35 Burst results for "Jack In The"

The Pixel 4a is coming

The Vergecast

06:08 min | 2 d ago

The Pixel 4a is coming

"We just had soon are on the show. Was it two months ago? And we're like what's up pixels and he like we gotta make him. Good. Did he make him good. I mean he made he made one one. Good. So the Pixel for a has been announced and released viewed it bunch of a tear. Actually, the podcast of used one but because the Pixel for is late and we can talk about why it is really close to when we're assuming the pixel five is gonNA come out. So Google is like you know what? Yeah, we're making a pixel five. It'll be out here this fall also there's GonNa be a pixel for a five G. 'cause you know that's what you want. So they just announced all three phones at once just Bam per year of you reviewed the. We've not seen photos of the five. We have seen various and confusing leaks all summer and Chris you might actually have a better handle around this afar but a bunch of the early leaks for like this must be the pixel five. Am It's like well, no, there's actually the probably the pixel for five G. now, and then there's more yet more internal documents, even more pixels at a foldable pixel like later on down the line like it's a fiasco in Pixel rumor land. Super. Confusing I mean they had that league. I think it was last month there was a phone. It looks just like the four day but they said it was the five and people weren't sure. But then it seems like they might get rid of their face ID clone which I really actually liked on the pixel of four like to just walk away from that the thumb reader but I mean, yeah, no one's really quite sure it's going to look like even the four five G. might have new specs or a bigger screen or who knows who knows what the story is I mean it's there's there's just always confusion about what's GonNa Happen is GonNa have brightly colored plastic rectangle smug s Yes The four as a decidedly, not brightly colored plastic rectangle. Four, you reviewed it. So the big big new innovation in the Pixel Foray is they dropped fifty bucks off the price. So it to three hundred, fifty dollars, which is. Pretty big. It's a pretty big deal It's a hundred bucks less than these storage equivalent iphone se. To get one I WANNA see one, hundred, twenty, eight gigs and they just like. Got Everything as good as you can probably get it on a three hundred, fifty dollar phone like I. Wish it had a faster processor but we live in a world of android where qualcomm. If you want to get a good qualcomm processor, you gotta spend way too much money. So I got like, okay one that's got a pretty solid screen. It's it's got a hole punch. It's got the Pixel camera a Becca actually pointed out to me when we were talking to them, she asked if it had was the sensor Becca three sixty three. Yeah. Same Sensor as. The Pixel four and the Pixel three and the Pixel three they've been using literally like the exact same camera stack for like two years now. So it's great. It makes takes rate photos but they haven't pushed it much. I would love it. If you could select your software tuning on the Pixel who right if you buy a pixel for and like make this shit, look like the Pixel two that would make me very happy because I thought the Pixel two looked it was the most contrast in the most dramatic and they have veered towards looking more like the overtime. But I wish. I. Could just be like go back to that look I love that look the best because if they're using the same hardware, they should give you the choices software, right? Everyone is just looking at me like. I mean it's like it's like saying you should just get your choice of. Clutch on your Mustang like it gets tied. The thing. Okay. Versus automatic. Put Your Ninety seven clutch in Twenty fifteen I mean you don't WanNa do that but you can be retune in anyway. Keep going the pixel for we're not gonNA talk about mustangs fingerprint sensor on the back. It works great. It's got a headphone Jack. because. Apparently low and phones are the only phone's headphone Jacks Anymore Beca you holding one right now you're holding. I'm holding one right now and what I'll have to say about this is that I love this thing like it gave me everything I like about phones in twenty twenty like a big screen and it's slim and the batteries diesen but it kept the things that I also love about previous cones that I love a fingerprint sensor like a one on the back and I love a headphone Jack and I love the Pixel camera in its three hundred and fifty dollars, which is a pretty good pricing twenty twenty for a brand new phone. There's this. There's this meme out there. For him but like there's this idea out there that like Google was bored with android in the pixels reflection of its board on this phone feel like they're bored with it. Now I'm bored with Andrew. Debut. The one new features accessibility feature for software a IT'll do real time captioning phone calls but it doesn't record them and it doesn't put them on the Internet. So don't have your conspiracy theories thrown at me Breitbart. They wrote it up terribly anyway So that's like the one thing but that's coming other pixels. It's just like Google. So committed to keeping the pixel software like really clean and basic relative to the madness that happens on every other android phone that it can feel a little bit boring and their decision to be really like understated with their design. I think it's like they've got they've. got a little bit too far. It's been like, no, no this is this is the the android phone that isn't flashy. It's just like a phone and after a while like that message gets through that like. Made a phone. Okay. Like they want it to be utilitarian to the point where it's like become a little bit boring. Thank you. Go. Has has been so long burned by Sergey Brin. Coming into Google glass event. On a hang glider. That's a real thing that happened they. US In like one of the founders landed on sage on a hang glider glass is the future and that was their last big attempt to be splashy. In it completely backfired like in every possible way

Google Qualcomm Becca Sergey Brin United States Chris Breitbart Jack Andrew
Smithsonian prepares to reopen in Washington, DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 3 d ago

Smithsonian prepares to reopen in Washington, DC

"Well, most of our fabulous museums around here close still. But the Smithsonian's working on plans for a phased in reopening and there's a lot to work out behind the Smithsonian's closed doors. Some workers are taking care of business. I'm in all of our front line. Pete, Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch means the security maintenance and animal feeders who went to work when others stayed home. Those are in my mind. The heroes of this was now the museum's preparing for you. The one thing you don't want are hundreds of people. Waiting in line, You know, cheek to Jack's trying to get in so bunch wants time passes to keep crowds small, and they're learning important lessons from the recent National Zoo re opening, even in the zoo. What we've done is looked at what spaces Interior can be open. What's faces were too tight. It's a heavy lift, but he believes it'll make the Smithsonian even better. Hillary Howard w. T o P News

Lonnie Bunch Jack Hillary Howard National Zoo Secretary Pete
With 'Star Trek: Lower Decks,' A Venerable Franchise Loosens Up

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

With 'Star Trek: Lower Decks,' A Venerable Franchise Loosens Up

"Today. As we hear from Tommy J. Powers, Star Trek fans are getting a new 10 episode. Siri's and this one's animated, Stardate 57436.2 1st Contact is a delicate, high stakes operation of diplomacy won must be ready for anything. Robert tends to do it. Captain's log. It's called Star Trick Lower Dicks with new episodes available weekly. The show was developed by Mike McMahon, co creator of Rick and Morty and focuses on the support crew on board A Starfleet starship. Stars lending their voices include Jack Quaid, Don Luis and Jerry O'Connell. Star Trek lower decks, a streaming now on CBS. All Access Sandiego

Siri Tommy J. Powers Jack Quaid Mike Mcmahon Jerry O'connell Don Luis CBS Morty Robert Rick
Dodgers Out-Slug Padres to Win High-Scoring Affair

The Darren Smith Show

04:36 min | 3 d ago

Dodgers Out-Slug Padres to Win High-Scoring Affair

"A stunning finish on the double play off the bat of the former dodger manny. Machado as the dodgers hold on at pet, go to win seven six, they win the series as well over the Padres, two games to one John Shea Jim Russell back with you here on the wrap up show, we said the padres lead baseball by the way and runs per game last. Last segment. They entered the day third in runs per game at five, and a half runs per game on the season and against scored six runs here today. So they've been very, very good offensively. But again, with the loss, they fall to seven and six on the season. Let's hear from the manager who was jacked for the first time in his career. Here's Jay Taylor game. Yeah, it's always good to see. You know the guys continue to battle and. You. Know we've we. Kind of felt that you know inside the. In the DUGOUT when we've been down never really feel like we're out of it and you know get get the heart of the order up and chance to you know always be in the game and. You know look at the end Mandy you know squared a ball up to to left field and and They made a hell of a play I. Mean it was A. Had to be you know a perfect throw and it was a perfect one hop throw and a intact. So but dancer question Yeah. It's. It's good to see him battling back and chip away and. You know we. You know we we came up short. Your first managerial ejection tonight. That's something that had been building up over the course of the game with Margaret Mature, as more of a spur of the moment reaction to that dish. Now. It's a, it's not built up minutes. Look. I think manny thought the ball was down I. thought it was down and. You know it either I go with me and he goes I'm guessing. So it's simple as up. Your thoughts on how? To. Handle. I thought you know Came in You know we were looking for a little softer landing but. The NFL west, there's there's no soft landing especially with the dodgers and. looking for a spark and. He gave up to ground balls got through and and then obviously Peterson clicking man you know. Peterson Click a couple balls tonight. You know and. But but I was impressed with how he went back out in the second inning and. I thought that was good and it's always nice to kind of You know finish on a on a higher note, and hopefully he gets some confidence and you know continues to go forth. Interesting admission there from JAS Tingler. We were hoping for a softer landing for Luiz Patino. Remember we heard yesterday literally yesterday when he was called up, he would not initially be pitching and high leverage spots. He makes his Major League debut, not not with the lead, but trailing four too. So you could argue the leverage component of it, but Jim again, he went left left right left with the VP that a left-wing cory seager who's read hide Jock Peterson three homers in the series including the homerun again. Again Against Patino and again, you're going to have to get him at one point or another. If you call them up, there's a reason you call it Emma but Jeez in the history of big league debuts, can it be much more difficult for Patina than the inning he had to deal with there could not have been more difficult. You're facing an MVP facing the guys at thirty six bombs last year who was notorious for being i. mean you saw in the home run Derby last year he. Is. Ball's. Chris Taylor their professional hitter. It's not an, there's no easy ways to face the dodgers especially in a four two game. You put him in there hopefully to have Jason, Taylor said this thing and there by the way it's four nothing before with two outs, TAT tease homers. So all of a sudden the dynamic of the game has changed it's chain, but but seniors already ready like you've already said he's GonNa Pitch the sixth, right? Like you wonder again at four nothing there you go. Down seven nothing whatever. But at fourteen like well, I'm back in the game and you don't want him to get up and then sit down again and I'm sure that's the reason why they put them in the game like look he's already ready. Maybe. It might be not the best time to put him in. But look, we just hit a two run bomb to to get us going hopefully and putting a guy in there where he is one of if not the top prospect on this in this organization, hopefully, we can get another spark on this guy route that is

Padres Dodgers Luiz Patino Jock Peterson John Shea Jim Russell Jay Taylor Chris Taylor Machado Manny Taylor NFL Margaret Mature Jas Tingler Mandy Jason Ball MVP Cory Seager Emma VP
Coins and Cash: Shortages, Hoardings, and Threats

Money For the Rest of Us

03:54 min | 4 d ago

Coins and Cash: Shortages, Hoardings, and Threats

"Walking money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it, and how to live without worrying about it. I'm your host David Stein today's episode three, Zero Eight. It's titled Cash Coins. shortages. Forty and threats. Weeks ago, my daughter and I were at a bakery buying a couple of loaves of bread. We didn't have the exact change and they didn't have the coins to make chain. So they rounded down, we got a small discount. This week I was going through the McDonald's drive through, and there was a sign that said due to treasury shortage of coins, use credit or debit cards. Round up to the nearest dollar, donate the different to Ronald McDonald house charities or use exact change on cash transactions. There is a coin shortage in the US right now. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell told Congress last month. What happened is that with the partial closure of the economy, the flow of coins through the economy, it has gotten all. It's kind of stopped. We've been aware of it. We're working with the meant to increase supply while working with the reserve banks to get this apply to where it needs to be. The Agency of the US Treasury responsible for minting coins is the US. Meant it was established in seventeen ninety two by Congress when it passed the coinage Jack and it chose Philadelphia as the site of the I meant. Now, the US mint operates production facilities in Philadelphia, San, Francisco Denver, and West Point. Every two years, Congress requires US Treasury to give a report on the US mint its budget and its cost to produce its coins. In twenty twenty, the US meant projected that it would produce fourteen billion circulating coins. Including eight and a half billion pennies. One point, three, billion Nichols two point, four, billion times. One Point, eight, billion quarters. Now. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the US mint cut back production of circulating coins in March and April. Year to date through July, they had produced eight point, two, billion coins. They said, they were back up to full capacity by mid. June anticipate producing one point six, five, billion coins per month. That would equate eighteen point, one, billion coins. But here's the thing about circulating coins in the US and other countries. The meant only contributes a relatively small percentage of the new circulating coins each year twenty, nineteen, it was seventeen percent. New. Coins. Going into the supply chain? The remainder came from third party coin processors are recyclers as individuals by things they get back and there are machines where you can put your spare change and it will sort it and this recirculating process. Make sure there is a sufficient supply of coins that has broken down. A couple of weeks ago, meant issued a bulletin, which said, we ask that the American. Public start spending their coins, depositing them or exchanging them for currency at financial institutions or taking them to a coin reduction kiosk. The coin supply problem can be solved with each of us doing our part. This isn't the first time that there has been a coin shortage. There was one in the early nineteen sixties in the US.

United States Us Treasury Congress Twenty Twenty Ronald Mcdonald West Point David Stein Federal Reserve Mcdonald Jerome Powell Nichols Philadelphia Francisco Denver SAN
Jack Del Rio on opt outs: I have views that wouldn’t sit well with my occupation

The GM Shuffle

01:06 min | 4 d ago

Jack Del Rio on opt outs: I have views that wouldn’t sit well with my occupation

"Jack del Rio gave an interview to the athletic the other day, and he said, I have personal views probably would not set well with my professional occupation right now, I think I'll just leave it at that. You know I think to me you know this is really the challenge of a coach now dealing with players I'm not saying you you shouldn't have different views than the players but I think you have to keep what you want or what you believe to yourself and treat everybody. And treat everybody. But the right to have their opinion because when you start giving out your opinion as a coach, you're basically saying that the people you're leading their opinions, really not what you're not gonNA listen to those, and I think this is a slippery slope for coaches. If any young coach listening to this is there's a separation between I'm not saying you should be a different person, but I, think you have to keep the professional relationship with the players respectful, and if they believe in their voices need to be heard you need. Need to listen to them the matter what? No matter what your personal beliefs are.

Jack Del Rio
Google Pixel 4a Has Ushered in a New Era of Excellent Cheap Phones

Daily Tech News Show

04:29 min | 6 d ago

Google Pixel 4a Has Ushered in a New Era of Excellent Cheap Phones

"Google announced the Pixel for a phone with a blog post with some with superbeets. The Pixel for a has a five point eight, one, inch, twenty, three, forty by ten, eighty, sixty hertz led display snapdragon at seven thirty g system on a chip six gigs of Ram one, hundred, twenty, eight gibbs gigs of S. two point one storage and a thirty one, Forty Mil. Battery a single twelve megapixel camera on the back and an eight megapixel camera on the front and a USB. USB Port and a headphone Jack as well phone. Wow. Know. What about that? He has a bigger battery than the four. A smaller top vessels well, doesn't the depth sensing required for air gestures consensus it's nicer looking than the four. It's not as powerful as the iphone se or one plus words, but it's also about one hundred dollars cheaper the Pixel for as available for preorder. Now, for three, hundred, Fifty Dollars Shipping on August twentieth. One more thing at the end of its post announcing the four, a Google also announced it with Havi Five G. version of the quarry for four, hundred, ninety, nine dollars and a five G. Pixel five coming this autumn. Yes. So the only feature, we didn't know because of the long delay was everybody thought this was going to come out in May and almost every detail about it leaked over the intervening months was the price and the price seems to be everyone's favourite feature at three, hundred, fifty dollars. It's one hundred dollars exactly cheaper than the one plus Nord, it's about fifty to one hundred, fifty dollars cheaper than the iphone e depending on what model you're talking about. It's quite a bit cheaper than other mid range phones as well but then Google goes and undermines or as some call it Osbourne's itself. By announcing, it will have a five G. version of the out in the autumn almost like saying don't buy yet. We're GONNA have a version with five G. also pixel five, which we kind of knew that that one's less than undermining but the version of the four, al cost more cost four, hundred, ninety, nine dollars. So if you're into that three, hundred, fifty dollars price point I guess maybe you don't wait for the. Five G. Because you're like five won't be widespread for a few years anyway. But I don't know that it seems like Google just wanted to get this out there and say look okay, we made it. It was a pain maybe they're not making as many of them as they had wanted in. So they're not pushing it as hard. I don't know but it's an odd launch for something that for for people who want to. Mind their mind. Their pennies is a very attractive phone. It is that said, the timing is curious as you mentioned I mean listen a five hundred dollar phone. A lot of people are like, oh, that sounds great I mean that's not even really expensive based on you know what a flagship phone will run you these days it kind of feels like to me that. There is some supply chain issues going on here Google's leg at just just released. And like sell for real cheap and you know, let's move the merch. and. Then we've got we've got other stuff going on this to push so hard since we didn't make as many of them kind. You're Kinda right it kind of feels like that. Yeah. The one thing and Roger I. Don't know if you want to weigh in on this for people who want the bargain price three, hundred, fifty dollars very attractive it's not very future-proof. That's not dragging seven thirty is not the seven sixty it's not even the best mid level snapdragon processor it obviously doesn't have five G. I mean we you end up spending more because you'll have to replace the sooner. I would say that for a lot of people like, for example, my wife, she wouldn't use a lot of the additional features. She just needs a phone that does all the basic does the context does a photos I can share through instagram or facebook. The only problem with her phone is it's no longer being supported right? It's a, it's a five year old one plus three and so it works great but it just it has no, no longer has any updates for security and all available. APSO having something like this also means that you know you get a new phone that's inexpensive but it's also part of the cold Google we strip it down to the bare essentials. There's no bloat wear that's added and it does what it does like eighty percent of what most people do on the phone. Yeah and if she still rocking a one plus three, this processor will probably be fine for her. She's going to be doing heavily intense things would use the processor. So yeah, that makes sense.

Google Jack Osbourne Instagram Roger Facebook
Jack Chisenhall and Vintage Air

Cars That Matter

05:49 min | 6 d ago

Jack Chisenhall and Vintage Air

"Welcome cars the matter I'm Robert Ross and joining me today as Jackson Hall, President founder of the vintage air and recipient of the prestigious Robert. E Petersen lifetime. Achievement. Award. Welcome jackets. Good to have you here. Thank you Robert. Appreciate that glad to be here. You've kind of an entire industry that's really come to be known as performance air conditioning. Vintage Air was founded longtime ago now in nineteen seventy six primarily to serve builders who wanted to bill. Really Cool. Hot Rods Right. Talk about how you got to where you are I. Understand you started rich and early age well, yes. I started reading a hot rod magazine and it was hot rod magazine, an Rod and custom which were once at the time that everybody was reading. It had got me interested in old cars and I was about probably thirteen isn't it? Funny? We're in it always starts Yeah. Well thirteen years old I think so long story short my mom my dad was an air force and he was at this particular time was overseas along so she would take me out looking for old cars driving around we drove by one old junkyard that had some pretty nice cars and for Junkyard, and there was a little Mali sedan sitting right there and so. With that one and that started it really which pay fifty bucks hundred bucks for no one hundred dollars ran and drove off. There's a lot of must have been a nice car. It was decent in Iran in my mom felt that was important. So she said that'd be good one it actually Lebron's than I thought well, mode will be in their law anyway but. What did you put in that thing? Jag. Let Me Guess Flathead v Eight maybe something like that. Yeah. The first walk was a mercury by then the mercury and the flatheads kind of really on their last legs so cheap and a guy out of Mercury, my dad and military, and so I could go out to the base hobby shop at work on it therapies they have the tools and equipment wilmer stuff anyway he was out there and he was pulling that thing out and he was gonna put an old set I'm looking at that thing going he san now I gotta get rid of this thing and I'm going hey, wait a second I ask him what he'd takes Twenty. Five Bucks for so. Two fifty, five key begins Mercury, flat. It sounds like deal and boy that was the bee's knees back. Then there really was water fun car that must have been what happened after those formative years he did some college worker well. And as going along I kept working on our of data as we went along than mercury got lost and I put a pontiac over at bow the eight. Okay. Okay. And I use that to go to school I drove that car was my only car and so yeah I, I went to school studied industrial design. Guy Down College it was Vietnam era so. I joined ROTC after I got out of college I went right into the air force that was pretty ambitious endeavor especially at the time you fly planes her through for a little bit and then I did other stuff when emir force well, it sounds like an interesting stint obviously got out your passion for hot rods did not diminish in the lease no it. Always Hot Rod Guy, was there an a Ha moment that you had that said, he wait a minute I'm going to get serious about this. Well, when I got out of the Air Force, I had to make a decision. I think a lot of people that go in the air force consider staining and making a career out of thought about that for just a second and pretty much decided that I wanted to do. It always wanted to do I told my mom when I was about thirteen or fourteen. I told her not WANNA build parts for Cars I decided. Well, if I wanted to do that, this long should stick with that I started looking around. What can I do at that point? Pete shakes had started a year before that. There was a couple of chassis guys out there now and I've thought well I don't want to go jump in the middle something someone is already doing so look can I do that's new made any backup just a second I had started an air conditioning repair installation sinner right after I got out of the Service in seventy three head that stuff laying around so I thought hey, street rod nationals coming up here in August August load up the van take a bunch of stuff up there and made three unique parts to have up there for that deal were no condensers at that time in the condenser is the part that goes in front of the radiate sure that support that takes up space and. A hot rod that could be a sore thumb and of course, in those days, it was all about thirty four. It's some people would say it's still. Also, we'll get to that I designed and had a company make me condenser company up in Minnesota. Make me a condenser that was vertical so it would fit that format because there was nothing like that available number one that's right that narrow narrow grill and the yeah it had to fit just right? Yeah. There were narrow ones but they laid down the width of the cars that were going on now. That's right. So we did that and then nine designed a compressor mounting bracket for a small black Chevy because there were more sponsorship, he's going in at that time anything else. So the hoods were narrow on hot rod so it couldn't hang out sides like they did in the newer cars. So that was the second thing we did that bracket and then the third thing we did is I made a mold. been working with my hands long enough that I just figured hands I can make them all and I can make my own plastic evaporator out in. That's right and put the coralline and I'll have a unique evaporator to fit of thirty, two

Air Force Vintage Air Robert Ross Rod Magazine E Petersen President Founder Jackson Hall Rotc Chevy Lebron Iran Pete Shakes Pontiac Mali Vietnam Minnesota
Obituary: Herman Cain

TIME's Top Stories

05:52 min | Last week

Obituary: Herman Cain

"Herman Cain helped define the American black conservative movement. He also set the stage for trump by Philip Elliott. Herman. CAIN remembered the nineteen ninety-six moment that changed his political trajectory as clearly as any in his life. The businessman was advising Jack Kemp's vice presidential campaign and accompanied the boss to the iconic Sylvia's soul food restaurant in Harlem for an event a man in the crowd shouted out to Kane and colleagues Black Republicans, there's no such thing. The. Same Man in canes telling called them Uncle Toms. The episode. So angered Kane that when he got home from that campaign swing, he switched from a registered independent to a card carrying member of the Republican. Party and over the next quarter century, the child of the segregated south became one of the best known black Republicans in the country briefly rising to be his party's presidential front runner for the two thousand twelve nomination and remaining one of the most quotable stars in conservative media. So committed to his party's stick it in the I e host was Cain that he flew to Tulsa. Oklahoma for President Donald, trump's first return to the campaign trail after one hundred thousand US corona virus deaths despite dire warnings from public health experts at that endure rally on June twentieth the stage four colon cancer survivor posed for pictures without wearing a mask and sat in the packed stands with fellow fans of the president on June twenty-ninth Cain tested positive for the corona virus. On July second, his aides announced he had been hospitalized while fighting the disease his twitter account continued to criticize mask wearing and to promote unproven endorsements of hydroxy. On. July. Thirtieth CAIN aides announced he had died from the White House trump attributed the death to the thing called the virus cain among the most prominent Americans to die during this pandemic who was seventy four In many ways, Kane and trump were cut from the same cloth neither had been elected to any political post before running for the White House, both delighted in needling the Republican Party's establishment and the mainstream press they shot from the hip campaigned in slogans and didn't much care to learn the details. Both men were dogged by allegations of sexual affairs and inappropriate behavior, and both denied the allegations they proved disqualifying for Kane who ended his bid in December twenty eleven under intense scrutiny. But they did not derail trump just one election cycle. Later, they were also both savvy exploiters of the media. In saying things they knew would provoke outrage and thus amplify the celebrity at the core of their bids indifference toward if not hostility against what had come before was a cornerstone of their strategy, not a flaw. CAIN was born in Memphis in nineteen forty-five to a domestic worker mother and a janitor father when his dad was hired to be the chauffeur for the head of coca-cola, the family moved to Atlanta where cain would graduate from Morehouse College. He then completed his graduate studies at Purdue University after civilian service in the navy from there Kane moved from engineer to executive with Pillsbury and its subsidiaries of Burger King and Godfather's pizza where he would be its CEO. In nineteen, Eighty Eight, he oversaw Godfather's. From, Pillsbury throughout the same time yelled positions with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. That part of his resume lead trump to consider cane for a position in his administration a move that drew dissent from fellow Republicans who were not eager to revisit the allegations against Kane for three years. Kane led the national. Restaurant Association a lobbying arm for the industry that paid settlements to at least two women who detailed canes unwanted advances. His was not a typical career in his post. CEO Years Cain became a sought after motivational speaker and unsuccessful presidential candidate in two thousand and a Senate one in two thousand four. As, the tea party movement started to organize after Barack Obama's election to the White House. Kane emerged as one of its strongest spokespeople when the twenty twelve election cycle began kane decided to run the scrappy est of campaigns focused on untrue additional travel schedule that often seemed more like a book tour than an organizing effort. His novel nine, nine nine tax plan proposing a nine percent corporate business flat tax, a nine percent personal income flat tax and a nine percent national sales tax drew I rolls from economists but curiosity from voters. Antipathy toward front runner Mitt Romney proved sufficient to give cain a chance to rise in the late summer and fall of twenty eleven until his personal life just proved too much. But he didn't shrink from podcast life. Instead he became a ubiquitous voice and reliable critic of Democrats

Ceo Years Cain Kane Donald Trump Cain White House Mitt Romney Jack Kemp Pillsbury Philip Elliott Republican Party Godfather Oklahoma Twitter Harlem Barack Obama United States Tulsa
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | Last week

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. 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These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

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Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:27 min | Last week

Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

"Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, and by the end of the month, the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, but Michigan came through the curve bent. Now, the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, there was the outbreak last month that. Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, in East Lansing, they're exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. The kit costs around three dollars a piece, and as you can see, it's pretty simple. You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, which maybe you've heard about recently, the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. They're going to step further than that. Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. Two teams. You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. The point is if two pools come back with positive results, it can only mean one thing. The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. Now, the third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. Communities, Wastewater Michigan State, professor, Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. Since April she says, they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. For the testing this fall, the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, even at the level of individual buildings. So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. Diagnostic testing. But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. If it works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? Lipton. Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. Thank you for being with us. We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. What would you think about full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. Bright. But we're not a multinational corporation. So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. have. More. More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So in this case, if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, we save a lot of time. So if you can save time and you can save supplies, you're going to Yeah. Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. This works 'cause you're not expecting a large proportion of people to have this thing right. So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, we'll come out negative. Right. pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. So the this actually could have broader implications There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. Test an additional five, hundred thousand to one million samples a day. Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You can see things early and intervene. Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, we can be. Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. Wow. That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, Hey, what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea resources all over the country run by different people but the the government of the United States providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which is what our laboratory did during during April we can marshal all of these resources all. Know How that exists in order to to. Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. Lifting. There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, but I have to tell you after this conversation. I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. Dr. Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I don't even know what that is. We'll talk about that another time at Michigan State University. Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. State, we'll stay on top of this with you.

Michigan Michigan State University Dr. Jack Lift Lipton Wastewater Michigan State Professor Governor Gretchen Whitmer United States Harper Dr Jack MSU Biomedical National Guard East Lansing Translational Neuroscience Miami Dolphin Wall Street Journal Seattle Minnesota Joan Rose
BREAKING: Herman Cain Dies Of Coronavirus At Age 74 in Atlanta

The Erick Erickson Show

03:35 min | Last week

BREAKING: Herman Cain Dies Of Coronavirus At Age 74 in Atlanta

"A political consultant who worked for Herman? Cain on his twenty twelve presidential campaign is announcing that he has passed away. from. covid nineteen. That's breaking news here in Y'all I'm not confide. This is not. Confirmed other than through Ellen. And I'm Yup. nope. It's IT's confirmed folks. Herman Cain has died of the corona virus. age seventy four. In Republican presidential candidate in two thousand twelve. Herman Cain ran his platform very famously was the nine nine, nine tax reform plan. He had been Fox. News contributor and a newsmax contributor newsmax is confirming his death He was admitted to the hospital on July first two days after being. DIAGNOSED WITH COVA night teen. Ten Days Prior, he had been at the Rally for the President they they don't know where he got the virus. And Herman Cain has now. Passed away He was the President of Godfather's pizza. He. Rose through the ranks He joined coca. Cola. He worked for Pillsbury. He was regional vice president for Burger, King, which at the time Pillsbury owned and then he took over. Godfather's pizza turned around made it a profitable company. And his big issue is marketing. He became the chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in Nineteen ninety-five He was in the position for twenty months in nineteen in two, thousand nine you'll recall the president renominated him for the Federal Reserve. Board? He ultimately withdrew his nomination. He dabbled in politics in one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty was an adviser to the Bob Dole Jack Kemp Campaign for President He ran for the Senate in two thousand four. He was defeated in the primary by Johnny Isaacson actually campaigned for him in two thousand four. Now he beat colon cancer it was stage four and two, thousand six he was diagnosed with it the and then from two, thousand, eight, two, thousand, seven, of course, he had the Herman Cain Show in Atlanta? On WSB, I was actually hired in two thousand eleven to replace Herman on WSB Because Herman had decided, he was going to run for president and he had been in the line to replace Neil Bortz they needed somebody to replace Herman as a result. So they hired me Herman off and ran for president. He at one point was the front runner for the Republican presidential nomination, and then he the ultimately lost the nomination and came back to radio has has wound down his career over time and. Herman Cain now dead he was a good man. Seventy four years old affected by coronavirus virus. Prayers for his family. And for for those who knew and loved and worked with Herman Cain God. Bless him.

Herman Cain Regional Vice President Herman President Trump Pillsbury Consultant Newsmax Federal Reserve WSB Ellen Bob Dole Jack Kemp Federal Reserve Bank Johnny Isaacson Neil Bortz Senate Kansas City Burger Atlanta
Austin Jochum on Bringing the Training Session to Life

Just Fly Performance Podcast

04:29 min | Last week

Austin Jochum on Bringing the Training Session to Life

"So why? Want to say this. So how it was there a better way to spell your last name then or would there be like Italic so I can have people pronounce it correctly when they read the headline here. Yeah everybody thinks like it's A. Job looks like Josh right here. But if you have really gonNA spell, we probably with a Y Y Y. Que you or something like that since last name just totally jacked up. The I I'm not GonNa lie when saw I think maybe it was when you asked me to. Be On your podcast dry your podcast before I thought it was Josh. So I apologize I just wrote in my little notes I put. Okay You M. so hopefully that eleven maybe that'll resolve things a little bit. So just for everyone out there that'll. Thousand my that was my iteration. And that's where we just have to get to a point as a coach and a company where people in the not to say. That's one of our goals. People say Yoga the right way yeah. Yeah. That'd be good. Creative Project Austin. So I know one of the things that I really like about looking at your work is I. Know that want to know you're really creative coach always love I know this is GonNa be an awesome talk and I was curious you did football I think track a you're into strengthening conditioning. What what was your formation in your years as a college athlete and then your choice to become the type of coach that you are now? Yeah and I think it's funny that you say I'm a creative coach because as a player I was anti creative like from from the very day one. Started lifting in high school with Olympic lifts like straight. Olympic. Style. Monday Wednesday Friday, all we did was clean and jerk clean snatch, and then maybe some bench presents watts and just the differ variation of that and. I mastered swore by those for so many years. That's literally the only thing I ever did. If. We sprinted if we did anything maybe some ladders we did but. The entire program was Olympic lifts swear by it was awesome in highschool got really strong at that. Thought that was the answer. When into my first year college at Saint Thomas Football Kaikan on the field first day we actually lifted before we went on the field we lifted and I was like smoking these guys like smoking on cleaner jerk like doing. More than a lot of seniors on their all I'm here I arrived I'm sweet a freshman. Football, we go to the practice that day and I I my mind was blown I had no idea was happening speed the game was different. Everything was different I'm move to like a robot out on the field and just moved terribly and I started the. To all right, what's happening in the weight room is not what's happening on the field and I need to find a way to bridge that gap and that started the full journey and I think it is a journey because then it was west side stuff on my. All right not the Olympic stuff. Now it's west side. Now it's the powerlifting. Now it's some box. Johnson plow metrics advance to my are still stuck in that weight reminds set of. Bands the bar now GonNa be faster and it helped a little bit I moved just a little bit better. But I think we're just because I was destroying my body a little bit less than the weight room and I still a little bit slower on the field and it was just this journey than it was bilateral to single lateral. Then it was traffic training and this this full hodgepodge of things but never fully breaking out of the weight room mindset never breaking into the movement onset and by the time graduated. At Saint Thomas I had some athletic success on the field and. But it was in a way of I forced myself into a mold of athletic success. I plays Nose Guard and my movement options were very small and I was watching other players and I was doing a job that was required to do doing his thing. I'm field that is required to do but the game move fast for me everything move fast for me I had. Very little movement options I had one may maybe one pass rush move and I was good at the pass rush move. But I didn't have a lot of options people next left and right and me that works out in quotation worked out a lot less than me that they had way more options and that's really where I started to dive into how can I get more movement options for myself? How can I move better? How can I give my athletes the ability to? Now that you have a huge output, you're able to lift a bunch of weight. You're able to sprint really really fast to do all these things. How can we give you options to do this? How can we give you? Can we slow the game down a little bit for you and that's Kind of a little bit of where we started the journey of where Rats Day and hopefully the journey continues for the next ten to fifteen years I can look back at this podcast. About Austin but that's kind of the

Josh Football Saint Thomas Football Kaikan Olympic Powerlifting Austin Saint Thomas Johnson
ACC schedule includes Notre Dame, 10 conference games

The Audible with Feldman And Mandel

06:57 min | Last week

ACC schedule includes Notre Dame, 10 conference games

"We're pleased to be joined. Now by our colleague NAP Fortuna nobody's more plugged in AC and also Notre Dame who is now at least for one football season a member of the ACC we were just talking a little bit offline map, but it's been kind of a whirlwind where this meeting of the president's for for Wednesday we knew about it for. A while and they were gonNA have poor. I. Was they're gonNa vote on one of few schedule models and then the day before it became no, they're not ready to vote. It's GonNa get pushed back a week and then all of a sudden band with almost no warning there was a full press release with the whole schedule model on everything. What happened. Like everything else when it comes to college football news amid pandemic I think everyone is learning things from anyone other than the primary source. So to speak I mean this was a rare case where a reported him break this story that the League was able to put this story out on its own terms and I think. Being that this was a president driven decision that probably shouldn't be too surprising because those guys are the ultimate. Shock collars when it comes to weather there will there won't be football. This fall but. Athletic Directors were not on that Board of Governors meeting call today they had. Kept them abreast of what they were talking about him models and so forth. But. As you said, I mean I was told as recently as yesterday. Tuesday that. The eighties were not ready to present a model that they were ready to go with just in light of the MARLINS fiasco with the. MLB. On Monday the evergreen situation going on there they still wanted to to to flesh things out and. figure out what the best approaches and I do think it's the irony of all ironies that as soon as the ACC puts out this press release, our friend Ross Stellar over sports illustrated has a report in the SEC is going to go conference only which. In many ways I can't help but think contradicts what the ACO is trying to accomplish right when they want to keep that one non-conference late open. Matt. Let me ask you this. So, as part of this deal Notre Dame is gonNA share the TV revenue from its home games with the rest of the members. How how big of a concession is that for them and was you? had been a stumbling block before and what do you think was in jacks bricks mind when when this kind of deal was presented to him I think operating under the assumption here for the sake of this conversation that there will be a season. I. I think that's a pretty big concession Notre Dame that's a deal as a private school that. Is Not public. We don't know the details I mean we. A. Very strong. I guess if you will that it's in the range of fifty million dollars or so and that it's significantly less than what they would be getting. From TV rubbing new distribution standpoint if they had joined the conference fully but I don't think that's a small matter that Notre Dame is is all in on the ACC at least for this year that they will be sharing that revenue in that they'll be you know. Frankly the big picture first time in one, hundred, Fifty, eight years of Notre, dame football they're going to interest season competing for a conference championship I mean that's that's very very. Big Ding even say finishing third place right they don't even come close to qualifying for they see if the season goes on just the fact that we're saying that that Notre Dame fans are reading that in hearing that and learning that about their school today I. think that is a very, very big headline when you talk about the Notre Dame, not just as program Business Itution, it's extraordinary I don't think you can understate how I mean they're they're the it's one of those issues or or griping points that. For my whole career I mean it's just been a constant. Why won't they join a conference? Somebody should force them to join a conference and then a permanent obviously but something finally. Put them in a position where they. Had to join a conference and I don't know the giving away the TV money. You know I don't I don't have the numbers, but that could end up being awash because they don't make that much from NBC and if they also get to now get a bigger share a full share of the you know the larger. ACC, ESPN deal I mean for all we know. They're making more money out of it. I don't know but the fact that they. So how how you know the Notre Dame fan base like how are they going to be feeling about this? There's the independence is such a point of pride obviously. But also if they didn't do this, there was a decent chance they were gonNA, end up with like a six game schedule. I think the initial reaction will be surprised in disappointment. Now, those feelings may linger throughout the course of this twenty twenty football season or they could be gone Tuesday when the Board of Governors of the NCAA makes a ruling on. How if and how the season will proceed and I can't help but think I may sound cynical here. But part of me wonders if it in the back of the decision makers minds at Notre Dame, they know what? Like the silent part is out loud. So to speak, they just don't think that season it's going to be feasible and if it makes everyone happy. Everything copacetic to just say, yes and concede to have everyone move forward in as unified of a front as possible under one umbrella as the ACC. then. They were willing to do that and maybe could. Bank that goodwill on the back end, I don't know that. That's me kind of theorizing here digging out loud. But I do think that headlined just seeing the press release seeing Notre Dame eligible for a conference title game I think that is a not insignificant. It's just like you said it's a conversation it's a question. I it's taken up. You know a chapter of your book God knows how many hours of our time on twitter at a mailbags and so forth t to hear the words Notre Dame, and let's say, Hey, you know they do play Clemson on their schedule and it's No divisions US here. So the top. Winning percentage teams go hypothetically. They could lose the CLEMSON and beat Clemson or be Clemson lose clemson. For the ACC title, I'm just picturing right now they're hockey team is currently the back to back big ten champions I'm trying to picture a big time championship. A banner. Compton. Ice Pavilion. A right down the road from an ACC championship banner at Notre Dame Stadium if the season out there, and if they were to to win the League because that would be pretty pretty funny. It would seem like it would make them more likely though for this to at some point, be permanent because I the argument I've always heard is nor named loves the aspect of of the uniqueness of not being. like everybody else, and at least for this year with all the craziness that's going on, they're going to be like everybody else to a large degree and find out they really. Like, Hey, this is cool. Seriously

ACC Notre Dame Stadium Football Clemson President Trump League Board Of Governors Nap Fortuna Marlins MLB Hockey Compton Ice Pavilion Matt Business Itution Twitter NBC United States Ross Stellar
ACC sets 11-game fall football schedule

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:58 min | Last week

ACC sets 11-game fall football schedule

"The ACC has made a lot of news today and eleven games schedule Ten conference one non conference over thirteen weeks the first game somewhere. After the first weekend of the season, and there will be one division of the big story out of this as Notre Dame. Andrea. Adelson covers the. ACC College football for ESPN, and we are delighted to welcome Andrea to the program. Andrew thanks. We knew this day was coming. We didn't think Notre Dame was going to be left at home. But your reaction to everything we have we have found out here in the last hour. Notre Dame being discussed as an ACC member for this just one year only it football is something that has been under discussion for the last several months says the ACC coaches, athletic directors, and Obviously League membership and Jacks war break at Notre Dame try to figure out the best scheduling model for US moving forward in order for us to try at least play a season with some uniform scheduling and a little bit of equity while also trying to eliminate long-distance around the ACC, it's impossible to do that. But at least they can try and bringing notre. Dame into the fold and obviously helps the ACC in terms of the number of MARCI Games now in the conference and it helps. Notre Dame because they're able to fill out an entire schedule, they're going to have opponents that are following the exact same protocols because that is in the ACC policy everybody's got to follow the same medical and testing and health and safety protocols and Notre Dame is eligible for the ACC championship game. This year without the divisions, it's going to be the top two teams based on conference win percentage Notre Dame would be eligible for the Orange Bowl. They don't make it into the college football. Playoff. So alive folks inside the League feel like this is a win win even though it's just for this one year this is kind of a a dream scenario of seeing Notre Dame's football in conference.

Notre Dame ACC Acc College Andrea Football Adelson Marci Games League Espn Andrew Orange Bowl United States
Will Pay for Quiet: Communication Apps Silence Your Barking Dog

Business Wars Daily

04:48 min | Last week

Will Pay for Quiet: Communication Apps Silence Your Barking Dog

"Oh. Me Sorry I didn't mean to disturb you. That's just my ruffles. The sort of distraction you've probably gotten sick of after months of doing conference in video calls from home right. Outside an office it's hard to keep those remote meetings professionally quiet. I mean these chips do taste good. And that can be in some cases embarrassing at worst it can shut down an important meeting. No one wants to lose a big sale because construction workers jack hammering outside your door. Or you know one of your coworkers is. Eating ruffled. Okay NFL that that brings us to a pretty new category of APPs that seeing a big pandemic boost noise canceling none out the kind of noise cancelling built into headphones, but software based artificially intelligent noise canceling APPs. The one getting the most buzz these days is called Crisp with a K.. The Small San Francisco Company says it's APP works with more than eight hundred other APPs on your iphone, tablet or computer. There's a limited time free version and a power user tear that costs one hundred dollars a year. Now Chris claims its atkin remove the hub of an air, conditioner or vacuum cleaner. WHAT CRISP CALLS CONTINUOUS NOISE! You can also use it to suppress intermittent noise the bark of your German shepherd, or if you're lucky, the angry screams of your kids fighting. I say that, some what sarcastically, because human voices can be hard to silence after all annoys, canceling APP has to understand which voiced, preserve yours and which to mute, there's. Crisp says you can also suppress background noises coming from someone else, which is something that some other noise cancellation technologies can't do. Crisp and other AI powered noise, suppression, APPs, or particularly interesting as competitive weaponry for videoconferencing businesses right now, millions of us are desperate to get rid of those annoying background sounds, and that means that the company's fighting to host your virtual meetings or starting to use noise cancellation as a competitive advantage, take zoom Google meet, and Microsoft teams for instance zoom has built in noise cancellation, but anyone who's ever been on a zoom Webinar knows it's not exactly. Awesome. How often have you heard annoyed facilitator, ask, we'll whomever is eating dinner. Please mute their Mike. UNACCOMPANIED BLOG POST CRISP, says users can the after their zoom calls and improves zoom's own noise suppression that could work for some who were both patient and technically inclined, but millions of news zoom users are, neither they're using the platform because they have little choice, so Microsoft teams trying to woo users away from zoom is taking a different approach Microsoft says it will soon embed. The Chris powered noise canceling APP into Microsoft teams. That's a big deal for Microsoft spite to catch up with zoom. By this Spring Zoom had more than two hundred million daily participants, according to venture beat at the end of April teams had seventy five. Five million, according to research firms to Teesta, and then there's Google meet which is also trying to catch up to zoom. Google made meat free to anyone with a google account back in late April at that point, it had one hundred million users half that of zoom venture beat reported, but for Google the pursuit of noise cancelling technology isn't new companies. Engineers have been developing noise cancelling feature since two thousand eighteen engineers in Google Stockholm office began considering it because of their own frustrations, holding teleconferences with people in many different time zones, particularly irksome to the Europeans were midday calls with Americans for whom it was early morning the. The Americans would eat breakfast skull. The kids and otherwise caused distractions. Google's surge, Chapelle told venture beat. It took a couple years to get to do I write the company added. It's D- noisier to Google Meden. June behind a feature that seems simple to users as sophisticated engineering and many development decisions for instance developers have to figure out how to teach the artificial intelligence engine to learn the difference between good and bad noises as I mentioned. You want the technology to keep your voice, and you also want it to block airport announcements or your spouse watching TV in the next room. Well, AI learns from your data, but as As we know from plenty of controversies around smart. Speaker supposedly listening in on conversations, this can pose another problem. No one wants companies eavesdropping on their calls both Google and crisp say they're preserving users privacy Chris says it's APP, is installed on your devices and works locally. Google says it encrypt data privacy, and some heavenly quiet sound like it could be remote work nirvana, but experiences with noise suppression vary so hey, if you try crisper, the noise cancelling features of Google meter Microsoft teams will let us hear how they're working for you in the meantime count on more and more conferencing chat, and even gaming platforms to promise. Quiet.

Google Microsoft Crisp Chris NFL San Francisco AI Teesta Chapelle Stockholm
City Of Los Angeles To Establish Community Safety Partnership Bureau With LAPD

All Things Considered

02:03 min | Last week

City Of Los Angeles To Establish Community Safety Partnership Bureau With LAPD

"To breaking news about how the LAPD has announced its expanding a community partnership program throughout the city in an effort to reduce crime, joining us now to discuss some of those reforms that Mayor Garcetti laid out at the beginning of this press conference is Jack Weiss. He is a former L, a City Council and for the fifth District and a former federal prosecutor hijack Hey, Larry. Thanks for hanging on Lamere Records said. He announced tonight the creation of a new community Safety Partnership Bureau in the city. This is the City Council recently, voting also to slash from $150 million from the police budget. In response to ongoing protests. Councilman Joe Buscaino said that this new department will require resource is does this new community safety partnership translate into more money for the LAPD? You know, it's a great question, and there was a moment in the press conference where Joe Buscaino said, You know, it's gonna be really hard to defund and expand the police at the same time, and I think in that in that sentence he sorted inadvertently identified what's going to be one of the key political issues, which is for people who believe in whether you want to call it. The funding or reducing the city. This is not that these are jobs that LAPD officers will fill at the same time. This program. The C S. P program is a very important program. It's been very successful. And I think the real headline coming out of today is we see two African American women? Connie Rice, one of if not the leading civil rights lawyer in Los Angeles, and monitoring your Edie's, a street cop, a long time street cop? Ah, they are the two people who are trying to remake policing not just in this city, but in this country, and I think in a modest Tinga Reedys, the nation is about to find a new spokesperson for law enforcement. This is someone who, when you meet her, she's she's ready for TV and This is her national moment. She needs to have a voice in the national conversation about policing.

Lapd Councilman Joe Buscaino City Council Jack Weiss Safety Partnership Bureau Larry Mayor Garcetti Lamere Records Connie Rice Tinga Reedys Los Angeles Edie
Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

BIG Esports Podcast

04:18 min | Last week

Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

"Those people who've. been listening to some of the content for period of time, when of ours was still fresh, we had women wheels headband Pfefferman I'm Canada from UK, capital and Mckay sports on board to work about a bit of coronavirus, economic response and things like that and one of the main things. He said women's right now you'll find his blowing up twenty four seven with presidents of basically every single media netware Colin you asking for content, a be interested in Konic kicking off the conversation with that e e, still getting these mainstream organizations looking for a splits programming way we are, and just had a sort of a conversation yesterday, which with a bunch of sports networks. At are represented under an umbrella of a media company, and and all still to this day all baseball comes back Major League baseball tonight in the United States. So that's a good thing. more normalcy, CPJ seeing some some driving events some some of those coming back, but still east or is the is the predominance or these days, and and it's yes, it's on twitch, Time Youtube, and and showing up on facebook gaming in elsewhere, but but now the these these I think what what has happened in the past pandemic is, that is traditional. Broadcasters potential traditional networks now Allie, the stand what he's is, and no, it's. It's a replacement for sports. that as I mentioned I think last time Jesus Alabama's back in the bottle, but also they're. They're now really sort of waking up the fact that man. We need younger audiences here we are is fifty year old. baseball demographic isn't going to is isn't going to. Be around forever. The sixty year old PGA demographics tackled mirror off forever, so so they're all waking up the fact that this is the way to communicate with an affiliate with much more youthful audience. Lousy Jesse's, and it's it's now. It's home to roost. These guys get it. They get managed, and they've got now got to figure out how to be gall whether or not. It can be involved is another Matt as another matter entirely I think he's four. doesn't need traditional media as much as traditional media needs. These sports but. You know this is their livelihood. This is what they do. They not Ino- broadcast. They know entertainment. They know how to do engage millions of people, and and with with the right formula with right approach. They have ever shot at this, but but thus far as we all know. This is all playing onstream in online and not -sarily other. You know we were just reflecting yesterday in this conversation about Turner. Journal riots early Turner had it right early with their first league in for car strike, and and not only do they have right, but the brands that they brought in to support it. They also had right, and that was that was four years ago. I was a long time ago. And and in the scheme of things yet they made some of their forays into in a broadcast use for in in bringing predictability around the broadcast that that's still Jack. Jamie stands up is one of the other great moments in in. In sort of democratization of of sports so so. I think I I don't think it's over for traditional media, I think. There's plenty of opportunity especially, as as now more organization comes to sports. It is getting more predictable. There are more path as two point eight to point B., or for players for events for mountain and the notion of broadcasts. Predictable broadcast is scheduled broadcasts that we all we all know. You know even if you're not. Austrailia I think you're pretty much. Know that NFL owned Sundays. At. One PM Eastern time and four PM time at eight eight thirty eastern time on Sunday. That's a sport doesn't have it, so I do think this is. Predictability. What what scheduling and programming can do for his or these? These big networks that are more traditionally focused I think they have. Do they replacing in this

Baseball Turner Jamie Mckay Matt Konic Facebook Allie Youtube Major League Canada CPJ United States Colin Jesus Alabama INO UK Austrailia
"jack the" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:41 min | Last month

"jack the" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"I'm your host. Kit, crumb. Today. Jack The ripper left hand. There are certain mysteries. Stand out and remain known answer. What happened to Amelia Earhart? How did Panamerican huge flying? Boat Hawaii Clipper disappeared without a trace and who was jack the ripper. Between August and November eighteen, eighty eight, at least six women were murdered in London's White Chapel district. But it was the gruesome nature, the murders that brought about panic and fear in the area for months finally spreading like the plague across London where the press picked up on the cereal, aspects of the deaths and dubbed the killer Jack The ripper. There are currently dozens of organizations that debate evidence surrounding the eighteen eighty eight white chapel murders attributed to Jack. The, ripper. There is speculation that there were two killers. Some experts attribute six victims to Jack The ripper. Others say eleven. The list of suspects exceeds five hundred ranging from royalty to doctors and one jill the ripper. As of this writing the number of nonfiction books on Jack, The ripper is closing in on two hundred and that's nonfiction. Without a doubt, the most highly publicized rip book to Come Out in recent years was written by Patricia Cornwell portrait of a killer Jack The ripper case closed. Cornwell claims to have found DNA evidence linking Walter Skirt to a small number of ripper letters. Her book rapidly climbed the Bestseller List and was the subject of numerous radio and television programs around the World Cornwell may have found evidence to suggest that Walter Skirt hoechst one more ripple letters, but the fact remains said skirt was in France on the night of at least four of the five ripper murders was not jack the ripper cornwell use twenty-first-century technology, including DNA to come up with skirt as Jack. Jack The ripper even though as mentioned. He was in France during a number of the murders on the other hand. James Tully author of the Book Prisoner Eleven Sixty, seven, the mad man who was Jack The ripper spent over thirty years, investigating the white chapel murders totally poses many questions about criminally insane inmate James Kelly who escaped from Broadmoor criminal lunatic asylum and evaded capture for over forty years. Specifically question why prisoner eleven sixty seven's government files are still classified and will remain sealed until twenty thirty. That's an interesting secret. Finally no collection of books on the why chapel murders would be complete without the nineteen hundred ninety volume Jack The ripper, first American serial killer. This highly research books speculation Jack The ripper may have been an American doctor Francis Tumblety who had a criminal record, and both sides of the Atlantic, and in fact was arrested eighteen, eighty, eight as a suspect in the white chapel murders. Their, theory is based on a recent discovery of a letter written by a Scotland Yard inspector. Authors Stuart Evans Paul. Gainey claim that Jack The ripper died in nineteen three, when tumble tease heart stopped shortly after I finish the research for the story, I received a letter with a fingerprint at the top that the author Ledge was taken off one of the letters received by Scotland Yard and determined to be from the thumb of the left hand of Jack the, ripper, he claimed the original was among the files of Broadmoor, criminal lunatic asylum prisoner eleven sixty seven, which would remain sealed until twenty thirty. The letter was signed anonymous, and curiously there was no postmark. The letter seemed validate author James. tolleys assertion that James Kelly's files were classified. But if at the time of the murders Scotland Yard had acquired the killer's fingerprint wind up, make an arrest. If however the print is that of James. Kelly was not say so. This begs the question. Cool is the British government hiding, or perhaps who were they protecting? Jack The ripper left hand was produced here at night. Owl Sound Studio.

Jack The James Kelly Walter Skirt Patricia Cornwell White Chapel district white chapel France Broadmoor Amelia Earhart London Scotland Yard Francis Tumblety James Tully Stuart Evans James British government Bestseller List Atlantic Gainey
"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

02:00 min | Last month

"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hey, so possibly, could i. Didn't do the point. Dear Listeners Jack was on tour so sweet, Sarah who I never met. But had I had been promised was the best person on the planet showed up with duffle bags at my apartment from London and was like Hey, girl. I have I have the MO-. have the I have the email. I have the EMA where I introduced the two of you. On the thirteenth of July Two Thousand Fifteen. Is the day that I introduced Introduce the two of you and is literally just like. It's just exactly what it is because that's the thing is I was like cool. So I'm going to hand this over to you guys now because I have to go on tour for the next three months. That's what happened. I can't believe I did that to the both of you. See this email. The email is literally like Sarah. This fear she is so very kindly offered you a place to rest your weary head. Come the data that we were moving. So this is Sarah the love of my life when one of the many reasons moving to Chicago. And, then Yeah Sofas I already explained. We had some issues finding a place. outface landlords, flatmates full through, and not keep their word. Thank you so much opening your home to Sarah and is we are trying to find. I'll leave the rest of the two and literally every. Every email that follows. Are Small, novellas written by Sarah. And then you in return, it's just like paragraphs and paragraphs at the of Sarah being like you. Angel I can't believe you're doing this for us. This is absolutely thank you. Thank you, and then you being like. Oh, did we? Silly, it's fine. You'll be ever ever. Well at honestly. Truly one of the greatest gifts that you gave to either of us has your wife is one of my best friends on the planet we were we were so immediately attached to the HIP binged so many..

Sarah London Jack Chicago
"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:48 min | Last month

"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"And you said Oh. We're just going to. We don't really know we're GONNA probably just like look apartments online and sign a lease. I was like I'm sorry. That was ended up I didn't know to not do that until you said don't do that, so technically. It's I would say. Is your vote for not having told me soon wonderful? I least I can rectify the thing that I did so so dear listeners and most of you know I have. A small amount of social anxiety around strangers, so you have to. Is because I said you can't possibly do that. First of all you need to come to Chicago. Neighbor you WANNA live in. Secondly, you need to come to Chicago and also understand how neighborhoods work. No and I said I've just moved, and I had this apartment and I've got all this space. Why don't you guys come and stay with me for a few weeks? When you arrive and you can look around and see where you WANNA. Go have to go see these buildings in person. You can't sign a lease on the a foreign country. And as you've said many a time, which honestly his Hirsch, as you said the very jack thing which you say, which is low compulsively. No, I wouldn't want to do that. I wouldn't want I wouldn't want be. I wouldn't want to be a burden couldn't possibly a loss? But. You could, it will be fine. And so then over the next couple of weeks every time we spoke I was like hands going Oh. Thought we had an AIRBNB, but it fell through, and we thought we were going to sign a lease, but we it turns out. This is wrong with this building, and I was like Hey Jack I still have a guestroom. You and Sarah are more than welcome to know. We could talk compulsively. How could how could I? How am I? Still Look my mother in the eye. That's not. That's not the British thing. Could you so weird to me I'm like I because I am Talian Grandmother Ninety mother. Cook for you. Are you hungry? Our go very hungry again. You know I I like to host. You know you understand how ridiculous this is I know. I know we've told the story a couple of times, and I know the I always joke literally in the same year. I think. I put the same joke every single time. When you're having this story, which is you wanted to send the how ridiculous is right, but but also to take you seriously for a second. You understand how ridiculous that is. We were strangers. We were strangers..

Chicago AIRBNB Hirsch Sarah
"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:23 min | Last month

"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Now. I can tell you firsthand. You're GONNA love it. We should probably tell the people because I realized we did this on our on our instagram lie. On album released, but we haven't done it on the podcast and I'm sure there's all these yo being like. Wow us to really love each other wonder how they got the best friends, but yeah, we met yesterday. So we've been friends for. Over still her five years now I've. US to believe out now. It's weird, right? Believe it. And, so it started really because your first record, nate such waves in my friend group, which most of my listeners know, music is kind of everything to. ME, and an author of pals and I just so. Jealous because all the buds had been going to show notes you were doing shows lay. I had some friends who saw you, nor and you met a bunch of my closest friends and everyone was becoming friends, and I was working in Chicago and I had missed like three shows just kissed it out it. Find this one more. Jack I swear to God and. I was coming home for a weekend and our. Maybe no, it was my hiatus. I was home over the summer. That's what it was. You were playing show at the troubadour at Aaron and Lauren and canning said come with us. We're GONNA. Go see check Gary I was like saying God. We came to your show, and it was the most sort of transcendent insane experience I'd had as an audience member in a long time, and we all hung out afterwards. and. I said this on our lives. The vibe was just. Like it. Kind of felt like made all known each other forever and also. You were so adored by by some of my best friends like my job is always like. Oh, you've been prescribed like you're I. Know you're. So you and I decided we were going to go on a friend day or next day, we went to lunch. GRASSI dre. was. Good Mexican food in California I didn't tell you it was began sorry about that. Totally forgotten about the IRA. Just remembered I just remember not having a choice in the matter. Now we were just..

US GRASSI Chicago Gary I Jack California Aaron canning Lauren
"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:44 min | Last month

"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"To be better. Doing that because that makes me a pain to work with, but what is happening to me, too? Is this is? My brain is so enwrapped in that way of thinking. It's finding it hard to. It's finding it hard to create. Yeah, I think. I've been desperate to get up into. This room was like wear. Am Right now is I'm in my studio at home, which is just a bedroom at the top of my this House I'm renting in London and I've got all of my toys in that, and if you know I, don't know if anyone who's listening is seen any of the like chose. Streams have been doing. It's the room in which I set. In knows exactly where I am right now. Some surrounded by toys and things that make noise. and. I find it hard to at the moment. I find it hard to ride. The wave will get to the shore of an idea like it's it's. It's kind of tough because I'm on one hand thinking about promoting raccoons, so I'm in quite like a a clinical way of thinking and I'm thinking about you know promotional things, but then at the same time also performing these songs for radio shows and you know J-. Chewing into facebook, extremes, like already said like radio stations in America and. The same time I'm doing phone interviews, and all that kind of stuff I mean. I mean like I'm in. I'm in business mode and I really enjoy that because I only get to do it when I'm putting an album out or when I'm putting music out, and I thrive in this place I enjoy this place, I get to be version of myself. The I find quite interesting, because it's not like Hawaii I'm usually I get to use the decisiveness that I'm usually star bad doing on my harshest critic and I'm the worst person to make a decision about anything because I over think when I'm in this mode. That guy just disappears. I. Need to be better at being able to have that version of myself. Coexist with the mccray versions of myself because I think. I think that decisive of who I am could be really important in my creativity, but he just he's not there when I'm creating. He's he's somewhere else. Which which again this? This diagram thing they charting his books everything none of them all at once kind of thing. I I need that part of me to be that to make decisions, but I don't need them there. If what he's GonNa do is over. Think the decisions that he's making a not guy so that business guy is great when I need him to be that like right now. No, in this conversation with a friend and I'm talking about fun stuff. It's easy for him to just take a break, but like. When I'm when I'm in a meeting with my label. That that's that's who I am that moment. And he said he makes decisions in the thinks about things, and he seems to know what he's talking about. which is very much, not like who I am. When I'm in creating something I don't want him to be there all the time. Because otherwise I'm going to be making music from a business perspective from a from a clinical perspective. But then again, the other question is, can he be there? A bit is not going to. We make good decisions quickly I and I. It's it's weird, but everything that I've said is is relevant to just my creative experience, regardless order not as to whether I'm stuck inside, because if a pandemic I think actually upping my my brain's been quite good at disassociating from like what's going on ten feet outside on the pavement, and just allowing me to kind of exist in this room and and work when I need to. I wonder if I people. Who Do spend so much time on the road for work and I mean..

facebook London America
"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

03:14 min | Last month

"jack the" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi Everyone Sophia Bush here welcomed a work in progress where I talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are, and where they think they're still going. Today's guest is not only one of my very best friends. He is one of my very favorite recording artists on earth. None very thin, the incredible Jack Garrett. He has a brand new album out now called love, death and dancing and today we're gonNA. Talk about how he came to create both the album and the visual film companies at. How and why he started making music in the first place who some of his inspirations are how he grew up training, his ear hiatus that he took for music to examine mental health and how you prioritize is. Real, vulnerable and substantive conversations around mental health today there is so much to enjoy in this episode. The.

Jack Garrett Sophia Bush recording artists
"jack the" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

Killer Knowledge

03:18 min | 2 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

"Is <Speech_Male> be. <Speech_Male> When the story <Speech_Male> is usually told, <Speech_Male> his victims <Speech_Male> are referred <Speech_Male> to as sex <Speech_Male> workers. <Speech_Male> But in reality <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> not confirmed that all <Speech_Male> of them were currently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sex workers or <Speech_Male> that they'd solicited <Speech_Male> their killer. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Most experts <Speech_Male> agree that there <Speech_Male> are five <Speech_Male> women <Speech_Male> killed between August <Speech_Male> in November <Speech_Male> of eighteen, eighty <Speech_Male> eight. That <Speech_Male> can be foreshore <Speech_Male> attributed <Speech_Male> to Jack The ripper. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That list includes. <Speech_Male> Mary Jane <Speech_Male> Kelly. <Speech_Male> But her murder <Speech_Male> stands out from the <Speech_Male> others in a number <Speech_Male> of ways. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Question number <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> three. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What. Detail <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Kelly's murder <Speech_Male> was different <Speech_Music_Male> than the other four. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> A <Speech_Male> It happened <Speech_Male> indoors. <Speech_Male> Be. <Speech_Male> There was <Speech_Male> a witness <Speech_Male> see. <Speech_Male> Her <Speech_Male> screams <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> were heard. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> correct answer is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a it <Speech_Male> happened in <Speech_Male> doors. <Speech_Male> Kelly's slang <Speech_Male> was especially <Speech_Male> brutal, <Speech_Male> even <Speech_Male> by the rippers standards <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> with her body, sustaining <Speech_Male> the most <Speech_Male> severe mutilations. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> By <Speech_Male> September <Speech_Male> few throughout <Speech_Male> London had not heard <Speech_Male> of the white chapel <Speech_Male> murderer, <Speech_Male> who was <Speech_Male> eventually dubbed <Speech_Male> Jack The ripper. <Speech_Male> Question <Speech_Male> number, <Speech_Male> four <Speech_Male> Where did the <Speech_Male> nickname allegedly <Speech_Male> come from? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> A A <Speech_Male> journalist. <Speech_Male> Be <Speech_Male> He gave <Speech_Male> it to himself. <Speech_Male> See <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> surviving victim. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> The correct <Speech_Male> answer is. <Speech_Male> Be. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> killer supposedly <Speech_Male> gave himself <Speech_Male> the nickname <Speech_Male> in a letter <Speech_Male> sent to the central. <Speech_Male> News Agency <Speech_Male> and police. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In the end <Speech_Male> the media. <Speech_Male> Would receive <Speech_Male> hundreds of <Speech_Male> letters most, <Speech_Male> if not all <Speech_Male> of them hoaxes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There <Speech_Male> have been hundreds of <Speech_Male> suspects in <Speech_Male> theories about <Speech_Male> the killer's <Speech_Male> identity. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> one idea <Speech_Male> put forth by <Speech_Male> detective Inspector <Speech_Male> Frederick Aber <Speech_Male> Line who <Speech_Male> investigated the <Speech_Male> murders win? They happened, <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> that maybe <Speech_Male> the killer <Speech_Male> is a woman? <Speech_Male> Question <Speech_Male> number five <Speech_Male> to end this <Speech_Male> episode. <Speech_Male> What did Aber <Speech_Male> Line call <Speech_Male> the killer when he talked <Speech_Male> about his <Speech_Male> theory? <Speech_Male> A. <Speech_Male> Joan <Speech_Male> the ripper, <Speech_Male> be <Speech_Male> Jane <Speech_Male> The ripper <Speech_Male> see <Speech_Music_Male> Jill The <Speech_Music_Male> ripper. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The correct <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> answer is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> c <Speech_Male> Jill the <Speech_Male> ripper. <Speech_Male> But witness <Speech_Male> testimony all <Speech_Music_Male> points towards <Speech_Male> a man. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> despite following <Speech_Male> up on hundreds <Speech_Male> of leads and eliminating <Speech_Male> dozens of <Speech_Male> suspects, <Speech_Male> police were <Speech_Male> never able to identify <Speech_Male> Jack <Speech_Male> The ripper. <Speech_Male> Over <Speech_Male> the years. <Speech_Male> Gis? <Speech_Male> Tes have suggested <Speech_Male> everything from <Speech_Male> Royal cover-ups <Speech_Male> to hidden messages <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> Lewis <SpeakerChange> Carroll <Music>

Frederick Aber Kelly murder Mary Jane white chapel London
"jack the" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

Killer Knowledge

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Killer Knowledge

"The theories about Jack. The ripper are endless, but there are many confirmed facts about the still unknown slasher. He preyed on women late at night. Has They tried to simply survive in the harsh conditions of a notoriously dirty London, district question number one. What London district is considered the epicenter of the Jack the. ripper murders. A ALDGATE BE SPILL field see white chapel. The correct answer is C.. White Chapel while several murders took place in neighbouring areas, confirm Jack. The ripper victims were mainly in White Chapel, which at the time had a population of nearly eighty thousand, and was home to the poorest Londoners. According to the BBC White Chapel, residents of that era only had a fifty percent chance of surviving early childhood. And most adults found themselves living on the streets question to. Per Popular Jack The ripper Lore. WHAT WE'RE! All of his victims rumored to be. A drug dealers be sex workers. C. Thief's. Correct answer.

white chapel Jack BBC White Chapel London C. Thief
"jack the" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Hey look there you go. You got it now. We're Buddhist. Yeah Jack Thank you so much you are. You're you're like condensed milk. You know what I mean. Yeah OVER SWEET. I gotTa Yeah. Yeah Bill I mean you're the good stuff but like tight and packed beautiful. You remind me of grade teacher Ron Johnson. And I'm so glad that you're here and that you're sharing these ideas. Thank you my pleasure. Thanks to everybody who listened. Would you say this is silly but we have the final thing is we have the guests say? Keep it crispy. I tell you what it means but you could just trust me that it means something good all right and again. Jack Cornfield DOT COM. If you really want something good there you go there. It is now we're in showbiz lowered Showbiz. Thanks take care. Oh you gotta say you gotTa say keep it crispy he'd be crispy say it with the right tone of voice. Yes eight and the Jack Cornfield certified Meditation Teacher Voice. Keep it Lincoln crispy make you so much all right really appreciate it all right. Bye Bye bye. Say Fifty Chris. I'm so crispy..

Jack Cornfield Ron Johnson Lincoln Ta
"jack the" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Weird forty and get into it That's it that's all I have to plug. I sincerely hope you enjoy the chat with Jack as much as I did. Boy It was just. It was like sunshine on my heart. I really hope you enjoy it as much as I did. And I'm probably going to listen to this again. We were just watching one of his talks today. And if you're into it go to Jack Cornfield Dot Com and just gobble up everything that he's put now these days guys it's really it's really a gift and I'm so glad that we have them all right. That's it enough blabbing and Boron get into it. The Amazing Jack Cornfield. We record that him. I Jack go in are you. I WANNA get your cough on the record. I don't want anybody thinking you're superhuman her unattainable. Actually you're a coughing will do you what. This is an audio recording. I'm assuming yes yes. This is just so we can see one another each in love. Okay there we go good to see you are you. How's your kid? She is beautiful. Yes have you ever. She's three now oldish ing. She's almost two she's twenty months. Yeah Oh yeah we have A. I have an eighteen month grandson. Oh Wow it's really fun and I'm so glad I'm not the parent I mean it's it's either what you want or not what you want. And that's what we want. I'm really happy to report. Yeah Yeah of course. We're we're at the at this time especially it gives so much meaning. I remember when What what is the firm? And Bob Thurman was talking about doing the dishes at one of the Ramdas retreats that you and I were at and I always think of him when I do the dishes. Because he's like doing the dishes. Great it's it's quiet time and and it's a time to reflect and just feel the water and smell the soap and I've heard that before but what he added was there's a feeling of accomplishment and that was like bad is right on and that is our is because that needs a diaper change. He needs to be Fed. Needs her nap. She's going down for a NAP right now. And and I both are benefiting not only from the love that that Leila's just constantly radiating but we get meaning we get like this real story every day of something to take care of and something to do universal s by the way we've begun. This is just how we do welcome. I'm so happy to see you. I've been Enjoying your teachings from afar and obviously also in person in Maui probably five times I think I've I've Oh yeah when you were there you know. Obviously.

Bob Thurman Jack Boron Leila Maui Ramdas
"jack the" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"You walk made it weird with me. Homesick. What's happening? Where does I hope everybody is happy and healthy and doing well through all of this I just we did a recording today. Actually with an author. That's sort of not everything that he does but his name is Chris Hewitt's and he wrote a book called the any gram of belonging. It WON'T BE OUT FOR A couple weeks. This is unplanned. Unscheduled this little plug up top but it was one of my favorite episodes that we've ever done. It always concerns me when somebody that might not be a name. Does this podcast that people skip it? So I'm saying on this episode. Maybe I'll plug it again that when it does drop in a few weeks. Please make sure to check out the Chris. Hewitt's H. E. U. Rtd Hubert's episode And check out his book. The grammar of belonging. He is incredible. We didn't actually talk. I know you know that I love talking about the any Graham but the conversation Went all over the place and only touch briefly on my favorite ancient understanding of personality types. this on the other hand is Jack Cornfield who is incredible and prevail. And I both through all of this has just been like a real port in a storm and I know for a lot of people. He's been posting a lot of guided meditations one of which he does Very short one in this podcast and just a lot of wisdom and patience and love well. People are struggling during this time so I wanted to bump this up and get it out as quickly as possible because I know this is a tricky time. A difficult time for people and Jack is such a source of comfort and wisdom and peace. So here he is. I do want to say I. I don't have to say this but this is not what I would call a typical. You made it weird episode Jack mentioned that he does better when he can prepare you. Give them some subjects and he can sort of go off on them. They'll see that he's sort of Guide in conversation which I was delighted in. He does a great job. But it's not necessarily the typical me Interjecting interrupting asking for a loss of virginity stories. Or Shit your pants to raise or whatever it might be. It really is just like a highlight and showcase and a spotlight on the wonderful teachings of Jack and I hope it is helpful to you as it was to me. I will say it's so funny. We talk a little bit about poetry in the episode. Some of the things he said in this episode first of all I teared up like four five times and at one point he talked about poetry in such a way that val and I have been starting every day By reading some poetry usually something by Mary Oliver. Who's incredible if you haven't checked her out and it's just been such a gift to us such a recalibration of our hearts every morning so I recommend that that's just something that I got out of this. I know it might not be for everybody but it I was compelled wasn't planning on telling you that but here we are I.

Jack Cornfield Chris Hewitt H. E. U. Rtd Hubert Mary Oliver Graham val
"jack the" Discussed on Ghostly

Ghostly

14:17 min | 4 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Ghostly

"Eighty eight four indecency he posted bail and then fled back to the US. So Scotland Yard's realized he was a doctor and that you know he was around during that time so they they actually followed him to the US but didn't find enough evidence to convict him. Okay then there's Joseph Barnett this one is. I've alluded to this one already. Okay this one is very interesting to me. I didn't know about this Suspect he used to live with Mary. Jane Kelly and he was crazy in love with her Barnett would've known his way around a knife as he was a fishmonger possible that Jack just reached some kind accumulation by killing Mary Jane Kelly Yard. It's possible I don't know to me if you if it was a passion killing like he wanted to kill this person who is in love with. I don't know I think you would have just killed her. I don't know that it would the others but as we said this could be multiple killers. I mean. Maybe he's yeah I don't know. Yeah yeah all right so Erin Kuzminsky. He was a Polish immigrant who lived in White Chapel. He was mentally ill and had a great hatred of women specifically of the Prostitute class. I sorry I said they not process any had a strong home. Homicide tendency died in asylum from gangrene in one thousand nine hundred nineteen at the age of fifty three okay and I have to bring this up because I am from Chicago. Land area as the attitude about this. Yeah so finally there was a show that I just couldn't stop watching called American ripper. I watched this as well. Yeah it was on the history channel. So everything and the history channel's one hundred percent fact alien yeah definitely so it was the descendant of H H Holmes. Jeff Mudge it. He was the great great grandchild of h homes. And they have a to prove that he was in fact his his greg. Yes yes yeah. He suggested that it could have been h h Holmes all along. Whoa connection between homes and the rarer airing oh so and you could listen to our H H Holmes episode to we actually have to episodes on h. e. because it was just so much information kind of like this one. Yeah so upon initially looking at the way that both of these people killed and the reason they killed you wouldn't really see the similarities but there are some. There's some big coincidences here. Yeah both of these. Murderers were really good with a knife. 'cause homes was trained as a physician. Also the timing is just. It's just really weird because right when Jack. The ripper was happening was during a time when h H Holmes was not killing people because he was having his murder castle built so there is some documentation which authorities have found tracking homes Throughout the ages and stuff like that but there was a weird gap between eighteen eighty eight in eighteen eighty nine where they did also comes less. They didn't know where he was. But also there's a shipping log. That has a man named h homes as a passenger who sailed from the U. K. To the US shortly after the ripper. Killings ended the canal arm so the police also had a couple of letters that could have been from. Jack The ripper the only one with which has any kind of merit is the dear boss letter this relates to Aj homes in a second yeah. This letter was sent to the London media on September. Twenty seven eight hundred eighty eight in this late letter made a couple of promises that relator acted out by the killer. That's why it has some merit now. Some people still think it's a hoax. Okay this letter was also known Was also how the White Chapel Murderer became known as Jack. The ripper and it was signed off that way. Oh Okay so do you want to read it for us. Shore now all right dear boss. I can't I keep on hearing. The police have caught me but they won't fix me just yet. I have laughed when they look so clever and talk about being on the right track. That joke about Leather Apron gave me real fits. I am down on whores. And I Shan't quit ripping them until them till I do get buckled. So I can't do this in a British ex. No Grande work. Was the last grand work. The last job was I gave the lady. No time to squeal. How can they catch me now? I love my work and want to start again. You will soon hear of me with my funny little games. I saved some of the proper read stuff in a ginger beer bottle over the last job to write with but it went thick as glue. And I think like glue and I can't use it. Red Ink is fit enough. I hope ha ha the next job I do. I shall clip the ladies ears off and send to the police officers just for jolly. Wouldn't you keep this letter back till I do a bit more work? Then give it out straight my knife's so nice and sharp. I want to get to work right away if I get a chance. Good Luck Yours. Truly Jack The ripper. Don't mind giving don't mind me giving the trade name. Ps wasn't good enough to post this. Before I got all the RED INK OFF MY HANDS CURSE IT. No luck yet. They say Emma doctor now ha ha all right so they did mention about the ear and there was an ear. That was removed affects killing. So that's why they believed that there is some merit to this. And that's why they call him. Jack The ripper. Wow Anyway in In the American river much it consulted a linguist expert that carefully analyzed the ladder and this expert confirmed that various quirks of the language suggests that the letter was American. Lau Yeah like dear boss kind of thing just the way they said things. They also commissioned artists to make a sketch. Based upon Jack. The ripper is witness testimonies and the picture looked a lot like homes. I have to admit academy remember that. Yeah but on. The contrary a lot of people believe the dear boss letter was a hoax created by a journalist. Also I still believe that homes killed for money. Jack didn't make any money on this. So this seems like too big of an issue for me to get over into link them together. I mean I think it's a fun theory but I just there's too many it would be. That would be crazy and like you said there. It seems like very different motives and different methods to absolute so. Yeah absolutely but there is a little. There is some similarities on. Because I was reading that Jack. The ripper might have actually Strangled his victims before before cutting their neck. Okay but I I didn't find enough Supporting evidence to that so I I don't know wall that's all I have about Jack. The ripper in the history section. Do you have anything to add? Rebecca wow no. You didn't amazing job. I mean I guess it would just say to me. It's just this is such a crazy thing because we will never know. Yeah you know you said that in the beginning it's that there's no answer and we were never going to find the evidence that says like. Oh yeah there's no smoking gun that's like Oh we found it like you might read stories every every few years right a new ripper. Hala GIS comes out and it's like this is it. I have a theory like this is the one we figured it out It's yeah but and and it's good. It's possible you could be right. But we'll never be able to fully actually one of our listeners Had a idea of who this could have been. Okay so Rachel listeners. And I'm member of the by me. Coffee membership That she believes Bob Anderson Bob after dark sealer suspect. She claims that he is the moth man. Okay and that Moffat Jack The ripper. Yeah I guess I don't know well I'm just saying AIRBNB BOB. We know it's you. He's reincarnated no. He's the Mothman so just an eternal. I see okay all right so I think now would be an excellent time for us to take a break definitely and then we come back. We're going to talk about some ghosts people. It's going to be really exciting or maybe not. I mean it's GonNa be exciting but maybe it won't be lost because there is no such thing so anyways let's take a break. Oh either.

Jack The US H Holmes Mary Jane Kelly Yard Scotland Yard Jane Kelly Joseph Barnett White Chapel Erin Kuzminsky AIRBNB Bob Anderson Bob gangrene Rachel Prostitute class Jeff Mudge Chicago White Chapel Murderer Rebecca American river murder
"jack the" Discussed on Ghostly

Ghostly

14:39 min | 4 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Ghostly

"So it was the perfect place for a Jack. The ripper to consume the media. Eight up these stories because they just assumed that's how everybody was there because they're all poor. They're all bad they're all fighting with. They needed someone to blame for. Every single thing Jack. The ripper was a brutal killer and so they a lot of times. You know you're going to hear that. They that he was anti-semitic. There's no there's only one bit of proof that and that's depends on how you take it and we're going to talk about that a little bit But we don't know exactly why he did it We can we can suspect things but the media portrayed all of these things. He said he was Irish. They said he was anti-semitic. They said he was a bunch of things. I mean you know then you can put anything on that absolutely and then blame it for every single problem that there was so jack the ripper was also known as the white chapel murderer or the leather apron. That's terrifying. I've never heard that. Yeah the leather apron leather a brin at Sir okay so there were murders that happen to women in that time between April third eighteen eighty one and February thirteen eight. Excuse me April third. Eighteen Eighty eight and February thirteenth 1891. Okay these were all included in the way chapel murderer case and they were all examined and it depends really on who you ask. Which eleven were the work of Jack? The ripper or not It's hard to say for sure. As we don't know who Jack. The ripper was in really can only speculate as to the motive of these murders. What we can say though what we know. Is that Jack? The ripper had a way of killing his victims that leaves us a little evidence as to which murders he or maybe she is responsible for K. Never heard that before have you. I have not there. Is Jill the ripper shelter. I R- is I swear to you. I've known dive into this. I'm ready all right so jack the rippers victims were all women and all known prostitutes. So I'm GonNa go through all eleven but I will give my opinion. Maybe Rebecca chime in too as far as if we believe that they were from Jack or not. Okay so going to the victims. Let's do going through the victim. So Elizabeth Smith is the first one she was robbed and sexually assaulted in White Chapel. On April third eighteen eighty eight a and a blunt object was inserted into her vagina. Okay so what do you think you? Think that's Jack The ripper. Ze M. O. It does not sound like him. No this doesn't seem to match Jack. The ripper is modus operandi eh. That was she killed. She was killed. Yeah okay these are all murders talking about. So they're all dead while definitely they're all bad. Now Guess Martha Tab rim. She was murdered in well. They believe she was murdered in George Yard. Which is White Chapel on August? Seventh eighteen eighty eight. She had thirty nine stab wounds to her throat. Lungs heart liver spleen stomach abdomen with additional knife wounds inflicted to her breast in Vagina. She was not raped too. So what do you think you think those Jack now see? That sounds more like what I've heard from Jack. The ripper yeah. I was thinking that I haven't heard the name before but I do not feel that that this was Jack I. It probably wasn't Jack. It was it. Was Jack Learning how to murder the way that he wanted to murder. I guess the reason I say this though is that her throat was not slashed. As you'll see in the next five also. Her abdomen was not exposed Interesting Okay Yeah. So then we have Mary. Ann Nicklaus Nicole's help Nichols. Yeah sorry now okay so we are now going into what they call the canonical five. Okay these are five murders that seem to have a lot in common and are mostly believed to be the work of Jack The ripper. Okay the first one is Marianne Nichols. Her body was discovered at about three forty. Am ON FRIDAY AUGUST THIRTY FIRST. Eighteen eighty eight in what was then known as bucks row and is now. Durer STREET WAY Chapel. Her throat was severed by two cuts one of which was so powerful that it completely severed all the tissue down to the vertebrae how her lower abdomen was partially ripped open by what looked like a jagged wound and she also had several other cuts on the right side of her abdomen that appeared to have been made with the same blade. And we're all made in downward thrusting manner. I can see now why we gave a warning for this episode. Oh and it just gets worse. That made you flinch a little you you might I? I won't even tell you to skip ahead. It gets worse and worse and worse as we go. Well you could skip bad to go see part. That won't be so bad but yeah so then. There's any chapman the second of the excuse me canonical five. She was discovered a week in a day later on Saturday. September eighth eighteen eighty eight only a week later a week and a day. Okay Yeah. They've found her remains at six am near Doorway in the backyard of Twenty Nine. Hanbury street in spit of fields which is like right there but went chapel. Yeah same as Mary. Her throat was slashed with two cuts. And now it gets a little bit more brutal with this one ready for this cap okay. So so her abdomen was entirely exposed with the section of flesh from her stomach being placed upon her left shoulder and another section of skin and flesh plus her small intestines being removed and placed above her right shoulder and when they performed an autopsy they discovered that her uterus and part of her bladder had been removed. Wow that's just creepy and just very precise in some ways you know like it's like just definitely that was purposeful. I mean obviously so when we did the H H Holmes episode. I got accused a lot of being supportive of H. I am in no away. Supportive of any serial killer. Jack The ripper I mean. He's a monster. Obviously older monster monster so one witness described having seen Chapman at about five thirty. Am in the in the morning and She was in the company of a dark haired man of Shabby Genteel appearance. And that means more like wealthy and probably a landowner The witness said that the man asked Chapman will you and Chapman replied. Yes all right. See Ready to keep going. Let's do it all right. So we have Elizabeth Stride and Catherine Catherine at a House Catherine. Eto At us. Yeah they were. They were both killed on the same night and discuss how he's coming. Yeah discovered in the early morning hours of Sunday. September thirtieth eighteen eighty eight okay. Strides body was discovered around one. Am In fields yard off Brenner Street. Which is now henriques street in. Wait Chapel This time the cause of death was one single incision across the back of her neck. The measured around six inches. How it had severed her left corroded artery and her trachea But that's it though. Nothing else were Jack. The ripper usually mutilated the body of his victim. This one was as if he almost got caught in the middle of the act. Okay so there were. There were a few witnesses to stride before the murder with a guy But they all gave different descriptions as to the person she was with so they don't really didn't help necessarily exactly. Yeah so as as for Cathrine at owes. Her body was found in in Mitre Square in London. That's the one you would you? Were talking about right. Forty five minutes after they discovered strides body as always her throat was slit and her abdomen was ripped open by a long deep jagged wound before the murderer put her intestines over her right shoulder. So the left kidney was removed in a huge part of her uterus had been removed her face was also disfigured. Her nose was severed. Her cheek was slashed and cuts measuring a quarter of an inch and a half. An inch. Were vertically incised through each ever eyelids. There was also a triangular incision which pointed towards her. I and they had also been cut onto each one of her cheeks. So the police surgeon who conducted this post mortem upon at Os body stated that in his opinion. These mutilations would have taken at least five minutes to complete. I would think at least five minutes cheese. He did a lot. I can see though like I mean. I'm not sure maybe we'll talk about this later but like I could just see there being a lot of weird theories that are like Almost like satanist or something weird. 'cause it's like. Oh there's triangles and they were you know putting the speculate about this forever spoiler alert. Some people think it was the freemasons. Oh okay scrape. Far As witnesses. There was a cigarette salesman named Joseph Laundy a he said he saw a fair haired of shabby appearance with the woman that night That might have been at does. I'm sorry but the two friends that Joseph with at the time would not confirm that description so both stride and eddoes became known as the double event so there was a piece of physical evidence though in this particular time okay it was a section of eddoes bloodied apron and it was found at the entrance to a tenement in Goldstone Street directly above it was in inscription upon the wall in the inscription. Read something like this. The Jews are the men that will be that will be named for Upping although there are some misspellings When it said Jews didn't they they've misspelled it. So it's hard to be sure If it if it was You know exactly what what its meaning bent. Captain was probably antisemitic and also we are not sure if it was written by the murderer or that it was already there and that particular piece of her apron fell off their Gotcha also. Graffiti was a common thing in white chapel. I mean obviously it's a you know there was a lot of crime there. So there's a lot of graffiti ash could have already been there and police. Commissioner Charles. Warren feared the graffiti might spark some antisemitic so he ordered that the writing be washed away before dawn even could have been evidence that they could have used for handwriting or something. Exactly all right so now. We are at the last of the canonical five And this one was the worst as far as the people that they believe. Jack The ripper killed. Wow it's GONNA get worse. Okay here we go. Let's do it. Yeah so it was the most extensively mutilated and disemboweled by body. It was Mary Jane Kelly. The body was discovered at ten forty five. Am on Friday November ninth. Eighteen eighty eight. She was found in in the room where she lived at thirteen. Miller's court off Dorset street spit fields spittle fields. The first thing you'll notice though if you look at the picture is that you cannot really make out her face. There's a picture. There is a picture and I know. We don't WANNA put it up on ghostly sight but can you please put the link to the picture. I will put a link to the picture but yeah I don't want anyone to see it if they're not choosing to see if well if they're not prepared to see to see it. Yeah so if you click on the link in the show notes for this one you will be taken to the picture and it is you know. Actually I didn't find it that gruesome because it's it's like black and white and it's hard to make out all the details so which is kind of sad that it's like you almost can't tell it's a person..

Jack The murder White Chapel Mary Jane Kelly Durer STREET WAY Chapel Marianne Nichols rippers us Elizabeth Stride Chapman George Yard Rebecca chime Jill Elizabeth Smith Miller Ann Nicklaus Nicole Upping Cathrine salesman
"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

07:58 min | 5 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

"This is important too because normally in this situation to you'd say like well this sounds like a job for the but the problem here. Is that again right? Now you also recently had another Election where the governing coalition is now run by Hezbollah allies and so the idea that the IMF is gonNA give a massive loan to a government where the governing coalition is run by Hezbollah that seems somewhat unlikely and then on top of that you have re representatives from us both saying we don't want the IMF to tell us what to do and if you think about it this government when you already have people on the street. Protesting doesn't especially want to start going through and putting through Jerry measures which they would have to do at least somewhat and so there are simply no good options will probably happen is delaying which will only make things worse. It's even possible that they will pay out some of their foreign creditors because they technically have the liquidity if they really wanted to. They could muddle for another year but they shouldn't do that. That's just a waste of money. But they they may very well do that in the longer they do it. Just the worst situation is going to get because if you think about like what incentive like this system only runs if you have dollar inflows sending their dollars to Lebanon now right like and so I mean Cosco. And he's going through college can Carlos. Save Lebanon actually interesting people. There's a there's a whole popular movement in Beirut right now saying color going for finance minister and he's like no I mean. He rescued some car companies. Why not a country? I think it's time for a numbers round. I start this week because I have one right here. Which is one point? Four million hounds this British pounds not Lebanese pounds as we know the British government is trying very hard to stop building relationships with countries and rich people around the world because it's now cut itself off from the European Union and it needs to try and get a bunch of investment and it needs to try and get a bunch of relationships going and reinvent itself somehow no one really thinks this is going to be very easy or even possible. But they're trying at least a little bit and so one of the things they do. Is they setting up meetings with rich people around the world and saying hey you should come and invest in Britain? If you're a government how do you think you would set up those meetings you would have? Some people causes people some people and then you would have you know if you're the British government. What you do is you pay. This company. Called quintessentially one point four million pounds to set up the meetings both Quinta Fontana quintessentially being this company that was founded by some toffee. Went to Eton knows a bunch of rich people and he. I can introduce you to rich people. And like he's like I've had dinner Buckingham Palace and I'm related to Camilla Parker Bowles and they're like. Oh Wow you're very special here have one point four million pounds and you can set up the meetings for us. That's that's an incredible scam Britain for you. This is all in amazing. Fda tickle about quintessentially which everyone should read if they have any belief that Britain isn't actually functioning country. It's better than Lebanon. It is numbers nine. That's a number of states that have passed measures to stay on daylight savings time because Sunday morning very early. We all have to spring ahead as we know there was a very nice piece in the Wall Street Journal detailing all the problems that occur when you set your clocks ahead and I personally really dislike it. I feel horrible. Everyone I know hates it. Just got a notification from my fit bit congratulating me on sticking to the same bedtime every night and my circadian rhythm is like really fine tuned. Yes and now along comes as daylight savings time which no one wants and it's going to mess me up an apparently I mean it's kind of like the studies but I'm going to bring them up with some studies. Say that there's more heart attacks and strokes right after the clock spring ahead Some people say it's usually. Let's just be clear about this. The daylight saving the daylight savings time is the problem. We should never have fallen back in the first place. We should be on summertime all year right. I think we should be on standard time all year. Round and the health experts Felix. According to the article in The Wall Street Journal. They agree with me. The health experts agree with me. I'm going to push back hard on this one health. Experts are saying the one thing you shouldn't do is vacillate. Backwoods was down vacillate. Credit to changing the clocks is bad. Yes so don't change the clocks right but if you're not going to change the clocks can we please have delayed at four? Pm in the winter. Come on I mean no. We can stay on standard time and like what is the reason why standard time better than having delighted four pm because if you have daylight at four PM minutes like really dark in the morning and all the kids walking to school get hit by buffing. This is this is like the razor blades in the Halloween Candy Molin Goes. I think we should never spring ahead again. We should never lose our again and we should just stick to the way it is. It's darker in the winter. Deal with it. Get a lamp and if there's more daylight in the summer it's fine so I'll be depressed. We'll get hit by a bus was actually also nine. It's nine inches. So that is the size of Joe Boroughs hand. So it is. Yes he's Lsu quarterback is almost certainly going to number one in the draft from fingertip to thumping so like so. What does that? That's a great it? Well no it's not the problem so apparently there was mole well so there was this controversy at the at the combine which is the thing where players that are going to go in the draft like do they get measured in the run basically track and field events to impress NFL scouts. It's stupid but so they measured his hand. People are like Oh my God. It's only nine inches because there's become this weird idea that for it to be a good quarterback your hand needs to be closer to ten inches. This makes absolutely no sense. The theory behind it is that like you will fumble the Baltimore which like it it. It it's completely quarterbacks. Have enormous hands though. This is like one of those things. I- fixate on when we watch football because the rest is kind of boring to me. But like the announcers always talking and gesturing with their hands in their hands are like these large men and paddles. I mean it is. It is true that like their big until their hands are big as well. But this idea that it needs to be closer to ten inches and that somehow it's nine inches because Patrick mahomes. Who was the Super Bowl? Mvp His hand is like nine quarters. So this idea is silly and can I just say this is my favorite. Part was the tweet from Joe Borough which was considering retirement. After I was informed the football will be slipping out of my tiny hands. Keep me in your thoughts on twitter again. A valuable of information and this no explains everything and explains why Donald Trump is so hands. The ball is falling out of its demands on which bizarre. Just wrap this up. Thank you very much for sticking with this episode of.

Lebanon Britain British government The Wall Street Journal Hezbollah football IMF Buckingham Palace Jerry twitter Beirut Camilla Parker Bowles Donald Trump Quinta Fontana European Union Joe Borough Patrick mahomes NFL
"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

11:26 min | 5 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

"Week by Samuel Adams which is all about positive and encouraging people to take a moment to recognize those of us in all of our lives who really make our lives better. Just tell them their appreciated. You know what the best way to do that is? It's a toast Sam. Adams wants everyone to just toast them onto the efforts for that hard work for that friendship for that support. Tell people that you care about them. There's never a bad time. Now's a really good time. Bring people together. It's simple it's easy to do and it's accomplished perfectly for toast so be sure to make a toast this year with Sam Adams from the Boston Beer Company. Boston Massachusetts Savor the flavor responsibly. All right so we put this to you last week. And for those of you who are ready for the Anna Szymanski Ned out about Lebanon. I can tell you the Earlier this week and I spent two hours listening to a lecture by the one and only Lebron Kite who was a previous guests on on slate money and he was addressing a bunch of very sophisticated law students about sovereign debt things. And so I'm just GonNa Remind Anna here that she has not talking to very sophisticated and you're going to have to pay stiff about four not just below where leeward. Okay interrupt you whenever I stop. I find okay so right now what you have in. Lebanon is a banking crisis and a general economic crisis. Now this has been going on for a while. It really started kind of come to a head last fall. This was around the same time when you start to see a lot of protests right okay. This is all related because Lebanon is the third most indebted country in the world there. Debt-to-gdp is between one hundred forty eight hundred fifty percent of GDP okay. Why do they have such a big debt burden while the reason they do is because they have massive what we call twin deficits which means they have big fiscal deficit? So they're not bringing in as much revenue as their spending and they have a big current account deficit which means that. They are importing a lot more than they're exporting. So consequently they need to raise money to keep all these things funded right. So how have they been doing that on the debt markets? Okay so who's buying this debt? Well a lot of this debt has actually been bought by the Central Bank of Lebanon and private banks in Lebanon and then some foreign creditors. Okay make sense right now. Okay now the way that the both the central bank and the especially the private banks were able to keep buying off debt to keep this economy going was because they had deposited flows now wherever the deposit inflows coming from well you have a large Lebanese Diaspora. That also was often wealthy. That we're sending money and then on top of that. You also had money coming in from Gulf countries around because the Lebanese Bang you could get higher rates of interest. There was a lot of bank secrecy. People wanted to put their money their question. Actually the for the People's the Daska sending the money. What does that mean? What this means is that. Let's say that I'm a very rich Lebanese past. And let's say I'm cost Goan or Nassim Taleb or someone like that and I feel a sense of loyalty to my homeland and the Lebanese bank comes along to me and says I will. You stole a bank account paying interest of seven percent. And I'm like Oh now now I get to kill to number one. I get to support my homeland and number two. I get way higher interest and I do putting in with J. P. Morgan and more bank secrecy and also no one will ever find out that my I have this money that because the Lebanese Central Bank won't force the banks to tell the irs so this is where Anna you start using the word Ponzi. Yes this is lie. Described it as a Ponzi scheme because so much of Lebanon's economy is their banking sector and just jenning up growth through loans for the construction and real estate and so it the whole thing only works from the government to the economy only works. 'cause you have these dollar inflows coming in now what had started to happen honestly? A while ago was these started declining now figuring influence. Just go up indefinitely forever now. No well okay well well. Here'S THE PROBLEM. Because if they don't everything falls apart you see. This is why I think that you think the twitter is like Lebanon. I do not like Lebanon so okay so basically one of the things you'd have been happening is that Hezbollah which is kind of a proxy of Iran having gaining more and more power in Lebanon and consequently you a lot of Gulf countries aren't super excited to send their money to a country that is increasingly being run by Lebanon are being run by Hezbollah right so that was one thing that started to kind of reduce this this flow of dollars in so then what happened was and I won't go into all the details here because Felix won't let me but I'm very mean there was another form of what is actually called financial engineering. Which if you go onto Lebanon Central Bank website. They will show you what they're doing but they did all of these various swaps and the reason they did all these various swops was basically to make it appear that the central bank had a larger stash of dollars and important because the lab. Lebanon has a pegged currency so their currency is kept at a certain rate in relation to the dollar. The only way you can do that is if you have to support that in the currency. So it's cool to Lebanese pound and I'm old enough to remember when the pound was pegged currency in the UK we have pegged the pound to the Ecu as it was then that the precursor to the euro and then famously George Soros made a big bet against the pound and the Bank of England had all these foreign currency reserves and was trying to support the pound until eventually they gave up and the pound crashed because pegged currencies have a tendency to crash when a lot of people betting against them and this is basically exactly the same thing instead of the British pound went out talking about the Lebanese pound it is pegged against the US dollar. And if there's two things that seem inevitable at this point One is that Lebanon is going to default on a bunch of its debts and another one is that the pound is going to Dev- devalued against the dollar. It all feels a lot in some way like Greece back in twenty eleven people. Like will they devalue will they default in the end Greece did default? But they didn't devalue Lebanon? I'M GONNA come out and say it's going to do both probably. It is super complicated. I mean this is even I would. I would argue. This is one of the most complicated re kind of defaults restructurings that we've seen since probably something like Iraq for a number of reasons one because because of all of this financial engineering one of the big results of that is that a lot of the dollar deposits from the private banking sector are at the Central Bank. And so what this means is that and also sorry and also the private banking sector owns a lot of the debt that was issued by the central government. So if the we've seen this multiple times with sovereign defaults it it means that if the government defaults and if it doesn't pay its debts the main bondholders who get hurt at the domestic banks. And then that just makes a domestic banks insolvent the government needs to bail out the banks. But it doesn't have any money to bail out the banks and so you have this combination banking crisis sovereign debt crisis. They often go together and even closer than they normally eve- e- hundred percent correct. And it's but it's almost a little bit worse because you've all of these dollar deposits that were being held out the central bank to make it appear basically that they had more reserves. But that means if you actually look at the numbers. The country doesn't have enough dollars to fund all of those deposits so they can have bank run and they actually have right now. Defacto capital controls to stop that from happening because they just simply don't have enough dollars. That is their problem. More than honestly their debt itself. It's the fact that they do not have enough dollars so what they'll probably going to do. I would argue is that they're going to do some type of swaps with the local banks where they'll say okay. We're GONNA take your debt. That's kind of going to mature soon. And we're GONNA swap that with that. That's going to mature further along in the future. We're going to lower the coupon the interest rate and that can buy them a little bit of Thai GonNa kick the can down the road because this is the first thing that is always do but I want to get back to where you started. Which was the demonstrations on the street? What water people that own straightening about? So what kind of sparked it was actually a. what's that tax. So because as I mentioned Lebanon has is not a tweet. Yeah then Turkey would be like. Turkey is all about with Lebanon so because Lebanon houses like massive fiscal deficit. They're trying to find ways to close that and instead of like. I don't know cutting down on the massive corruption of the government. They're like let's tax people for what's that messages and so unsurprisingly this really anger people. But I think it's important that it wasn't just the WHATSAPP messages. This is decades and decades of misrule of lack of social services being given to the population while you have this governing elite that is just wasting all of this money and living lavishly while most people are suffering especially the bank is if you thought there was a bunch of anger in America are bankers second occupy like multiply that by a hundred. The bank is in Lebanon. Have just been basically what they've been doing is they've been borrowing money from the government. Two percent lending it out at nine percent it's been the easiest cash generating game in the world and they've been paying themselves hundreds of millions of dollars in dividends these. This is like personal income. These the big bank is in in Lebanon as Anna said Lebanon is basically offshore banking centre. More than isn't anything else have made billions of dollars and they've done nothing relief to improve. The health is all by design from the government. All of that activity that we're talking about the banking sector is directly what the central government want so. Now we're in a situation right now where unfortunately no matter what happens. The population is going to end up screwed. Because if you would. Almost certainly going to happen is that the pound is going to be valued. It's already on a parallel exchange rate trading like forty percent less than where it technically is so people who are regularly just holding Lebanese pounds all of a sudden now. They've a lot less money and then on top of that. This is an unsustainable system. At some point this has to collapse. You're going to need to have reforms and unfortunately part of those are going to be like cutting the massive electricity subsidies that they can't afford which are like three percent of GDP. I mean this has been another problem. Is that Lebanon has had the opportunity to get money in. I think France actually put together like big pot of money from a bunch of different countries that technically Lebanon could've used but in order to use it they would have had to put through forms they didn't want to do it and then now this issue of Hezbollah so bad I in the IMF or something..

Lebanon Central Bank of Lebanon Lebanon Central Bank Anna Szymanski Ned Lebanese Central Bank Samuel Adams Boston Hezbollah Massachusetts Boston Beer Company Bank of England Nassim Taleb government Greece Lebron Kite Ponzi scheme twitter Turkey
"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

12:42 min | 5 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

"To Undo Jack Jack? Let's do Jack Jack. After Bob last week was Bob this week. Jack Jack Jack. The name of the baby in the incredible amazing baby. Incredible so amazing baby in the incredible is like an impossible human being and I feel like Jack. Jack is another impossible in human being. Is that a good segue. That's pretty good but we should tell people what Jack's we're talking about which drugs we talking about talking about. Jack Welsh who died this week. He was the legendary. Ceo of General Electric. He was eighty four. I think and Jack Dorsey who is also somewhat legendary Ceo of not only twitter but also square and Jack Dorsey is in trouble and Jank. Dorsey is has doubled. The number of CEO ships that. Jack Welsh hats. Obviously he's twice as CEO. She's much richer and is much richer. Jack Welsh Again I put this in Magnon plucking my newsletter a lot this week. I don't know why Jack Welsh got a severance package of four hundred seventeen million dollars and then he got a divorce and then in the divorce it turned out. He was getting like even more stuff that no one ever knew. Like two in the half million dollars worth a year of just random perks of being retired and everyone was like. Oh my God. This guy is so rich and paid so ridiculously lavishly and this is capitalism. Gone Bizarre conquers and in comparison to Jack Dorsey. The guy was a Porp- feel sorry for him now on it's interesting because I think that Jack Welsh and a lot of ways started this kind of cult of the CEO. Not Entirely. But I think he was a big player and he was he he definitely was other. And there's a few others I think like Lee Iacocca like He. What he did was he was the guy who started the cult of the CEO and really Made it the same as the cult of the rising stock price and shareholder value. Yeah and and because if you look at what? The G share price did when he was in office. She'd be like great. Of course. Then you look at what it's done since then and it's not just that you've had nine eleven in the financial crisis it was also that a lot of the things that Welsh did in terms of GE capital you know and just expanding the footprint of Ge into areas where it did not have a competitive advantage was shown to not actually very smart so what well did was financial engineering. Lots lots and lots of financial engineering. There was the obvious financial engineering which everyone knows about. Which was he would engineer the prophets. Every quarter said they would. They would beat expectations. Every quarter and price would of the stock would go up every quarter because everyone go. Oh my God you made even more money this quarter than we thought you would and so. He was very good about that. Expectations Management and endings managing the other piece of financial engineering. He did that was the way he did that. And the way that he got the growth in the way that he got the earnings with by Turning around and realizing General Electric is this huge industrial company with massive cashflows. Had this incredibly valuable thing which was a AAA credit rating and he's like shouldn't let that AAA credit rating go to waste. And so he became a thank. Basically he became an Linda and he started lending out and borrowing huge amounts of money using his AAA credit rating that he could borrow cheaper rates than even like J. P. Morgan or Goldman Sachs. Anyone like that. So he had a comparative advantage in nets in his funding costs with super-low to borrow money and then he will turn around and lend that money just like banks do and so he up massively leveraging General Electric and that leverage in those liabilities that he took on a borrowing so much money really walked the company over the head with a two by four in the financial crisis when it lost its AAA credit rating. And it couldn't roll over its debts and it needed to bail out from the federal government. And the reason I find Jack. Welsh interesting is less the financial engineering and more his management style which he was celebrated for. But I'm he delivers lots of people rank and Yank right where you would rank and rate all of the workers in the company and then cold the bottom ten percent literally five literally fire even when the company was growing this neutron Jack Nickname et from lake. Firing one hundred thousand people came in where like the buildings were still standing. But the people were like vaporized. Yes even after that every single year in good years and in Betty is he would still fire. Ten percent of the best method was lauded. People thought this was really smart and other companies followed suit and I think it was invoked for a really long time and only way a lot more companies now. I think recognized that you don't want to have a culture of fear and got sent in the mail the upcoming book by Reed Hastings that CEO of Net flicks who basically does not bad. No they have this whole like They'll fire low performers but they think they do it really nicely so it's okay good for everybody because if you're not fitting in then you gotta go but yeah. I was thinking also Reykdal EEO in bridgewater. Things like people generally recognized now. This is not good strategy. I think a lot more companies and we can talk about twitter. Yes I don't I think. Twitter is very much the yeah. I mean I will say that there have been a number of studies that have shown that that type of competition within a company really decreased productivity off. I mean the one thing I will say one thing though that like in Jack Welch's defense a little bit. What you saw a lot of these eighty. Ceo's was that they were responding to some genuine big problems that you had in the seventies that there was a reason that the US economy kind of tanked as it did and some of those were external but some of those were because a lot of companies had become very uncompetitive. Ceo's were only thinking in their own interest in the interest of shareholders. And so I do think that there are parts of what he was thinking to do. That weren't a bad idea. It was just. I would argue how he did it and the excessive. What he's in the problem of if we look back at the seventeenth we're like. Oh my God that will if these huge inefficient conglomerates and then what does Jack Welch to he creates he he buys like NBC and makes it wasn't just commerce. I mean it was part of the reason that the we don't have to go into too much of this will be the last thing. I say the part of the reason that the US economy was not as competitive in the seventies was because you had companies and other countries particularly Germany and Japan that their companies were leaner and the US companies. Could not compete. That was a problem that was things didn't need to change. Isn't that the whole? I mean the auto industry that was the shining example right right so in any case what we now have in this enlightened fist passing meditation Goo p. You Know twenty-first-century era is Jack Dorsey. Who you know walks fifty miles a day and is very thin because he never eats anything and he manages to run two companies essentially in his bad time while trying to become you know achieve some kind of Navan and and he's going to understand Africa and well he's not anymore he has now come out Because he's in the middle of shareholder proxy war with a good friends at Elliott Associates He has now announced that he is no longer going to spend six months of the year in Africa. He is in fact going to stay put in California. Still running to companies. We will see whether Eliot manages to oust him from twitter or not but the thing that a lot of people have really picked up on I think is that Elliott trying to oust him as CEO of twitter. They don't care about him as CEO of square where he is by definition justice stretched and doing justice little work as he is twitter because the square share price is doing just fine and so long as the share price is doing just fine. You can be a touchy feely absentee. Oh No one cares. I I've been thinking a lot about this and like Elliott management definitely. They have a point right. Like twitter's finally turning a profit now but like compared to facebook. It's just not as big. It's not growing as fast. It's not as innovative. It's still the same old twitter more or less but like that's fine. No it's not I'm Elliot on this. I'm like that's not being run. Well like if you look at how. The share price has performed in relation to other companies. And I know we'll we'll share price doesn't matter no it does because it. It represents the fact that like as emily or even just admitting this company is not innovating if a company companies there's no stasis you either grow or decline. This company is not getting better okay. So twitter is growing. The rate of growth is not increased is growing actually very healthly. It is it's prophets and its revenues have been going up strongly under Dorsey much more than under previous CS. The only thing isn't going up is the share price everything else up until the right and honestly like why do we want a really high growth social network like I fault and all the takeover by Bats and sixteen? You cannot argue that facebook. Facebook was way worse. Like let's just let twitter kind of like be twitter like we don't need some Mike. We don't need another monster social network doing crazy stuff to grow and get more and one of the arguments ended die. No well wait. Hang on say Anna. We've had this conversation many times on on slate me and we're just GONNA have it very briefly one more time. Twitter is profitable. It is making good healthy amounts of money. Let's assume it remains at current levels of profitability and has no growth. It'll and it is growing. But let's assume West case in there that it has no growth tool it will retain those healthy levels of profitability in perpetuity. That isn't the same as dying now. It might. It doesn't need to fund itself because it's making money it's probably going to be using its cash that it's generating and let's just say it is not historically been very profitable but now. I'm saying I'm saying I'm thinking is profitable now. Let's assume that it remains profitable at current levels. Which is a good amount of profitability in? Perpetuity it no longer needs to fund itself it can send those out to shareholders if it wants. Us dividends it can keep on going. Just fine does not die. No I'm sorry I I just I disagree with. I think that like it is a so number one. This is a growth company number one. I don't even know what that means but I'm just saying that this isn't less humid. It stops growing fine. Why is that bad? Well it's equity valuable than decline. Yes so we we. Let's assume that the stock goes down. Why is that bad okay so then if it needs to? I don't know acquire another company. How's it going to do that? It doesn't need it. That's why I'm saying it's just going to make lots of money in perpetuity. Why is that that all of its competitors are going to be able to keep innovating they're going to be able to acquire they're gonNA be able to get better talent and then you're going to have this company that apparently like it's equity value is going to decline its ability to raise debt is going to be lower so it yet it apparently is going to still get the same amount of profits which. I'm not exactly sure how that's going to happen. All its other competitors are going to be able to do all the things that normal companies that are growing quickly do and yet it's going to do just fine and Dandy. I would say history suggests that that is not going. I think it'll be fine and Dandy and you just need to let twitter twitter sort of. It's my favorite social network. And don't miss next thing we're going to be around for long. Yeah you millennials. Wouldn't understand we don't need twitter to be that much better because then it becomes like big brother becomes facebook and no one wants that. We need twitter to be a little more like kind of like low rent. And like maybe we in the. Who Does this passive meditation Al-? Ceo's should work part-time honestly like we don't need them obsessing about growth that much. That is what I think. Support.

twitter Ceo Jack Jack Jack Jack Dorsey Jack Welsh General Electric facebook Us Lee Iacocca Bob Elliott management California Africa Reed Hastings Navan Goldman Sachs engineer
"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

13:38 min | 5 months ago

"jack the" Discussed on Slate Money

"So. When was the last time we had an emergency rate cut? I feel like that was financial crisis in two thousand and eight per fifty basis points out and these things are rare and meant to panic the world. I guess not meant to panic if you want if you want to really try and send a signal. The don't worry people we have this under control and don't panic then like a panicky rate cut in between meetings. Feels like the wrong message to send. It was weird because you basically had before the rate cut you. All of a sudden had. This kind had a jump in stock prices. Because there's an anticipation of a rate cut. However when there was then this emergency rate cut. That was not communicated clearly then. The markets fell. It was just another example of this particular feds poor communication skills. Well there's one market which isn't fooling which is the bond market of course which is soaring and you highs. But that's not good news. That's a sign of pessimism and flight to quality and scared. Nece we should. We should say the Fed did an emergency rake head on Tuesday because it came off of this phone call with other Leaders around the world writing seven g seven peeps and it took action almost right away it also was being pressured of course by trump. Who is tweeting about doing rate cuts? And then then they did it. And then the market went bonkers but it's been bonkers before the monkey looking at the market. What the market did in length the fifteen minutes? After the rate cut or the day after the rate cutler the two days after the rate cut has limited utility because the market has been bouncing around like a demented pogo. Stick for the past two. We true but if you've looked at in the number of past years when we've had some type of issue and the market's been scared and then the Fed has come in with the cut. The market has responded pretty well and granted. This is still early. It's possible that the markets will calm down. But I think the fact that it hasn't is kind of telling it's important because this rate cut doesn't seem like it can do an enormous amount to stop the damage potentially of the It's the whole like wrong tool scenario right like summer. But it's not a nail contain this virus. You need to do public health so right. I had a big thing in my newsletter. This week saying the racist is the CORONA VIRUS. The crisis isn't epidemiological public health crisis. We do not have a financial crisis and there is no financial crisis anywhere on horizon except for in Lebanon. We're GonNa talk about later and so the tools that you use to fight the financial crisis which all the kind of tools that we used back in two thousand eight with coordinated rate cuts between central banks and fiscal policy and all that kind of stuff have relatively limited utility that said the corona virus is going to cause a macro economic slowdown that is an OECD forecast for the first quarter of negative GDP growth since the crisis and like exiting the crisis since one thousand nine hundred eighty two so this is a big deal the corner virus of the global economy and if global central banks including the Fed. Do everything they can. To mitigate the the economic effects of crossovers. That's fine. We just need to be very clear. The all of this is secondary to the number one big priority which is medical so the fiscal policy makes more sense. That's what I was. GonNa say told me whether eight billion dollars is remotely fiscal policy. Is I mean so right? So the Congress passes eight billion dollar corona virus. Emergency spending bill. But it's mostly focused on re and rightly so medical spending public health spending. But I think what? A lot of economists were talking about this week was we sort of like hit. The Wall on monetary policy like the ray cut rates are very low already. This ray cut hasn't really isn't really going to do much what we need to finally do recognize that fiscal policy has to happen. We have to do stuff to inject money into in the US. We have to for example. We do do things like extend unemployment insurance and get it set up so that if people start losing their jobs they have unemployment insurance. We can be food stamps. We can send out. This is what I wrote about today. We can send out checks not maybe just too sick people for starters but then maybe two. I have an idea. Why don't we send reimbursement checks to anyone who has any kind of medical expense associated? Yes you can absolutely true. Although everyone's corona virus related healthcare. You can assure people that if they're sick and they stay home they will be reimbursed. That was where the check idea came from. Because you do paid sick leave. But for like tipped workers for example if they're paid their reimbursed just for the tips hourly wage. That's like nothing. They're still missing tip. So maybe it's better to send to send the checks out but if you if you want people to continue to eat out at restaurants. Those people need to have some assurance that the kitchen workers on sick and in order to have that assurance those kitchen workers do need to be able to stay home if they ask and in order for them to be able to stay home if they are sick. They need to somehow get paid if this things and we need a mechanism for doing that exact otherwise no one will eat at restaurants in fiscal policy actually becomes public health policy. Because it's sort of bolstering. Its allowing people to stay home and rest up and Making it so that people don't go to work every day and it's really important and also because even though right now this is would basically be a supply shock. There is the fear that there is going to be a demand shock as well and then now can you please just because I'm a barrel very little brain exciting. What the difference is between the supply shortage question that you have so one of the big fears with the Corona virus? Is that because you had all of these factories shut down in China that now all of these parts. All of these goods that are needed aren't going to be available. The supply is lower shock right. So that's that's the shock. So what is more likely that we see happening here is that we have this. You know clear supply issue. But then on the same time the panic and the shutdowns and the quarantines is going to reduce demand people aren't going to be using services people aren't going to be shopping as much so you're having a little bit of both and so that's where what the. Fed is doing in theory could make a little bit more sense it with the idea of we want to continue to spur economic growth now. I just want to point this out though that there are downsides to what the Fed has done normally when an economy is still doing relatively good and we thus far don't have a lot of data for the United States to support the idea that things are falling apart in fact just on Friday. We had an amazing these strong jobs. Report showing three hundred and fifty thousand people. New Jobs Allen Clements is at three point five percent like this is all kind of before the Corona Virus Shock. But the fact is that the economy is about as healthy as it's ever been going into this show right and so the fear is that if you do go into an actual recession normally when you go into an actual recession the. Fed cuts a lot. You know we don't have that much room to cut. The Fed has already said they don't want to go negative and they shouldn't go negative because as we've seen in other countries Japan and Europe it's not overly effective. And then you say okay. What are the other tools? Well they can do quantitative easing again but okay again when rates are already so low okay. Great you're going to lower rates a tiny bit more on the end like longer dated bonds as not GonNa do much until there's no reason not to cut rates. I feel like this. Is this argument. The Larry Summers has been out making and being. Broadly ridiculed ridiculed about. He's like it's like defend only has two bullets left in its gun and now it's fired two of them and it doesn't have any bullets left and you should save bullets and in fact that's just like a really bizarre analogy because if lower rates are going to be good in like a couple of months time whenever he wants to hypothetically by those bullets then if you lower rates now the the rate will be lower in a couple of days time you will. You'll have what you want and like it's better to lower the rates now and have even more effect. He has this idea that it's not. The lower rates number is low. It can only go so much exactly but the quest the big question is when when you cut rates what makes the difference. Is it the fact that interest rates are lower in which case you want them to be as low as possible for as long as possible rates now or is it the fact that you cut rates? Is it the actual like physical action of cutting rates? The has some kind of solidarity effect on the economy and as we saw with this emergency rate cut. The physical action of cutting rates doesn't do very well now but I I think looking at what we just saw and using that to say to discount everything we've seen in the last few years. I'm not sure if I totally agree with that. I'm not saying I totally agree with Larry. Summers. I'm not saying one hundred percent by this argument but what I am saying is that historically I think the in recessions the Fed has cut a lot and that has indicated that the Fed has the ability to control. What's happening now if you're getting to a point with basically can't cut and you're going into a recession. I do think that limits what the Fed can do and top of that when you have rates extremely low. You're putting pressure on your banks very very low rates. Do not help banks so I think there's a lot of people worried about right now. The bank okay who makes loans who keeps the economy going to the bank loans on keeping the economy going. Well then why are we cutting rates? Because that's really what this is is a good thing because monetary policy isn't the only weapon in the arsenal. We have to go back. I agree and I think we learned in the last recession and the slow agonizing slow recovery. Was that there needs to be more fiscal stimulus. You need to help. Not just the banks but the people and that'll work that's its own kind of stimulus and the past decade. There's been this push away from that and this this this running towards austerity. That really hasn't worked. So maybe the silver lining here is like an end. This a lot depends on the twenty twenty election but like maybe the silver lining. Is We actually start doing more of that stuff? And and we solve some inequality issues that people were sort of like unwilling to deal with except except I feel that everything will saying on one level is right but on another level. It's doing this thing I again talked about my newsletter which is fighting the last war that we're looking at this problem through the Lens of how we fought the financial crisis whether we did it the right way whether we should have spent more on fiscal and there is this General Consensus Expos that we should have spent more on fiscal in two thousand nine but the fact is that that was a major financial crisis and financial crises have financial solutions and the epidemiological crisis has medical solutions and while fiscal monetary policy can be helpful at the margins. I think the one thing we can agree on is that honestly the economic problems facing America although they are potentially significant and it is possible that there could be a recession pale in significance to the virus in medical problems. So let's concentrate on go with that one hundred percent but we need strong policies. That help like I said before. Americans stay healthy like yes. The physical is tied to write like looking behind and saying Oh. We should've done more in the recession. But it's also looking at like the uninsured population the underinsured population the percent of people. Who again like you have to go to work like these really important intersection. You're absolutely right and I just think that cooling fiscal stimulus is a little bit a weird way of framing policy. I mean it is. It is in front and his by definition fiscal fiscal policy. I'm just saying that like everything. The government spends money on Cisco Policy. But what? We're really talking about here. Is Public Health Policy? And it's it's like it's a huge sign that like we need to return to the era of big government like we need a strong government with good sound policies that can help us maneuver through public health crisis an effective government. I don't know but yeah no it needs to be effective and it needs to be spending money in small ways and I guess the reason why. I recoil a cooling. This fiscal policy is because when people talk about Fiscal Stimulus. Like what's the size of the stimulus we need and then they work out. Where spend it? It's like should we do tax cut. We do more spending that kind of thing like here. It's not like that. It's not like let's start with the size of the stimulus and then workout wet do it. It's like let's don't wed do need to spend money in order to keep Americans healthy and then spend that money agree okay. Slate.

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