35 Burst results for "JPL"

"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

05:05 min | Last week

"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Any same thing so I get on it and he's like you won't miss all the stuff you said Michael like you all Miss semi-colon. Then I'm still co-developing ally in Java and Python to. Beginning and I'm going back and forth and I'm just like, Oh my God, it's so it is so bloated I can't stand this anymore like Oh this waste for stupid curly braces and this is just a waste and then also one thing that python does is it almost makes you think more executive like in a way I think about that it's bullets. The reason that tabs there is it's like bullets it's indent this it organizes your thoughts in just a more natural way whereas the structure in Java and other more verbose languages is imposed through like you having to sort. Of. renumerated. But this is a life I mean over the years what we have in an ID now didn't exist before and actually the way I learned to program and maybe you and I still think a valuable skill as I still go into the I instrument the code I don't even use the buggers because they really sucked back in the day when I learned I mean maybe was there and other things but the weren't that great and so I still guess what people instrumentation in any language and printing stuff out and values of your variables works independent of any debugging. People look me nowadays to, and they're just like, oh God he's still do again and it works that wanted to be hyper efficient. So some of these basic constructs but again, like the tooling, the ID's and all of that eventually supplanted I think python is a natural evolution of language. Everyone tells me Julia the next thing actually my p. l. people at j.p programming language walks who are just amazing. Sometimes people award I got Julia Julia Julia. Is Great. It came out of the dirtbags data program. I was a part of that I know all the people that MIT that made it and tastic it's growing it is now python python has now become it's not just scientific. Cool. It's enterprise and python is I really think it's the plan to Java. In many ways and Julia, maybe the next thing but by then I don't plan to be programming Dari. Maybe sitting on a beach somewhere. That's the goal or effect. All right to other things I wanNA, talk about we'll get a on time here but just really quickly tell us about a couple years ago. I read this book called the Panama Papers and it was rocking the world. There's so many people who had been doing shady things through offshore companies and whatnot, and there was a guest someone on the inside that dumped gigs and gigs of data that exposed a bunch of folks. I, don't remember the details well enough to go into. It was a big deal and some of your projects were involved in sort of the discovery of that right else about the yes. To the key was. Tika and that was a really interesting time. We were right in the middle of the Darpa Mex- program, which was to build the next generation of search by that I was mostly exclusively in technology development. It was pre-. It I had moved into it yet and I was finishing out my career really in engineering and science and leading a team of real rockstars. The Best of the world, some of them who are building and have built Siri outed apple in their future things right now some of them. Who have been bought by apple for huge company values, talent buys people really they just went in and changed the world in search every I worked with Darpa programs, which is why love Darpa so much in NASA Darpa work. Well, together, I look around the room and I'm like Oh God I, just fan boy geek out on all the people that are there I worked on Darpa project as well and at the same feeling. Yeah that's so awesome and so we should talk about that line. But so yeah. So I'm sitting there on x and Mex- my big goal was to build out Tika to evolved ticket for the next generation not like all AI. Today although we're in the process of really a and Tika and it's construct. But it was like the first step into ai beyond just statistical information retrieval, which like teak. So what does he gets the digital Babel fish the way I describe it as teak is just like fish from the hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy, you put it to your ear. You could understand any language FICA, you give it any type of file format, any type of file that exists on the Internet that we know a fourteen hundred plus file types more peca. Will extract out the text extract out Meta data from the file, and it'll tell you information about the language of the file, which is basically everything you need to do something with the data in the file and it incorporates all of the major third party parsing libraries that are free and open source to get that information out and uses all the standard data models and this and that, and so what we were doing during Max is we were evolving Tika to. Support. The Non Standard Types of content you know the easy taxed and the other things. But when you get an image instead of just getting meditated out, get out who's in there do object recognition and tell me the people, places, things, dates, times, and other things that are in those images, videos and multimedia formats that was the goal of medics, and so we were significantly building out teak at the time there so much action going on the open source community well. We had this guy. Matthew Korenaga's Anglia up and Mike. Oh who's this guy he had built not we had a bunch of people building teacup interfaces into other programming languages and so he did that he contribute it and we start talking to him starts asking us these questions telling us he's part of the I C I for Jay or international consortium of Journalists Cool we start looking it up and then boom Panama papers drops and we're like holy S H use..

Julia Julia Julia Tika Darpa NASA Darpa executive Michael apple Panama Papers boom Panama Matthew Korenaga Jay Anglia Siri Mike Max
"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:27 min | Last week

"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Angles especially around some of the remote stuff. . A lot of things you guys do work with like Rovers. . You talked about spirit just to have a conversation with those things is like we complain about late and senior website was slow or I was playing this game and it was hard because there was. . Two hundred milliseconds of latency. . There's different kinds of latency out in space. . Right? ? Wouldn't the speed light is not enough. . So he can some of the smart and putting it on rovers and other stuff. . Some of this ai work that you're doing. . It sounds like it might have some <hes> lakes Ai I. . Hope. . So and we think it does too. . So Michael, , basically the work that. . We're doing for your listeners. . We have a project that we've been investigating now. . So let's fast forward the clock rovers nowadays the last one that landed on the planet. . I won't say that we shipped because we just shipped one, , which we'll talk about called does a couple of weeks. . The right we did pandemic shipping and launching of rockets, , Rovers, , new fad but yes, , for pre. . That pre pandemic in two thousand, twelve, , , we ship the the Mars Science Laboratory or the Curiosity Rover, , and that one is about. . So spirited opportunity just the size them ver- you know your listeners it's about the size if you have kids of one of those cars that you push maybe or something like that or maybe like a power wheel big wheel type of thing that size. . Of Spirit and opportunity the MSL rover is about the size of a small car like Volkswagen bug and if you came to jpl and it was open to have these some day and things like that, , you could walk into our building agency a full scale model of to really get the feel of it but that's the size rover over that we're talking about now that's. . Sort of the modern class at them and so twenty, , twenty s the perseverance, , the launched it's the same size. . So we've got MSL still operating spirit and opportunity arts anymore because they were solar-powered MSL is powered basically by nuclear fission uses an rtd power source and things like that. . So it doesn't have to worry about solar panels so it can go for quite a while and. . Has Been. . So it's a great test basically as long as it mechanically is still functioning right? ? Absolutely and so challenges with mechanical functioning are like, , Hey, , we learned a lot about the wheels for a car sized thing as we drove over walks in it toward the wheels up, , you know and things, , and so we did we learned a lot about them if you look at one. Quick . Update and twenty twenty as the wheels have little homer simpson speed holes are not speed old but holes to prevent having just track and tread that dies catching on everything and that's just one thing we learned amongst other things. . We've got smart engineers JPL. . MSL's agree platform to test stuff out on. . However let's talk about AIML L. I'm going to dispel some missing rumor so. . MSL and space assets and others they all need right we gotta do computing we need a processor and A. . And things like that they are running off of an old the what is that the latest? ? GP probably like a Invidia like twenty eighty something like that. . Yeah. . Everybody thinks that and I know you're being facetious and I liked the snark it's awesome. . But yes, no, , , and that's the challenge. . Everybody thinks that and it's not it's running off of a rats fifty, , which is a be a h that's as bad as powerful as a POWERPC chip and process or in so and why real quick y right when we crash something in the government, , we've got a congressional inquiry that we have to respond to. . This virtual companies do it and we love the commercial companies where partner with them. . Now, , they don't right they I mean not to say that it doesn't ruin their value stream or their reputation or things like that. . But they've got a little bit more flexibility to do testing and stuff like that than we do and so we are risk averse by profile definition, and , so because of that, , we were only use things that are what we. . Call radiation hardened, , which means that when it gets up there in space, , a space does and cosmic radiation do weird things to your hardware they flip the bids amongst that's the easy stuff they do. . They do a lot of other nasty stuff and so you gotta make sure that the hardware works in space and so because of that the technology, , the Gartner life cycle for what we could use for that is real behind and so this big. . Smart this big. . Potentially smart you know and it is smart. . They did great things on MSL and they're going to do even greater on twenty twenty is writing off of an old processor. . So the I is human in the loop even more. . So coupled with the fact that you alluded to, , Hey, , you know bandwidth latency you think that's an issue the lifetime from Earth to Mars eight minutes round trip. . So anything you send to Mars you, , gotTa. . Weigh eight minutes to figure out what the heck happened or even what happened for your report back. . Then you know that's not it doesn't all have to be synchronised. . They're asynchronous ways. . There are ways to kind of achieved some advantages and key things up, , but it's still it's eight minutes basically, , and so because of that, , there's a video on youtube by the way for your listeners. . If you haven't seen it, , it's called the seven minutes of terror. . Closer to eight. . Yeah. . Yeah. . That's a great one. . Yeah. . Yeah. . That's for the entry descent and landing. When . they landed MSL curiosity, , they had to use a big sky crane instead of the typical big balloon rap the rover to balloon it let it balance which was the way they did it before it was so big they had to have this elaborate sky crane thing and in that seven minutes when you go into entry descent and landing there seven minutes before you knew, , Hey, , what the heck happened and all this stuff had to happen autonomously and things like that, , which is great. . But yeah, , normally eight minutes and so if I told you today that the Mars surface operations people use about two. . Hundred images a day that are taken from the rover from its NAVC cans, , which are camps by the wheels, and , it's Mass Cam, , which is the big head that take selfies and other things that you see what it's arm. . If I told you that today, , they only use two hundred images to plan what to do for rover operations. The . next day you'd understand why we're bandwidth limited or Ltd what we can process on the reverse sucking them down to the ground and making decisions. . What if I told you tomorrow? ? We'll get close to that nvidia chip maybe not exactly but there's efforts called high-performance space like computing to build a multi-core. . GP. . Like chip that is radiation hardened. . It's a big government project. . That has an emulator already that they're making and that we also today have Mars helicopter I'm perseverance, , which is a little drone that went along with it that if successful is running a qualcomm snapdragon, , which is gp like chip and why are we not fully radiation hardened and all this? ? It does we've tested in whatever but it's not like has the years and years of testing. . Why are we doing that? ? Because it's a technology demonstration and we have a bigger like the mission is still successful even if Mars Halley you know is not successful with that what you call ingenuity right and I. . Suspect that the risk to a little drone helicopter thing

USC La football JPL Chris opio professor Michael US Santa Clarita Dr Neil Med Vitovich Jay Bilas EPA jbl hp Doug cutting T. C. H. Carbon Observatory
Python at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Talk Python To Me

06:27 min | Last week

Python at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

"Angles especially around some of the remote stuff. A lot of things you guys do work with like Rovers. You talked about spirit just to have a conversation with those things is like we complain about late and senior website was slow or I was playing this game and it was hard because there was. Two hundred milliseconds of latency. There's different kinds of latency out in space. Right? Wouldn't the speed light is not enough. So he can some of the smart and putting it on rovers and other stuff. Some of this ai work that you're doing. It sounds like it might have some lakes Ai I. Hope. So and we think it does too. So Michael, basically the work that. We're doing for your listeners. We have a project that we've been investigating now. So let's fast forward the clock rovers nowadays the last one that landed on the planet. I won't say that we shipped because we just shipped one, which we'll talk about called does a couple of weeks. The right we did pandemic shipping and launching of rockets, Rovers, new fad but yes, for pre. That pre pandemic in two thousand, twelve, we ship the the Mars Science Laboratory or the Curiosity Rover, and that one is about. So spirited opportunity just the size them ver- you know your listeners it's about the size if you have kids of one of those cars that you push maybe or something like that or maybe like a power wheel big wheel type of thing that size. Of Spirit and opportunity the MSL rover is about the size of a small car like Volkswagen bug and if you came to jpl and it was open to have these some day and things like that, you could walk into our building agency a full scale model of to really get the feel of it but that's the size rover over that we're talking about now that's. Sort of the modern class at them and so twenty, twenty s the perseverance, the launched it's the same size. So we've got MSL still operating spirit and opportunity arts anymore because they were solar-powered MSL is powered basically by nuclear fission uses an rtd power source and things like that. So it doesn't have to worry about solar panels so it can go for quite a while and. Has Been. So it's a great test basically as long as it mechanically is still functioning right? Absolutely and so challenges with mechanical functioning are like, Hey, we learned a lot about the wheels for a car sized thing as we drove over walks in it toward the wheels up, you know and things, and so we did we learned a lot about them if you look at one. Quick Update and twenty twenty as the wheels have little homer simpson speed holes are not speed old but holes to prevent having just track and tread that dies catching on everything and that's just one thing we learned amongst other things. We've got smart engineers JPL. MSL's agree platform to test stuff out on. However let's talk about AIML L. I'm going to dispel some missing rumor so. MSL and space assets and others they all need right we gotta do computing we need a processor and A. And things like that they are running off of an old the what is that the latest? GP probably like a Invidia like twenty eighty something like that. Yeah. Everybody thinks that and I know you're being facetious and I liked the snark it's awesome. But yes, no, and that's the challenge. Everybody thinks that and it's not it's running off of a rats fifty, which is a be a h that's as bad as powerful as a POWERPC chip and process or in so and why real quick y right when we crash something in the government, we've got a congressional inquiry that we have to respond to. This virtual companies do it and we love the commercial companies where partner with them. Now, they don't right they I mean not to say that it doesn't ruin their value stream or their reputation or things like that. But they've got a little bit more flexibility to do testing and stuff like that than we do and so we are risk averse by profile definition, and so because of that, we were only use things that are what we. Call radiation hardened, which means that when it gets up there in space, a space does and cosmic radiation do weird things to your hardware they flip the bids amongst that's the easy stuff they do. They do a lot of other nasty stuff and so you gotta make sure that the hardware works in space and so because of that the technology, the Gartner life cycle for what we could use for that is real behind and so this big. Smart this big. Potentially smart you know and it is smart. They did great things on MSL and they're going to do even greater on twenty twenty is writing off of an old processor. So the I is human in the loop even more. So coupled with the fact that you alluded to, Hey, you know bandwidth latency you think that's an issue the lifetime from Earth to Mars eight minutes round trip. So anything you send to Mars you, gotTa. Weigh eight minutes to figure out what the heck happened or even what happened for your report back. Then you know that's not it doesn't all have to be synchronised. They're asynchronous ways. There are ways to kind of achieved some advantages and key things up, but it's still it's eight minutes basically, and so because of that, there's a video on youtube by the way for your listeners. If you haven't seen it, it's called the seven minutes of terror. Closer to eight. Yeah. Yeah. That's a great one. Yeah. Yeah. That's for the entry descent and landing. When they landed MSL curiosity, they had to use a big sky crane instead of the typical big balloon rap the rover to balloon it let it balance which was the way they did it before it was so big they had to have this elaborate sky crane thing and in that seven minutes when you go into entry descent and landing there seven minutes before you knew, Hey, what the heck happened and all this stuff had to happen autonomously and things like that, which is great. But yeah, normally eight minutes and so if I told you today that the Mars surface operations people use about two. Hundred images a day that are taken from the rover from its NAVC cans, which are camps by the wheels, and it's Mass Cam, which is the big head that take selfies and other things that you see what it's arm. If I told you that today, they only use two hundred images to plan what to do for rover operations. The next day you'd understand why we're bandwidth limited or Ltd what we can process on the reverse sucking them down to the ground and making decisions. What if I told you tomorrow? We'll get close to that nvidia chip maybe not exactly but there's efforts called high-performance space like computing to build a multi-core. GP. Like chip that is radiation hardened. It's a big government project. That has an emulator already that they're making and that we also today have Mars helicopter I'm perseverance, which is a little drone that went along with it that if successful is running a qualcomm snapdragon, which is gp like chip and why are we not fully radiation hardened and all this? It does we've tested in whatever but it's not like has the years and years of testing. Why are we doing that? Because it's a technology demonstration and we have a bigger like the mission is still successful even if Mars Halley you know is not successful with that what you call ingenuity right and I. Suspect that the risk to a little drone helicopter thing

Rovers JPL Nvidia Qualcomm Twenty Twenty Michael Gartner Volkswagen Partner
"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:43 min | Last week

"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"He pulled a couple of other people that he was working within and is like Oh God. The floodgates are open weakened develop again, and then I just let them take the idol. I haven't done anything in years but the projects alive today because of that, and so you've gotTa capture absolutely is scarce resource like you said, motivate what was that Rsa at. Video about like purpose motivation that's such a great way to capture it to the same thing. So absolutely so these days you're over JPL and you have some really interesting things going on there your the first principle office in the area of data science. What's the story there to JPL has this thing called the principal designation, which basically are somebody that's normally been there like fifty years when so I'm joking no one killed me for that police, but it's been there for a long time and usually our principles are in we've got the founder of Hyper Spectral Their Guy Rob Green, argues the founder of the field of hyper spectral science. We've got people who explore the guy who used to be the project scientists for the square kilometer array huge billion dollar international project of ground-based sensing, looking at the cosmos an answering the tough question that has so much interesting stuff in terms of how much dated has had some of the folks on from a strategy on their talk about that it's kind of like you can't put in hard drives it so much data. Type of problem. So Yeah Oh God seven hundred terabytes per second to in the twenty ten to twenty fifteen timeframe. That's two, thousand, sixteen even that's all anyone ever wanted to hear from me is that I had some referal involvement in that and they're like talk about that you know a but we've got the guy that was the project scientist founder of that JPL. Those are our principles usually and so yeah. So in twenty fourteen, they gave me that title because they realized that in data science allow lot of the stuff data science was becoming something that basically we were developing a maturity, a skill set and capability and JPL actually needed to go triple down. And quadruple down on that and so what it means is that all the experiences they have I talked to people like your podcast Michael and others I sit there and talk I needed to talk and evangelize to that JPL and so that was the recognition I was an individual contributor still then I basically just would tell people here's all the stuff with data scientists it science it's math. It's around that time I wrote a paper in nature called division data science to and and you know people like me don't normally get paper in papers in nature. Yeah. That was a big deal and basically I was thinking a lot about data science and how you'll like. This I had this dichotomy in education. At the time I'm a computer science software engineering person who after about a decade at JPL learned hyper SPEC mud sensing why western US water matters cared about the cosmos s k. and I haven't thought at times about getting masters, degrees but kids kids, mortgages and other things. Other interests gotten away, which is important. But I was sitting there thinking how many of me Jpl make it to me high being there for ten years and any software engineer that we hire five years at JPL before they learn the lingo and it's really hard unless they only live in it or what we're seeing at the time was an emergence of. Atmospheric scientists or PhD Computational Biologist or whatever who learn python believe it or not could write code understood what logistic regression was whatever, and we had this emerging class of them. As data scientists they wanted to share their code they wanted to they want to work with the software engineers as opposed to really in this is going to sound ages away, but it really isn't but as opposed to sort of the generation before who didn't want to share their data. They wanted nine month publication moratoriums to them. They wanted to file a patent instead of making open source code and things like that, and they're still the evolution of those folks into the new. Generation today but I was looking at that sort of alcohol supply chain in the education community for data science and I was asking myself what's better? Is it the python person highly skilled in deep discipline domain that their software engineering code isn't that great? But if we pair them with a Master's PhD level software engineer, they clean that up and then over time they'll learn it like you said, everyone starts out with python but doesn't mean anyone's going to contribute to their code you know, and so I was actually seeing more on the atmosphere science side of people and Python. Now, being more useful in data science, and so that's really one of the questions. I was asking that nature paper and one of the things that I still don't have an answer today but we've seen different I'd say momentum's and it's not just a jpl in how we source the talent and the same is true today with a a agendas and things like that. Well, I think one of the really interesting questions is, do we need more software developers or do we need more experts with software development capabilities? Right? You hear the politicians and policymakers go on and on like we need to teach coating because we have all these coating skill gaps and whatnot and I think often at that level, it Kinda gets portrayed as to what? We need is more computer science graduates. Right. But my theory is what we need is amazing biologists, physicists, doctors, lawyers who can take whatever they do in really amplify it with a little bit code and I think that's why Python is. So powerful is hyphen is one of these special languages where you can be affected with a very partial understanding of even what it is or what it does. You don't even know what how to create a function and you could be useful in python under percent under percent. Agree that was the conclusion of my nature vapor at the time and I'm trying to be diplomatic but let me say something controversial maybe degenerate cliques. Yeah. I completely agree with you and it's heresy in my community where I originally come from but I don't read transactions on engineering anymore I'm sorry I don't only stay in the software engineering community and computer science, and so for me I've I've noticed the same my direct experience in both building big suffer projects for big big national and international things and sourcing over hundreds of people at JPL and in consulting roles and other things I've come to the same conclusion. I completely. Agree with you. Yeah and that's not the discount computer science degrees I think it's A real important role for goods offer developers with all the practices in place there but I don't think we need and times of those I think the value it'd be better if we brought everyone or into that camp rather than growing at in that isolated camp though, yeah totally, and you can relate it back to the twitter Hashtag campaign the learn to code and why it generated so. Many I think hate on both sides of the political out with that you know when the challenges with that you know we're GonNa let's talk about this. We're going to have a big there's GonNa be a skill gap and people ask me about this all the time related to ethics and other things. So as for your listeners after all the software development in job and big data and whatever..

JPL software engineer founder twitter PhD Computational Biologist US Michael project scientist Rob Green principal
"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:21 min | Last week

"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"The time wanted us to do our final projects in notch and so mine was a really simple syndication or RSS. And by the way for your listeners, I'm going to get to the python part. I. Just have to tell you that. So you can make fun of me because I started out in big big hardcore, Java. So I got into notch. I built the RSS Sparser for feeds for news feeds. That was my final project in my search engines class during my PhD and I contributed too much. And I got involved in Apache. The Apache Software Foundation were had just moved to and I started talking to Doug and all the other developers and I became friends with them and I became a niche committer. The funny part was my academic cousin at UC Irvine because it's all in the academia, there's like who's your advisor? He's like Dad, who's your advisors by your GRANDPA cousins and uncles? On the academic side, one of my cousins was Justin EHRENKRANZ was the president of the Patchy and my academic uncle was roy fielding who was the founder of Apache and so I had this sort of Apache connection without even as well as rest the whole idea, the rest architecture yet Royce famous for that. So you see Irvine during the mid nineties, which was like the decade before i. was doing it was like the place to do software in a big software gooey and multi architecture development and architecture and stuff like that dictator ran the group and anyway Seattle eat a bunch of all stars. He had the guy who invented Argo Yo Mel, the guy who invented web down the Guyland arrest the guy who did the component connector architecture stars. So those are my ancestors academically so I'm doing search engines and whatever I've got this connection anyways to justice Roy who are telling me get involved in open source and unlike cool. Okay. I could do that. Let's and so I started contributing to notch and not eventually became do yeah and so then you became spark and so I'm in the system I'm playing contributing I got into search engines that was really became passion because I was I was building. These big data systems that JPL for mission science I was like we need to use this Java stuff and all this ecosystem, and we need to scale and do all that. So the fighting was here's the python long winded answer you asked me how did I get into python in about two thousand nine after I had led teams done this myself built three mission ground systems on John we proved all the naysayers wrong. Can't do it. You know got to be sleepless blessed. We did a ground system on Java. got. Tired of Java. And I was getting shoved down my throat then and that was like everybody has at some level in their career one or two or three eras of their career and my second era beyond early programming was really Java, and so then my third era was python I mean by started to get involved I went away from missions. I got involved in technology development and I started going to government technology development and the early two, thousand, ten to twelve. During the Obama Administration. There was the big data initiative and they. Funded a bunch of programs, hundred million dollar investments and things in big data and I was toe in some of these programs standing alongside them with people like Peter, Wang Travis Olifants, and I started to learn in fact I, even funded them during a program called Darpa Mex-, to grow what became what was continuing Olympics at the time a smaller company out of thought what became now Anaconda, and so I started talking to and then Peter Sitting, there telling me Oh Chris Screwed, Java. Yeah. Java. Guy Sitting amongst all the. I can just hear I hear Peter say in that as well. Yeah. What are you doing? You're messing around her. Peters tell me he's telling me about bouquet and he's like, Oh, you know number and all this, and I was like you guys got you got your own foundation numb focus Andy Farrell and I became friends and easy to come talk at Apache Kahn, which was great. They never invited me to pie data or anything I. Did them. But yeah. So I got involved in that and so I said I can do this. Walmart. Time go deep and learn, and so really probably circa twenty thirteen. The big thing for me was I created Tico we'll talk about that later but that was my big thing in Java besides hit all this and so in two thousand, thirteen, twenty, fourteen reported that the python and I did that with a guy named Brian Wilson at Jpl and that was my I can go deep in do python and deliver something of value to the python community, and so the around them, that's how I got involved in Python and that's how I'm there now to do machine learning and other stuff. anyways, I don't want to dominate but yes, that's of the answer. Well, two things first to get a call from jpl out of the blue in your Undergrad or a master's degree program say, Hey, why are you just drop in and just do some work on like cutting edge space just down the street like that is incredible ride to get such an. Opportunity and I I think that's really neat. It's a big time, Opportunity Michael, and for me the thing I like to tell me but I've learned a lot of JPL twenty years there. A lot of people will give me a God, you've been here for twenty years. I said Yeah I'm just sort of entering mid career twenty years jpl JPL's made career i. Want. To run a mission you've got like, that's a twenty year commitment fifteen year commitments of dimes out dude you're. Right and so you can see JPL I, tell people this. You can see the people that are going to be there for five years, and you can see some of the people that are going to be there, and by the way we like those five people to will get whatever we can. We can talk about that later out of whoever you know our mission is space and hit me in two, thousand, three, two, thousand, four the big thing was the spirit and opportunity twin rovers. The first three or four years of JPL. It's awesome and you're just like, but you're young and you don't know in pre sheet space and everything else and so I was like, oh? Yeah. Maybe I'll go work at startup. Yeah. After this and it hit me in the Mer over Mars exploration rover Spirit and opportunity and they send them and they land and I saw the landing I stayed up at night I watch nasty was just my wife and I at the time in our new house, we bought our first house and I had Bought my first fifty, five inch TV that if you compared to the TV's the thin ones now it was like as big as my living room and I'm like, yeah, we're as own cooling unit, its own cooling in it. Oh. Yeah and so he's sitting there watching it and then Arnold Schwarzenegger comes out east the Governor of California and he shaken hands with my friends some of my friends who I worked with on some of the Senate on Mike I'm like I know this is amazing and and everybody, and then it's like the JPL. You know when we land and stuff like that and so the yeah that that's when I was like, Oh, I worked there. That's awesome. Yeah, and I knew I was going to stay there you know. Yeah Really Cool. This portion of talk python to me is brought to you by Leonod whether you're working on a personal project or managing your enterprises. infrastructure..

JPL Peter Sitting roy fielding Apache Software Foundation Guy Sitting Irvine advisor first house UC Irvine Arnold Schwarzenegger Seattle Guyland Apache Kahn Justin EHRENKRANZ Obama Administration
A Guided Tour of Mars

Innovation Now

01:03 min | Last month

A Guided Tour of Mars

"Leveraging virtual reality and augmented reality technologies. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in collaboration with Google has released access Mars a free immersive experience that allows the user to take a guided tour of Mars by following the path of the curiosity rover users can. View the actual dunes and valleys explored by the space craft. As they wander through the lonely red desert, the user can zero in on objects of scientific interest including rock outcrops and mud cracks. A JPL scientist narrates the walk explaining the geologic evidence curiosity has unearthed. The web walk is available for use on all desktop and mobile devices or any VR ar headset and will be periodically updated to reflect curiosities ongoing mission. Previously, these technologies were used to take NASA scientists tomorrow's. But with access Mars anyone in the world can ride a law.

Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Google Scientist
Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

Esportz Network Podcast

05:31 min | 2 months ago

Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

"While the podcast. So we're going to be breaking down this deal for both perspectives. It see how the cookie crumbles really what it comes down to how these deals habit. You see all the headlights you see the products being worn by the players Orga dive into really the steps that lead up to the creation of a brand deal like this one. So starting out from the early stages which side reach out I was JBL. Making the step over to one hundred thieves or one hundred thieves reaching out to jbl. Do you guys remember? I'm pretty sure we were the ones that initiated the contact. Through an agency that we're working with at the time to help us to grab craft our approach to to exports into gaming in general. So I i. think we were the first ones to to to. To Extend the hand. Absolutely, Jacob, do you remember when those conversations started and the energy was like a as you reached out? This is a space that's really filled with a lot of partners jbl. Here's a legacy audio brad reaching out to you remember what those early conversations through like. Yeah. A excitement is always Key in figuring out these partnerships and really looking at all brandon and who reposition ourselves with. We need partnerships that we that we truly get behind an ice either about So with JBL obviously premium quality products something we feel like we represented in displays of east bolts. So while I, can't remember the. The. Stop Time. All who initiates I remember you know sort of the. The sense of feeling in the room once we came over the initial hurdle of introductions and you know that was one of excitement. Absolutely. I can only imagine the seems like a trend that's happened this year of these really log running brands enter eastward seeing that with Herman. Miller. For example, in the complexity partnership, you've got a brand that well out dates video games, much less e sports getting into the space promising. Hey, we've got this great product that's been used by all these other industries, and now we want to be involved in East Sports Michael From your perspective. Why was J B L A natural fit for East? Sports. So I I think to to answer that it was. We were looking at this more as a great fit for gaming and where we think gaming is is going in the future if you take a look at how the graphics within the game have evolved over the last fifteen or twenty years like. It has grown in leaps and bounds, and so the realism that's now. Prevalent in President Gains. Really helps to create the super immersive experience for Gamers and we felt like sound was a piece that was that was lagging in that equation. And so our whole idea was we want the gamers actually be able to hear the game in the same way that they see it. and. When we identified that as a need in space, that's when we knew it was time for us to actually enter. We didn't want to be just another brand that said, hey, gaming. It looks cool. Let's do that. We wanted to make sure that we're actually bringing something new table and and actually you know solving a need that we thought consumers gaming space might have. And that was really the whole impetus for US designed to get into gaming. Absolutely in every game knows how important audio is you mentioned how graphics approving well, sow does it prove it as well especially in the battle royale? Sowed is so important you've three hundred, sixty degree view. There's always people either above below at identified where they are and reacting to it is becoming an increasingly important part of being successful in eastport. Jacob you of a background is professional player. Could you talk about how audio matters especially at the highest levels of water video game? Yeah. Absolutely like you mentioned the. But I think The. The shooter Genre in general audio is one of the most primary importance of of of performance ride. So when we first started this conversation, it aligned sort of when we. Just picked up our counter strike team as well. both counterstrike fortnight now valor and call of duty call everything right sound. So very pivotal to to play performance. So as one of the the first conversations that I remember having was making sure that whoever we partnered with on the audio category, it would be a product that we were excited to use them that all of our. Players get behind and use on a daily basis because of how how big of an importance it has on the products on performance site So it was very reassuring. I remember Maddie from from team coming into the conversation saying listen it's got it's going to be jpl I'm really excited about this what are your concerns here because mostly on the performance side without teams and so Speaking on behalf of all of our players and going into the competitions it's important that we have You know state of the OPS. Hardware. When when we playing whether that's mountain. audio. Absolutely, you're only as good as your equipment. Well, that's a lie could be better than your equipment plenty of types, but at the highest level, those little those little differences really make a big deal. Michael

JBL Jacob United States Maddie Brandon Eastport President Trump Herman Miller Michael
Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Innovation Now

01:21 min | 3 months ago

Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

"Specializes in spacecraft not medical device manufacturing, but excellent engineering rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of the agencies specialties. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers. At Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators. So they may be used on patients with the most severe covid nineteen symptoms. When people at JPL realized, they might have what it takes to support the medical community. They felt it was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise. And in just thirty seven days had created. The prototype medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. Flexible design means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers, hotels, and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe, the office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech, which manages jpl for NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jennifer Pulley Nasa Technology Transfer Caltech
NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

Innovation Now

01:00 min | 6 months ago

NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

"A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators so they may be used on patients with the most severe Kovic nineteen symptoms when people at Jpl realized they might have what it takes to support the medical community It was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise and ingest. Thirty seven days had created the prototype. Medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. It's flexible design. Means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers hotels and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe the Office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech which manages. Jpl FOR NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Office Of Technology Transfer Nasa Caltech
"jpl" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:40 min | 6 months ago

"jpl" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Live music from their porches that happens in the laurel canyon neighborhood which does have a rich musical history there's a tradition in the in the can wear these to drop the needle on the record back in the sixties all the same time seven o'clock rock dropping the needle on sticky fingers rolling stones and open the windows and they would let all walked out into the hands of this is kind of part of that tradition funk says he'll do the concerts until the day at home orders are lifted but hopes to continue the new tradition afterward well for many people working remotely has become the new normally even our local NASA scientists have had to figure out how to work from home and still continue their space missions Chris Martinez has more on the JPL researchers working from beyond their Pasadena laps my work from home made guilders workstation at home looks relatively relatable for a job that certainly is not I'm gonna lead rover driver rover as in the Mars curiosity rover and Giltner is now driving it on the red planet from his living room he's part of a thirty plus person team that commands the spacecraft and for the first time ever all the Rovers operations are being handled remotely from makeshift home command centers in person problem solving sessions replaced by video conferencing and messaging apps I'm used to be able to literally like turn over my shoulder and talked to a fellow rover driver Hey what do you think of this drive I'm planning on just that rock looks scary is that Sam patch you over there look really deep do I need to drive around it and instead I have to rely on you know screen sharing over network connections that sometimes can be slow still there making it work so well in fact that on the first day of remote operations the team successfully commanded one of the Rovers most complicated jobs drilling a rock sample on Mars it's kind of an interesting change of pace you know be able to do the job well you're have a pet NEO three feet away or you stop to make lunch in your own kitchen the mission so far remaining mostly on schedule thanks to the team's ability to adapt and their commitment to explore Chris Martinez CBS news Los Angeles thanks for staying up late with us we've got more news coming up next on Leslie Mattingly your streaming CVS at email magically need all the right people if your email let you easily share a message with everyone who needs to see that it wouldn't be email at all choose a better.

funk Chris Martinez Giltner Rovers Leslie Mattingly laurel canyon NASA JPL Pasadena Sam Los Angeles
Lucky Peanuts: The Traditional Space Launch Snack

Innovation Now

01:07 min | 8 months ago

Lucky Peanuts: The Traditional Space Launch Snack

"Launch. Most NASA astronauts eat a hearty meal of scrambled eggs and steak no matter what time of day the launches scheduled a tribute to the breakfast enjoyed by astronaut and shepherd before his mercury freedom seven flight in nineteen sixty one after a successful launch rookie launched directors test directors and engineers have their neckties clipped and the team of launch controllers. Enjoy a hearty meal of beans and Corn Bread since the gym is six mission in nineteen sixty five astronauts in space awake to music chosen by mission control each day and Lucky peanuts are fixture at every major deep space mission event since nineteen sixty four. That tradition started after the first. Six Ranger spacecraft failed during launch or while leaving orbit on the seventh launch. Someone brought peanuts into mission control. The mission succeeded and peanuts have been tradition at JPL launches and landings ever since for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley

JPL
Active wildfires are fast-moving disasters, and the fallout can be terrible, too

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:24 min | 11 months ago

Active wildfires are fast-moving disasters, and the fallout can be terrible, too

"Of our series how we survive. We've been looking at how tech can help us adapt to climate change today. We're looking at fires and smoke. NASA and its Jet Propulsion Laboratory are launching flights to gather more data about the lingering pollutants from fires by flying things straight into the smoke plumes. We can't actually see these super tiny pollutants but they are big enough to affect our breathing especially for those who have asthma both NASA and JPL are learning more from studying the plumes during an active fire as well as the air post fire to help understand how these pollutants could affect us over the long run. Marketplace is text Hayes Use Alvarado reports earlier this fall NASA and JPL sin two planes flying into some plumes of wildfires northern California. The planes were on a special mission. Shen together air samples from an active fire carbon dioxide carbon monoxide nitrogen Nitrous Oxide Particulate matter the talk show style rose and Applied Sciences engineer at J. p. l.. She says flying planes very close to the flames to grab air samples as necessary because the existing awesome data. NASA generates comes from too far away those hybrid satellite images from space useful for tracking and even anticipating the path of fire. Can't give us enough information about the breathe here on earth but air samples can tell us about the fuel composition. How high the plume is being injected into the atmosphere? And how dense that plume is and doctors and scientists are hungry for that data to answer questions. Like how much ash will be trapped in the atmosphere wants to flames are out. How will our breathing an overall health down here on earth be affected? All of these are things that will affect how far that the emissions Sion's will carry and in fact we've actually seen fires from Canada affecting air quality in Florida you took the planes house emission the D. C. Eight flies down one of the fire with hoses attached to the outside of the plane sucking air into empty tanks for evaluation back at the lab the Er two cruises that so many thousand feet about twice as harder than commercial flights using high tech sensors to detect how hot the fire is an measure. The height of the flames scientists can use this data to to extrapolate down when effects of the fires because a super tiny particulate matter too small for the naked eye to see literally affects every living organism born an even unborn. They've actually also recently found some of those particulates on the lining of a fetus. The mother was breathing a an literally affected her baby. Would doctors need to know. Is What happens. Long-term when the respiratory system and even the lining of the amniotic sock where the baby is growing eh exposed for weeks or months to invisible fallout from a wildfire. JPL's a style road says emissions are targeted to help find answers trying to get at the relevant relevant information for decision making so that decision makers can make it quickly in an informed way climate change means wildfires are increasingly inevitable and now saying JPL have launched this research to help figure out how to live without new normal that was marketplace tax other auto. NASA also has a new APP out called called Earth. Now where you can see in real time. Active fires satellites hovering over our planet and of course a bunch of other cool NASA things And now for some related links. Australia has been fighting horrible. Bushfires in recent months that killed six people oh and created a very toxic air quality in Sydney hospital visits were up ten percent and the air quality was up to twelve times above. What's considered Hazardous speaking of Nasr's data the organization found that fires in New South Wales and Queensland pumped out almost half of Australia's yearly normal amount of greenhouse gas emissions and that because so much forest land is either burned or compromised by smoke. It's usual ability to absorb all that carbon dioxide it is also greatly reduced the T. l.. Dr Here the fires caused by hotter and drier. Weather resulting from climate change are also contributing to more climate change. Change California's carbon emissions also went up dramatically during the twenty eighteen fire season. So that's a bummer.

Nasa JPL California Jet Propulsion Laboratory Australia Nitrous Oxide Canada Sydney Hospital Shen J. P. L Hayes Florida Nasr Applied Sciences
"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:45 min | 11 months ago

"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Engineer from JPL like Austin more often than not the school teams perform better than the JBL teams at JPL Chris and Carla okay fine you can update from Washington the Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to approve the articles of impeachment against president trump there are twenty three eyes and seventeen knows Democrats have charged the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress the ranking Republican on the committee congressman Doug Collins objected to the vote for my purposes the gentleman seek recognition for Santa Claus to L. rule that I give notice of intent to file dissenting these Republicans have called this impeachment ridiculous process the house is expected to vote on it next week I'm all that's happening president trump says the US and China have reached the phase one trade deal and a seventeenth month long care for war the US has agreed to drop plans to impose tariffs on a hundred and sixty billion dollars in Chinese imports the Chinese have agreed to massive but unspecified purchases of American farm and manufactured products there's road work on the one oh five in south LA on the westbound side they're working from the one ten to the four or five and I have two left lanes shut down until five AM you're seen traffic really bunch up from the one ten over to about Crenshaw's already make that merge on the four oh five freeway southbound connector to the eastbound side of the one oh five there's an accident there's a that trend is red completely shut down the drive is backing up you come away from sentry bill about you can just use entry to head east bound or you could also head south on of dress up towards Elsa bendable biting use Appier eastbound Dr all lanes are shut down on the four or five in Orange County both directions there between magnolia and Warner for Caltrans work southbound lanes were we open at five AM northbound lanes to be shut down until six AM and then further north on the four oh five until beach to the six oh five monthly budget is the time to convert your home the solar sun lacks is the choice of so many KFI listeners based on dean sharps.

US KFI Caltrans Elsa Carla JBL dean sharps Warner magnolia Orange County Crenshaw LA China Engineer trump Doug Collins congressman
Live at Amazon Re:MARS  Interview with Tom Soderstrom, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:10 min | 1 year ago

Live at Amazon Re:MARS Interview with Tom Soderstrom, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

"Here at the Amazon remorse conference which is going on between June third and seventh in Las Vegas two thousand nine hundred and that is and for those who they're not aware of the Mars conference it actually stands for machine learning automation robotics and space of course being focused on artificial intelligence and it's broad applications focused on those first three letters mostly machine learning mation and robotics components and as part of that we are thrilled and excited to have today as our special guest Tom Sodas trump who is the chief technology and innovation officer at NASA jet potion laboratory hi Tom Thank you so much for joining us on the podcast today well thank you for having me this is a true pleasure and an honor yeah thank you so much for joining us today we'd like to start by having introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a bit about your background and your current role at NASA my role is really to try to predict the future and in future today so it's really if you can we've created an innovation experience center where we go into this room to experience the future today and with that is all about is trying to understand what technology waves are ready to be served and which ones are worthy to be surfed and if we serve them can we have an impact to JPL NASA and really any enterprise and we're from California so were surfer dudes that's our metaphor yeah as a matter of fact yeah we heard you give a talk at the Keno on Wednesday here at the conference and for our listeners who were not able to make that show maybe you can give us a little bit of a recap of what you talked about some of the insights that you have at Nasa Jpl certainly the talk title was too Walker Thais Mars and this was playing words Mars in this context means machine learning automation robotics and space and of course we care a lot about the planet Mars so democratizing means two things that means surfing these technology waves that makes it available to people so that's the other part having everyone participate in answering the questions that NASA is answering like is there life in space are we alone if we one day needed to export humanity would we have a place to go and where do the universe comes from where is it going these are big questions that affect all of us and therefore all of that should be involving solving them so democratizing Mars means to make the Algorithms make it available make data available so that future explorers can stand on the shoulders of giants not in years or decades but in minutes and right now as I know that this event is all about machine learning and ai but so in your talk you didn't touch upon that much can you tell our listeners some examples about how Jay is using a I certainly did I gave a few examples of a but very few because the conference is full of really good examples of ai the one I gave was about predictive maintenance so we use today we have satellites around Earth and in deep space and we want to see if they're about to go wrong so you use machine learning and take the previous tracks or orbits US training data and then we now take the actual data as news around machine learning algorithms to see things on wrong if they're going wrong then what we do is we visualize it for the people so that the people are still in the low so we intelligent assistance rather than artificial intelligence. I A rather than and that's been very successful we're finding just about all the anomalies that people found we tested and now some that people didn't find that's great you know we talk about ai as seven patterns of a until predictive analytics is one of them and we do know that NASA is doing a lot of predictive analytics so I appreciate that example that you're with us because we talk about that a lot and I don't think that some of our listeners understand or know just how how much NASA is using predictive analytics so the example with the satellite was great can you talk to us about other ways that you're using it as well so in other one predicted maintenance is so if you think about what NASA and JPL does we track spacecraft in all of our solar system and beyond actually on this sort of system so to do that as the earth rotates you have to have antenna farms that can understand and listen to our spacecraft talk to them wherever this baseball Dr for instance voyager it takes almost forty hours to get a signal out back so the space Antonio that Central Command another antenna will receive well those antennas are in very high demand so you need to understand what maintenance do we need to do so we're using a lot of ai to say what looks like it was going to break we hope you're enjoying this podcast and sorry for the brief interruption Kakinada not only produces the AI podcast listening to right now but we also generate research and advisory to help companies make sense of AI cognitive technologies we also run the most authoritative vendor neutral she learning training and certification on the market if you're looking to make a reality for your organization are a three-day cog lick training is for you if you're interested in attending confined pricing and registration on our website at cognreznick dot com will also provide a link in the show notes we've met many of our podcast listeners in our classes and we hope that we'll see are you there as well now back to the podcast who's going to break we'll use another antenna and take it off line for a little bit and that's one good example that can then be democratized two trains automobiles airplanes cars just as we can learn from their methods to make our machine learning better so I know that you know we talked about some of these applications of around predictive analytics and some of these other things that you're doing at NASA JPL but maybe you could talk about some of the broader things because NASA is involved only in stuff that's orbiting other plans but right here at home as well so maybe you could talk about how he is being applied in space both on other planets and right here orbiting our own perfect why don't we start with home the homeless where the hardest and there's a lot of things happening what we do at NASA is to look at Earth from space and you get a very different perspective so we have a lot of satellites orbiting Earth they take around ninety minutes to get around and for instance one good use case of AI is detect forest fires so they're looking and all of a sudden let's see they see a plume and it looks like a forest fire they can then re target another satellite too zoom in and then trigger the fire department to respond to so that is really about an autonomous swarm of satellites working on the human behalf another one is to take in all of we're sending a lot of satellites out to look at water so we understand the water pattern we understand that the ice melting pattern so we can do machine learning on that and let people know with real data what's happening and neither one is predicting Salamis hurricanes floods droughts all of that it's all about looking at massive amounts of data and analyzing it and looking for patterns and giving you a heads up warning happening so those are some easy if I can say that use cases another one anyway so that's enough about earth for now space so are farthest craft voyager it's about roughly fifteen billion miles away with a B and we have a lot of space craft in between we have spacecraft on Mars awesome Mars is the Mars Curiosity Rover for example is driving a Mars and finds it looks for rocks that we have pre identified it also has a I running on it that is looking for interesting rocks so it has so it finds one of those and it takes naps a picture of it and then if it has enough energy and depending on what else it needs to do then it sends that serves as an intelligent digital assistant to the human to catch the things that we missed so that's one example of

Amazon Ninety Minutes Forty Hours Three-Day One Day
Rolling Stones Rock

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Rolling Stones Rock

"Four decades the music of the rolling stones had global reach here on earth. Now the band's influence extends all the way to Mars. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. NASA team has named Iraq on Mars Mars for music legend. The rolling stones a little larger than a golf ball. The Rock apparently rolled about three feet propelled by thrusters as insight touched down on Mars. The insight landers primary mission is to study the Red Planet's Interior but images of the surface taken the day after landing show where the rock rolled with the rolling stones about to perform nearby it made perfect sense for the JPL L. Team to name the Rock. The Rolling Stone Rock Robert Downey junior made the announcement at Pasadena's Rose Bowl stadium just before the ban took took stage official names for objects throughout the solar system can only be designated by the International Astronomical Union however the informal informal nickname will appear on Nasr's working maps of Mars giving rock scientists rock musicians and rock bands something to celebrate great for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Rose Bowl Stadium National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Pulley Robert Downey Jpl L. Team Landers International Astronomical Uni Golf Pasadena Nasr Official Four Decades Three Feet
Ten Months And Five Hundred Megabytes discussed on Dear Hank & John

Dear Hank & John

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Ten Months And Five Hundred Megabytes discussed on Dear Hank & John

"Week in mars news mars got hacked so that's my mars news this week jpl the jet propulsion laboratory had a security breach about five hundred megabytes of data was stolen so some restricted information some of the stolen files related to the curiosity rover it happened last april and it went undetected protected for ten months oh my god i gotta stay at a hole in their security for ten months you might think that hacking nasa would require some pretty advanced like mission impossible type technology but the actual source of the hack or the security hall not the hack was a small cheap computer a called raspberry pi raspberry pies are can you please tell me they are super cheap computers that are often using like d i y fun things

Ten Months Five Hundred Megabytes
"jpl" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on Security Now

"Yeah. Just gonna put a raspberry pi in here and we'll stick a little webcam on the raspberry pi, I can just get a picture of the coffee pot and see how we you know what the water level is. Oh, by the way, we got an at work. I'll just put it on the network. Why not Leo? So in a report published last week by Nastase. Oh I g the office of inspector general in that report it revealed that in April of twenty eighteen hackers breached the agency's network and stole, they did act in this was more that this was an active threat stole approximately five hundred megabytes of data related to Mars missions because, of course, that's what J P L does the point of entry was a raspberry pi can do the network at as I mentioned, J, P L, without authorization or going through the proper security review me, they have they have they have systems in place, which, which says, we're you're supposed to log and have approved anything connect to the network. But hey look, there's a there's an RJ forty five port. Let's plus plug in the raspberry pi according to this. Forty nine page. Oh, I g report, the hackers use this point of entry to move deeper inside the JPL network by hacking shared network. Gateway, the hackers use this network gateway to pivot inside JPL's, infrastructure and gained access to the network. That was storing information about NASA JPL managed Mars missions from where they exfiltrated information quoting from the report, quote, the attacker, exfiltrated approximately five hundred megabytes of data from twenty three files two of which contained international traffic in arms regulations information related to the Mars. Space laboratory mission. The Mars science laboratory is the JPL program that manages, the curiosity Rover on Mars among other projects, JPL's primary role as we know is to build an operate planetary. Robotic spacecraft such as the curiosity Rover and various satellites that orbit planets in the solar system. JPL also manages Nasr's deep space network, which is the worldwide network of satellite dishes, which are used to communicate with NASA spacecraft during their missions, investigators said that besides accessing the JPL's mission network. The April twenty eighteen intruder also accessed, the deep space networks, IT network upon discovery of the intrusion. I got a kick out of this several NASA facilities immediately disconnected from JPL and ESN. You know, just up pull the plug do not connect JPL. Those crazies out there in California, in Pasadena. We don't know what they've got crawling around their network, and they, they disconnected fearing, of course that the attacker by pivot into their systems as well. Nasr's. Oh, I g said, quote classified as an advanced persistent threat. The attack went undetected for nearly a year and the investigation into this incident is ongoing. The report blamed, and here it is JPL's failure to segment its internal network into smaller segments. And, of course as our longtime listeners know, we've talked about the need for strong.

JPL NASA Nasr Leo J P L Nastase California Pasadena five hundred megabytes
NASA JPL Hacked

SPACE NEWS POD

03:09 min | 1 year ago

NASA JPL Hacked

"Hello. And welcome back to the space news pod. A daily podcast where we discuss space science and tech. space station. I'm your host And according will to Walden a report in on on Forbes this episode. dot com, Massa the GPO. deep space network The Jet DSM Propulsion array Laboratory of radio has telescopes had its computer and numerous systems hacked. other GPL Hackers systems got into were the system. affected during this hack They and Johnson enter Space the system Center, who's through responsible a raspberry for pi the international computer space station and disconnected, then. completely Hecht further from into the system, the network not just just GPO to make sure at one point, that nothing the were to international happen space to the station ISS was amongst other in programs. jeopardy And they of said being that part of of these these Johnson's attacks. attacks. officials But But were concerned the cyberattacks luckily, luckily, we we could had had move some some engineers engineers laterally from on on the board board gateway into at at their mission Massa Massa systems, that that potentially were were up up gaining access, to to and the the task task initiate to stop initiating the hackers malicious to signals stop basically to human unplug spaceflight the systems that use that were those systems. in contact So basically, what with happened the. is ISS hackers found a before way the hackers not got gonna control go into too much technical of the detail international here. But there's. Security violations. There is no ticket resolutions, and there were delays in patching security vulnerabilities that were known by auditors. So what happened was Hecker is basically targeted a system JPL, and they found backdoors into other parts of NASA systems administrators lax security certificates, no role based security training was in place, GPO, and unlike masses main security operation center, it didn't have a round, the clock incident reporting capability, so things like this are very important to security as far as NASA goes, and our people in space, as well as all the science that could be happening at NASA. And if hackers were to intrude on that and deleted information, well, that would be a sad day for science for Hugh. Humanity in Massa is a big target masses. High-profile target and Mike Thompson. Who's a security analysts said many purely associate them with space related activities, but their depth of research and development includes patents covering, cutting edge science, that nation states would literally kill for the hackers might still be in their network, without them, even knowing it.

Massa Massa Massa Nasa Jet Dsm Propulsion Array Labor Johnson ISS Mike Thompson Walden Hecht JPL Hecker Hugh
The Star Trek Starfleet Logo Shows Up on Mars

SPACE NEWS POD

01:05 min | 1 year ago

The Star Trek Starfleet Logo Shows Up on Mars

"Nasa actually just found a Star Trek symbol on the surface of Mars. Now it's not an actual Star Trek simple mind. You it's, it's a formation rocks in, it is possible, that it's caused by aliens Nagas joking. There's no aliens on Mars. Not that could make this symbol. We don't know if there's actual bacteria or anything like that on Mars yet. So. It is the Starfleet logo. It looks like the Starfleet logo. So. And it's not made by you know I just want you to know that it's coming straight out there, just telling you. Hey, man, there is no alien on Mars carving little Starfleet logos in the dirt. So NASA JPL tweeted dunes lava in wind are responsible for this curious shape on Mars,

Nasa
Table salt may be hiding in Europa's underground sea

The Frame

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Table salt may be hiding in Europa's underground sea

"Travel millions of miles to Jupiter's moon Europa, and you'll find something more often found on dining tables here on earth. It's according to a new study from researchers at Caltech and JPL more from KPCC science reporter Jacob Mongolia's breakthrough Europa's icy crust dip your Cup into it. Subsurface ocean and take a big drink. Scientists think it tastes like like salt like your table salt that you're used to eating your food that Samantha Trump. Oh, PHD candidate and planetary science at Caltech and lead author of the new paper. They found evidence assault on the moon's surface that they think is being left, there by frozen ocean, water that ocean waters filled with salt, possibly because it's interacting with super hot areas of the ocean floor known as hydrothermal vents. That's kinda tantalizing because here on earth there, organisms that can survive in water next to those kinds of events. That means that theoretically, some could be alive, and thriving on Europa, too, though, there's a lot more. We need to learn about it before we can say, that's the

Caltech Samantha Trump Jacob Mongolia JPL Reporter Assault
Open Source Rover

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Open Source Rover

"Would you like to build a Rover of your own JPL has published an open source design that could help you put wheels on the ground? This is innovation now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape, the future the open source Rover created by engineers at NASA Jet Propulsion lab is a scaled down version of curiosity from it's six wheel steering to its rocker bogie suspension. The plans published under an open source license on get hub can be built from commercial off the shelf parts for as little as twenty five hundred dollars while the Rover instructions are quite detailed. They still allow builders to personalise their own designs determining what controllers to us or whether to attach science payloads giving builders, the chance to really understand what it takes to construct a Rover like curiosity. The developers. Hope the community will contribute improvements and additions that could be incorporated into future Rover designs. But the team is most excited about putting the wheels in motion for a fleet of these Rovers to pop up in schools and workshops everywhere for innovation now. I'm Jennifer police innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w. HR wien.

Rovers Nasa Jet Propulsion JPL National Institute Of Aerospac Nasa Twenty Five Hundred Dollars
Investors raise bets on Fed making two rate cuts

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Investors raise bets on Fed making two rate cuts

"If investors expected, fed sheep JPL to do nothing for the rest of the year that then futures would be at ninety seven point five. The fact that they're ninety seven point nine may not seem like a big deal to you, but it's used you change the dollars in this market means. The futures markets are forecasting at the pit bull start easing sometime in the next six months. Now that doesn't mean these speculators will turn out to be right, though, people who try to game, the fit are often wrong and disappointed lasted member. When Jay pal was making threatening noises about how he needed to raise it straits aggressively in order to cool down a red hot economy. Remember that the fed funds rate went to ninety seven okay. Meeting people were looking for three percent federal funds rate. Then the stock market cratered, the economy, slowed down, and pal changed course talking about the need for patients. But garner points out that it didn't take long for the futures market to go from into spending no change to spitting rate cuts by April, that funds rate futures were soaring. You can see see this big rally. That's all people making a bet. How would a bookmaker break it down? Okay. Garner notes that the fed funds futures are pretty an eighty percent chance. Eight o of at least one rate cut by envier stiffly. The futures Mark is priced in a forty percent probability of one rate. Cut a thirty percent chance of two cuts and a small group of traders are even daddy, one, three or more rate cuts really outside that's over over over and all this seems like an overreaction guada- believes that the fence fund feds is stuck between a rock and a heart place. When the one in we've got robust economic growth couple with barely any inflation. Take a look at that obviously employment growth is pretty good. That should be Nevada for the fed. So there's no real reason for them to do it. When the other when JPL tightened to aggressively late this year. It really did slow down the economy and it's possible if might be willing to. Mentally cut rates. If that means staving while recession of the room making horrible corners conference that we could see in multi. Pause from the fed both because it makes sense as monetary policy and because of what she sees in these charts when it comes to the fed funds futures. Both the relative strength index the RSI, okay? And the Williams percentage or oscillators are Ma in mildly. Overbought tur- you of that, this one's just a little bit of which just a futures have come up too far too fast meeting. This thing was was an overreaction. Plus, there's a powerful Cillian ninety seven point nine to ninety eight so she's saying there peaking, right here, right now, she's making a very big call people if Garner's right December, futures contracts should drift back to where it was trading at the beginning of the year round, ninety seven point five. Remember right now, this thing is baking more than one rate cut and that seems way too optimistic for and it's not just the pit funds futures. Check out this daily chart of the I shares twenty plus year treasury Tf right now. Long term treasuries are forty with multi your. Highs member when rates go down bonds go up in value. Okay. Yields on your multi your lows while long term interest rates are only partially impacted by the Federal Reserve, there's still some correlation. And as far as Garner's concerned, this chart is bad news for the bulls. It's just the treasury prices are poised and go back down. Meaning yields will go up meaning more rate cuts might not be in the menu. I told you how contrary this thing is, it's an extraordinary. Call by Carly, extraordinary

Garner Federal Reserve JPL Jay Pal Treasury Carly Nevada MA Cillian Bulls Eighty Percent Thirty Percent Forty Percent Three Percent Six Months
Access Mars

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Access Mars

"What was once only available to a select group of scientists is now available to all so anyone with an internet connection can take a walk on Mars. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas, that shave our future, leveraging virtual reality, and augmented reality technologies. Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in collaboration. With Google has released access Mars, a free immersive experience that allows the user to take a guided tour of Mars by following the path of the curiosity Rover users can view, the actual dunes and valleys explored by the spacecraft as they wander through the lonely red desert, the user zero in on objects of scientific interest, including rock outcrops and mud cracks. A JPL scientist narrates, the walk explaining, the geologic evidence. Curiosity has unearthed the way. Web. Walk is available for use on all desktop and mobile devices, or any VR, AR, headset, and will be periodically updated to reflect curiosities ongoing mission. Previously these technologies were used to take NASA scientists to Mars every day. But with access Mars anyone in the world can ride a law for innovation now? I'm jennifer. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr Google Scientist Nasa
Lighter Leaves

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Lighter Leaves

"A synthetic field laboratory at J P L allow scientists perform experiments in hours that would have required months if they were using actual plants. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future, the university of Illinois and the university of Dusseldorf are joining forces with Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to find strategies to address earth's future food needs. And they're beginning with soybeans the team proposed that of a righty of soybean with lighter. Green leaves could be a key step to increasing. Crop yields the green pigment chlorophyll gives leaves their color a decrease in chlorophyll, not only makes the leaves lighter. But conserves the plants use of nitrogen without reducing the plants photosynthesis rate over time, it might be possible to breed plants that would apply this extra nitrogen to growing more beans. By combining detailed soybean field, measurements with sophisticated model of JPL's multilayer, canopy model scientists were able to conduct the agricultural experiments in less time with fewer resources all without beating around the soybean Bush for innovation now, I'm Jennifer pulling animation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H, R Wien.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory University Of Dusseldorf Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac University Of Illinois Bush Jennifer J P L Nasa
Listen to First Mars Quake Measured and Recorded

SPACE NEWS POD

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Listen to First Mars Quake Measured and Recorded

"And on earth. High quality seismometers off. Placed underground to insulate them from changes in temperature and weather, but it can't be done on Mars. And as a result, it has several ingenious barriers which has a cover which is built by JPL called the wind and thermal shield to insulate it from the planet's winds dust, extreme temperature swings and other sources of noise into date. The E S has surpassed all the teams expectation in terms of sensitivity, president of the C N E S commented that the French SEI s size monitor as the cornerstone of space cooperation between France in the United States instrument has barely begun its mission, and it has already hit pay dirt with this world. First revealing new insights into Mars a planet that was habitable in its ancient past the teams at the s I s Mosey mission control center into loose on working around the clock to operate SAS and analyze that data. Being back from the red planet once again, congratulations to all of the scientists and engineers to whom we owe this fantastic success on the surface of Mars in one Petit who is the CEO of CNRS said that earth is no longer the only planet continuously monitored by size monitors the S S instrument deployed on Mars at the start of this year is now recording the slightest ground vibrations day and night be due to the atmosphere, and it's wind sweeping the surface or quakes in meteorite impacts Mars is the third rocky planetary body in the solar system to be studied by size Malla Just's one hundred thirty years after the beginnings of instrumental size. Molly Jeter had fifty years after the first seismometers developed and deployed by Apollo eleven in July of nineteen sixty nine no fewer than eleven C R S technologies in partnership with universities are working with these exceptional data in. In the months and years ahead. Their research will tell us more about how Mars formed and whites volcanic activity ceased to leave the cold dry desert surface. We see today I'm gonna play you in actual sound of a Mars quake now. So this audio has three different parts the first part of it is Mars wind. So it's sort of sounds like that's my my closest that I could get in the middle. It goes a little bit. Little bit deeper pitch in goes a little bit louder in that stops in. Then there's the robotic arm from the science device. So listen to this closely in the middle. You'll hear the Mars quick. So pretty cool stuff and JPL is going to continue working of insight Lander and working with the French teens to have more SAS data and more on Mars quakes in the future.

Mars Wind JPL Ceo Of Cnrs Molly Jeter Lander Malla President Trump France United States C N E S C R S One Hundred Thirty Years Fifty Years
"jpl" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"He worked for JPL in Pasadena. No, I've learned a lot over the years about faith. And I believe what that means. You know, the planets path through the. The dome of the guy Bertrand mercury in retrograde mercury going the opposite direction that it usually does. Turned around. This doesn't seem like that's huge. That's the problem. On the other way, exactly. That go back. The other way working mercury appears to be traveling from east to west county to its standard west to east or tracks going the opposite way to go. Scott a rocket. It's an alien ship says appears to be maybe it's not it's not actually K K or Soldo. We're good again. I'm not sure if it's an illusion, right? All right. I hear you. Thank you very much. Appreciate the call. Let's say good morning to Dan, Dan. Good morning. How are you buddy? I'm doing well. How about yourself during trying to figure this whole mercury in retrograde? What can you bring to the table here? Yeah. I'm retired astrologer, and I can tell you that mercury the planet. Mercury is control the communications. And so the vibrations from mercury when it's in retrograde makes you mess up, basically. So when you say controls communications, let me let me just jump in. Are you talking about the synapses ever reminder talk about mass communications, satellites, etc. That much anything technology itself as well. So you might encounter.

Dan JPL west county Pasadena Bertrand Scott
"jpl" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Station. KNX ten seventy NewsRadio. It's three forty five. I'm mark. Austin Thomas coming up at least twenty one people have died in political unrest this week in the capital of Venezuela. And that's his opportunity Rover began its fifteenth year on the surface of Mars, but scientists are JPL in Pasadena say they can't contact it. Those stories coming up in the next fifteen minutes. First, traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the fives. Taking a look at our traffic. Here's Pete in Toronto. Well, in Long Beach right now southbound on the four zero five freeway approaching Palo Verde earlier accident involving a car on its side. It's in its final stages have been cleaned up. I'm still seeing some slumming southbound on the four or five approaching the accident scene. This one in the second lane from the left. Hopefully, they'll have that off the freeway within the next few minutes. So we'll keep you updated on that in downtown. We have construction the one ten southbound connector to the one one north blocked off up until around five. And if you're travelling through south LA right now on the northbound one ten freeway slauson tomorrow Luther King junior boulevard there is right lane construction and heading south on the one ten exposition down the Martin Luther King right lane roadwork and heard from his hipster that the ten east and west connector to the one ten south is closed off. So we'll keep you updated on that otherwise Hawthorne construction four or five freeway, southbound El Segundo boulevard, down rosecrans, two right lanes taken away until six I am seeing a little bit of slowing there and an updated San Pedro. The Vincent Thomas bridge is shut down. If you're heading north harbor boulevard ferry straight up. Until six so for the meantime, you can use Anaheim street to get around that closure if you'd like to be a k next traffic tipster, you could always dial three two three four six seven ten seventy. That's the metro traffic tip line. Our next reports coming up three fifty five I'm Pete interact with more traffic reports..

JPL Martin Luther King Vincent Thomas bridge Austin Thomas Venezuela Pete Palo Verde Toronto El Segundo Long Beach LA Pasadena San Pedro fifteen minutes ten minutes
"jpl" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"On your mind and wanna talk about four to four twelve sixty. All right. If you were not able to watch or listen to historic moment, right before one o'clock today, our time, I'm not really sure what the local time was for the event because it took place on Mars. The landing of the newest Rover that NASA Santa up JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory about six and a half months to get there. And they called it seven seven minutes of terror and seven minutes of tear because the time the delay for win insight. Could have sent a message or an alert saying I'm broken or I'm I'm behind schedule or you know, we pulled over for a lot. It takes about seven minutes for the radio signal to get from Mars to Pasadena. So whatever you're hearing. Now in Pasadena happened seven minutes ago. So your chance to correct or impact. Whatever insight was experiencing was gone. So you just have to trust. All your math. All your arithmetic was good. You know, you didn't misplace a decimal point. So insight was approaching Mars. I recorded this right before one o'clock because I thought it was interesting. Science reports sudden change in Doppler. Visions are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Album..

Pasadena JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory seven minutes seven seven minutes
"jpl" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Scientists JPL are busy this weekend. Gearing up for Monday's planned landing of new. A high tech spacecraft on Mars, and meanwhile, they've also outlined plans for another mission that's designed to look for possible signs of life on the red planet. Well that spacecraft to be a Rover that set the land in twenty twenty inside a dry lake bed shape project. Scientists can Farley says the area used to be covered with water and may have rich delta, sediment, one of the reasons why we focus on this area. Is that this part of the planet is unique and its abundance of carbonate rock. We're quite interested in carbonate rock how it was produced. What it tells us about the early history of Mars, and whether it was a habitable environment Rovers was fiscal equipment to drill for rocks and store them. They selection of land decide comes after years of research and days of fierce debate over the best spot to look for evidence of ancient life, the eighty seventh annual Hollywood Christmas parade takes place tomorrow. And with it comes road closures and parking restrictions. All things you probably need to know to avoid the headache of trying to find already limited parking and potentially risk getting your car. Towed? It's best to just. Not drive in the area of Hollywood Boulevard to the north sunset to the south LeBron to the west and vine to the east all weekend long with sidestreets being used for staging Devon far fan is with L A's transportation department of transportation Metrorail the best way to get around over here. L A city councilman David Roo this parade is where the magic of the holidays meets the magic of Hollywood the parade will benefit the marine toys for tots. It starts at six pm on Sunday at Hollywood Boulevard and orange drive in Hollywood. Margaret, caro- KNX ten seventy NewsRadio the two big movies in theaters this weekend, or Ralph breaks the internet and creed to do this..

Hollywood Rovers JPL David Roo Farley LeBron Margaret Ralph KNX Devon L A
"jpl" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"That their opportunity Rover sent them a message, and then they realize that's not from the opportunity Rover. The published story in the New York Post talks about how Nasr's opportunity Rover has been silenced since Jim. We talked about that, you know, everything just went completely and space, you know, Kepler's dead. They they actually sends commands to die. So Kepler the the beautiful telescope that gives us all his visions of these Goldilocks planets. Life can be no more. We won't hear anything about that anymore because Kepler's dead. They had a glitch in the Chandra x Ray observatory fix that dot Keppler Hubbell had a glitch fix that. Gyroscopes are going completely haywire. Everything was going. Not SpaceX had some problems. The holy ISS. I mean, a lot of things like a couple of weeks ago, we just having all these problems in space glitches and problems China had to abort a mission because they had a glitch in a rocket. So Nasr's opportunity rubber got gotten a sandstorm and just shut up and and so. Glitched went into mode went into failsafe mode. And now she hasn't heard from it since June. Days ago. Okay. The opportunity team had been actually waiting patiently for the Rover to wake back up ever since June and win a signal identified as coming in from opportunity popped up on NASA. Deep space network last Thursday got a lot of people very excited. However, the signal did not come from the Rover. It did not come from the Rover. Even NASA admits it did not come from the Rover JPL admits it do not come from the Rover. JPL quickly address the supposed communication noting that further investigation quote and quote further investigation revealed the signals weren't actually from opportunity at all. So if the signals weren't coming from opportunity if offered if opportunity wasn't sending me signals than what would sending the signal. Both JPL and NASA have not given an official answer. Silence speaks volumes. Ms what we've expected from NASA. Right. They say that they get a signal. They hope it's from one of the Rovers and what it is. And they just act like it's business as usual. Be quiet about don't tell anyone. Someone needs to come forward against nation. But of course, reports say that NASA and GPO remained vague on the issue there. Silence speaks volumes opportunity knocked okay opportunity, knocked of so to speak. So NASA they've not answered any questions about what this signal was. Or what the signals were? They thought they were coming from opportunity. But they weren't. Now, I did due diligence and tried to figure out if there was ever an answer from JPL announcer K about this. And I found something very ambiguous. All right. That's why I say the end beauity of NASA. I had these volumes of the embassy the best explanation. Given my NASA JPL is did they received either false positives? Or test data that may be blamed for the mistake. So. Sends me where do these false positives? Come from and the test data where did it come from? If if you opportunity is dead in the water or pardon me, dead in the sand. So NASA sending these big signals about a signal. There's not one of their signals. And perhaps it sounds crazy to speculate that it's aliens are intelligent extraterrestrials. But what is crazy? I mean, I mean, what is crazy? I'm telling you people about an errand signal. And then giving a vague explanation about not being from the Rovers sends a message loud and clear that something is out there something on Marston a signal they picked up. I I know that there are still people that believe that believing in the paranormal is shorthand for crazy. And I know there are a lot of people are holding off with some sort of sophisticated alien to reveal itself. And I know that sounds crazy. What's so great? I mean, this is crazy. This is nuts. This is this is aggravating. I don't know if you can feel my pain here because. For the longest time. We have been reporting some of the I guess, you could call the positives of what's happening in space, the talk that's going on it's steady in medi about trying to contact or or find technical signatures other NASA saying well now, you know, if you go out into space, you gotta have a reason for going out there, including finding biological signatures in space. Okay. I have played you many signals that have been picked up on by by a number of these probes and satellites and all they can say as well, you know, they're kind of cool. Kind of cool with mean anything, really? And there's always a more and more and more and more flies in we didn't pick up anything off of a more and more. No sound. No, no. They did though they picked up something because that's why SETI and Stephen hawking of time. One of the last things he did before he died was saying get on that more and more and find out what it is. Donald Trump said space force as soon as a memorial, right? We need a space force. He says because this thing was an alien alien spacecraft. Come right out and say it, but that's what it was is. He was so impressed. He goes to the Pentagon and says, then you guys just do a study on the threat assessment of UFO's Pentagon goes. Yeah. So what about the came in from interstellar space that we should be afraid of? No, MR president. We shouldn't be afraid of it. It does seem a little weird that it's red, and it's kind of shaped like this. But you know, it's not naturally shaped. And but this is a disaster just hear him. Now. It's. Huge go after this. Space force. It's like what happened when Truman? After Roswell Truman goes guys. We got to do something about these flying saucers. Okay. We'll separate the air force will separate the army, and then we'll create the CIA sound like a good idea. Good idea. So here we are again. A signal gets picked up by NASA. Nasa thinks. That it's the opportunity waking back up after a death, or at least a coma a sandstorm. And when they find out that the signal is not opportunity. Me immediately clam up. And then they give some ambiguous statement to what it was. And it doesn't make any sense..

NASA Rovers Nasr Kepler SpaceX New York Post Chandra x Ray observatory dot Keppler Hubbell CIA China Jim Donald Trump Stephen hawking Glitched Roswell Truman Pentagon official Marston president
"jpl" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"As for whether teddy Rex being computer tips, flew to Mars, I've tried to track down whether the rumors true. I contacted the Mars orbital camera manufacturer conducted research with JPL historian and spoke to people who've been working on the missions that the camera flew on Mars observer and Mars Global Surveyor. Everyone had heard the rumor, but no one could confirm it the chips hadn't been purchased directly from the manufacturer worlds of wonder but from layers of vendors who purchase and resell parts. I was told that the paper trail is so complex it could take years to wait through it. But I had one more avenue of investigation the ID number on the AT and T chips that were used in the Mars orbital camera. So I bought a circa nineteen eighty five teddy Rex pin doll that was being sold for parts and with a little help from folks here at JPL performed open heart surgery, the heart of the doll in this case was his circuit board. And it was appropriately located in its chest. The circuit board had seven computer chips. But none of those tips were made by AT and T. And none of those tips were for memory. Instead they were used for other tasks like managing power in voltage or audio amplification. The rumor is far as I can tell is wrong. However, it's still true that computer chips originally made for one product or repurpose for camera sent to Mars that product. Just isn't a teddy wreck spend all as often happens with gossip the details may have gotten jumbled to the telling and is often happens in science, the hypothesis doesn't give you the answer you expected. But instead opens up new questions perhaps someone out there has the answer to this mystery. Next time on a mission those kind of investigating work, but we did actually go back to those tapes to see if anyone come in between certain hours though, you really do feel like police departments times. If you like this podcast, please subscribe rate us on your favorite podcast platform and shares on Facebook Instagram, Twitter, we're on a mission a podcast of Nasr's Jet, Propulsion Laboratory..

teddy Rex Mars Global Surveyor JPL Mars AT Facebook Nasr Propulsion Laboratory Twitter
"jpl" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Banker to hear my comedic. Oh, host mad. Hey, Heather, Burland, neuroscientist and joining the panel. I have the Talia Reagan tell you welcome. Not sure I star taught rodeo now. You're an apologist and also a comedian and writer, and I'm just curious about something. There's weren't you part of an improv troupe. Where the improv got to do some of this right. Yeah, yeah. It's like, you know, living minds, it's it's. It can be pretty painful. Sometimes you'll first time doing the, you've done it plans. Oh, yeah. You missed the perfect opportunity to kiss on older on the lips. Good money. But it is a way to connect with your audience and a big part of improv is getting your partner to say yes and it's all about. Yes and yes. And, and when you're dealing with an audience, you want your audience when you're connecting with them to say yes and Jesse and like what's next. You want them to keep up with you and a lot of academics and teachers. Lecturers already do improv because you know, they always having to adapt to what their audiences if you're teaching a group at JPL about astrophysics. Exactly. You can talk about you can use them big words where if you're at a monster truck rally or a town hall meeting or a high school, you have to speak in their terms. And that's doesn't necessarily mean talking down to them. It just means speaking their language of what is new assigned, say about this sort of Mirroring, heard about something called mirror neurons. So there are these mirror neurons which were discovered actually in monkeys about twenty years ago where within the motor cortex there are these neurons that respond both when you're doing a movement, and when you're observing somebody else doing a movement, we think it has to do with mimicry like monkey see, monkey do. And so when you are watching someone else moving, it'll activate your own motor neurons. Now people, then I feel like y'all that same moment it could be could be actually why yawns contagious actually. Really, but but these these mirror neurons than people started extrapolating and say, maybe they have to be maybe they're involved in empathy and and and it's actually one of the most. It's been calling the most hyped neurons neuroscientist because I think we're, we're pushing it further than really where the evidence is has shown. I mean, there's a whole neural network that's involved in empathy and it's not necessarily just about these mirror neurons and then self awareness is something different. Just like in in animals, humans protests about eighteen months. You can pass that mirror of self recognition. But self recognition is a whole nother set of neuro circuits in the brain. Remind me you have an eighteen month old child right now. Experiments are you doing. Actually, I have ten month old and he way ahead of schedule in mirror. Recognize. Calculus and everything looking fine every day. Hilarious about ferry young babies don't that's constantly shocked by the hands and they, there's an age of which they don't even realize that this is them right cellphone, even a very still has he still. I have no idea how much together. Professionalism, stopping me from king knowledge. But you know, it's actually really interesting. Very young babies have senses sense of fairness. They, they have empathy. They like one puppet if it's a good puppet versus a bad one. Empathy that presumably has value in communication and and are are sort of anchor topic today is communication. So would you agree as a neuroscientist that this this mirror exercise can bring you a little closer to your audience or at least the person you're trying to communicate about making that connection? So it's it's again, getting away from that idea of just having a monologue or lecturing to really having a conversation communicating actually got from Bill Nye one of your guests here. Great piece of advice you told me was when you're talking to general audience talk as if you're talking to one person your best friends, and you're telling them about the science, and that's how you really make that connection and. Understanding, are they really getting it, you know? And if they're not slow it down and really just be talking about one person as it is about that connection. What if your best friend is also a neuroscientists..

Talia Reagan Bill Nye motor cortex JPL Heather writer Jesse partner eighteen months eighteen month twenty years ten month
"jpl" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Kickass News

"Polymath he was a chemist physicist and he'd been hired by jpl early on in the early years to help with a life detection experiments and he was like you know no you guys think you're going to go to mars and just look for microbes like you find in the mojave desert and he's like that's the wrong way to think about it and he went back and started thinking about atmospheres as life detectors because he realized that the for example on earth oxygen the chemistry of the atmosphere is only the way it is because there's life right now if we disappeared all life if the biosphere disappeared the oxygen very quickly would react out of the atmosphere and then so that was the first recognition which we still use today in our was we're looking for life on other right so biospheres but then he realized you took it another step that why is the oxygen level in the atmosphere exactly what it is because if it was like thirty percent if it was a little bit more everything would catch on fire right you can't you know too high one forest fire would never stop if it was too low you couldn't have the kinds of biochemistry that we have and he realized that there were these feedback loops that basically the the life the biosphere had the ability to regulate the the whole planet the whole planetary systems in a way that could keep the planet stable for life and then he brought in the great biologist lynn margulis they got in touch and she provided the the microbial background for guy so the guy hypothe was basically the planet is some kind of you can think of the biosphere is being this giant living organism like a cell that has homeo stasis just like our bodies are always at ninety six point eight degrees the planet sort of does that now people really and they called it the guy a hypothesis because guys the greek god of of the earth if first of all it got picked up by all the new age you know became very woo right right so they were churches churches of guy and guy ceremonies and guy yoga camps and so a lot of scientists were like oh god i mean the problem was it had a helium logical it sort of seemed to people like it was saying like oh the earth has a goal in mind and that's what it does until it regulates the planet with this goal and of course you know evolution has no goal evolution outlined what love lock and margallo's pushed back on and they showed that really there is no teleology and so what eventually happened was is that guy that were dropped but the basic idea of the blight being a major player in the planet's history was picked up and called earth systems science and so for us to come into some cooperative relationship with the biosphere means the planet wakes up right the whole planet interests he comes in some sense you know and i mean this i want people to understand what it means but becomes conscious right there's a conscious goal of the technological species trying to work with the biosphere to to bring the planet into some kind of long term sustainable version that both has a healthy biosphere with lots of biodiversity and this very you know energetic technological civilization so we're the completion of guy that's why i like to think of it well then i have to ask you about this recent mars discovery that nasa announced i get why the.

physicist jpl thirty percent eight degrees
"jpl" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"So forth and the problem with new horizons was a poodle mission nasa basically create an opportunity for a pluto mission on a very low budget you know like a fifth the cost of the voyager missions which were the last missions to the the the fly by new planets in the outer solar system and there just didn't seem to be any way to do that through jt l and allen and his team went to this other lab ap l we should say for those not in the know about acronyms jpl was the jet propulsion laboratory in pasadena ap l is the applied physics laboratory in maryland and ap l had a good track record of doing they're relatively new much smaller sort of leaner operation and they had done a couple of very impressive space missions in the inner solar system but they had never done an outer planets mission and that that's a whole different kind of game because it's a much longer space bite it requires nuclear power sources which is the toll very complex thing in and of itself both technically and in terms of regulatory approvals but allen put together a proposal with ap l allen and his team and and there it was very much kind of underdog approach because they didn't have the track record that jpl had and they had to convince the panels the review panels that they would be able to do of long duration outer planets mission even without the specific experience from the lab because they had a great team but using the.

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"jpl" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Get rid of the space debris and the problem with know been efforts at figuring out how you can get rid of it before and some of it is just pure prevention like if you're going to launch something you're not allowed to leave crap up there so used to be that you shoot a rocket into space and then the rocket body would just kind of float away in space until it decided to eventually come back down you can as paper was get was coproduced by stamford and nasa jpl jet propulsion laboratory so another dual university plus californiabased nestle so that's like our consistent theme for the week yeah so where prevention methods fail this team from stanford and jpl want to look at how they can actually capture a satellite and that's hard because as i mentioned if they've run out of fuel they're just kinda tumbling in you might be going the wrong globe at the wrong orbit to catch up with it and it's hard to grab onto them without you know than transferring inertia to yourself all it because the tumbles kind of a big deal emmys it really hard to grab me it's it's sort of like maybe is about analogies i'm just trying here job but it's like if you throw the football the perfect spiral it's easy to catch but if it has a good analogy that is a good analogy i deflated the football though is the problem so i exhibitor while this best at prevention method that's the reverse dresser that sends it back so we just need to make inflatable satellite so we can then deflate with the help of tom brady and everything we've fine let me just sports to add to the sports authorities a sports goes parts poor you guys red seventy eaves the neil stevenson novel gets on the it's on the to read list all man okay i want to spoil part of it so bad right now but don't don't the people who know while the spoiler is our like fistpumping because i feel like it's one of those things where if you're a podcast listener and it's like why haven't they said this thing and i'm like i'm saying it now i thought about it.

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