27 Burst results for "JUD"

"jud" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

05:21 min | Last month

"jud" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And that drops us into this space of as you described curiosity, where now we can kind of inquire into it a little bit. Under that context, you also, you write about, and I know it's part of your work. This acronym that again was familiar with originally from a Buddhist teacher Tara brach and it's a shorthand the acronym is rain. So it was interesting to see you bringing it in in the context in a very specific way in the work you're doing. Walk us through sort of what those letters stand for. And how it actually really plays into the curiosity and reinterpreting process. Yes. So first off, a shout out to Tara because she makes these practices so accessible for so many people. So she is certainly adding light into the world. In a much needed way. So this rain practice is this acronym. I think I was actually Michelle McDonald, who had first come up with it and then Tara has done a great job of helping people learn about it. Our stunts for recognize. If we're lost, we can't, we're not aware. So the first step is that moment of recognition. Like we've been talking about gold star boom. I'm aware. Oh, okay. And it could be a craving. It could be worry. It could be anything, right? Whatever we're lost in, we're aware. The second step that a stands for allowing or accepting where if we notice something and we're like, oh, my mind wandered. We kind of want to push it away. We don't want to face it. You know, we run away, or we push it away. What we resist persist, right? So here, instead of pushing something away, we invited in, oh, well, here it is. Can I just allow it to be here as compared to pushing it away? Already, there's less energy needed, right? Because it's like we're not resisting. That I stands for investigate, and this is where curiosity comes in. So if we recognize, let's use a craving as an example. I've craving for food. I recognize that craving, okay, here's the scraping instead of saying I want to ignore, get rid of this. Oh, what does this craving feel like in my body? That I stands for that investigation where we're starting to get curious about what that craving feels like in our body. And then N sitara originally talked about non identification where we're seeing that it is not me. Like a thought, I have a thought it's not me. That can be challenging for people who are first learning these practices. So I brought this together with a practice from a Burmese teacher, mossy said I was the first one that popularized this noting practice where you basically note physical sensations thoughts, sounds, smells, tastes, just basically note whatever's in your experience. And that noting practice is a really helpful way to help us gain perspective. It's in physics, they call this observer effect when you're observing something, you're likely to affect the result. And in psychology, I think the same is true. When we observe a thought we're less likely to be identified with that thought. So the end happened to be the same end. So I was like, okay, great. Let's use noting instead of non identification. So we can really keep it on the pragmatic level. And so somebody is a craving, they can note, what does that craving feel like? Is it tightness? Is it tension? Is it burning? Is it heat? And as somebody notes, and they're having that perspective, they're less identified with it, and they can notice, oh, this can come and go, and I don't have to act on it, because it is not me. It is just physical sensations. And the more they inject the curiosity that I part of the practice, the more you're going to be like, huh, what's going to come next? You know, oh, what's next that's converted? Oh no, this craving, you know, when's it going to go away? So that's what The Rain practice is for and again, we use it as a core practice in all of our digital Therapeutics in our eat right now program. We got these gangbuster results. 40% reduction in craving related eating. And that rain practice is really a critical piece of that. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense to me. It's interesting reframe the sort of the non attachment versus noting. It's almost like, again, it's creating this kind of similar goal, but or similar sort of state, but maybe more accessible language to different people. You know, the last piece, the third element is for you and you referenced it earlier is kindness. I've seen you describe it as compassion or self compassion. We're not talking about being kind to other people when you're anxious. Not necessarily a bad thing, of course. But it's about ourselves. And that was interesting to me because I recently had a conversation with bessel van der kolk about trauma and what it does to us. And he said, one of the things that's so difficult to deal with is actually not the trauma itself. It's actually the shame. That people have around the trauma. Not necessarily around feeling there's any responsibility for the events that led to it, but they're inability. Their inability to integrate it to move through it to find a way back to life. And if you can't find a place to let that go, if you can't step into a place of self compassion, it becomes its persistently brutalizing experience. And it sounds like there's a similar context for anxiety here. Absolutely. Yes, absolutely. So think of.

Tara brach Michelle McDonald Tara mossy bessel van der kolk
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:36 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"So we've got a bunch of resources there including links to the book in the different apps that we have So you're solving something that has had two hundred fifty. Two hundred fifty percent increases that right did you is that the number two hundred fifty percent increase over twenty twenty thirty. Five percent of the population is probably more like seventy right. A struggle with anxiety. What are you gonna do with your. You've got a solution you got. You got an app for that. What are you going to do with your billions. I you know the thing that is most rewarding to me is hearing people transform their lives. You know it might sound hokey. But honestly i don't think money makes people happy. I think helping people at least for me makes people happy and so i'm happy just to be out there trying to help people wake up and you can help people from a yacht heat as well. It's okay judd. So i would like to do a little more surfing but even that. I'm pretty happy doing what i'm doing. All right good when you when you get the yacht and you're going to get the fire up the as and go surfing. Hit me up. Okay yes good all right. that's perfect. I'm so stoked for your job. I hope i wanna. I wanna really support people default. Good science i hope. This conversation did a fraction of the early. You know celebrate the brilliance. That that you hold in this was a treat for me and so Thank you brother my pleasure. It was a treat for me as well really enjoyed a good. Okay all the best to you..

judd
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

05:46 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"That unfolding moment that you know is quote unquote opportunity. So how do you think about the relief. Experience that people are looking for as opposed to really meeting the opportunity. It's a great question. So here i would say you know. The first step is really helping people see what processes what's driving the the need for relief and separating out the needs versus the wants right so if if feeling lonely for example and that loneliness is driving us to go on social media which drives more social media loops it doesn't actually provide a sustainable or nourishing relief to the feeling of loneliness strategist drives more loneliness and more social media use so we look to see how we're actually approaching the problem. The relief problem. It actually helped just map it out. What's trigger was baker was the result. We can start to see clearly what we're doing and then we can check in with ourselves that second step. What am i getting from this. Is this actually solving the problem or is it just making it worse. Just that elimination helps us step back and say oh you know if it's helping great keep doing it. If it's not helping of its driving even more problems than we can become disenchanted in find another way out and here. You know i think boy. It's so much of this is solved simply from defining the problem clearly seeing it becoming disenchanted with the things that didn't work and not disenchantment especially we're bringing curiosity and it opens up the space. I move into growth mindset and say oh that's not working what might do differently and we can start experimenting with what's actually going to satisfy our needs and when we get to needs satisfaction we're hitting maslow's hierarchy. Were doing all the stuff that we need to do. And then we can move to you know self actualization and even self transcendence transcendence who said at the end the okay and then if you were to If you were to help people that are struggling sleep. And because they are wound up with anxiety you help them. Let's say they're trying to shut. Down lights are off the got the face mask on temperatures. Just right you know they. It's been like three hours since the eight something they're hydrated properly. Well before they go to bed all they're doing all the behavioral stuff but the the the head hits the pillow their heads appel on go and they start to think and they're trying to solve things and they're in the loop. How would you help people while they're in bed. Yeah you're describing about ninety percent of my my clinic patients right you. it's like you. Were there watching everyone in my patients. Walk in the door and describe exactly what their issue is so funny. I love just finished a study on this. So we had an nih funded study looking at. Can we actually address worry as it applies to sleep long story short. We used on winning anxiety app here to help people map out their habit loops around worry sleep. And you just nailed it hits. The pillow says my turn in. They start worrying about tomorrow. They start regretting things. They've done today and then they can't get to sleep because they're aroused right. They're anxious they look at the clock and they get more freaked out because they're like. Oh no i can't get to sleep and now they're definitely not getting to sleep so here. Same process map it out. Start to work with that. Worry and here. I bring in specific. Mindfulness practices like body. Scans are a really great way for someone to kind of. Take that energy and help it help. Transform it into exploration of one's direct experience rather than feeding that worry habit loop okay so so You recognize it. The you're in the behavioral activity. The mental behavioral activity is the worry loop and then what is the. There's no real reward so you're saying yes so then you've got the interrupting thought right and then so you would say hey. Here's a better solution which is let me just have a deep focus on relaxing my feet relaxing my calves relaxing my hamstrings michael and just just body scan that way. Yeah and they don't even have to relax. They can just get curious. Like oh what am i toast like you know is my left foot warm. Now they can even get curious like Cincinnati islamic bodies game. But they'd like my left foot warmer than my right foot. You know as a way to bring awareness and curiosity into the body. they wanted. Do a specific body scan like you're pointing out that can just be scanning up the body but they don't even have to focus on relaxing. Okay so yeah so. I added that to you. You're staying with kindness and generosity as the as the the big kind of differentiator okay. A judd is awesome. Dude i think we went into Serious technical areas and But the simplicity of your model is appreciated. And it feels like there's a key question and then there's a direction to go so become aware. Ask yourself a key question and go to kindness or curiosity And you'll find yourself interrupting the loop and then replacing it with something that is sustainable and non addicting about the reds and repeats. Rinse and. Repeat brilliant judd. That's cool arts with. Where can we find the up. How do we get on. How do we get on your app. The app is just called unwinding anxiety. There's a website Same name unwinding. Anxiety dot com people can just download it on the store or they can go to my website which is dr judd dot com on..

maslow baker appel nih Cincinnati michael judd dr judd
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

07:03 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Okay so you're more interested in the post terrier cingulate cortex being damped down and it gives of other available resources to come online. Does that seem right. Okay it doesn't allstate. Specifically there have been studies showing that the more the post year shingle. It's activated the worst. We do on cognitive tasks the more these other. Networks like the executive network dorsal In particular the more. They're kind of acting and i say dampening down the pcc because it's hard to know exactly if it's causing matter if it's correlated but the more the pcc deactivated the better. We do on cognitive tasks so one hundred percent. But i just wanted to add that little detail in what switches on the p. c. post syria singular cortex. What switches that on or is it all. Is it always kind of on until we go too. Deep focus yet. It's hard to know because at rest win. We're not doing anything in particular. It seems to be activated. In fact it was there and impetus discovered because of this default mode. This is what we do. We're not doing anything in particular so it seems to be and whether this is a habits or not who knows but what in the general population it seems to be on pretty much. You know when we're not doing anything else and so i agree with you. Curiosity can help us. Switch that off and switch into deep focus. Yeah so all right. So deep focus in is in inoculation potentially for the posts posterior singular single cortex to to to damp down. So this is why. Mindfulness meditation is a mechanism right because it requires some focus. Some curiosity if you will in open monitoring okay. So is exciting. Can i add a third. Yeah exempting here. So i think kindness i get it curiosity i definitely get i love the that okay and then i think the third would be celebrating like a wild person. I caught you. I got you. I found the loop on it so i think there's something this is. This is a if. I think if it's in your model. Is that if you can celebrate like a wild person and manifest Internally the manifest like woo i mean manifests internally. The unique chemical response of excitement. But you're manifesting you're looking me. I just did it. I found i got a. I'm going to call judd later. And tell them i got this loop millan good job. Let's go then so celebrating. Like a wild person. I think is non addictive. It's an interruption. And i better get you some of that neuro chemical exchange that would I don't know if there's not a single deep focus their necessarily curiosity and kindness. But i'm wondering if that would hold up in your lab in any respects so it would if you differentiated joy from excitement. Is it more joy or is it more excitement. And then i'll tell you by So i think i might know where you're going I was saying more excitement. Yeah i know. I think excitement might pull us right back in Yeah so the excitement has contracted quality to it. Excitement has a self in there where you're just using your examples like check me out. I got it whereas joy is just the joy of getting it. It doesn't matter who got it or whether somebody's gonna get it again. But if it's the excitement. I got it that actually drives it back and says and i want it again. Bats addiction right at its at its heart is ooh dot felt good. I wanna do it again. Joy you what's the. There's this great line from from blake where he says he who finds himself. The joy does the winged life. Destroy he who kisses joy as it flies. Listen eternity sunrise. If i've got that right and the idea is ooh here's something good i want it. There's a self their self referential processing. Pcc activity restless. I want more. Joy is expanded as compared to the contracted quality of excitement. So here i would say. I love that concept. Celebrate like a wild person but don't hold onto it celebrate. Enjoy the celebration and that will get somebody there. But the more they say. I did that or i want to do that again. The more they destroyed that wink life. Yeah that's super interesting in the sport world. That is a framework that works. Like it's like have your own back. It's like self talk for confidence saying things to yourself back yourself like yeah you. let's go. You got this whatever. Those kind of frameworks are those Statements are but it doesn't. I don't think it works here because of your that is ego referenced itself referenced which end then you're using expectation which is really close to anxiousness right. Curiosity is not kindnesses not joy is not a less go. That's right it feels like i might have just gotten really close back to the on ramp. Yeah so just way to highlight this and this is more than mine so tell me to step out if you look at team sports so me just watching team. Sports and i've only worked with some like olympic team soup. Not you know. This isn't my day job when there's a team that's working really well together really harmoniously and somebody does a really good job and they've become the prima donna and are like i did a great job right totally blows the whole the whole vibe whereas when every was like yeah we did it. I mean look look at all these great players and they get interviewed and they're like no. It wasn't me. It was the team right as compared to me. Check me out on the best that nobody wants to hear that because it just that vibes socks and so here it's the joy it's the connection it's the camaraderie as compared to the self. Yeah that's cool. Okay how about this idea. People that are anxious are actually a need to go do something so called performance anxiety. But it's really it's general anxiety triggered by something like we can get into the weeds here but just say there's an anxiousness and they're about to go do something whether it's onstage or important conversation with a loved one or whatever it is that really what they're looking for is relief and that relief is it's not going to get you to your most optimal way being you're just trying to get through it as opposed to capture the unique unity of that moment and and be able to express yourself in that unfolding moment that you know is the quote unquote opportunity. So how do you think about the relief. Experience that people are looking for as opposed to really.

allstate pcc syria millan judd blake olympic
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

09:09 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Utility of the thought. Then you'll dissipate the anxiousness so help me understand where. I'm getting tripped up there. So this is a critical distinction so the thinking our way out of anxiety is a twang to change. What's happening right. That's very different than awareness. So awareness is something. That doesn't take the prefrontal cortex something more fundamental of more basic and actually more critical for survival. So here we differentiate what the brain trying to fix or change or avoid like doing something versus simply bringing awareness in. What am i getting from this and asking a question rather than saying i need to change or fix or solve something. Okay so when when i recognize them in a loop the way. I need awareness. That i'm in the loop. I'm anxious state and the You're saying the off ramp is to say What's the question again. How is this. What am i getting from this. What am i getting from this. And then that actually fundamentally will change. It's an interruption in the loop right so you say. What am i getting from this. I've interrupted the loop. And then i go Nothing okay and then okay. So now fundamentally altered from the loop what prevents me from getting back on the loop to say nothing. What is wrong with you. Jesus like you know what you should worry. Because you can't figure things out you've been stuck in this loop for so long and you know what i'm gonna fucking silver bullet still and i'm on the freeway and what am i doing. Oh my god. My life is a mess. I mean catastrophes. You know obviously but you're beautifully describing the catastrophes habit loop right. So there's another habit loop that gets built on top of this. That's another doing loop where we can't fix the anxiety but we can sure beat ourselves up over it or think that it's never gonna end. So i'm glad you point that out because that is a loop on top of loop. It's kind of a fracture pattern of echo. Habit leaps one on top of another so as you're pointing out the what am i getting from. This helps us step out a little bit because it gives us. Perspective is a little bit of distance and helps our brain see. This is not rewarding that reward value drops and that critical drop reward value opens up the space for what i think of his step three or the i call it. The bbc the bigger better offer. So our brains are based on your. They're gonna do behaviors. That are more rewarding. We've gotta give our brains something that's more rewarding and it's not just staring at our phones right. Because that those avoidance things just create other problems. it's about tapping into things that are intrinsically rewarding and the don't become habituated and i say that in the sense of if we drink alcohol to avoid our anxiety while we're creating problems there but we also become a bit. We need to drink more and more and more because we develop tolerance. Same is true for looking at pictures of puppies on instagram. Or whatever our avoidance mechanism is so here we ask what is intrinsically rewarding and can actually be applied right in these moments to flavors that i find one is easy and one is kindness so with those self judgmental or the catastrophe adding habit loops the antidote. Their itself kindness right when we judge ourselves and terrible person versus. What's it like when we're kind to ourselves. Which could be as simple as oh. That's my brain. Let me bring a little bit of self compassion in here. My survival brains. Just a little out of whack. It's trying to help me survive. You know pat o'brien the head so to speak and say okay this direction as compared to this direction it feels much better to be kind to ourselves. That's the bottom line. Curiosity is a direct antidote to anxiety. So again my labs done these studies. I know it's a. It's gonna sound like a no brainer but we've got to do the studies to show that it's drew anxiety feels contracted. Curiosity feels expanded which one feels better curiosity universally feels better than exerting so in a moment that were anxious we can actually get curious and dive in rights. I'm sure you know the phrase the only way out is through right. We turn toward her anxiety and we go instead of going. Oh no anxious. What's wrong with me and blah blah blah. we go. Oh this is what does it feel like. Always it tightness is that anxiety is it restlessness. Is it that. And it's just like a thunderstorm like a kid who's never heard of thunderstorm. Before it gets freaked out the first time parent can step in and say oh. Hey let's go to the window and luck. Can you see the clouds they. Can you see the win there. Can you see the rain. Oh these are elements that make up thunderstorms same anxiety. Oh there's tightness oh there's tension there's burning that oh is the curiosity that already feels better and helps us. These are just physical sensations that come and go rather than something that i'm it's going to be an ailment forever and it helps us change. Our relationship to those physical sensations and in the process help says step out of the anxiety. Loop i love it. So what part of the brain is is activated during curiosity or kindness. So let's go in stepwise. Which part of the brain is is activated when we're in a loop when we're feeling anxious either. We've got a thought loop or we feel tight and or some sort of harmony between the two harmony disharmony between the two. So what part of the brain is switched on their again. This is actually the default one network. The post your cingulate cortex gets active. More worried post. Your is singular gets activated so if we zoom in there that's a pretty consistent finding and also that's the same brain region gets deactivated. When we're curious in fact there was a study that was published a couple of years ago they induced. Aw in people. Which i think of as one of the oh the so blown away by curiosity that you blows your mind that also has been shown to have a linear drop in. Pcc activation all of tell you how i measure daily success in a minute and then and then what part of the. I'm not so sure it's curiosity. Curiosity is the mechanism for deep focus. You've studied this. i have not. I've just read your work. But when i'm really curious and i'm committed and my my hands are on the panes of glass and i'm i'm like a kid looking up at the thunderstorm and i've got someone guiding like look at that and listen to this and oh and watch through. The windows rattled when the lightning encounters like my parents. That with me. You know like just just like you described. Count the seconds that'll tell you. How far does away. Whatever whatever like their science. So i'm with a curious mind. I think that the d. focus is what you're doing for me for my brain but when i'm in that state i'm now fundamentally out of the loop okay so there's a cognitive thing here but i'm interested in the brain region that's on during curiosity so let's start with the experience so when your so you're saying i'm not sure that i'm out of the loop. So can you be contracted and expanded the same time. No i say. I'm saying i am out of You've just taken me out of loop. I've asked the question a fundamental question. That's altered interrupted loop. And then i've gone to either curiosity your kindness Now i'm in curiosity and so. I think there's a third i want to add. This is me being unreasonable for minute. So there's this the second one you've got which is curiosity and my hands are on the glass. And i'm looking examining at my own internal state you know like i'll look mining zayed's in my hands. Look at them trembling. That's interesting like look at that. I wonder where that comes from. A you know what that comes from my heart pounding a little bit all. My hands are downstream from my heart. Pounding okay so. I mean this loop of being curious right. What part of the brain is switched on. At that point you only know which parts of the brain are switched off. And i would guess that it's probably less of a localized process wing because with curiosity you can. I mean literally it's were were are is probably a bunch of things happening at the same time and the most the best i can. I'm thinking of the research here around. Second alex which are kind of like throwing a hand grenade in the brain and like literally expanding the mind so much that we don't even know where we are. There's no self. They're right their people when people have looked at it. Connectivity the brain region talking to each other. there's this huge increase in connectivity. If i remember correctly when people are on psychedelics and i would guess when people are truly essentially curious so there are two types of curiosity not deprivation curiosity where somebody doesn't know the answer to something. Most of the research in the scientific realm has been done in that way. And that's more of a dopaminergic driven. I've got to get the answer..

pat o'brien bbc
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

05:38 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Full blown panic disorder infobahn generalized anxiety disorder. And so first thing. I did after i started to get a sense for what was ailing him. I pull the of paper. I wrote down trigger behavior result and i said let me see if i can get this straight for him. His panic was driven literally driven by driving on the highway. So he would get these panic attacks on the highway driven by thoughts. I think it was like i'm speeding. Bullet he felt like he was going to get an accident. Those thoughts would drive him to avoid driving on the highway. Because that avoidance behavior could keep him from having panic attacks so there was a reward for his brain will quick. let's do. The trigger is walking towards the car knowing. I'm making something up but walking towards the car knowing is going to get on the freeway. Was that the trigger or was it getting in the car or was it actually thought That i'm going to get on the freeway later. It was. It started with him being on the highway. Driving and having thoughts come up in his head like oh no. I'm in a speeding bullet. So he'd be driving on the highway he'd have thought and he would get totally caught up in. That thought to the point where he became. He would get panic. Attacks kisser. the trigger is thought. The behavior is the loop of the thought and the reward is what well he so. His behavior became avoidance where he would avoid driving on the highway. So that dot avoidance was that was a compensatory mechanism for him. Yet as you're as you're pointing out the mental behavior was he he would start getting caught up in the thoughts like. Oh no. i'm going to get caught in. You know. I'm going to get cards. Onum going to hurt somebody bubble up. That was that worrying that started to get out of control which then led to a panic attack. Yes i thought you know. The behavior was the worry at firms and then the result was a panic attack. That fed back into a secondary loop. Where the next time he had thought his brain would say. I'm not going there as an. I'm not getting on the highway. As and i'm not getting in my car. That's the behavior at this point. That was his compensatory mechanism. So these are these are two different but related behavior loops that he had does that. Make sense it does. Then what is the reward of not getting the cars. It relief relief and avoidance of panic attacks so human panic attacks because he wasn't on the highway. Okay all right. i'm totally with you. And so in that interloping Let's stick with the first one It's super simple. And then so. What are the three steps that you help people on wind the anxious loop that you just lend up so that the critical piece here is chew. I check to see what we're doing to try to fix or anxiety saying in our western world. We're just doing mentality. Great is great when you're going up a hill because it gets the hill yet. It's it's not so great when trying to work with mine because we can't just tell ourselves to stop worrying you. You can't just think you're way out of anxiety and in fact thinking and planning department of the brain goes off line when we get anxious. The prefrontal cortex is no longer available. So not only does it not help but it's not available so i did that because often people think oh i mapped out this habit loop now just got to stop it. I got avoid those triggers. Which in fact just drives other habit voids so here i think bit of neuroscience is really critical which is to know that the only way to change a habit this any habit the only way to change the habit is to update the reward value of that behavior in our brain. I'll give a. I'll give a simple example and then we'll apply this to worrying so my lab just Just finished a study where we were working with people who are overeating and so what we did was we embedded this this awareness tool basically in our ear right now to have people pay attention as they over eight and i was that as people pay attention when the overeat they'll realize it's not very rewarding because awareness is the only thing that updates rework value in in our brains and in fact it only took ten or fifteen times at somebody people somebody paying attention as they were overeating for that reward value to drop below zero to the point where they were shifting behavior. So we know that this is true. This has been known back into the nineteen seventies the first researchers that described this risk orland wagner very well known phenomenon so we apply that practice which is bring awareness in hell. People pay attention to the cause and effect relationship. So when we're worrying what are we getting from the worry. So i have people ask that simple question. What am i getting from this right. Is it solving the problem. No is keeping my family member safe. No whatever we think. The worrying is doing besides just occupying our minds and making us more anxious. We've got a really dive into experience and see the warnings. Actually just making us more anxious. It's not it's not helping us. That helps us become disenchanted with the behavior of worrying. Just like when we overeat and see that it's not helpful we become disenchanted from that behavior or smoke a cigarette or procrastinate or whatever i think i'm tripped up on one piece because there's a you made which is we can't think our way of out of anxiety and then i hear you saying if you have a thought which is to examine your thought. The utility of the thought. Then you'll dissipate the anxiousness so help me understand where. I'm getting tripped up there. So this is a critical distinction so.

panic disorder infobahn genera orland wagner
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

05:38 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Full blown panic disorder infobahn generalized anxiety disorder. And so first thing. I did after i started to get a sense for what was ailing him. I pull the of paper. I wrote down trigger behavior result and i said let me see if i can get this straight for him. His panic was driven literally driven by driving on the highway. So he would get these panic attacks on the highway driven by thoughts. I think it was like i'm speeding. Bullet he felt like he was going to get an accident. Those thoughts would drive him to avoid driving on the highway. Because that avoidance behavior could keep him from having panic attacks so there was a reward for his brain will quick. let's do. The trigger is walking towards the car knowing. I'm making something up but walking towards the car knowing is going to get on the freeway. Was that the trigger or was it getting in the car or was it actually thought That i'm going to get on the freeway later. It was. It started with him being on the highway. Driving and having thoughts come up in his head like oh no. I'm in a speeding bullet. So he'd be driving on the highway he'd have thought and he would get totally caught up in. That thought to the point where he became. He would get panic. Attacks kisser. The trigger is the thought. The behavior is the loop of the thought and the reward is what well he so. His behavior became avoidance where he would avoid driving on the highway. So that avoidance was that was a compensatory mechanism for him. Yet as you're as you're pointing out the mental behavior was he he would start getting caught up in the thoughts like. Oh no. i'm going to get caught in. You know. I'm going to get cards. Onum going to hurt somebody bubble up. That was that worrying that started to get out of control which then led to a panic attack. Yes i thought you know. The behavior was the worry at firms and then the result was a panic attack. That fed back into a secondary loop. Where the next time he had thought his brain would say. I'm not going there as an. I'm not getting on the highway. As and i'm not getting in my car. That's the behavior at this. Point was his compensatory mechanism. So these are these are two different but related behavior loops that he had does that. Make sense it does. And what is the reward of not getting the cars. It relief relief and avoidance of panic attacks so human panic attacks because he wasn't on the highway. Okay all right. I'm i'm totally with you. And so in that interloping Let's stick with the first one It's super simple. And then so. What are the three steps that you help people on wind the anxious loop that you just lend up so that the critical piece here is chew. I check to see what we're doing to try to fix or anxiety saying in our western world. We're just doing mentality. Great is great when you're going up a hill because it gets the hill yet. It's it's not so great when trying to work with mine because we can't just tell ourselves to stop worrying you. You can't just think your way out of anxiety and in fact thinking and planning department of the brain goes off line when we get anxious. The prefrontal cortex is no longer available. So not only does it not help but it's not available so i just highlight that because often people think oh i mapped out this habit now. Just got to stop it. I got avoid those triggers. which in fact just drives other habit Voids so here. I think bit of neuroscience is really critical which is to know that the only way to change a habit this any habit the only way to change the habit is to update the reward value of that behavior in our brain. I'll give a. I'll give a simple example and then we'll apply this to worrying so my lab just Just finished a study where we were working with people who are overeating and so what we did was we embedded this this awareness tool basically in our state right now to have people pay attention as they over eight and i was that as people pay attention when the overeat they'll realize it's not very rewarding because awareness is the only thing that updates rework value in in our brains and in fact it only took ten or fifteen times at somebody people somebody paying attention as they were overeating for that reward value to drop below zero to the point where they were shifting behavior. So we know that this is true. This has been known back into the nineteen seventies the first researchers that described this risk orland wagner very well known phenomenon so we apply that practice which is bring awareness in hell. People pay attention to the cause and effect relationship. So when we're worrying what are we getting from the worry. So i have people ask that simple question. What am i getting from this right. Is it solving the problem. No is keeping my family member safe. No whatever we think. The worrying is doing besides just occupying our minds and making us more anxious. We've got a really dive into experience and see the warnings. Actually just making us more anxious. It's not it's not helping us. That helps us become disenchanted with the behavior of worrying. Just like when we overeat and see that it's not helpful we become disenchanted from that behavior or smoke a cigarette or procrastinate or whatever i think i'm tripped up on one piece because there's a you made which is we can't think our way of out of anxiety and then i hear you saying if you have a thought which is to examine your thought. The utility of the thought. Then you'll dissipate the anxiousness so help me understand where. I'm getting tripped up there. So this is a critical distinction so.

panic disorder infobahn genera orland wagner
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

08:20 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"J. o. V. dot com slash finding mastery and with that list. Jump right back into our conversation. So let's let's get into the Some interventions to honor unwind anxiety. And it's a beautiful title. You don't get your wife. Came up with because Wound up is the kind of vernacular that will use. You know when we're feeling anxious in that construction that you're talking about you've got set of processes to help people Unwind so can you walk through a couple of key points. If people are feeling anxious and then i also wanna hit on the percentages. It was fifteen percent of people reported general anxiety prior to the pandemic it was a radical spike in that. And course correct me if our numbers are different. I've always thought that thirty percent was the accurate number. That three out of ten people that i know are anxious but fifty fifteen percent. Feels like an underreported At least double that. I'm sorry of people that actually had it but never raised their hands anxious. So what numbers are you using as a Abroad sweet four. Let's just call it in. The united states right now are experiencing anxiety. Yeah well and. I'm glad when this out because there can be an experience of anxiety in there can be disorder so we'll get people being diagnosed with the disorder which is kind of a higher bar to meet. There was a meta analysis that was just published showing that in the last year. I think it was thirty. Five percent of people on average in cross like seventeen studies at thirty five percent the anxiety disorder clinical. So here. I would guess that the number of people that actually feel anxious is even higher than that because thirty five percent meet this bar of anxiety disorder and that thirty five percent means that there's a medical practitioner that has somewhere charted. You know like the oh you meet. The clinical criteria. You know is kind of the idea. There is that thirty five percent in the last thirty days or thirty five percent lifetime. I don't remember specifically. But i think it was said this was done. They were specifically looking to see it increases during the pandemic so displays in the last year. Probably probably okay. I don't know the research. But i think that the number is extraordinarily high for people that would meet the criteria for anxiety In their lifetime clinical anxiety in their lifetime. Think extraordinarily number. Okay yeah alright so folks that are feeling in it judd. Take us home. What are we doing so here you know in this actually goes back to the origin of wire actually started working with this so in medical school. I was trained to prescribe medications. Frank if you look at the best medications out there there's this clinical term number needed to treat which basically means you know how many people you need to give a certain treatment to before one of them shows significant benefit or significant reduction in symptoms for our best medications out there. That number needed to treat is five point. Two which means i have to give five patients and medication by point to patients a medication and one of them shows significant reduction in symptoms. So i was playing the medication lottery when i started practicing psychiatrist. I didn't know which of the five i treated next. We're gonna was gonna benefit. And i also didn't know what i was going to do with the other eighty percents so so here. You know we were my lab was doing. My lab really focuses on mindfulness inhabit. Change we were studying this right now that we developed and we'd found this forty percent reduction in craving related eating and somebody had said you know. Hey they were mapping out what drives their stress eating. This person said it's my anxiety drive stress eating. Can you create a program for that. And i was thinking well. I prescribe medications springs. I am not sure. I can help yet. That put a bug in my ear to go and actually look at the literature and it turns out literature from the nineteen eighty s. So this is when the stones were singing about mother's little helper. This is how much benazir being prescribed like. Candy like valium and a xanax. And all these these which are no longer for line treatment because there are major problems with these things. So they were like medication and medicaid everyone and these researchers like thomas birkbeck and others were suggesting that anxiety could be driven like a habit so for me. When i read that this was i this big moments whereas i never thought about it could that it could be driven this way. And the other part of my brain said dude. You know how to work with habits. Why don't you bring these two things together. So of course as a researcher. I wanted to see well. How could i research this as a clinician. I wouldn't see. How can i help people with this. So we started by developing this morning. Anxiety app where we and then this is the basis for what turns out to be a three step process that anybody can use and so walk us through this three step process. The first thing we did was to see how well this thing worked and the first thing the first group we tested this was in physicians. Why because i can speak for myself. We tend to be a pain in the ass. physicians right. oh. I'm too busy are shouldn't be taking care of myself and we learned to armor up in medical school in you know any moment that i could be you know that i take care of myself could be helping my patients all this martyred martyrdom stuff right so of course we burn out like crazy so we did the study. Fifty seven percent reduction in clinically validated anxiety scores in inex- physicians who uses unwinding anxiety. Up we also got a fifty percent reduction in burnout without mentioning the word. Burn out once. Okay 'cause you're highly correlated. We did a second study people with generalized anxiety disorder. Sixty seven percent reduction in these folks. These are the olympians of worry. They really know how to sixty seven percent reduction and there we can calculate the number needed to treat and their medications. It's five point two in this study. One point six. Hey so so. An app could do a mic drop. Oh one point six. So i just highlight that because this process them going to strive is actually well not only. Is it pretty well theoretically based but we now have very strong empirical data supporting that it actually works so it's not just hey job thinks this is a good idea that he's going to try to sell a book. It's a gender budge research and found that this actually is the best thing that that he could find that that actually is out there so three-star process anybody can use. This is pretty simple. The first step is somebody's got a map out how their mind works so this could apply anxiety this completed any habit and it really goes back to the survival mechanism trigger behavior results right dots. What drives any habit. So exile eighty anxiety. The feeling of anxiety is the trigger. The mental behavior of worrying is the behavior. Right and the other behaviors could be procrastination. There could be a bunch of things that we can substitute in there. And then the result is we we get some reward out of it from our brains perspective and then that drives the lip if we're not aware of it. There's no way we're going to be able to work with it. I'll give a concrete example. Because i think you know theoretically make sense but the the stories really make the most sense to me. So i patiently right about him in my book. Who was referred me okay. He had anxiety for over thirty years when he was referred to me and he you know nothing helped and what he described so he comes into my office they start taking us history and wants to restore he's got full blown panic disorder infobahn generalized anxiety disorder. And so first thing. I did after i started to get a sense for what was ailing him. I pull the of paper. I wrote down trigger behavior result and i said let me see if i can get this straight for him. His panic was driven literally driven.

anxiety disorder thomas birkbeck judd benazir united states Frank
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

08:23 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Head to that link again. Serve j. o. V. dot com slash finding mastery with that list. Jump right back into our conversation. So let's let's get into the Some interventions to honor unwind anxiety. And it's a beautiful title. You don't get your wife. Came up with because Wound up is the kind of vernacular that will use. You know when we're feeling anxious in that construction that you're talking about you've got set of processes to help people Unwind so can you walk through a couple of key points. If people are feeling anxious and then i also wanna hit on the percentages. It was fifteen percent of people reported general anxiety prior to the pandemic it was a radical spike in that. And course correct me if our numbers are different. I've always thought that thirty percent was the accurate number. That three out of ten people that i know are anxious but fifty fifteen percent. Feels like an underreported At least double that. I'm sorry of people that actually had it but never raised their hands anxious. So what numbers are you using as a Abroad sweet for. Let's just call it in. The united states right now are experiencing exciting. Yeah well and. I'm glad you went out because there can be an experience of anxiety in there can be disorder so we'll get people being diagnosed with the disorder which is kind of a higher bar to meet. There was a meta analysis that was just published showing that in the last year. I think it was thirty. Five percent of people in albuquerque in cross like seventeen studies at thirty five percent the anxiety disorder clinical. So here. I would guess that the number of people that actually feel anxious is even higher than that because thirty five percent meet this bar of anxiety disorder and that thirty five percent means that there's a medical practitioner that has somewhere charted like the. Oh you meet. The clinical criteria. You know is kind of the idea. There is that thirty five percent in the last thirty days or thirty five percent lifetime. I don't remember specifically. But i think it was said this was done. They were specifically looking to see it increases during the pandemic so displays in the last year. Probably probably okay. I don't know the research. But i think that the number is extraordinarily high for people that would meet the criteria for anxiety In their lifetime clinical anxiety in their lifetime thinks extrordinary number. Okay yeah alright so folks that are feeling in it judd. Take us home. What are we doing so here you know in this actually goes back to the origin of wire actually started working with this so in medical school. I was trained to prescribe medications. Frank if you look at the best medications out there there's this clinical term number needed to treat which basically means you know how many people you need to give a certain treatment to before one of them shows significant benefit or significant reduction in symptoms for our best medications out there. That number needed to treat is five point. Two which means i have to give five patients and medication by point to patients a medication and one of them shows significant reduction in symptoms. So i was playing the medication lottery when i started practicing psychiatrist. I didn't know which of the five i treated next. We're gonna was gonna benefit. And i also didn't know what i was going to do with the other eighty percents so so here. You know we were my lab was doing. My lab really focuses on mindfulness inhabit. Change we were studying this right now that we developed and we'd found this forty percent reduction in craving related eating and somebody had said you know. Hey they were mapping out what drives their stress eating. This person said it's my anxiety drive stress eating. Can you create a program for that. And i was thinking well. I prescribe medications springs. I am not sure. I can help yet. That put a bug in my ear to go and actually look at the literature and it turns out literature from the nineteen eighty so this is when the stones were singing about mother's little helper. This is how much benazir being prescribed like. Candy like valium and You know sonics and all these these which are no longer first line treatment because there are major problems with these things. So they were like medication and medicaid everyone and these researchers like thomas birkbeck and others were suggesting that anxiety could be driven like a habit so for me. When i read that this was i this big moments whereas i never thought about it could that it could be driven this way. And the other part of my brain said dude. You know how to work with habits. Why don't you bring these two things together. So of course as a researcher. I wanted to see well. How could i research this. And as a clinician. I wouldn't see. How can i help people with this. So we started by developing this morning. Anxiety app where we and then this is the basis for what turns out to be a three step process that anybody can use and so walk us through this three step process. The first thing we did was to see how well this thing worked and the first thing the first group we tested this was in physicians. Why because i can speak for myself. We tend to be a pain in the ass. Physicians right where. I'm too busy are shouldn't be taking care of myself and we learned to armor up in medical school. And you know any moment that i could be you know that i take care of myself could be helping my patients all this martyred martyrdom stuff right. So of course we burn out like crazy so we did the study. Fifty seven percent reduction in clinically validated anxiety scores in inex- physicians who uses unwinding anxiety up. We also got a fifty percent reduction in burnout without mentioning the word. Burn out once. Okay 'cause you're highly correlated. We did a second study people with generalized anxiety disorder. Sixty seven percent reduction in these folks. These are the olympians of worry. They really know how to sixty seven percent reduction and there we can calculate the number needed to treat and their medications. It's five point two in this study. One point six. Hey so so. An app could do a mic drop. Oh one point six. So i just highlight that because this process them going to strive is actually well not only. Is it pretty well theoretically based but we now have very strong empirical data supporting that it actually works so it's not just hey jude thinks this is a good idea that he's going to try to sell a book. It's a gender budget research and found that this actually is the best thing that that he could find that that actually is out there so three-star process anybody can use. This is pretty simple. The first step is somebody's got a map out how their mind works. So this could apply anxiety this comply to any habit and it really goes back to the survival mechanism trigger. Behavior results right dots. What drives any habit. So exile eighty anxiety. The feeling of anxiety is the trigger. The mental behavior of worrying is the behavior. Right and the other behaviors could be procrastination. There could be a bunch of things that we can substitute in there. And then the result is we we get some reward out of it from our brains perspective and then that drives the lip if we're not aware of it. There's no way we're going to be able to work with it. I'll give a concrete example. Because i think you know theoretically make sense but the stories really make the most sense to me. So i patiently right about him in my book who was referred me for anxiety okay. He had anxiety for over thirty years when he was referred to me and he you know nothing helped and what he described so he comes into my office they start taking us history and wants to restore he's got full blown panic disorder infobahn generalized anxiety disorder. And so first thing. I did after i started to get a sense for what was ailing him. I pull the of paper. I wrote down trigger behavior result and i said let me see if i can get this straight for him. His panic was driven literally driven.

anxiety disorder thomas birkbeck albuquerque judd benazir sonics united states Frank jude
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:12 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Are trying to make a narrative of what they might be thinking of me. And i think if i could just kind of throw out the beginnings of a framework and see if i'm on or off is that the default mode network am i. Okay is this okay. Are we okay. The self referencing obsession about you know the. That's kind of with one of the things that the default mode network is involved in that to answer that we look. I look to you as a social creature and say well does jetson thing. I'm okay and of judson thinks okay. Then i'm okay. But i've got to interpret jetsons micro expressions. His tonal stuff. I've gotta i've got to interpret all of that and i'm not a mind reader. I can actually get some sense of expression micro expression. But i don't know what he's gonna think of me so why let me just play the game here. And let me try to do with judson think would like therein. I think lies one of the great constrictors of human potential is the fear of other people's opinions. But can you. Can you get a smarter on. Well i can try a so if this is helpful one way to look back on this. Is you know what's our brains to do. And if this is probably driven by tribal psychology where we've got it is basically if you run around into pack. You're more likely to survive. And so you've got to figure out pretty quickly. Is this a friendly packers. Is this a not from the pack. So there is. There's this underlying piece here. Where should bible rain is in there saying. Hey you know friend or foe. I got to figure this out quickly. And i think that probably feeds into modern day. Where you're talking about here we. We're not as dependence on the tribal psychology. Now you know we were really. We're a global tribe if we really look at this and we all should be banding together to save the planet. But that's you know that's a different conversation so here it's less about you know we've all got a gang up against this woolly mammoths because there's no way i could take down willamantic by myself but if there are seventy of us we've got a better chance of doing that so that tribal psychology is still in there in that programs to have a say. Hey you know. I gotta i gotta get people. Don't like me basically and the other part of that programming is that says okay. Let me find things what's simple way to do that. Well you take views for example you know and it's like oh what do you think about this. I agree with you now. They're suddenly a tribe that's been developed based on that and in fact this is so simple there have been studies time that if you give people like the same colored mug in a psychology experiment. If i'm remembering correctly basically the same color mug suddenly they have a greater affinity toward a complete stranger just because they have this same colored mug or something you know. I think we all experience. You've people drive down the street and they're like oh i drive mazda. That guy's a mazda. Suddenly were a tribe were mazda tribe because they have no idea who this person is but they happen to drive the same brand of car that i drive so it is really baked in. And if we're not aware of that this can be manipulated very easily. You know this is where it was the documentary. This social dilemma. I think where they talk about how these social media companies their whole revenue structure is based on attention. The attention economy and the best way to drive revenue is to basically polarize people and the best way to polarize. People is due nudge them farther and farther and farther and farther into these extreme views. All of that based on tribal psychology does that make sense. and what parts the brain. Would you go research a bit deeper when you think about fear of other people's opinions and because this is kind of the i think this is one of the epicenters for anxiety for people right. It's no longer the sabertooth. It is like m. i. o. k. based on what they think potentially might be thinking of me and so as we're starting to get into the unwinding of anxiety. What brain regions do you go. Hey might go dig here. I think that you're gonna be. You're gonna love some research around these brain regions. Yeah the one that i've seen most consistently implicated here is the post your senior And here i remember their experiments showing choice justification meaning. I think this group is cd cases where they had people pick. Cd cases and they're pretty much same entity for to and then they pick when and suddenly i like that more Psychologist choice justification. So the post your singlets activated during those times when people feel guilty. The post your simulates activated when people are again as i talked about what people are worrying about the future. This same region is activated. I so i think there's that constricted quality experience lined up pretty nicely with activation of this brain region. Which buried nicely with this. Con- this experiential concept of self so let's differentiate that from conceptual self right so the concepts. I am jaide is is just the concept that helps me navigate the world. You know somebody says hey judd you know. I'm not i'm looking earlier. They're talking to me right but if they say hey judd. You're a jerk. Suddenly i'm attached to view. Maybe on lamma jerk. And i'm like yeah i'll let your you know i like. I like to try to think that. I'm not to be a jerk. And so somebody says hey judd. You're a jerk. Suddenly it points out that attachment to view that i have. And there's this instructed quality that comes in his low. Why did that person say that to me. And you'll that and that is the same feeling that same constricted restless quality that we feel when we're anxious. Let's take a quick break here to talk about masterclass with masterclass. You can learn from the world's best minds anytime anywhere at your own pace and i recently was watching one. That wayne gretzky did is like a really cool moment.

judson mazda packers judd wayne gretzky
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:10 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"For anxiousness and so can you can you. I'm fascinated by by the mechanism that many of us are operating from that. We are trying to make a narrative of what they might be thinking of me. And i think if i could just kind of throw out the beginnings of a framework and see if i'm on or off is that the default mode network am i. Okay is this okay. Are we okay. The self referencing obsession about you know the. That's kind of with one of the things that the default mode network is involved in that to answer that we look. I look to you as a social creature and say well does jetson thing. I'm okay and of judson thinks okay. Then i'm okay. But i've got to interpret jetsons micro expressions. His tonal stuff. I've gotta i've got to interpret all of that and i'm not a mind reader. I can actually get some sense of expression micro expression. But i don't know what he's gonna think of me so why let me just play the game here. And let me try to do with judson think would like therein. I think lies one of the great constrictors of human potential is the fear of other people's opinions. But can you. Can you get a smarter on. Well i can try a so if this is helpful one way to look back on this. Is you know what's our brains to do. And if this is probably driven by tribal psychology where we've got it is basically if you run around into pack. You're more likely to survive. And so you've got to figure out pretty quickly. Is this a friendly packers. Is this a not from the pack. So there is. There's this underlying piece here. Where should bible rain is in there saying. Hey you know friend or foe. I got to figure this out quickly. And i think that probably feeds into modern day. Where you're talking about here. We don't we're not as dependence on the tribal psychology. Now you know we were really. We're a global tribe if we really look at this and we all should be banding together to save the planet. But that's you know that's a different conversation so here it's less about you know we've all got a gang up against this woolly mammoth because there's no way i could take down a willamantic by myself but if there are seventy of us. We've got a better chance of doing that. So that tribal psychology is still in there in that programs to have a say. Hey you know. I gotta i gotta get people. Don't like me basically and the other part of that programming is that says okay. Let me find things what's simple way to do that. Well you take views for example you know and it's like oh what do you think about this. I agree with you now. They're suddenly a tribe that's been developed based on that and in fact this is so simple there have been studies time that if you give people like the same colored mug in a psychology experiment. If i'm remembering correctly basically the same color mug suddenly they have a greater affinity toward a complete stranger just because they have this same colored mug or something you know. I think we all experienced. You've people drive down the street and they're like. Oh i drive mazda that guy's a mazda suddenly were a tribe mazda tribe because they have no idea who this person is but they happen to drive the same brand of car that i drive so it is really baked in. And if we're not aware of that this can be manipulated very easily. You know this is where it was the documentary. This social dilemma. I think where they talk about how these social media companies their whole revenue structure is based on attention. The attention economy and the best way to drive revenue is to basically polarize people and the best way to polarize. People is due nudge them farther and farther and farther and farther into these extreme views. All of that based on tribal psychology. Does that make sense absolutely. And what parts the brain would you go research a bit deeper when you think about fear of other people's opinions and because this is kind of the i think this is one of the epicenters for anxiety for people right. It's no longer the sabertooth. It is like i o k. based on what they think potentially might be thinking of me and so as we're starting to get into the unwinding of anxiety. What brain regions do you go. Hey might go dig here. I think that you're gonna be. You're gonna love some research around these brain regions. Yeah the one that i've seen most consistently implicated here is the post your senior And here i remember their experiments showing choice justification meaning. I think this group is cd cases where they had people pick. Cd cases and they're pretty much same affinity for two and then they pick when and suddenly. I like that more. Travels college choice justification. So the post your singlets activated during those times when people feel guilty. The post your simulates activated when people are again as i talked about what people are worrying about the future. This same region is activated. I so i think there's that constricted quality experience lined up pretty nicely with activation of this brain region. Which buried nicely with this. Con- this experiential concept of self so let's differentiate that from conceptual self right so the concepts. I am jaide is is just the concept that helps me navigate the world. You know somebody says hey judd you know. I'm not i'm looking earlier. They're talking to me right but if they say hey judd. You're a jerk. Suddenly i'm attached to view maybe on attested amateur. I'm like yeah. I'll let you know i like. I like to try to think that. I'm not to be a jerk. And so somebody says hey judd. You're a jerk. Suddenly it points out that attachment to view that i have. And there's this instructed quality that comes in his low. Why did that person say that to me. And you'll that and that is the same feeling that same constricted restless quality that we feel when we're anxious. Let's take a quick break here to talk about masterclass with masterclass. You can.

judson mazda packers Travels college judd
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

10:23 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Your experience. But i'm just gonna put an astrakhan there because if people are feeling anxious and they've got adrenaline and quarters all coursing through their system. It takes time to get that out of the system. You you can't do just a couple breaths and get it out. So i think it's like twenty to forty minutes but that's maybe old data. Do you have a sense of how long it takes to pass cortisol through the system. I probably yeah. I don't i haven't i'd have to look at this. Study is myself. But i would guess insult faster than that certainly adrenaline courses kind of clears out a little faster than that. I think it's got a pretty short half life. But i don't remember the cortisol specific. Yeah it's kinda. Did it. The way i think about is like there's an agitation when you have just enough to much portable too much adrenaline there's an internal agitation and some of the folks that i've spent time with work in some of the most contra consequential environments. They don't perform they. They'll walk away from the thing that they've dedicated to years to plan for if they've got too much of that activation on board because they know there's a restriction a constriction in their ability to adjust to the unfolding known. That makes a lot of sense to me. And so i i don't so here i think a lot of folks might be focused on that piece where there may be more more more information in looking at well what can help move us reliably reproducible early in the direction of your of unwinding of expanding. Because they're you can almost think of this as as orthogonal right the the arousal piece you can be high arousal and expanded. You could also be high arousal in contracted so the arousal may not be as important as the expansion contraction continuum. Okay alright so. Let's let's kind of use that as a jumping off point to your framework which is constriction or expansion. Right so and i love that. I love that i'd ladder. I've used that in since our last conversation. And i've over-simplified something on the backs of that is that thoughts that we're going to oversimplifies thoughts if we could do that for. Just the framework is that thoughts are either creating constriction or creating expansion and so like to oversimplify It's not that clean. But i love that framework. Do you like that as well. You know our data more and more support it. And so for example. Our neuro imaging studies when we've actually studied experienced meditators. Some of them have actually gotten into self described flow in the scanner and we can actually measure brain activity of the brain regions that are associated with getting caught up in experience. And letting go and in fact those brain regions so for example specifically the default one network. The post your senior cortex it gets activated when we were separate when we worry about the future it gets in the more we worried. The more activated gets it also gets activated when somebody's craving everything from chocolate to cocaine to cigarettes to gambling right so this is a well described a network of brain regions that is associated with getting caught up in experience in my lousy done studies to link that specifically with subjective experience. Here people getting into flow deactivate that network of brain regions and as we do these neuro phenomena Studies people report letting go in fact. We just completed a study with hundreds of people. This was just a wait to see how universal language of contraction versus expansionists so we use constriction and closed down this and expansion and openness in a specifically undefined. Way we just said. Do you want across fourteen different mental states and we had people just describe. How open or closed is this when you're anxious for example when you're when you're feeling frustrated and versus you know things like curiosity and kindness universally people report that anxiety fields closed. Constructed frustration feels closed constricted and that curiosity and kindness feel open and expanded so we can see this both analogically when people not even define people can rely. They all relate the same way to these things. And we can also see this neuro biologically where we can link these things out to brain regional activation and and importantly deactivation as people are letting go so more and more. I think the framework is lining up. Pretty nicely okay. So when folks are feeling anxious. And that's it you know we're being smart with that word feeling anxious when they're feeling anxious there where they recognize it. Do you have a sense of why that is so predominant right now. I think you're going to lean on. There's just so much information and our brain is trying to solve the future and we're not sure what to trust. I hear that part of your narrative there but if you were to double click down underneath like do you have. Can you take it one. Step further about the main themes exiling. Yeah and we've actually had a naturalistic experiment. Happened over last year. So anxiety has been on the rise so even bc before corona virus. I know it's hard for people to even remember with that was playing but in twenty twenty. We saw a huge spike in anxiety. Psychological distress went up like two hundred and fifty percent diagnoses of anxiety disorders. Like almost three hundred percent so we saw this huge spike anxiety. Well the biggest different. The biggest thing that we saw happen was this uncertainty around virus. It wasn't that there was a new virus. it was that there was a global pandemic. So if you look at sars for example not a global pandemic didn't have the same level of anxiety levels spike. So there's a thing of the control condition. Now we saw this global pandemic everybody's freaking out. Why two things. One new thing that nobody's experienced before a global pandemic to a lack of information about how dangerous it was. How we're going to deal with it. And i guess the third thing is that people were also using social media to spread misinformation so their skin so they feel a certain way because the future their futures unclear. guess what. It's always been unclear right yet right like i barely know what you're going to say. I'm sorry i have no idea what you're gonna say. I barely know what i'm going to say in the next moment so like our future is constantly unfolding so but this just kind of pulled that right into front view like okay and then where do i go to see. It is natural to look outside to say. Where can i get some information. Scan the world for food and dangers and but that those sources of information were not clear right okay so then we feel a certain way. And then there's that interloping experience so what what the world has been doing also over the last. I'm gonna say since the invention of the smartphone. These weapons of mass distraction. We've been continually driving ourselves. More and more into distraction and two in making ways Afraid this differently in finding ways to make ourselves comfortable through distraction. Our world has never had the ability to collectively distracted self to the degree that we can now so our distress tolerance had is dropping and dropping and dropping so for example. Somebody could be sitting at a stoplight right. Thirty seconds of a red light. Not a big deal. No if you look around at night. Everybody's crotch glowing blue. Because they've suddenly you know they can't tolerate the distress of sitting at a red light for thirty seconds doing nothing you know there was. There was a study in two thousand fourteen showing that people would rather shocked themselves at a level. That is uncomfortable. Then sit in a room and do nothing right. there was. This is a study published in science so collectively. We've been we've been been moving as a society toward more and more and more and more comfort and i think that also adds to it because our collective distress tolerance has decreased. So we're uncertainty. You can lead into uncertainty and say. Oh this is different. This is new. We're being trained. Oh this is different. This is uncomfortable because our survival brain is saying. Hey is there danger out there. An incentive saying hey let's go see if there's danger we're going oh this is uncomfortable. I got run away from it as quickly as possible purely because we've trained ourselves that way. So let me flip on. My blue net eliminate emanating crotch machine Let me flip on my phone to be able to get a little hit of dopamine. 'cause that'll calm this anxiousness right and i know that it's relatively safe but it's an empty meal at the end of it. I might feel a bit while. Use the word empty. Let me throw a word out there dissatisfaction. We're we're not fully satisfied and it actually that that not being fully satisfied makes us want more. Suet actually drives a little bit of craving that says hey go back and do it again okay. How would you map this framework that you have onto fear of people's opinions as being one of the drivers for anxiousness and so can you can you. I'm fascinated by by the mechanism that many of us are operating from that..

anxiety disorders
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

10:23 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Your experience. But i'm just gonna put an astrakhan there because if people are feeling anxious and they've got adrenaline and quarters all coursing through their system. It takes time to get that out of the system. You you can't do just a couple breaths and get it out. So i think it's like twenty to forty minutes but that's maybe old data. Do you have a sense of how long it takes to pass cortisol through the system. I probably yeah. I don't i haven't i'd have to look at this. Study is myself. But i would guess since a little faster than that certainly adrenaline courses kind of clears out a little faster than that. I think it's got a pretty short half life. But i don't remember the cortisol specific. It's kinda did it. The way i think about is like those agitation. When you have just enough to much portable too much adrenaline there's an internal agitation and some of the folks that i've spent time with work in some of the most consequential consequential environments. They don't perform they. They'll walk away from the thing that they've dedicated to years to plan for if they've got too much of that activation on board because they know there's a restriction a constriction in their ability to adjust to the unfolding known. That makes a lot of sense to me. And so i i don't so here i think a lot of folks might be focused on that piece where there may be more more more information in looking at well what can help move us reliably reproducible early in the direction of your of unwinding of expanding. Because they're you can almost think of this as as orthogonal right the the arousal piece you can be higher razzle and expanded. You could also be high arousal in contracted so the arousal may not be as important as the expansion contraction continuum. Okay alright so. Let's let's kind of use that as a jumping off point to your framework which is construction or expansion. Right so and i love that. I love that i'd ladder. I've used that in since our last conversation. And i've over-simplified something on the backs of that is that thoughts that we're going oversimplifies thoughts if we could do that for just. The framework is that thoughts are either creating constriction or creating expansion and so like to oversimplify. it's not that clean but i love that framework. Do you like that as well. You know our data more and more support it. And so for example. Our neuro imaging studies when we've actually studied experienced meditators. Some of them have actually gotten into self described flow in the scanner and we can actually measure brain activity of the brain regions that are associated with getting caught up in experience. And letting go and in fact those brain regions so for example specifically the default one network. The post your senior cortex it gets activated when we were separate when we worry about the future it gets in the more we worried. The more activated gets it also gets activated when somebody's craving everything from chocolate to cocaine to cigarettes to gambling right so this is a well described a network of brain regions that is associated with getting caught up in experience in my lousy done studies to link that specifically with subjective experience. Here people getting into flow deactivate that network of brain regions and as we do these neuro phenomena Studies people report letting go in fact. We just completed a study with hundreds of people. This was just a wait to see how universal language of contraction versus expansionists so we use constriction in closed down this and expansion and openness in a specifically undefined. Way we just said. Do you want across fourteen different mental states and we had people just describe. How open or closed is this when you're anxious for example when you're when you're feeling frustrated and versus you know things like curiosity and kindness universally people report that anxiety fields closed. Constructed frustration feels closed constricted and that curiosity and kindness feel open and expanded so we can see this both analogically when people not even define people can rely. They all relate the same way to these things. And we can also see this neuro biologically where we can link these things out to brain regional activation and and importantly deactivation as people are letting go so more and more. I think the framework is lining up. Pretty nicely okay. So when folks are feeling anxious. And that's it you know we're being smart with that word feeling anxious When they're feeling anxious there where they recognize it. Do you have a sense of why that is so predominant right now. I think you're going to lean on. There's just so much information and our brain is trying to solve the future and we're not sure what to trust. I hear that part of your narrative there but if you were to double click down underneath like do you have. Can you take it one. Step further about the main themes exiling. Yeah and we've actually had a naturalistic experiment. Happened over last year. So anxiety has been on the rise so even bc before corona virus. I know it's hard for people to even remember with that was playing but in twenty twenty. We saw a huge spike in anxiety. Psychological distress went up like two hundred and fifty percent diagnoses of anxiety disorders. Like almost three hundred percent so we saw this huge spike anxiety. Well the biggest different. The biggest thing that we saw happen was this uncertainty around virus. It wasn't that there was a new virus. it was that there was a global pandemic. So if you look at sars for example not a global pandemic didn't have the same level of anxiety levels spike so there is a thing of the control condition. now we saw this global pandemic. everybody's freaking out. Why two things. One new thing that nobody's experienced before a global pandemic to a lack of information about how dangerous it was. How we're going to deal with it. And i guess the third thing is that people were also using social media to spread misinformation so their skin so they feel a certain way because the future their futures unclear. just what. It's always been unclear right yet right like i barely know what you're going to say. I'm sorry i have no idea what you're gonna say. I barely know what i'm going to say in the next moment so like our future is constantly unfolding so but this just kind of pulled that right into front view like okay and then where do i go to see. It is natural to look outside to say. Where can i get some information. Scan the world for food and dangers and but that those sources of information were not clear right okay so then we feel a certain way. And then there's that interloping experience so what what the world has been doing also over the last. I'm gonna say since the invention of the smartphone. These weapons of mass distraction. We've been continually driving ourselves. More and more into distraction and two in making ways Afraid this differently in finding ways to make ourselves comfortable through distraction. Our world has never had the ability to collectively distracted self to the degree that we can now so our distress tolerance had is dropping and dropping and dropping so for example. Somebody could be sitting at a stoplight right. Thirty seconds of a red light. Not a big deal. No if you look around at night. Everybody's crotch glowing blue. Because they've suddenly you know they can't tolerate the distress of sitting at a red light for thirty seconds doing nothing. There was a study in two thousand fourteen showing that people would rather shocked themselves at a level. That is uncomfortable. Then sit in a room and do nothing right. there was. This is a study published in science so collectively. We've been we've been been moving as a society toward more and more and more and more comfort and i think that also adds to it because our collective distress tolerance has decreased. So we're uncertainty. You can lead into uncertainty and say. Oh this is different. This is new. We're being trained. Oh this is different. This is uncomfortable because our survival brain is saying. Hey is there danger out there and incentive saying hey let's go see if there's danger we're going oh this is uncomfortable. I got run away from it as quickly as possible purely because we've trained ourselves that way. So let me flip on. My blue net eliminate emanating crotch machine Let me flip on my phone to be able to get a little hit of dopamine. 'cause that'll calm this anxiousness right and i know that it's relatively safe but it's an empty meal at the end of it. I might feel a bit while. Use the word empty. Let me throw a word out there dissatisfaction. We're we're not fully satisfied and it actually that that not being fully satisfied makes us want more. Suet actually drives a little bit of craving that says hey go back and do it again okay. How would you map this framework that you have onto fear of people's opinions as being one of the drivers for anxiousness and so can you can you. I'm fascinated by by the mechanism that many of us are operating from that..

anxiety disorders
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:27 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Out judd's book. Maybe you want to check out the book that i wrote with head coach carol. It's called compete to create. And so maybe you enjoy both of those same time so with that. Let's jump right into this week's conversation with judd brewer. Judson how are you. i'm good it's It's great it's been too long in so I'm stoked to be here with the in congrats on your book. Congratulations thank you. Yeah okay so it's not surprising. The title of your book is no surprise. You knowing you knowing what you're been interested in for the last couple of decades Can you just talk a little bit about the title. What led you to that title and the quick flyover for like why. You wanted to berth. This book into the world. Yeah i'll be so all the credit for this idol goes to my wife who came up with the term unwinding anxiety and if anybody that reads it will actually see she She's got to yourself a us a scenario from per describing how she didn't even know she had anxiety until she could start to see it clearly in her family so the unwinding anxiety pete's comes from what anxiety ios like feel we wound up and that wound up quality of experience. Actually totally totally gets in the way for everything from helping. Are you making our thinking planning brain gloss line to making us focused on things that are not in our best interest. You know where we get caught up in. You know unhelpful habits stress eating and procrastinating even addictions because that women quality experiences do something in our survival brain is saying this is uncomfortable. Make it go away. So the title came from that in terms of being wound up but also came from a lot of the research. That might have been doing rounds. The experience of what. It's like to let go. We've studied experienced meditators. I've been meditating myself for a long time. And the simplest way to explain that dichotomy of wound up versus letting go is is kind of being caught up being wound up versus unwinding and so the unwinding piece is this journey that we all can take as we unwind whether it's anxiety or any other habit or any addiction or even being attached to abuse for example and so on the if we just stick with us for minute of for folks that are unfamiliar with a definition of anxiety. And i wanted to do this for a moment because we throw around the word anxiety a lot and we throw around the word anxious and worried and nervous. We like we throw around these words like almost like the same thing but anxiety has a little bit more gravitas to it then anxiousness. Let's say so when you talk about anxiety what is your working definition. I like the. There's actually a pretty good different dictionary. Definition which is a feeling of nervousness warrior unease about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome. And i particularly like because it describes this feeling the feeling of being wound up the feeling of being nervous. This is this This restless quality to experience and it also points to how anxiety can be this feeling and it can also a trigger the mental behavior of worrying. So we can be worried. We can feel worried and we also worry judd. You just snuck in mental behavior okay. You're not getting that. You're not getting that. Pass me okay. Mental behavior as opposed to mental activity. And so that sounds like a behaviorist. Okay so let's pull on that thread just a little bit. Because i think you're you're nodding your kind of eastern. You're giving a nod to either behaviors them or eastern thought in that in that threat. And i know you not to be a behaviorist okay. But but you're straight down the lane about habits and addiction and Forming new habits. And and and so if you look at you know at the buddha he was the story is the word on the street was that he became awakened when he was exploring something called dependent origination which turns out to be the first description of reinforcement learning. He and this was described before paper was even invented. We we wrote a scientific paper on this. I wrote this with a pali scholar. Showing how this is actually been described so the behaviorisms piece. The reinforcement learning was described way back in the buddhist time in the data description. Really encapsulates in kind of been rediscovered in modern day to reinforcement learning. And the not that. I give their whether it's to buddhism our behavior assume is that if you look at how much behavior is driven in a way. That's unhelpful habits. A form ninety five if not more percents of the problems that are formed in the world. The buddha described it as craving leading to separate. You know the behavior is describe it. As wanting to hold onto things that are pleasant we get cravings to hold onto those things and we also get urges to push away things. That are unpleasant of anxiety is unpleasant so we do something to make it. Go away so certainly a nod in both directions and it just depends on how far back historically wanna go is to where the non goes on like it. Okay so this back to your train of thought Is that mental behavior. The activity of your mind. The the stringing together of thoughts. You're saying that anxiety has a psychological component in a physiological component. And so are you agreeing with somatic and cognitive anxiety as a framework for a a sensitivity to the type of anxiety people can have i think but just defined that to make sure that we're talking about the same thing so cognitive anxiety would be excessive worry so anxiety feels like Constantly consumed with what could go wrong later. And my thoughts find themselves in an inner looping Play you know. I can't quite get out of that drama..

judd brewer judd Judson carol pete
"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"jud" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Okay. Welcome back or welcome to the finding master. Podcast i'm michael vais in by trade and training i'm a sport performance psychologist and i am fortunate to work with some of the most extraordinary thinkers and doers across the planet and the whole idea behind these conversations behind this podcast is to learn from people to pull back the curtain to explore how they've committed to mastering both their craft in their minds. Our minds are our greatest asset. And if you wanna learn more about how you can train your mind this is just a quick reminder right here to check out the online psychological training course that have created with head coach of the seattle seahawks pete carroll. You can find all of that information at finding mastery dot net ford slash course. Now this week's conversation is with. Dr judd burger a new york times bestselling author a neuroscientist and addiction. Psychiatrist and flat out a thought leader in the field of habit change. He's also the director of research and innovation at brown university's mindfulness center where he also serves as an associate professor. Dr judd has developed and tested novel. Mindfulness programs and the center of his work is really round habit. Change how to create change and how change happens. And then he narrows down into treatments for smoking and emotional eating and anxiety and you might be familiar with his work from his first appearance on finding nassar a few years ago that was episodes. Sixty six so awesome one. Encourage you to check out as well. And i wanted to have judd back to discuss his new book and the title of it is unwinding anxiety. New science shows us how to break the cycle of worry and fear to heal your mind. You can probably imagine where this conversation is headed. We dive deep into some of his new findings around how to work with anxiety in any walk of life. And if you want check out judd's new book which a highly encourage that you do. I think that you know where i'm going to point to audible and for those of you who are unfamiliar with audible..

Unwinding Anxiety With Dr. Jud Brewer

The Rich Roll Podcast

10:55 min | 1 year ago

Unwinding Anxiety With Dr. Jud Brewer

"So maybe the best way to launch into this. Is i just define our terms when we're talking about anxiety what are we talking about specifically and how does that differ from other kind of kindred emotions like fear and worry and and the like. Yeah i think that's a great place to start so if you look at i think the dictionary definition of anxiety goes something like feeling of worried nervousness or unease about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome It's interesting in that definition. Worry is an interesting word because it can be a noun like this feeling of unease but it can also be a verb. Where i am worrying so i think. Let's bookmark that. And come back to that. Because i think that's a really critical distinction That in both of those can actually the now and can lead to the verb which can feed back to the noun of worrying but looking at it from a scientific standpoint. I think a lot of people. It's exiled was something that's kind of necessary needed for survival. You know especially right now. And that's something that i dove into a lot of my book because i've been really interested with this idea. You know there's this whole idea of performance and i actually haven't found any evidence to support it so let's bookmark that as well and talk about some of these origins here So think of fear as a survival mechanism okay. We've talked before about habits and setting up habits for survival right to remember where food is and to remember where dangerous so these learning mechanisms go way back. You know that could serve the sea slug like this is the oldest learning mechanism known in science positive and negative reinforcement. So if you zoom in on fear as a negatively reinforced behavior fear helps us survive fray think of our ancient ancestors album savannah they are forging for food right. But they don't know if it's dangerous so they're moving from their safe zone their cave out into more of an uncertain space the satnam so their brain naturally goes on high alert to tart. Start to learn things like. Oh there's food go there again. There's danger don't go there again okay. So fear helps us learn where things are safe and where things aren't safe so we can avoid the unsafe places that fear mechanism is is part of the brain and then layered on top of it is a thinking and planning part of the brain neo cortex prefrontal cortex in particular and this is interesting because it helps us survive in a different way. It helps us survive through thinking planning yet. It needs information and preferably accurate information so in this day is a lot of misinformation which gets in the but it also is helpful for it. They have precedent. So when it's going into unchartered territory. It's really hard to think and plan you know like. Oh let's let's go explore saturn. Well we've never done that before so so we've got you got you got to think of a bunch of things and try to approximate. But it'd be much easier if somebody else had explored saturday and wrote a book about it. So do this. Don't do that okay. So the prefrontal cortex think of fear. Help survive the prefrontal cortex survive. But if you pair fear with a lack of certainty right which is what. The prefrontal cortex is trying to help us do is trying to help predict the future based on past experiences if there is no precedent if there's a lack of certainty that fear plus uncertainty leads to anxiety and people think oh anxiety. It's going to help me survive. No right there is no evidence for helping us survive. It makes our thinking and planning bring go off line. And if you think of the extreme form of anxiety panic right which is wildly unthinking behavior. That's that far end of the spectrum of anxiety right. it's an interesting but subtle an important distinction in that it is the uncertainty. That's driving the irrationality right. You can be afraid when you have a certain set of predictable parameters to deal with but when you don't know what you're venturing into that's what provokes anxiety so it kind of extend that what's fascinating about that is. It's not the dire consequence that creates the anxiety. It's the lack of certainty around whether that consequence is going to be dire or not so dire. Yeah absolutely and just to be super clear for your listeners. It's not that fear is a problem right. Fear helps us learn in new situations in particular But fear doesn't have the same neuro chemical Reaction in the brain anxiety like how nero chemically like. How do these two things distinguish themselves. Yeah i don't think all of the industry's been worked out. But i think one way to think about this on a temporal scale so if you look at the timescales you could actually differentiate them pretty well as an example of. Let's say stepping out into the street. So let's say in this day and age when everybody is distracted by their cornell. Well say are weapons of mass distraction. You know everybody's looking at their phone so somebody steps out in the street. It doesn't see the bus coming bearing down on them. They instinctively jump back onto the safety of the sidewalk and say instinctively because this is much faster than our thinking brain. Imagine you look up the bus and go. Is that really going fast enough you know. Is it going to veer splat. Credo no time for that so we jump back onto the safety of the sidewalk and then we have a fear response. All of our our basically our fight or flight response cakes in and says well that was crazy and i to be more precise that fight or flight response is where we get these catecholamines. We get all these basically adrenaline surge. That says hey you gotta you gotta run if you need to if you're not if you're not safe at this point okay but that also helps us have this fear response that says wow. You could have almost gotten killed. You should learn from this. Look both ways relearn what you learned as a kid. The problem is so that's think of that as super rapid. Is that instinctual response. The rapid response is that fear response. But then ideally that drains out of our system and we move on when we've learned right so this is what differentiates eighty is with the anxiety. Maybe we keep replaying it in our head. Oh i could have gotten killed. I'm an idiot. I shouldn't have done that. That is just kind of keeping that fear. Response going chronically naked. Happen for hours days weeks years you know and this is where people you know. It's not like we need a lifetime of psychotherapy for fear response right but what we do. What we do need is the ability to see the difference between a helpful fierce bonds and us literally getting spun out of control because our minds going out of control making us continue to think about it right. And i think we're all experiencing some very ation on those two things over the past you know year whether it's fear or unhealthy anxiety you know amidst a global pandemic and you know our weapons of of mass distraction that are feeding us conflicting about x y and z. I would suspect that you know. This is created an unbelievably robust. Petri dish. For you to really you know immerse yourself in the subject matter in which you are an expert and i know that you know early in the pandemic like last may you were writing pretty extensively about anxiety and how we were you know grappling with how to manage this this crazy shift in all of our lifestyles but here we are almost a year later It would seem to follow that. There's less uncertainty now. Perhaps the same amount of fear but have you seen any kind of differentiation in how your patients or or the population at large is kind of coping with Cova i so i would say there are two main things that i'm noticing both in my clinic and then just at march one is that there is that big spike of while. This is crazy this is really going to be a pandemic as it. Wow this really is a pandemic and then how dangerous is this. How infectious is this. All of that that uncertainty has gone down a little bit and the death rate has gone down when people figured out things like using steroids. To help you know severely ill patients so that part has helped yet. We've seen continual spikes and these are intermittent once we don't know when they're going to happen. With other forms of uncertainty like the variants o of this variant popped up. And now there's and then those things feed a whole 'nother level of uncertainty. We've also seen things that really haven't changed that much. In terms of the uncertainty you know small businesses for example the economy for example. This is totally unprecedented. So everybody is kind of feeling their way through this whether it's a poor small business owner i've seen so many who've just like put their life savings in like just one more just one more month right and then they crash and burn or the. You know the feds are trying to figure out how to prop up the economy without you know throwing us into whatever wild inflation or whatever. That's not my lane. So i don't know but the other piece that i've seen on top of this is how people are coping coping with air quotes. Because you know you've probably heard of a quarantine fifteen and where people have gained weights and people are turning to these short-term coping strategies because they are immediate and you feel good in the moment whether it's drinking drinking has gone up. Actually it's interesting. Drinking has gone up a significant part of the population and some people have just basically cut out there drinking. Probably due to lack of social resources in the usual places that they do so drinking's gone up netflix's had quite a ride. You know social media all these things have gone up as coping mechanisms. That are probably gonna get laid down even harder as negative habits. That people are gonna have. That's gonna give this pandemic along tail and then you know. I think the anxiety piece is going to have an even longer tail summer describing this as the coming. You know epidemic of anxiety

Anxiety Panic Cova Netflix Anxiety
The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:51 min | 1 year ago

The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

"In December nineteen, ninety-eight, Sylvana, Polo left her home city of Cordova Argentina banned for the United States. The, sixteen year old had inherited her mother's spirit for travel and had signed up to bay a Foreign Exchange Juden. For the next three months, Silvana would be living with the six member to family in the northern Californian port city, of Eureka. The pelos Os and sons were longtime friends through mother's Ricco and Cairo. The two women met in the seventies when Carol traveled to Argentina has an exchange student herself. Carol Ray visited the country used laid off with her two year old daughter Juliana better known as Julie. But this stage the Palacios had two daughters with Sylvana the younger of the Pan. Into Julie Juliane to a similar in age but opposite in personality. Sylvana was an introvert unlock Julie more outgoing. Despite that differences, the girls formed a lifelong friendship of their own. Silvino was Jud to return home from the US in light. March nineteen ninety nine. As she was very interested in American culture, the sons had endeavoured to give her a memorable experience of their homeland. They had taken Sylvana old across the state to visit landmarks such as Disneyland Tint Fisherman's wharf. The Grand Canyon in Arizona was next on the list as was Yosemite. National Park. It took Cairo son a month to meticulously planned the perfect to road trip to Yosemite. Carol schedule was typically fool with family work and other commitments. So she made the most of every minute of her vacations. They Yosemite troop revolved around one of Julie's leading competitions and would be taking place over four days that encompassed the long weekend. Only carroo Julie, and Sylvana would be going. It was set to bay a you naked fanshawe as winter had brought snow to the region. The trip began on Friday February twelve. Carol Julie and Seven A- flew to San Francisco. From there they ha- Attica, and of two hours northeast to Stockton. City was home to the University of the Pacific where Julie's cheerleading competition took place on Saturday February. Thirteen. Julie was impressed by the campus and considered enrolling their after graduating high school. She had ambitions to become either a chef for an architect while maintaining her. For Violin and piano. Julie Caroline Sylvana, organized to return to the university for a proper tool in three days time. From Stockton the trio drove to the small farming town of Moore said known as the gateway to Yosemite. They spent the nod at the Ramada Rin before continuing on to Yosemite National. Park on the Sunday. Selena was particularly excited to see Yosemite granite cliffs waterfalls, lakes, meadows, and mountains. Shay was inactive person by nature who enjoyed our skating skiing and roller skating. She'll say loved the outdoors and hoped to study in the environmental field in the future. Carol. Julie and Venus spent death first day at Yosemite exploring pod of the pox seven hundred and fifty thousand acres of. Rugged. Wilderness. Before and they drove through the dense and far raging forests along highway one forty to the nearby town of. El Porto. There they checked in at the Saito Lodge. An affordable hotel on the banks of the mess said reveal. On the evening of Monday February fifteen, yen sund received a phone call from his wife Carol. Shea. Happily spoke of her time away with the Julie and Silvy Narine Yosemite. They had spent the previous two days exploring the park and was settling in for their phone or gnawed at the hotel.

Sylvana Julie Carol Ray Juliana Better Julie Juliane Argentina Silvino Carol Cairo Disneyland Tint Fisherman's Wh Silvana Carroo Julie Yosemite Cordova Palacios Carol Julie JUD Eureka
"jud" Discussed on TrapCracker Radio Uncensored

TrapCracker Radio Uncensored

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"jud" Discussed on TrapCracker Radio Uncensored

"The face. Yeah. They got a better I could have done it because i. Know I can do they just. got. They got a website called crazy shit dot com I've never been there and every. Couple days ago I went and looked to that whatever and they got. They got they got people like sitting there with their balls tied up to. The. Chicks chicks. Boxing. And they're getting paid. WHICH CRAZY Thing. Right I guess. Last night. Know why I'm yeah. I mean I mean they got her goats are nice. You know. In the mix. Ruin. Living. would. C. See. Like way. Down move. Like the win. On. Back. Negative? Like the. My status. Not Pregnant I'm not every. Patio. Too much. About it up back in the globe is dead. Going big. Kid 'cause I'm running. A player Nigga. Look at my lives. Jacket on. Day They WanNa go tell Jud. He'll be. B.. B.. Off. His. His. Speeches. His. They weren't. They watch what? We bought. Let's go. I. Just playing. To me and the dog. Chocolates. Lanes. Jumping. Photo. Name but if you do in this Oh. His. His..

Jud Boxing
"I'm Saying Goodbye": Maria Sharapova Retires From Tennis at Age 32

Beyond the Baseline

10:24 min | 2 years ago

"I'm Saying Goodbye": Maria Sharapova Retires From Tennis at Age 32

"Don't know if you share my sentiments. This was news. That is not remotely surprising. We were all expecting this. I think Most people had already pre filed. The Maria Sharapova retires column and yet I gotTa say it feels you know an hour into this but Feels a little weird definitely I. This is not like Last time we had big Sharipova News at SL which was of course it. Two Thousand Sixteen and that that was a big surprise. This like you said I think we all saw it coming. It was a matter of when and not if so for to be now is I think a pretty normal timing given whether she's going to play Indian Wells and Miami probably would have kick started her into the French and Wimbledon and then sort of. You're playing out the year at that point so for her to call it quits after all. Cheyenne this little gaps. Seems to make sense but I don't know what do you think? Yeah ranked ranked three seventy three. Something had to give here. This is a five time major champion. Who you did not think was going to play the wild card game for very long. I I guess I would perhaps suspected she would have played Indian Wells. It's an event where she's had success. It's two hours from her home in southern California she would have gotten a grand sendoff But you know this. This is I had these two competing instincts with Sharipova. What what do we know about her? She is fiercely. Driven fiercely competitive. She is and always has been. I think we can talk about this a bit later. The consummate professional and those are really dueling instincts when you're ranked three seventy three and not playing it anywhere near the level that you're accustomed to Part of you probably says I can fight through this. This is just more adversity. I can overcome. I'm better than this. I just need to work harder. I can get my body right. I can get my mind right. I can get back. I don't WanNa go out like this and another part of you says surely I can't have this indignity. I can't be losing round after round early. I'm not seated so I'm playing tough opponents. My Body's giving up on me so I think you had and they came from the same place but they're two very different ways to react to to the same core instinct and today she said enough is enough. I mean I think you're right that You know February is a strange month in tennis. And I guess you know we're we`re. There's no perfect way to retire from the sport and we see even within tennis players very differently. Some players go on this goodwill tour and some players like Caroline Wozniacki says look. I'm going to pinpoint this as my last event and go ahead and prepare your tribute reels. And I'm GonNa play this event knowing when I lose my last match. That's IT and Sharipova. We've seen other players. There's players do this as well. Sharapova pulled us out of the blue and it's it's a Wednesday and she's not at a tournament today And retired in her own way. So I don't know I mean the other. There are a number of questions that stem from this whole conversation and jump in any jump in anytime here. I mean I think the overall question when a player retires as we assess legacy I don't know particular bullet points. Jump out at you Jamie. I think I think highs and lows complicated legacy Of course is going to be attached to share over The the craziest thing I think if you look at the timing now she's ranked three hundred seventy three which says absolutely nothing about her career but to your point. I mean she was at the point now where she was trying to come back and she's nowhere even near the top one hundred You know not even winning any matches and it's it must be really hard for her honestly to you know given all that she's accomplished. I think we said thirty six. W titles obviously the five Grand Slams all these rivalries quote unquote particularly with Serena Williams which is also another interesting conversation to have but I think it was probably getting difficult for her to continue to be you know struggling and Her her legacy given you know the the MELDA NEOM and the ban will always thou always be part of her story? Yeah I think you're absolutely right and today should be happy day. Celebrate a five time major champion. I mean I was looking at her staff and I think we forget how good she was for for a variety of reasons. I think to the casual tennis fan. They were misled by two. One is the head to head with Serena that you reference. She beat Serena Breakthrough Center women. Final Two thousand four and then she loses whatever. The math twenty two is the derived. So lose eighteen nineteen matches to Serena Williams And I think that to the casual fan that we say rivalry. And then we sort of have to amend that to say with a lopsided rivalry which might be an oxymoron. The other thing about Sharipova that I and I wrote about this that I think is a great Sort of misleading bid about her is she had this regal disposition and she endorsed product after product. And it was very upscale. And it's Evian Cole Haan I remember you. I remember walking in New York and seeing her on three different billboards for three different upscale products. And there was this or of elegance. She was selling herself as much as she was a brand. She was selling sort of cosmopolitan posh elegance in yet. The tennis was. I was called her sort of tennis. Gym Rat I mean. It was not elegant tenants by any stretch and Jud admit to that and she was in her own way your own six foot one inch which she was a grinder and she was not what you call an athlete. He wasn't a graceful mover. She did not play graceful elegant tennis and I always thought that was really to her credit. That you'd see her on the back court and she'd be doing her footwork drills because she knew that was an area to improve and she would be working on her serve which always gave her fit in part because of the shoulder injury and she would grind out matches and she would win tough matches. She did not. This was not the female Roger Federer and I think tennis fans of course know that but I think casual fans see all of this aura of elegance and assume she played that way and that wasn't the case at all I mean the the screaming grunting grinding sweating. You'll brushing the hair that had managed to her forehead. That's the Maria Sharapova on the tennis court has an athlete And I think you know again I want to just this should be a day to give credit to someone who had a tremendous career and five majors. Yes but thirty six titles almost forty million dollars you got to number one. I mean this is really an a-list career and you know she had the misfortune of playing. At the same time Serena Williams and there was a lot that went into that relationship beyond the tennis. That probably did not work to Maria benefit but you take away. Cerita you take away. Venus Williams seven majors. Maybe Justine Henin. Maybe Kim Clijsters and I think it's very easy to make the case. Marisha published one of the top five players of the Post Steffi Graf of the last twenty five years and tennis so this is really a remarkable career. And yet as you mentioned if we're going to talk about her honestly. This wasn't the way it was supposed to end. Which is you know a a doping ban. I thought a very clumsy handling of the doping ban. I thought it was very out of character and off brand of her to have been so sloppy. Not just in the violation but then in the aftermath and how it was handled and some of the the the the press conference that we referenced and she was never the same player after that and you know co correlation is not causation and may simply have been that. She was a little sport and she was in early thirties and players get older. We see this on not just in tennis but in in sports in general I mean thirty two big number in in women's tennis but it was not supposed to end with a doping band and a ranking that drifted deep into triple figures so overall macro great career hall of fame player but there is a tinge I think of bittersweet. There is a little bit of disappointment. That This wasn't the way this hall of fame career was supposed to be a gift. Compare what we saw a month ago when Caroline wozniacki is out there on the court and our families there and she's toasted and all of the players are making tribute videos and were. She's crying but she's saying I'm not sad and she does. I mean I talked to her the following day. She was all gussied up because she clearly had been doing the spots around. There's definitely a difference of a decision on your terms and decision that was made based on your body and The time of your career. You know it's it's very different in comparing into. What was the Yankee especially given those? The Yankees recent title in Australia just seemed very full circle for her to do that. this again is random but also very expected. I think one of the things I always sort of liked about Sharipova was Her personality in in two ways. I think we talk. You talk about her on the court sweating grinding shrieking. I mean everyone. I think even if you're not a big tennis fan you know share Provo. Because maybe she made you mute the TV while you're watching a match and that's something that a lot of people will probably joke about but you know she worked hard in the court she was always like fierce and and you know a competitor for sure but she also you know. I remember processors and and interviews where she's actually has a very great personality and and you know quite opposite of that fierce competitor where she could be funny and she was actually Kinda Witty and and You know there was a a side to her personality. That was very likable. When most people on the court probably saw the opposite so overall she's a huge name. In this sport she's one of the handful that transcends just tennis you you mentioned her and she needs only one name There's only a handful of those type of athletes so I think She will definitely be missed. I think we're fair to

Tennis Maria Sharapova Serena Williams Caroline Wozniacki Cheyenne Serena Breakthrough Center Miami Serena California Venus Williams Evian Cole Haan Justine Henin Yankees Sharipova Kim Clijsters Roger Federer New York Steffi Graf JUD Australia
How does music influence your workout?

20 Minute Fitness

05:31 min | 2 years ago

How does music influence your workout?

"For many as we've known that music has impacted us in numerous different ways. It captures attention like in films when a jump scares approaching it can trigger a sense of or range of emotions building a sense of anticipation it can ultra regulate our mood. It can increase our work. Output it can even induce states higher functioning and much more. It's also been found to have an ogre. Genyk fact Menia can help increase exercise performance. It can delay fatigue and accounting crease. Power and strength. Caffeine is another ugly genyk substance that's been proven to be quite effective by many sports scientists. It's really difficult to understand what it is about music. That may be helping us to work out harder if it does this atoll. Ginette Bicknell in her article for psychology. Day writes that. It's hard to know whether it's the internal characteristics the music such as the tempo the rhythm and so on or fits the external features such as the personal or cultural associations that the musical scene carries the regardless of what it is about the music the overall impression given by this research is highly positive when music is used before athletic activity it has been shown to increase arousal to facilitate relevant imagery and to improve the performance of simple tasks. It can increase physical capacity improve. Your energy efficiency and influential moved on one such study which backs this up was called the effect of Music Tempo on exercise performance on heart rate among young adults. Now this study psalm. Twenty five young men and twenty five women. He will untrained in the sense they want experienced athletes on the study found that music helped to increase that total exercise duration. So why might music Viagra Genetic Whoa? Several studies found the music benefits. Performance by reducing perceived exertion for example study published in the social and applied psychology of music. Found that music distracts from pain and Jud during exercise for competing sensory stimuli. Because it's easy to forget about this pain. All the fatigue you're experiencing what assume you're listening to is distracting you however there's also a study. The effects of music on work rate distribution during cycling time trial on this study found the opposite to be true. They had sixteen physically. Active participants. Perform two ten K. Time trials on cycle Goma's to different conditions. One group played without without music on the other with trump's music playing out now the group listening to music don't average improvement of twenty two seconds to percents explained mostly by an increase in the first three K. Author Ten K. But interestingly enough ratings of perceived exertion will consistently higher for all the time trial where music was playing with the research saying cycle speeds and proceed exertion would both higher during the music trial suggesting that participants were working hard during the music trial but they were fully aware. They were doing so. What's more other studies found that the power of music has definite limits while music can hamper physiological feedback knows at moderate levels of intensity. It is markedly less effective. When you're performing exercise at higher intensity it does not reduce perceptions of exertion exercise pushing themselves beyond that anaerobic threshold point at which Latin cast begins. Trip accumulates in the bloodstream. One possible explanation is that a high levels of intensity the body's physical feedback dominate the nervous system so destruction by any means actually more difficult to achieve also music seems a great to lesser trained exercises. Those who have less experience when it comes to health and fitness and this could be because trained oboe competitive athletes tend to work higher levels of intensity so there is some conflicting evidence there on what is going on that makes music of genetic on will definitely be interesting to see this space developed and I think personal preference also comes into play in this so when I think about it I can actually understand what the study is saying. That more experienced athletes actually have few benefits from music when compared to untrained athletes. I have a good friend. That is a very solid medium to long distance runner who is consistently puts out sub one fifteen times for half marathon which is very good considering the the amount of training does he is stopped listening to music altogether to allow him to focus on his breathing and he's found. This has helped him increases times. Just a more comfortable pace for example walls quite often. We hear less experienced athlete. Say that they want to try and run to the beat of a fast paced track. For example. Are they believe it helps them? Pick up the pace and the two thousand and six thirty. On that's in less experienced runners. Whilst listening to fast paced music participants increase the pace and distance traveled when on a treadmill and there is some truth in this as well. But obviously as you progress that you might find it is just listen to the signs or your body is actually giving you regardless. I think all continue to keep listening to music from my workouts based on my personal preference now. I think it makes me before. Recent studies have also share that participants. Who listened to music that they deemed pleasing hot higher levels of Serotonin which is obviously the feel good hormone so when you're approaching your workout listening to a song you go into a feeling better. Psyching himself up on an overall good moves how I want to workout so again. Alessia personal

Pain Menia Ginette Bicknell Goma Caffeine Viagra Psyching Donald Trump JUD
The Rediscovery Of The Colorado Orange Apple

Environment: NPR

03:19 min | 2 years ago

The Rediscovery Of The Colorado Orange Apple

"As the decade comes to a close we can now report that in fact you can mix apples and oranges well kind of in the western. United States Apple. Well an thr- apologists are excited about the rediscovery of an apple variety that was believed to be extinct. It's called the Colorado Orange Apple Jud Shannon Meyer of the Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project in South Western Colorado. Helped track down the Orange Apple. We asked him what makes it so special so the Colorado oranges a mix of sweet and tart being a winter apple. The flavor opens up over time so winner apples like the Colorado orange. You wouldn't even think of starting to eat until Christmas. You'd go through all your summer apples all your fall apples. You'd have these in the root cellar. And then starting Christmas. You'd start to pull these out and month by month. The flavor would open up a little bit of the suite would go a little bit of the. Tang might but they were still going to be very flavorful. They have some of the most complex flavors of any apples. You'll ever have. They said culinary have some of the most complex flavors you'll ever have anything. The Colorado Orange was popular in the late eighteen hundreds but around the nineteen forties. It started to disappear the biggest thing it had going against. It was a yellowish wish. Orangish glow apple at a time when America was going into monoculture where shiny red apples were considered the only apples worth buying. It wasn't because it was bad quality or didn't grow. Well it lost out like so many of the thousands and thousands of apple varieties that have gone extinct. It lost out because it wasn't the Shiny Red Apple Shanta Shanta Myer says locals around Canyon City Colorado cherished the Orange Apple. They knew it was a really high quality apple winner Apple. Good Keeping Apple in in Canyon. City of the memory of it was kept alive for a long time in the old timers. Like Oh yeah. I used to have a tree at died but we kept thinking there was still going to be one around we. We felt like we could still find one and so he and his wife. ADDIE started combing the state two years ago. We were in Canyon City in this orchard in December. And this person Mr Diana said. Hey I've got a tree also and he took us to a tree my wife. Addie and I looked at it and Lo and behold on the ground underneath the tree and the duff there were. These orange blushed apples apples and then on the tree. There were some of the apple still hanging and it had that really good sub acid flavorful. Taste that you'd expect from a winner apple so yeah it was a it was a a big moment for us. But the Shannon Myers have been careful and taking their time. They did cutting edge. DNA testing and compared their find to some archival wax apple full replicas at Colorado State University. They wanted to make sure they'd found the actual orange apple of memory because it's considered extinct. There's probably never in absolute but we've got his close to an absolute as we can between this newest new DNA technology the historical purvey of the orchard itself in and the waxed apple to compare it to. That's an extraordinary amount of information that most people would never be able to have to compare anything and so in a couple of years once the a young trees get going. Keep Your Eyes Open in the produce section for something new and please restrain yourself from asking. Ju- Shanta Meyer about mixing apples apples and oranges. Yeah people when they hear of the Colorado Orange. They definitely wonder what we're talking about. That's for

Apple Colorado Orange Jud Shannon Meyer Colorado Colorado State University Montezuma Orchard Restoration Canyon City Colorado Addie United States Shanta Myer Canyon City Shannon Myers Tang Mr Diana LO America
Dr. Jud Brewer On Treating Addiction With Mindfulness

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Jud Brewer On Treating Addiction With Mindfulness

"On a very basic level we're probably all addicted to some degree or another and classically we used to think of addictions you know these substances like alcohol and cocaine and heroin and whatnot but really I think that's a little narrow view if we look at this eight in all these things that are failing propositions for the last fifty years the dominant paradigm has been willpower in that is proving to be more myth than muscle it's more legend than reality and that's exactly what I think we're seeing with meditation is if we get out of our own way are really work better and we can really start to totally get in sync with live and get into almost get into the flow of things that's one thing I like about mindfulness actresses it basically distills down to pay attention see what the results of your behavior are repeat

Cocaine Heroin Fifty Years
News in Brief 21 August 2019

UN News

03:04 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 21 August 2019

"This is the news and brief from the united nations the u._n. Announced on wednesday that it is being forced to close several humanitarian programs in yemen because money committed by member states has failed to materialize the announcement was made by lee's grundy. The u._n.'s humanitarian coordinator yemen who said did that when money doesn't come people die at a pledging event for yemen held in february two point six billion u._s. Dollars was promised to meet the urgent urgent needs of some twenty million yemenis to date less than half of that amount has been received all the thirty four major u._n. Humanitarian programs comes in yemen. Only three funded for the entire year several have closed in recent weeks and many large-scale projects designed to help destitute jud hungry families are on hold another twenty to life. Saving programs will close in the next two months unless funding is received the prospect of a fresh offensive in syria. The last opposition held stronghold in the country could unleash a new wave of human suffering offering u._n. Chief antonio guitarist declared on wednesday the secretary-general said in a statement that he is deeply troubled by the continuing escalation in northwest south-west syria which could impact up to three million civilians mister guitarist strongly condemned ongoing attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure including healthcare and educational facilities and urged all parties to respect international humanitarian law the heightened threat of conflicts in italy follows following the collapse of a truce between warring parties earlier this month and despite encouraging developments insecurity across somalia remains a serious serious concern. James swan head of the u._n. Mission in somalia or unsung warned the security council his first briefing to the world body since taking office. Mr swan the effectiveness of the collaboration between the u._n. And international partners and the somali security forces working with the african union mission in in somalia which has seen areas near the capital mogadishu taken back from tyrod group al shabaab and stabilized however he noted that terrorism remains a threat to progress citing the deadly al shabaab attack on the offices of the mayor of mogadishu in july which killed and injured several government officials does mr swan also reiterated that the u._n. Is resolved to helping somalia overcome the security economic and humanitarian challenges. It's facing building sustainable peace and stability in a country that has suffered the trauma and shocks. That's amalia has experienced over. Many decades will take perseverance and patients with the continued support of this council and the wider international community on psalm remains committed to assisting somalis on their journey towards a peaceful and prosperous future conillon u._n. News.

Yemen Somalia Syria Mr Swan Mogadishu James Swan United Nations JUD Amalia LEE Shabaab Coordinator African Union Chief Antonio U._N. Secretary-General Italy Two Months
Theresa May wants U.K. Parliament to vote again on Brexit deal in early June

WBZ Morning News

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Theresa May wants U.K. Parliament to vote again on Brexit deal in early June

"Britain's prime minister will try once again to push Brexit deal through parliament, Theresa May's three previous attempts all failed miserably. And despite the fact that most of the politicians and our own party wanted to resign. She'll roll the parliamentary dice one last time. Her brands that secretary Steven Barkley made clear that we all bring withdrawal agree. Bill the week commencing the threat of Jud, and it is no time for Paul to make decision, but it's far from clear how the government plans to persuade majority of lawmakers to back Mays e you divorced terms since few legislators seem prepared to change their

Theresa May Steven Barkley Prime Minister JUD Secretary Mays Britain Brexit Paul
"jud" Discussed on Z104

Z104

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"jud" Discussed on Z104

"Is going to be in the party. This is the conversation took place. From college I chosen, and I was reading for the name, and I got one and she was like. Oh, thanks. Oh why? And she goes, I would just be careful not everyone thinks the same friend behind your back as they already your. Meaning what exactly that's what I want ask? Like, she was like nothing. I just. About people and you're one of them. No, not true. We're really close. And she just went, okay. Maybe I heard wrong, then but. Whatever. Okay. So which friend is supposedly the one who talks all this crap about you behind your back college friend her name is. All right. So the girl's name is. Now, we think that either one of two things you brought up a really good point Jordan, which is that sometimes bridesmaids talk crap about the other bridesmaids because they don't want to spend the whole weekend with them. And they can't stand that person's they talk to the person thinking the bride will go, oh, maybe I should uninvited or whatever so comporting to this other friend this faira girl talks crap about Caitlin behind your back. And if that were the case if you were getting married. Would you want that Girling and your wedding party knowing that she taught crab budget behind your back? Probably not no. Make it pretty exciting. I guess the way would be quite interesting. There was a fight or something. Yeah. Drinks stress. So what we're gonna do is we're going to call faira fear is one of the friends from college Jordan is gonna pretend to be Monica. What are the friends from home? They never they never met Monica and and fair have never been. So she won't know your voice. Try to be as negative about the wedding as you can and see if she jumps in ads on okay, this'll be a really good testament sprint because for you. Jud up actually, wouldn't I promise no pressure pressure. Ashley would..

Monica Jordan Girling Jud Caitlin Ashley
Making Ballet Accessible to Youngsters

Inside Europe

03:37 min | 3 years ago

Making Ballet Accessible to Youngsters

"Usually doesn't take much persuasion to get children to go and see a film at the cinema can be quite a different situation though for other art forms like setting quietly for a ballet performance. Now, a British ballet company has come up with an idea they hope will introduce a new young audience to classical dance, and perhaps their parents as well lauch provider has this report from Manchester in the UK. And popcorn cornet. At one of those massive multi screen cinema complexes where you can pick and choose from a dizzying array of made for popcorn blockbusters as a group of children aged around four to six eagerly waiting to get into one of the screens. But then not here to watch the latest Pixar animation who Mary Poppins watching. That sitting comfortably in the cinema. My name is an neater and before you'll get to watch the wonderful. I thought it might be nice. If a toll to a little story. This is the story of the toys and the hat performed by world-class stances from the lead spaced northern ballet company. Most children will already be familiar with the story and with the use of bright colors phone costumes, and some animation the dances on the silver screen have this audience transfixed. So you take a step with that leg and cross over this lack? Stat another step and three bulbs of the head. Hi, my name's government cake. I am tortoise and a massive Cain apply. -able shell on my back that allows me to move and I've been how on 'em. So basically the cinema screenings 'em at the beginning of them. We are going to teach the kids some of the dance moves. So that Juding m the the performance they can kinda get up and have allow dance along with us. Just great to see cads engage in with the arts and that way. Government cage on his fellow dances. Already been toying with three different live Bally's, especially adopted four children. But now the ballet company hopes to reach a far bigger audience with these filmed versions with the help of event cinema distributor sin ovens. They'll host over two hundred screenings across the UK this winter and spring David Nixon is the northern Ballet's artistic director. Once you put something into a cinema. You have possibility to to really reach out and go further, it's an experiment. I mean, we haven't done it before we're hoping people engage with it. And that they see it as an add on to theater experiences. Not instead of after they've seen something like this in the cinema. Is it also your hope that they might then feel it's time to approach theater to have already done. So you always trying to get people to the theatre. It's about new people and is about this. Kind of unconscious bias that. Some people have that they can't go to theater, I some people feel that when you enter into that elitist thing I'm not of the right class to go to the and so hopefully in that different environment. If people see well, actually, I'm quite enjoying this performs. Maybe I'll go see a live performance. Now that would really be the icing on the

UK Manchester Mary Poppins Pixar David Nixon Cain Director Bally
Wall Street extends rally, tech leads S&P, Nasdaq to record highs

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:34 sec | 4 years ago

Wall Street extends rally, tech leads S&P, Nasdaq to record highs

"I'm Charlie Pellett remove into, the final hour of trading in these two headlines to pass. On to you from the Bloomberg professional service President Trump says the Canada trade, talks are going well he goes on to say. The Canada wants to be a part of the trade accord. Stay with Bloomberg for the latest on those trade talks stocks higher the Dow the s&p NASDAQ all advancing SNP up fifteen again. Now, of five tenths of one percent add twenty, nine twelve that is a record with the SNP above twenty nine hundred. NASDAQ also advancing to a record up seventy two to eighty one oh to

Bloomberg Charlie Pellett Donald Trump Canada Vinny Del Giudice President Trump Charlie Pelletan Dick Texas America Assault Carol Massar Spence Laura JUD Jason Kelly Bank