friends are hard to save his life one day in nineteen forty eight like we do Eisenhower was a close personal friend so he wrote his memoirs hello she also started a cosmetics company the Jacqueline Cochran cosmetics company and that that was one of the few luxury brands in the country and one point was second only to Elizabeth Arden which you know if your cosmetics person that's a that's a big name yeah she's she just kind of did everything like she she wanted to be the best she could possibly be and she just mailed it in every way that helps that she was married to Floyd Odlum who is not a very not a very common name either but he was one of like the robber barons who actually need money off the depression so he was one of like the ten richest man in the country at the time when they got married so between the two of them they knew everybody and like built America I mean power couples and all power couples here yeah among many of her record she broke the sound barrier in nineteen fifty three yes but it wasn't until nineteen eighty three when Sally ride went to space as the first American woman why was it so long before an American woman made it to space it took American women a long time to get into space because the way NASA was set up at the time and the way it was recruiting for astronauts women couldn't meet the basic qualifications so Jackie was kind of this really interesting rare case in in the sixties verging on senior citizen ship she was still one of the only women in the country who had worked as a test pilot a jet test pilots should say and had extensive job experience which for NASA at the time of the Apollo era being a jet test pilot was one of its base requirements the idea being everything in space was so new and no one really knew what was gonna happen so the Cadia was protects them from certain death by getting the best qualified men possible and hope they die little as possible is a really sketchy in the sixties and a lot of ways so the base requirements women could not fly for the Air Force women could not be jet test pilots so women just didn't have what NASA needed and its astronauts at the time and you know when you're talking about going to the middle of like just sticking with what they knew what the agency knew was jet test pilots as astronauts was kind of like taking out one variable it was in nineteen seventy eight that NASA's realizing okay we've got we've got the test pilot thing done we know how to live and work in space now we need to start doing science in space and we need actual scientists and that opens the astronaut corps to the distinction between pilot astronaut and mission specialist mission specialist be anybody who had an expertise that was needed in space and that opened it up to win so there were six women shows were not first class with mission specialist and Sally ride was among them and in enter Jerry Cobb with Jackie Cochran for mercury thirteen what was mercury thirteen mercury thirteen was a name for a group of women that a Hollywood producer made up in the nineteen nineties it was not a real country so the story goes that this was this group of women at thirteen women even the one actually withdrew her name from contention from all the records I found so is actually twelve the name is not even a real thing who took the medical tests that the mercury astronauts took in the nineteen indeed the magic at nineteen fifty nine the women to get in nineteen sixty nineteen sixty one these women felt that by virtue of passing medical tests that they were as qualified as the man to fly in space and took on NASA for what they thought was their fair shot at a space flight and it kind of becomes an epic mess people fighting for what they believe is right and what date individual wants and read the end of the day you know it a medical test in nineteen sixty does not mean you are qualified for spaceflight so they really kind of took this on for reasons that were very in some cases quite quite selfish in some cases just because it was a curiosity in some cases they didn't have any inclination that it was going to be a real program so the book really kind of dives into this idea of like what what happened with the story because local story of women taking announces like such a great feminist epic but in reality it was a bunch of individual women with very different ideas of what was going on Cobb was one of the first women to undergo these tests and kind of became the face of that fight which turned into congressional hearings in nineteen sixty two who is Jerry Cobb Jerry Cobb was a pilot she was she can't she's a generation younger than Jack and so she grew up in a very different world where it wasn't it wasn't common but wasn't unheard of for a woman to learn to fly yup and Jerry actually learn to fly with her dad when she was a teenager so she was what kind of in the first iteration of women to really make a living and a name for herself as a pilot and she did supporters of the pilot but she the most important thing in the story is that she all of her you know she had a few records yourself and it'll you know did some really good flying she was exclusively flying propeller planes which I try to kind of make the make the analogy for people because not everyone flies I don't either it would be like taking your daily commuter car feeling like you're really good at dodging traffic and then deciding that that means you can do NASCAR so the difference between the propeller planes and jet planes is significant and Jerry was very adept I let but she threw in some way and I I deliberately introduced some evidence in the end of the book in the epilogue that calls into question she managed to take the medical test of the astronaut steps first and by virtue of being person her name came out in the media and she's kind of spearheaded it was one of the people kind of spearheading the idea that this would be a real program and you know much the same way that that today you see so you know as a scientist will release the paper of there's new evidence for the existence of past water on Mars and then all news outlets are like there's water on Mars and they're still not media in nineteen sixty heard woman passes tests given to astronauts and then right there's a woman astronaut and Jerry really wanted it to be true so she didn't contradict it and she kind of ran with her own inflated publicity and she kind of she really kind of took on this role as like a space murder almost willing to sacrifice herself to be the first woman in space and was really interesting and reading all the letters that she wrote that other people are writing that they were writing to each other all these women because I I was able to use an amazing amount of primary sources to write this book her tone changes as she becomes more desperate so at first she talks about it like she wants to do what's right for women she wants to open the door to space for women and then by nineteen sixty three nineteen sixty four she's using I language I want to be the first woman it's my personal goal this is my god given purpose and it becomes this really interesting thing where the woman who's always kind of the hero of the story becomes the villain because I don't really think there's a villain in the story but you kind of start to see her in a different light when you see her desperation really bleeding into everything she does now both Jerry and Jackie testified in the congressional hearings and where is Jerry was more for women in space Jackie came out and affected police stated that it would be a waste of time and money to introduce women into the program why do you think she testified to this effect I think Jackie is testimony is coming from a lot based on her own experience with the wasps in the second World War she she knew that it took a lot of work to get a female program off the ground and space flight in nineteen in the early nineteen sixties was akin to aviation in the forties it was still knew it was still really hard for women to be taken seriously I think she knew the reality that if something went wrong with a launch and John Glenn died you know there are exist copies of speeches that both Kennedy and LBJ would yeah in the event of his death is all about how the technology is heard in spaces this daring new frontier but if a woman died it would be seen as well the woman's not good enough she did something wrong and that would have the effect of pushing women's progress back years if not decades so what Jackie was actually advocating pushing for it was a really big research program into women as astra and this would be gathering all the medical data all the flight due to having all the testing done such that as soon as NASA said we need women astronauts she could hand over the report and say you can start immediately because I've done all of your life work and I think that that's what she's saying to all the people before the hearing and in the hearing I think she kind of got angry and there's a lot of things that are being fed it's like you're not making the best arguments but if you read the letters she sent before the hearing that's really what she's advocating for and I think she's.

Alan Shepard Jerry Cobb Amy John Glenn Jackie Cochran
"jackie cochran" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Bring it down to short level good morning everyone and thank you for coming out to listen to me talk at first thing in the morning for some including myself weird about hearing your bio read like that so I'll try to live up to everything that says was just intensely said about me so I want to start with the brief audience participation of who here has heard of the story of the the so called mercury thirteen Kim there's like a decent number of hands maybe fifteen or twenty hours sometimes called the flats the First Lady astronaut trainees sorry I don't there is no way to print my talks I'm gonna read this bit off my phone if you don't know if you don't know the story of the so called mercury thirteen I'll explain all the error codes later don't worry I'm basically it's a story of everything here because right now it's the story of thirteen women who trained for space flight in the nineteen sixties and took on NASA with the goal of righting the wrong of sexism now at the time did not allow women into the astronaut corps and so they they decided that they needed to have this changed it went all the way to eighties I have subcommittee hearing in nineteen sixty two and spoiler alert not really a spoiler it didn't work so these spaceflight pioneers according to Forbes or astronaut candidates according to NBC any secret NASA program according to UPI he trained for space flight according to Reuters and could have been mercury astronauts according to air and space this story that's usually told with all of the air quotes invariably features a hero named Jerry Cobb Jerry is a young woman and she was in her early thirties at the time she was the first woman to take all the astronaut tests and was kind of the media Darling she's the one who spearheaded it she's the name most familiar with the story she is the woman right here and these stories also invariably feature a villain named Jackie Cochran this woman right here and Jackie is basically like a Disney villain she swoops down from on high the words were would be sisters in this Senate this subcommittee hearing and then goes home to her castle in a forest to confer with her pet raven she's basically Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty the original not the dean Angelina Jolie wants so there's been a lot written about the story of pops up in the news with some regularity someone finds it gets all excited because it's reduce you know appealing rah rah feminist story and it's all wrong the more I dug into this and the more I started really researching it that's why there's so many air quotes because that whole narrative is just not right so I'm gonna tell you a little bit about the story the real story today well also kind of walking you through the process of how I came to write this book which I will do this so that it is burned into your memory to start off when I started reading about the story I read the raw rock them this one the one that Jerry taking on NASA this intrepid warrior and you know she's a woman in her early thirties in a male dominant field trying to be known for her skill it hit home to me in a lot of ways and it really felt like a great story to tell because you want you know how who doesn't love giving aid do you know what unknown figure from history are little known figure from history there do so as I started researching the story something bothered me about the characterization of Jackie why did she come out of her forest castle just to tell NASA and to tell Congress then that women shouldn't find space I mean no one's that vindictive no one is that me no one does that with that because reading the transcript of the the congressional or them subcommittee hearing your Jerry's going on and on about women are smaller and lighter there's scientific evidence to support women in space of women are smaller and lighter fewer resources later payload don't forget the nineteen sixties early sixties if you were too heavy for the rock if you're over a hundred eighty pounds the rocket wouldn't get off the ground mass is at a premium here and in the Senate hearing this custom hearing either Jackie goes on about how it's just not the right time for women that is you know if the rocket blows up with John Glenn on it it's bad but technology is new with rocket was up with the woman on board it's because the woman did something wrong and not pushes women's progress back I started reading this I thought you know this villain kind of makes sense I mean it's dated it's very dated obviously but for nineteen sixty two for the Cold War it makes a lot of sense also I've always loved Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty I'm not gonna I have that movie on my phone it's beautiful and I love Maleficent so I want to know more about this real life Disney villains luckily Jackie wrote memoirs and I it was the first source I really read about her specifically and immediately she emerged as this like epic badass so I'll give you the cold no schools no through the Canadian cliff notes I still can't get cliff notes top of mind so called notes Jackie was an orphan she was born into abject poverty in Florida and she got out of Milltown life through the beauty industry she was a hairdresser she learned to fly in her twenties in the nineteen thirties and by the end of the decade was when all kinds of awards was so good that in the second World War she actually led the women's airforce service pilots the first ever branch of female pilots flying for the U. S. military she ran for Congress she was the first woman to break the sound barrier she was friends of muscle presidency saved LBJ's life one day like you do she and Eisenhower were such good friends he wrote one of his memoirs at our house in the guest cottage it's a hill now it's very sad she ran one of the largest cosmetics companies in the country it was actually one of the luxury brands on par with Elizabeth Arden at the time and it gets better because she married Floyd Odlum is that a familiar name to anybody a resounding silence of knows Floyd was one of the ten richest man in the country he was one of the robber barons he was right up there with the Vanderbilts the Carnegie's melons tribe he was up there he built America they are the power couple to end all power couples and no one's ever heard of them now we all know memoirs can be self serving everyone can tell you that Jackie's memoirs no exceptions so I wanted to see if everything she said was true and for the most part yeah she she did I was able to find a lot of other sources to back up all of her records all of her stuff for the president all of the first woman to break December she's friends of Chuck Yeager Amelia Earhart I found the stuff to back all that up but I couldn't find anything to back up her orphan story and she readily admitted that she actually made that bit up which I thought was really interesting so digging into Jackie's early early life was like the funniest thing in the world involved finding early divorce records with a very excited clerk at the Montgomery County clerk's office even know where that was I think it was in Georgia actually now that I'm here so everything about Jackie's adult life as a pilot she was right but her early life turns out to be so much more interesting and I do want to just read a very brief excerpt from the book here because it's easier to just read this office is open thank what to read it instead of try to encapsulate exactly Jackie's early life so the only thing you need to know going into this she wasn't born Jackie Cochran she was born Bessie Pittman Amy title fighting for space in the span of a decade Bessie had been married and divorced welcome to son then buried him she buried her father and her brother her sisters and beloved brother Joseph for all raising their own families and the only family Bessie had left with her.

"jackie cochran" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:05 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Beekman foundation we are especially grateful to dear Jack and Mary Romano's sponsors for this glorious venue the Trinity United Methodist Church we'd also like to welcome our literati members and individual donors today it's through your support that we are able to make festival events this Saturday free to the public ninety percent of our revenue comes from our donors and literati members and we thank you this year's festival is full of great events and authors and we don't want you to miss any of them so download the new Savannah book festival twenty twenty app on your phone and you can be in the know about everything we have going on this year so we want everyone to be able to hear your question and I know we're all eager to talk with miss title but please limit yourself to one brief question so we have time for the answer and other guests have a chance to ask a question as well Amy Shira Teitel is with us today courtesy of call stream aerospace corporation Amy is a spaceflight historian author youtuber public speaker and popular space personality not unlike her subjects she is one of the only academically trained young female spaceflight historians writing for a general audience she runs the beloved blog vintage space hosted by discover magazine which is also a YouTube channel with over three hundred and twenty five thousand subscribers she's a regular writer for discovery seeker and has hosted numerous space and science related shows among them NASA's unexplained files she gives talks about space flight all over the U. S. in America please give a warm welcome to Amy Shira Teitel bring it down to short level good morning everyone and thank you for coming out to listen to me talk at first thing in the morning for some including myself weird about hearing your bio read like that so I'll try to live up to everything that says was just intensely said about me so I want to start with the revised presentation of who here has heard of the story of the the so called mercury thirteen Kim there's like a decent number of hands maybe fifteen or twenty hours sometimes called the flats the First Lady astronaut trainees sorry I don't there's no way to print my talks I'm gonna read this bit off my phone if you don't know if you don't know the story of the so called mercury thirteen I'll explain all the error codes later don't worry basically it's a story of everything here because right now it's the story of thirteen women who trained for space flight in the nineteen sixties and took on NASA with the goal of righting the wrong of sexism now at the time did not allow women into the astronaut corps and so they they decided that they needed to have this changed it went all the way to eighties I have subcommittee hearing in nineteen sixty two and spoiler alert not really a spoiler it didn't work so these spaceflight pioneers according to Forbes or astronaut candidates according to NBC any secret NASA program according to UPI he trained for space flight according to Reuters and could have been mercury astronauts according to air and space this story that's usually told with all of the quotes invariably features a hero named Jerry Cobb Jerry is a young woman and she was in her early thirties at the time she was the first woman to take all the astronaut tests and was kind of the media Darling she's the one who spearheaded it she's the name most familiar with the story she is the woman right here and these stories also invariably feature a villain named Jackie Cochran this woman right here and Jackie is basically like a Disney villain she swoops down from on high works here would be sisters in the Senate or the subcommittee hearing and then goes home to her castle in a forest to confer with her pet raven she's basically Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty the original not the dean Angelina Jolie once so there's been a lot written about the story of pops up in the news with some regularity someone finds it gets all excited because it's realistic you know appealing rah rah feminist story and it's all wrong the more I dug into this the more I started really researching it that's why there's so many air quotes because that whole narrative is just not right so I'm gonna tell you a little bit about the story the real story today well also kind of walking you through the process of how I came to write this book which I will do this so that it is burned into your memory to start off when I started reading about the story I read the raw rock them in this one the one that Jerry taking on NASA this intrepid warrior and you know she's a woman in her early thirties in a male dominant field trying to be known for her skill it hit home to me in a lot of ways and it really felt like a great story to tell because you want you know how who doesn't love giving aid do you know what unknown figure from history or a little known figure from history there do space historian Amy title fighting for space so as I started researching the story something bothered me about the characterization of Jackie why did she come out of her forest castle just to tell NASA and to tell Congress then that women shouldn't find space I mean no one's that vindictive no ones that meet no one does that with that because reading the transcript of the the congressional or them subcommittee hearing your Jerry's going on and on about women are smaller and lighter there's scientific evidence to support women in space of women are smaller and lighter fewer resources waiter payload don't forget the nineteen sixties early sixties if you were too heavy for the rock if you're over a hundred eighty pounds the rocket wouldn't get off the ground now this is a premium here and in the Senate hearing or this custom hearing rather Jackie goes on about how it's just not the right time for women that if you know if the rocket blows up with John Glenn on it it's bad but technology is not with the rocket was up with the woman on board it's because the woman did something wrong and not pushes women's progress back I started reading this I thought you know this villain kind of makes sense I mean it's dated it's very dated obviously but for nineteen sixty two for Cold War it makes a lot of sense although I've always loved Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty I'm not gonna I have that movie on my phone it's beautiful and I love Maleficent so I want to know more about this real life Disney villain luckily Jackie wrote memoirs and I it was the first source I really read about her specifically and immediately she emerged as this like epic badass so I'll give you a call no schools no through the Canadian cliff notes I still can't get cliff notes top of mind so called no Jackie was an orphan she was born into abject poverty in Florida and she got out of the mill town life through the beauty industry she was a hairdresser she learned to fly in her twenties in the nineteen thirties and by the end of the decade was when all kinds of awards was so good that in the second World War she actually led the women's airforce service pilots the first ever branch of female pilots flying for the U. S. military she ran for Congress she was the first woman to break the sound barrier she was friends of muscle presidency saved LBJ's life one day like you do she and Eisenhower were such good friends he wrote one of his memoirs at our house in the guest cottage it's a hill now it's very sad she ran one of the largest cosmetics companies in the country it was actually one of the luxury brands on par with Elizabeth Arden the time and it gets better because she married Floyd Odlum is that a familiar name to anybody a resounding silence of knows Floyd was one of the ten richest man in the country he was one of the robber barons he was right up there with the Vanderbilts the Carnegie's melons tribe he was up there he built America they are the power couple to end all power couples and no one's ever heard of them now we all know memoirs can be self serving everyone can tell you that Jackie is no more is no exception so I wanted to see if everything she said was true and for the most part yeah she she did I was able to find a lot of other sources to back up all of her records all of her stuff for the president all of the first woman to break the Sanders she's friends of Chuck Yeager Amelia Earhart I found the stuff to back all that up but I couldn't find anything to back up her orphan story and she readily admitted that she actually made that bit up which I thought was really interesting so digging into Jackie's early early life was like the funniest thing in the world involved finding early divorce records with a very excited to clerk at the Montgomery County clerk's office even know where that was I think it was in Georgia actually now that I'm here so everything about Jackie's adult life as a pilot she was right but her early life turns out to be so much more interesting and I do want to just read a very brief excerpt from the book here because it's easier to just read this office is open thank you out to read it instead of try to encapsulate exactly Jackie's early life so the only thing you need to know going into this she wasn't born Jackie Cochran she was born Bessie Pittman in the span of a decade Bessie had been married and divorced welcome to son then buried him she buried her father and her brother her sisters and beloved brother Joseph for all raising their own families and the only family Bessie had left with her mother with whom she continued to clash to view yet springs held nothing but painful memories for Bessie so she decided the time had come to make a clean break one mid summer day in nineteen twenty nine twenty three year old Bessie arrived at the train station in Pensacola her worldly possessions were packed into suitcases and her life savings was tucked away in her pocketbook including the money should gain from selling her beloved Ford model T. she bought a ticket and boarded a train heading north watching the countryside stream past the window she decided to reinvent her past she would tell people that she was an orphan that the pigmented taken her in but never really cared for her this would explain her lack of family ties she would never admit to knowing her biological family and would instead tell people that her foster parents mauling in Iraq had been so poor and I'm loving that you've been forced to leave the house eleven years old to find work she also decided never to tell anyone about her marriage or her son though she couldn't bear to raise Robert junior entirely he was her happiest memory she needed to keep him with her somehow so decided to keep the only thing she had left that they had shared a name she would remain a Cochran to keep her little boy alive in her heart that she would tell people she picks the surname at random running her finger through a phone book as the train spread further north Bessie Pittman faded into obscurity when she arrived in New York City days later she retained Bessie skills her dresser nurse her obsession with cleanliness and her moxie but nothing else no one would ever know Bessie pigments she decided but the world with absolutely no miss Jacqueline Cochran so that's our villain don't you want to know so much more about her here's this woman who reinvented herself so completely but she's so complex there's so much in her backstory she was twenty three by the time all of that happened of course she's going to become this fascinating character to dive into and to really understand and he's basically I always say she's real Forrest Gump she was involved in every moment of history and knew every single person but you know isn't Tom Hanks not not no distracting thanks a lot thanks she's not really the villain of the story the story of women in space because Jackie was everywhere is really her story and everyone else kind of comes into it and gives it that dynamic so let's look at Jerry as the woman who gets your contacts up with this back up to its continued to burn into your brain Jerry was twenty five years younger than Jackie and she grew up in a very different worlds for women Jackie you would learn to fly in the nineteen thirties when flying was really for the rich it was rare it wasn't wasn't totally uncommon but it was fairly rare for a woman to fly let alone to be that good but in the thirties in a pilot was this leverage and also liberties like Lindbergh and Earhart's means are still names people know even though what they did by today's standards I mean still terrifying and amazing but you know this is not a hot shot fighter pilots Jerry grew up in a world where you know post war she learned to fly as a teenager because it was accessible to younger girls to learn to fly in the nineteen fifties when she was an adult it was still really hard for a woman to make a living as a pilot but it was possible and she did find a way and she you know worked in a lot of odd jobs to do it but it was her passion it was she felt what she was brought on the earth to do she was a very good pilot but she was not remarkable and rare the way Jackie was remarkable in hers then the space age happens and I my joke is always that it just kind of ruined everything for everyone in the air by changing the game so completely.

Beekman foundation Jack Trinity United Methodist Churc Mary Romano
"jackie cochran" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on KGO 810

"He feared what he called the garrison state which was that the military would just take over interesting the general worried that the military would take over but he obviously knew where he was coming from and so he was determined to save money believe it or not the great general Eisenhower through these very scary years of the Cold War actually cut defense spending even as he was beating up rockets and missiles and and bombers to be able to wage of New Jersey they have a nuclear threat he was cutting the military budget because he wanted basically to keep the budget and balance and not make the military gets too strong I mean your listeners may remember the phrase the military industrial complex Eisenhower warned against that at the end of his presidency but in fact he was doing his best to control it all the way during his his is a presidency now it did but however he was not pacifists he didn't want to the folders tent stack arms and go home the he felt that we had to face off against the Soviet communism which he believed was expansionist in just by looking at the map the you could see why the Soviets after World War two were very much on the March so we had this delicate balancing act of trying to keep the defense spending from getting out of control but at the same time facing off against the Soviet Union and his secret weapon the one that didn't cost anything on the federal budget was his ability to bluff he was a great card player was he better it poker then Bridger rated well the easy to switch to bridge from Parker because you as a great poker player west point in in the army but he was taking so much money from his fellow officers that was during his career to me to give up poker and switch to bridge he was a very good bridge player but he never forgot how to bluff and he never forgot had a scared and his opponents and and help me know all these poker cliches one to hold him and window for little man and he he he L. he he just knew instinctively how to do that and he was just a champion block for will come to the Cold War and I X. bluff and the crises of the nineteen fifties which if you all remember them as Pasifika you're wrong there was nothing but war conflict threat death a bomb shelters however would go back to the winter of fifty two there's a moment in your you're telling Evan in which I think has to be convinced to run for the presidency and a man puts together a show for in in Madison Square Garden eighteen thousand people come and I'm just flabbergasted to see that Humphrey Bogart Lauren Bacall and Clark Gable and merry Martin all made appearances to urge like to run but it was a great day shaman named textile car you put on this incredible demonstration Madison Square Garden everybody chanting we like like we want to like and they made a movie of it and in eighty eight tracks a woman aviator in Jackie Cochran fluid over to Paris were Eisenhower was head of NATO was spring allied commander of NATO and showed in the movie and I've now was so moved by this public outpouring this demand for him that he wept and he finally said that Jackie town okay go home and tell him that that'll do it he had been under tremendous pressure for years relate to throw his hat in the ring he had resisted he was a military man he didn't really want in a like politics hello he is really very good politician but this finally turn he and Manny got together is like maybe got together and figured duty duty calls and so homely went and ran for president October twenty fourth in Detroit he utters the words I shall go to Korea was that an accident it was that coming to win the election over Stevenson was coming especially since I've never did know what he was gonna do when I got there they walked the race really was over as soon as he said that the idea of the great general coming in and getting us out of a war the people Americans people forget this is Corey is known as the forgotten war but we lost as many men there almost as we did in Vietnam the war dragged on for three years and I've never wanted to get us out any any did he although we said that he didn't know quite what he was doing he ended up dropping he basically threaten to use nuclear weapons in North Korea and less these Chinese communists and the Soviets backed off north Koreans backed off and they did a couple of details about Eisenhower's personality you emphasize and all of the correspondence in your book site he had a very bad temper a temper that he struggled to control was that a threat to his health when he was a younger man because it certainly was when he was in the White House what he's an interesting combination tremendous self control this warm but nine smile and his ability to keep his temper in a seething temper he kept it bottled up it was a day in the doctor's worried that he was going to basically pop a Cork he had a heart attack in nineteen fifty five joke in nineteen fifty seven that they thought was related to his temper he had a temper yet a artery with rob on the side of his head would scare people because it will become and Glenn gorge when he got mad at anecdotes of him doing the same thing when he was in in North Africa or a planning for D. day did he throw fits like that when he was out of shape because my stories all point to the fact that he was calming everybody down all the time but that's the thing I mean he's that he was known as the terrible terra Mister banks to its own staff with his own staff he was explosive but with his allies he was soothing and therefore he comes in the White House and now we have to assemble the dramatist's personae let's start with the Dallas brothers Allen and John foster Dulles John foster Dulles is the man to become secretary of state what was Eisenhower's opinion of him when he hired I thought he was a bore kind of a long winded preachy border but he came to like Dallas and he used them as this answer of a good cop bad cop why he left John foster Dulles kind of be Manichaean warn against the forces of darkness which allowed Eisenhower to play the but nine good cop in fact now is calling all the shots and using John foster Dulles is kind of his his attack man and then Allen Dulles who becomes DC I did Eisenhower have a good opinion of Alan dollars he did initially Alan dollars would have been a great spy master in World War two and his eyes an hour said it takes a strange kind of genius to run the CIA so it first now is all for Alan does but he over time he lost faith in Dallas and Eisenhower surrounds himself with men with stag only parties he any in fact you emphasize how he likes westerns that don't have female leads in them that was the way he conducted his White House is it just us looking back from the twenty first century that this looks strange dream I think it was strange at the time and now I mean it now you know the nineteen fifties it was just a different time in the idea that the president of stag dinners and only stag dinners for only males nobody batted an eyelash at that that was just the the the the way it was men or men and women were women in that particular year especially and I've never did not take any grief at the time it looks very kind of retro he did not now I should say he had a good marriage hello.

"jackie cochran" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John batch this is the John Batchelor show Dwight David Eisenhower born in Texas but raised in Abilene Kansas Dwight David Eisenhower one three brothers extremely successful throughout his life and whatever and Jeffrey through and did it himself into for example after high school he worked two years in a creamery to make enough money for his older brother to go to the university of Michigan and then the deal was the older brother would take two years off and work for Dwight Eisenhower Ike is he was called little like the older brother was big guy didn't work out that way because he found himself winning a an appointment to west point and therein lies the tail a wonderful new book Ike's block president Eisenhower secret battle to save the world by Evan Thomas takes us to the I. presidency and nothing in capsule lights for me the challenge of understanding this man this young man from Abilene Texas who rises through the army's ranks many many posts for many years to command the success in your the landing on D. day and the triumph over the Hitler rights nothing in caps lights at all then a term that IQ's called the big equation I hope I say that right Evan congratulations and good evening what was in Ike's mind the big equation that he held that he needed to advance throughout his presidency well I understood the real national security comes from economic security that you can you can build all the weapons you want but if you drive the economy into the tank you don't have a national security he feared would call the garrison state which was that the military would just take over interesting the general worried that the military would take over but he obviously knew where he was coming from and so he was determined to save money believe it or not the great general Eisenhower through these very scary years of the Cold War actually cut defense spending even as he was beating up rockets and missiles and and bombers to be able to wage of New Jersey they have a nuclear threat he was cutting the military budget because he wanted basically to keep budget and balance and not make the military gets too strong I mean your listeners may remember the phrase the military industrial complex Eisenhower warned against that at the end of his presidency but in fact he was doing his best to control it all the way during his his is a presidency now it did but however he was no pacifist he didn't want to the folders tent stack arms and go home he he felt that we had to face off against the Soviet communism which he believed was expansionist in just by looking at the map the you could see why the Soviets after World War two were very much on the March so he had this delicate balancing act of trying to keep the defense spending from getting out of control but at the same time facing off against the Soviet Union and his secret weapon the one that didn't cost anything on the federal budget was his ability to bluff he was a great card player with the better it poker then Bridger rated well the easier to switch to bridge from Parker because you as a great poker player west point in in the army but he was taking so much money from his fellow officers that was hurting his career to me to give up poker and switch to bridge he was a very good bridge player but he never forgot how to bluff and he never forgot had a scared and his opponent and and had all the you know all these poker cliches one to hold him and wonderful man and he he he L. he he just knew instinctively how to do that and he was just a champion block for will come to the Cold War and I expletive and the crises of the nineteen fifties which if you all remember them as Pasifika you're wrong there was nothing but war conflicts rat death a bomb shelters however would go back to the winter of fifty two there's a moment in your you're telling Evan in which I cast to be convinced to run for the presidency and a man puts together a show for him in Madison Square Garden eighteen thousand people come and I'm just flabbergasted to see that Humphrey Bogart Lauren Bacall and Clark Gable and merry Martin all made appearances to urge like to run well there is a great shaman named textile car you put on this incredible demonstration Madison Square Garden everybody chanting we like like we want to like and they made a movie of it and then aviatrix a woman aviator in Jackie Cochran fluid over to Paris were Eisenhower was head of NATO was spring allied commander of NATO and showed in the movie and I've now was so moved by this public outpouring this demand for him that he wept and he finally said that Jackie town okay go home and tell on that but I'll do it he'd been under tremendous pressure for years really to throw his hat in the ring he had resisted he was a military man he didn't really want in a like politics although he is really very good politician but this finally turn he and mainly got together is white maybe got together and figured duty duty calls and so homely went and ran for president October twenty fourth in Detroit he utters the words I shall go to career was at an accident it was that coming to win the election over Stevenson well it was cutting especially since I've never did know what he was gonna do when I got there they walked the race really was over as soon as he said that because the idea of the great general coming in and getting us out of a war the people Americans people forget this is Corey is known as the forgotten war but we lost as many men there almost as we did in Vietnam the war dragged on for three years and I've never wanted to get us out any any did he although we said that he didn't know quite what he was doing he ended up dropping he basically threaten to use nuclear weapons in North Korea and less is Chinese communists and the Soviets backed off north Koreans backed up and they did a couple of details about Eisenhower's personality you emphasize and all of the correspondence in your books site he had a very bad temper temper that he struggled to control was that a threat to his health when he was a younger man because it certainly was when he was in the White House well he's an interesting combination tremendous self control this warm but nine smile and his ability to keep his temper in a seething temper he kept it bottled up it was a day in the doctor's worried that he was gonna basically pop a Cork he had a heart attack in nineteen fifty five right okay nineteen fifty seven that they thought was related to his temper he had a temper yet a artery with rob on the side of his head would scare people because it would become and Glenn gorge when he got mad at anecdotes of him doing the same thing when he was in a North Africa or a planning for D. day did he throw fits like that when he was that have shaped because my stories all point to the fact that he was calming everybody down all the time but that's the thing I mean he's that he was known as the terrible terrible Mister banks to its own staff with his own staff he was explosive but with his allies he was soothing and therefore he comes in the White House and now we have to assemble the dramatist's personae let's start with the Dallas brothers Allen and John foster Dulles John foster Dulles is the man to become secretary of state what was Eisenhower's opinion of him when he hired I thought he was a bore kind of a long winded preachy border but he came to like Dallas and he used them as as an answer of a good cop bad cop why he left John foster Dulles kind of be Manichaean warn against the forces of darkness which allowed Eisenhower to play the but nine good cop in fact now is calling all the shots and using John foster Dulles is kind of his his attack man and then Allen Dulles who becomes DCI did Eisenhower have a good opinion of Alan dollars he did initially Alan dollars would have been a great spy master in World War two and as Eisenhower said it takes a strange kind of genius to run the CIA so with first now is all for Alan does but he could over time you lost faith in Dallas and Eisenhower surrounds himself with men with stag only parties he any in fact you emphasize how he likes westerns that don't have female leads in them that was the way he conducted his White House is it just us looking back from the twenty first century that this looks strange to him I think it was strange at the time and now I mean it now you know the nineteen fifties it was just a different time in the idea that the person would have stag dinners and only stag dinners for only males nobody batted an eyelash at that that was just the the the the way it was meant or men and women were well then in that particular year especially and I've never did not take any grief at the time it looks very kind of retro he did not now I should say he had a good marriage hello people gossip that it was not he actually did but maybe did not advise him on matters of state she was a more traditional I've held us up out of the more traditional white now is very reliant on is a very good secretary and Whitman who is a very smart forceful woman and help like a lot so I valued women but he was he was you know a soldier and a man's man Evan Thomas spikes block will push into the Cold War in a moment but a couple of our obstacles one of them's name McCarthy the subtitles president Eisenhower secret battle to save the world Evan Thomas is the author I'm John bass or this is the John that's for sure.

John Batchelor Dwight David Eisenhower Texas Jeffrey Abilene Kansas two years three years
"jackie cochran" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"His older brother to go to the university of Michigan and then the deal was the older brother would take two years off and work for Dwight Eisenhower Ike is he was called little like the older brother was big I didn't work out that way because he found himself winning a an appointment to west point and therein lies the tail a wonderful new book Ike's block president Eisenhower secret battle to save the world by Evan Thomas takes is to the I. presidency and nothing in capsule it's for me the challenge of understanding this man this young man from Abilene Texas who rises through the army's ranks many many posts for many years to command the success in your the landing on D. day and the triumph over the Hitler rights nothing in caps lights at all then a term that IQ's called the big equation I hope I say that right Evan congratulations and good evening what was in Ike's mine the big equation that he felt that he needed to advance throughout his presidency well I think I understood it real national security comes from economic security that you can you can fill all the weapons you want but if you drive the economy into the tank you don't have any national security he feared would call the garrison state which was that the military would just take over interesting that a general worried that the military would take over but he obviously knew where he was coming from and so he was determined to save money believe it or not the great generalizing our through these very scary years of the Cold War actually cut defense spending even as he was beating up rockets and missiles and and bombers to be able to wages they have a nuclear threat he was cutting the military budget because he wanted basically to keep budget and balance and not make the military gets too strong I mean your listeners may remember the phrase the military industrial complex I've now warned against that at the end of his presidency but in fact he was doing his best to control it all the way during his his his presidency now it did but however he was not pacifists he didn't want to the folders tent stack arms and go home he he felt that we had to face off against the Soviet communism which he believed was expansionist in just by looking at the map you can see why the service after World War two were very much on the March so he had this delicate balancing act of trying to keep the defense spending from getting out of control but at the same time facing off against the Soviet Union and his secret weapon the one that didn't cost anything on the federal budget was his ability to bluff he was a great card player was he better it poker then Bridger graded well the easier to switch to bridge from Parker because you as a great poker player west point in in the army but he was taking so much money from his fellow officers that was during his career to me to give up poker and switch the bridge he was a very good bridge player but he never forgot Hannibal off and he never forgot had a scared and his opponent and an adult you know all these poker cliches one to hold him and window full of men and he he he you know he he just knew instinctively how to do that and he was just a champion blubber will come to the Cold War and I expletive and the crises of the nineteen fifties which if you all remember them as Pacific you're wrong there was nothing but war conflict threat death a bomb shelters however would go back to the winter fifty two there's a moment in your telling Avenue in which I cast to be convinced to run for the presidency and a man puts together show for in in Madison Square Garden eighteen thousand people come and I'm just flabbergasted to see that Humphrey Bogart Lauren Bacall and Clark Gable and merry Martin all made appearances to urge like to run but it was a great day shaman and textile car you put on this incredible demonstration Madison Square Garden everybody chanting we like like we want to make and they made a movie of it and in eighty eight tracks a woman aviator in Jackie Cochran fluid over to Paris were Eisenhower was head of NATO was spring allied commander of NATO and showed in the movie and I've now was so moved by this public outpouring this demand for him that he wept and he finally said that Jackie town okay go home and tell him that that'll do it even under tremendous pressure for years relate to throw his hat in the ring he had resisted he was a military man he didn't really why didn't like politics although he's really very good politician but this finally turn he and many got together is white maybe got together and figured duty duty calls and so homely went and ran for president October twenty fourth and Troy he utters the words I shall go to career was at an accident it was that coming to win the election over Stevens what was coming especially since right now to know what he's gonna do when I got there they want the race really was over as soon as he said that because the idea of the great general coming in and getting us out of a war the people Americans people forget this is Corey is known as the forgotten war but we lost as many men there almost as we did in Vietnam the war dragged on for three years and I've never wanted to get us out any any did he although we said that he didn't know quite what he was doing he ended up dropping he basically threaten to use nuclear weapons in North Korea and less the Chinese communists and the Soviets backed off north Koreans backed up and they did a couple of details about Eisenhower's personality you emphasize and all of the correspondence in your book site he had a very bad temper temper that he struggled to control was that a threat to his health when he was a younger man because it certainly was when he was in the White House well he's an interesting combination tremendous self control this warm but nine smile and his ability to keep his temper in the ceiling temper he kept it bottled up it was a doctor's worried that he was gonna basically pop a Cork he had a heart attack in nineteen fifty five the joke in nineteen fifty seven that they thought was related to his temper he had a temper yet a artery with rob on the side of his head would scare people who would be coming in gorge when he got mad at anecdotes of him doing the same thing when he was in in North Africa or a planning for D. day did he throw fits like that when he was the head of shape because my stories all point to the fact that he was calming everybody down all the time it was but that's the thing I mean he's the issue is known as the terrible terrible blister bang to its own staff with his own staff he was explosive I see but with his allies he was soothing and therefore he comes in the White House and now we have to assemble the dramatist's personae let's start with the Dallas brothers Allen and John foster Dulles John foster Dulles is the man to become secretary of state what was Eisenhower's opinion of him when he hired I thought he was a bore kind of a long winded preachy border but he came to like Dallas and he used them as this answer of a good cop bad cop way he left John foster Dulles kind of the Manichaean warn against the forces of darkness which allowed Eisenhower to play the but nine good cop in fact right now is calling all the shots and using John foster Dulles is kind of his his attack ma'am and then Allen Dulles who becomes DC I did Eisenhower have a good opinion of Allen Dulles he did initially Alan dollars would have been a great spy master in World War two and as I am our said it takes a strange kind of genius to run the CIA so with first right now is all for Allah does but he could over time you lost faith in Dallas and Eisenhower surrounds himself with men with stag only parties he any in fact you emphasize how he likes westerns that don't have female leads in them that was the way he conducted his White House is it just us looking back from the twenty first century that this looks strange dream I think it was strange at the time and now I mean it now the nineteen fifties it was just a different time in the idea that the president's staff dinners and only stack dinners for only male nobody batted an eyelash at that that was just the the the the way it was meant or men and women were women in that particular year especially and I've never did not take any grief at the time it looks very kind of retro he did not now I should say he had a good marriage hello.

Dwight Eisenhower Ike university of Michigan three years two years
"jackie cochran" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Feared what he called the garrison state, which was that the military would just take over interesting that a general worried that the military would take over. But he obviously knew where he was coming from. And so he was determined to save money. Believe it or not the great generalizing our through. These very scary years of the Cold War actually, cut defense spending, even as he was beefing up rockets and missiles and bombers to be able to wage of not having nuclear threat. He was cutting the military budget because he wanted to basically to keep the budget and balance and not make the military gets too strong. I mean, your listeners may remember the phrase, the military industrial complex is in Howrah warned against that. At the end of his. Presidency. But in fact, he was doing his best to control it all the way during his his his presidency now, however, he was no pacifist. He didn't want to folded tent stack arms and go home. He felt that we had to face off against Soviet communism, which he believed was expansionist and just by looking at the map. You could see why the Soviets after World War Two were very much on the March. So he had this delicate balancing act of trying to keep the defense spending from getting out of control, but at the same time facing off against the Soviet Union and his secret weapon, the one that didn't cost anything on the federal budget was his ability to bluff, he was a great card player was he better at poker than bridge or graded both having well, they he had to switch to bridge from poker because he was a great poker player West Point. And in the army, but he was taking so much money from his fellow officers that it was her. During his career. So we had to give up poker and switched to bridge. He was a very good bridge player. But he never forgot how to bluff. And he never forgot how to stare down his opponent. And and had you know, all these poker cliches wanted to hold them and wonderful them. And and he he he just knew instinctively how to do that. And he was just a champion buffer. We'll come to the Cold War and ice bluff and the crises of the nineteen fifties. Which if you all remember them as Pacific, you're wrong. There was nothing, but war conflicts threat death, a bomb shelters. However, we go back to the winter fifty two there's a moment in your telling Evan in which has to be convinced to run for the presidency. And a man puts together a show for him in Madison Square Garden eighteen thousand people come and I'm just flabbergasted to see that Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall and Clark Gable? And Mary Martin all made appearances to urge to run. There was a great showman than textile car. You put on this incredible demonstration, Madison Square Garden, everybody chanting. We like we like, and they made a movie of it and an ABA tricks. A woman aviator and Jackie Cochran fluid. Over to Paris were Eisenhower was head of NATO was premed allied commander of NATO and showed him the movie, and is now is so moved by this public outpouring demand for him that he wept and he finally said to Jackie Talim. Okay. Go home and tell them that that I'll do it. He had been under tremendous pressure for years really to throw his hat in the ring. He had was that. He was a military, man. He didn't really want it and the light politics, although he was really very good politician. But this finally attorney and Maimi got together as wife Mamie got together and figured duty duty calls and so homey went and ran for president October twenty fourth in Detroit. He utters the words I shall go to Korea was that an accident was that cunning to win the election over Stevenson. Well, it was cutting especially since Eisenhower didn't know what he was going to do when he got there. It worked the race willing was over as soon as he said that idea of the great general coming in and getting us out of a war that people Americans people forget this of Chris knows the forgotten war. But we lost as many men, they're almost as we did in Vietnam dragged off for three years and Eisenhower wanted to get us out. And he and he did he. Although when he said that he didn't know quite what he was doing. He ended up bluffing. He basically threaten to use nuclear weapons and North Korea, unless the Chinese communists and the Soviets backed off North Koreans backed off and they did a couple of details about Eisenhower's. Personality you emphasize and all of the correspondence in your book site. He had a very bad temper temper that he struggled to control was that a threat to his health when he was a younger man because it certainly was when he was in the White House. Well, he's an interesting combination of tremendous self-control, this warm, benign smile and his ability to keep his temper and a seething temper. He kept it bottled up. It was a doctor's worried that he was going to basically pop a cork he had a heart attack in nineteen fifty five stroke in nineteen fifty seven that they thought was related to his temper temper he hit a artery that with throb on the side of his head that would scare people becoming engorged when he got mad. Find anecdotes have him doing the same thing when he was in North Africa or planning for d day. Did he throw fits like that? When he was that of Shaef because my stories all point to the fact that he was coming everybody down all the time. He was but that's the thing. I mean, he's he was known as the terrible terrible, Mr. bang to his own staff with his own staff. He was explosive with his allies. He was soothing and therefore he comes into the White House. And now we have to assemble the drama to persona. Let's start with the Dulles brothers Allen and John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles is the man who becomes secretary of state. What was Eisenhower's opinion of him when he hired him thought he was kind of a long winded preachy bore, but he came to like Dallas, and he used them as sort of a good cop bad cop way. He lets John Foster Dulles kind of be mannequin and warned against the forces of darkness, which. Allowed Eisenhower to play the benign good cop. In fact, is now calling all the shots and using John Foster dolls is kind of his his attack, man. And then Allen Dulles who becomes did. Eisenhower have a good opinion of Allen Dulles. He did initially Allen Dulles have been a great spymaster in World War Two. And his Eisenhower said it takes a strange kind of genius to run the CIA. So if I. Is now is all four Alan does. But he overtime. He lost faith in Dallas. And is in our surrounds himself with men with stag only parties, he any. In fact, you emphasize how he likes westerns that don't have female leads in them. That was the way he conducted his White House is it just us looking back from the twenty first century that this looks strange anybody think it was strange at the time. I mean, I, you know, the nineteen fifties. It was just a different time. And the idea that the president would have stag dinners and only stag dinners for only males. Nobody battling eyelash at that. That was just the way it was men or men and women were women in that particular era, especially and I did not take any grief at the time. It looks very kind of retro. He did. Now, I should say he.

Eisenhower Allen Dulles John Foster Dulles White House North Korea Howrah president Soviet Union Madison Square Garden Dallas John Foster NATO Mary Martin Jackie Cochran Vietnam army Evan
"jackie cochran" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on KGO 810

"And he feared what he called the garrison state, which was that the military would just take over interesting that a general worried that the military would take over. But he obviously knew where he was coming from. And so he was determined to save money. Believe it or not the great general Eisenhower through these very scary years of the Cold War, actually, cut defense spending, even as he was beefing up rockets and missiles and bombers to be able to wage of not having nuclear threat. He was cutting the military budget because he wanted to basically to keep the budget and balance not make the military gets too strong. I mean, your listeners may remember the phrase, the military industrial complex Eisenhower warned against that. At the end of his. Presidency. But in fact, he was doing his best to control it all the way during his his his presidency now. However, he was no pacifist. He didn't want to the folded tent stack arms and go home. He felt that we had to face off against Soviet communism, which he believed was expansionist and just by looking at the map. You could see why the Soviets after World War Two were very much on the March. So yeah, had this delicate balancing act of trying to keep the defense spending from getting out of control, but at the same time facing off against the Soviet Union and his secret weapon, the one that didn't cost anything on the federal budget was his ability to bluff, he was a great card player was he better at poker than bridge or graded both heaven. Well, they he switch to bridge from poker because you was a great poker player West Point and in the army, but he was taking so much money from his fellow officers that it was her. Putting his career. So we had to give up ochre and switch to bridge. He was a very good bridge player. But he never forgot how to bluff. And he never forgot how to stare down his opponent. And and how you know all these poker cliches wanted to hold them, and when to fold them, and and he he he just knew instinctively how to do that. And he was just a champion buffer will come to the Cold War and ice bluff and the crises of the nineteen fifties. Which if you all remember them as Pacific, you're wrong. There was nothing, but war conflicts threat death, a bomb shelters. However, we go back to the winter fifty two there's a moment in your telling Evan in which has to be convinced to run for the presidency. And a man puts together a show for him and Madison Square Garden eighteen thousand people come and I'm just flabbergasted to see that Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall and Clark Gable? And Mary Martin all made appearances to urge to run. Well, there was a great showman than textile car. Do you put on this incredible demonstration, Madison Square Garden, everybody chanting? We like Ike we want like, and they made a movie of it and an ABA tricks woman aviator in Jackie Cochran fluid. Over to Paris were Eisenhower was head of NATO was premed allied commander of NATO and showed him the movie, and is now is so moved by this public outpouring demand for him that he wept and he finally said to Jackie Talim. Okay. Go home and tell them that they'll do it. He had been under tremendous pressure for years really to throw his hat in the ring. He had was enlisted. He was military, man. He didn't really want in the lake politics. Although he was really very good politician. But this finally attorney in Maimi got together as wife Mamie got together and figured duty duty calls and so homey wet and ran for president October twentieth. In Detroit, he utters the words, I shall go to Korea was that an accident was that cunning to win the election over Stevenson was cutting, especially since Eisenhower didn't know what he was going to do when he got there. It worked the race willing was over as soon as he said that because the idea of the great general coming in and getting out of a war that people Americans people forget this Kris knows the forgotten war. But we lost as many men, they're almost as we did in Vietnam dragged off for three years and Eisenhower wanted to get us out. And he and he did he. Although when he said that he didn't know quite what he was doing ended up bluffing. He basically threaten to use nuclear weapons in North Korea, unless the Chinese communists and the Soviets backed off North Koreans backed off and they did a couple of details about Eisenhower's. Personality you emphasize and all of the correspondence in your book site. He had a very bad temper temper that he struggled to control was that a threat to his health when he was a younger man because it certainly was when he was in the White House. Well, he's an interesting combination of tremendous self-control, this warm, benign smile and his ability to keep his temper and a seething temper. He kept it bottled up. It was a doctor's worried that he was going to basically pop a cork he had a heart attack in nineteen fifty five stroke in nineteen fifty seven that they thought was related to his temper he hit a temporary hit a a artery with throb on the side of his head that would scare people because it would become engorged only got mad did you? Find anecdotes have him doing the same thing when he was in North Africa or a planning for d day. Did he throw fits like that? When he was that of Shaef because my stories all point to the fact that he was coming everybody down all the time. He was but that's the. Thing. I mean, he's he was known as the terrible terrible, Mr. bang to his own staff with his own staff. He was explosive with his allies. He was soothing and therefore he comes into the White House. And now we have to assemble the drama to persona. Let's start with the Dulles brothers Allen and John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles is the man who becomes secretary of state. What was Eisenhower's opinion of him when he hired him thought he was kind of a long winded preachy bore, but he came to like Dallas, and he used them as sort of a good cop bad cop way. He lets John Foster Dulles kind of be mannequin and warned against the forces of darkness which allowed Eisenhower to play the benign good cop. In fact, I was calling all the shots and using John Foster dolls is kind of his his attack, man. And then Allen Dulles who becomes DC. I did Eisenhower have a good opinion of Allen Dulles. He did initially. Allen Dulles who have been a great spymaster in World War Two. And as Eisenhower said, it takes a strange kind of genius to run the CIA. So if I. Now is all four Allen does. But he over time. He lost faith in Dallas. And Eisenhower surrounds himself with men with stag only parties, he any. In fact, you emphasize how he likes westerns that don't have female leads in them. That was the way he conducted his White House is it just us looking back from the twenty first century that this looks strange anybody think at the top. No, I mean, no. The nineteen fifties. It was just a different time. And the idea that the president would have stag dinners and only stag dinners for only males. Nobody batted in Iowa at that. That was just the way it was men men and women were women in that particular era, especially and I did not take any grief at the time. It looks very kind of retro. He did. Now, I should say he had a good marriage. Although.

Eisenhower Allen Dulles White House John Foster Dulles North Korea president Soviet Union Dallas Madison Square Garden John Foster Mary Martin NATO Vietnam army Iowa Evan Detroit
"jackie cochran" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Nothing encapsulates at all then a term that IQ's called the big equation. I hope I say that right? Evan. Congratulations. And good evening. What was in mind? The bigger question that he held that he needed to advance throughout his presidency. Well, understood that real national security comes from economic security that you can you can build all the weapons you want. But if you drive the economy into the tank, you don't have any national security and he feared what he calls a garrison state, which was that the military would just take over interesting that a general worried that the military would take over. But he obviously knew where he was coming from. And so he was determined to save money. Believe it or not the great generalizing our through. These very scary years of the Cold War actually, cut defense spending. Even as he was beefing up rockets and missiles and bombers to be able to wage of not having nuclear threat. He was cutting the military budget because he wanted basically to keep the budget and balance and not make the military gets too strong. I mean, your listeners may remember the phrase the military industrial complex I warned against that at the end of his presidency. But in fact, he was doing his best to control it all the way during his his his presidency now, however, he was no pacifist. He didn't want to folded tent stack arms and go home. He felt that we had to face off against the Soviet communism, which he believed was expansionist and just by looking at the map. You could see why the Soviets after World War Two were very much on the March. So yeah, this delicate balancing act of trying to keep the defense spending from getting out of control, but at the same time facing off against the Soviet Union. And his secret weapon, the one that didn't cost anything on the federal budget was his ability to bluff, he was a great card player. Was he better at poker than bridge or graded both? Well, they he had to switch to bridge from poker because you was a great poker player West Point and in the army, but he was taking so much money from his fellow officers that it was hurting his career. So we had to give up poker and switched to bridge. He was very good bridge player. But he never forgot how to bluff. And he never forgot how to stare down his opponent. And and had you know, all these poker cliches wanted to hold them, and when to fold them, and and he he just knew instinctively how to do that. And he was just a champion buffer will come to the Cold War and ice bluff and the crises of the nineteen fifties. Which if you all remember them as Pacific, you're wrong. There was nothing, but war conflicts threat death, a bomb shelters. However, we'll go back to the wind. Fifty two. There's a moment in your telling Evan in which has to be convinced to run for the presidency. And a man puts together a show for him and Madison Square Garden eighteen thousand people come and I'm just flabbergasted to see that Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall and Clark Gable? And Mary Martin all made appearances to urge to run a great showman than texts. Mccarter? You put on this incredible demonstration, Madison Square Garden, everybody chanting. We like we want and they made a movie of it and Eighty-eight tricks or woman aviator Jackie Cochran fluid over to Paris where I was head of NATO was premium allied commander of NATO and showed him the movie, and is now is so moved by this public outpouring demand for him that he wept and he finally said to Jackie Talim. Okay. Go home and tell them that. I'll do it. He'd been under tremendous pressure for years really to. Throw his hat in the ring. He had was that. He was a military, man. He didn't really want and the lake politics. Although he was really very good politician. But this finally attorney in Maimi got together as wife Mamie got together and figured duty duty calls and so what and ran for president October twenty four th and detroi-. He utters the words I shall go to Korea was that an accident was that cunning to win the election over Stevenson. Well, it was cutting especially since I didn't know what he was going to do when he got there. It worked the race willing was over as soon as he said that the idea of the great general coming in and getting us out of a war, the people Americans people forget this Chris knows the forgotten war. But we lost as many men, they're almost as we did in Vietnam dragged off for three years, and I wanted to get us out. And he and he did he. Although when he said that he didn't know quite what he was doing ended up bluffing. He basically threaten to use nuclear weapons in North Korea, unless the Chinese communists and the Soviets backed off North Koreans backed off and they did a couple of details about Eisenhower's. Personality you emphasize and all of the correspondence in your book site. He had a very bad temper temper that he struggled to control was that a threat to his health when he was a younger man because it certainly was when he was in the White House. Well, he's an interesting combination of tremendous self-control, this warm, benign smile and his ability to keep his temper and a seething temper. He kept it bottled up. It was a a doctor's worried that he was going to basically pop a cork he had a heart attack in nineteen fifty five stroke enacting Fifty-seven that they thought was related to his temper temper. He had a a artery that with throb on the side of his head that would scare people because it would become engorged when he got mad. Find anecdotes have him doing the same thing when he was in North Africa or planning for d day. Did he throw fits like that? When he was that of shape because my stories all point to the fact that he was coming everybody down all the time was, but that's the. The thing. I mean, he's he was known as the terrible terrible, Mr. bang to his own staff with his own staff. He was explosive with his allies. He was soothing and therefore he comes into the White House. And now we have to assemble the drama to persona. Let's start with the Dulles brothers Allen and John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles is the man who becomes secretary of state. What was Eisenhower's opinion of him when he hired him thought he was kind of a long winded preachy bore, but he came to like Dallas, and he used them as sort of a good cop bad cop way. He lets John Foster Dulles kind of be mannequin and warned against the forces of darkness which allowed Eisenhower to play the benign good cop. In fact, I was calling all the shots and using John Foster dolls is kind of his his attack, man. And then Allen Dulles who becomes C. I did Eisenhower have a good opinion of Allen Dulles. He did initially. Allen Dulles had been a great spymaster, enrolled war too. And his Eisenhower said it takes a strange kind of genius to run the CIA. So if I. Is now all four Allen does. But he over time. He lost faith in Dallas. And Eisenhower surrounds himself with men with stag only parties, he any. In fact, you emphasize how he likes westerns that don't have female leads in them. That was the way he conducted his White House is it just us looking back from the twenty first century that this looks strange anybody think it was strange at the time. No. I mean, no, you know, nineteen fifties. It was just a different time. And the idea that the president would have stag dinners and only stag dinners for only male. Nobody battling eyelash at that. That was just the way it was men were men and women were women in that particular year, especially and I did not take any grief at a time. It looks very kind of retro. He did. Now, I should say he had a good marriage. Although people gossip that it was not he actually did. But Mamie did not advise him on matters of state. She was a more traditional weapons held herself out as a more traditional wide, very reliant on his very good secretary and Whitman who a very smart forceful woman and helped a lot so valued women, but he was a he was a soldier and a man's man. Evan Thomas ice bluff will push into the Cold War in a moment. But a couple of obstacles one.

Allen Dulles Eisenhower John Foster Dulles Evan Thomas White House Madison Square Garden North Korea Mamie president Dallas Soviet Union NATO John Foster Mary Martin Vietnam Mccarter army
"jackie cochran" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"jackie cochran" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"And in fact, on the rockets that he works on a law was a unproved rocket called, the titan Centaur, and there's actually a model of it in the bag up the space hanger, which I didn't realize until I was actually doing an interview with walked up to it. So the model is back in the corner. And so I went to most of the launches that that rocket launched the jurors. Voyageur Q just left the solar system. How crazy that? I actually saw over them launched down in Florida. Another thing it see, I get it. I mean that was just so incredible thing I saw these things launched and now they're both outside was alert system. So when I was a kid growing up because I went to launches an around now. So you know, I got exposed to it. But. It wasn't when I went to the Viking launches. I realized like oh Nelson's face. Perhaps the planet's signs trying to stand Moore's understand the origins of life. And I thought okay, that's what I wanna do. But it was hard to look at NASA. And think of it as someone who looks like me couldn't have a career because all the people that I saw ASA looks like my dad. But Nevertheless, I sort of said that's what I wanna do. And so I went to graduate school. I worked on missions to Venus, miss Mars, the whereas orbiting mission talking and that other conceding the Satter Abbas chief signs of massive for while. Most of what I wrote my career is to look at the surfaces of other planets solar system likeliness like Mars, but it was always to try to understand. Report on because only having one planet to study makes it really hard to understand things like volcanoes. Like, why do we have earthquakes, you know, how does this plant a change over time? How does our climate change over time? Having other planets to compare earth to helps us understand this planet. Watch better. Doc about only seeing people who look like in this. How does the museum sort of change it's face to inspire young women to inspire kids hearing backgrounds to get into careers. You've talked a lot about in science technology engineering that has the museum sort of changes faced for more people. All the stories. I think a lot of people were so inspired by Hidden Figures out more relief federally then the movie that came out like, you know, what we should've known that story all they should not have been Hidden Figures. And in my thing is when I was growing up, and I was little poor women scientists, and it was like Marie Curie. Then it was Murray, Jerry like pay, you know, Mary Zeki. But there there wasn't. There were tons of women Hollomon there were people like either love lights out, actually, invent computing. There were women. Astronomers for example, Caroline Herschel on was out there doing the work. Brother took all the credit for. And that we actually tell her story in the museum. So money is to tell all sports. And as I said, we already do that there aren't Spacey's downtown again, we talk about Herschel of key figure in the early astronomy. We we certainly show even the case on Sally. So Intel a we have a exhibit on husky airmen and doesn't Holman. So we have to tell all the stories. So we can't just tell them in one place. We have to tell them every place all to the museums of every kid who walks in the museum's says someone like me can do has done amazing things. I'm really excited actually later this week. We're going to be getting into this museum. Jackie cochran. Who was the first woman who writes the speed of sound we're getting craft. Exception coming into this museum. We need to show those artifacts. It's how low stories otherwise they'll remain hidden like, unfortunately, Katherine Johnson this way, way way too. Because like orders that people. Here are storytellers cigarette. Just sort of trying to present the story in a different plane. I think what's. So fascinating is interviewing for this information right now on the national. How does the story look?.

Caroline Herschel Florida Satter Abbas Marie Curie Katherine Johnson NASA Intel Nelson ASA Moore Jackie cochran Mary Zeki Spacey Sally Holman Murray Jerry