35 Burst results for "JPL"

"jpl" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

03:30 min | 2 months ago

"jpl" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Author was just looking at the cover of amazing stories. And i didn't see at the top of their rod pilots as true tales of nazis in orbit. That's link paid isn't it. Soldiers on the moon orphaned martian robots and other fascinating accounts from the annals of spaceflight so so authors. As you know because you've been one we always come up with our title right. Yeah and then we submit some publisher and they do what they want. Yes once that thing had been on the rack for a couple of weeks. I got a note back from the the the publishers saying from now on all your books have to have space nazis and the title. Probably not a bad idea. Razi was chapter one after all. It's of course you know. Furtive unploughed and the german came off like odd. Germans are better than your jong us who you can. Saga was the that that chapters mainly about five correctly. The silver bird sub orbital skit bomber. That's right that's he's we're gonna try and build right and you know. I mean the math worked and everything had gone perfectly but you generally doesn't was flight could have. Potentially the germany could have had a sub orbital skip bomber that would have reached. And you've got a picture of it would have reached from somewhere and the western western edge of europe. Chew dropped bombs on manhattan tariff and they. You know it's it's interesting because people assume well they would have had to have a nuclear bomb to make that work but from the altitudes they're talking about a large bomb would have so much kinetic energy that it wiped out a big chunk of downtown. Exploding it just be like dropping an asteroid on. Yeah it's like dropping those big tungsten rods. More better something. So yeah that was. That was a fun chapter to do that. The german heat ray. From where but that was an amazing stories of the space age rod pile available. Better bookstores everywhere. From prometheus books. There's your pl- and even less better ones. Even some of the routier downtown bookstores. avid us. Bookstores you name it. So what's up in space this week. Well we've we've had some interesting times on mars here. i'll start with. The chinese rover is wrong. it's doing well. They've extended their mission past their first ninety days right. Glad second glad to hear that so. It's a chat with folks to jpl about it. They're impressed you know. They said it's hard to get something that size off the lander especially doing it the first time and it's it's not it's not a terribly ambitious mission but i i. It's very ambitious So they've taken a lot of photographs. They rolled over and found their parachute in the back. Shell that came off the ladder and Have done some radar soundings and a bunch of photo surveys but now it's moving onto its extended mission. So this could be another opportunity or or spirit has as it moves along and then perseverance as you probably know had its first first drumming attempt on Looking for oil well they just wanna see what the rocks are made out of and seal up those samples so we can bring them home. And i hope a few years and so everything was looking good. And the drill went in and all the indications were that the pressure on the arm was right because it it turns and hammers at the same time right..

Razi germany europe jpl Shell
RaInCube: In the Eye of the Storm

Innovation Now

01:18 min | 2 months ago

RaInCube: In the Eye of the Storm

"Its flight demonstration rain cube provided scientists with three d. pictures of what was going on inside storms around the world. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Jonathan souter is a metrics engineer. At nasa's jet propulsion laboratory his passion is finding ways to merge new technologies with those being readied for flight demonstration missions. Here's jonathan an example of that was an antenna that i was working on a technology development project. Gpo it was intended that was a deployable tenant that fit in a canister and basically would drive pop up about half meter size of a small umbrella. It turned out. There was another team of jpl. Who's developing a radar that used to be the size of basically like the coffee table. And had shrunken down to the size of a loaf of bread and with these. We were able to combine these two technologies together. And we're able to launch the first active cubesats mission. Rain hugh after nearly two and a half years in orbit the shoebox-size weather satellite phone home. One last time before burning up in earth's atmosphere last december but not before proving that big things really can come in small

Jonathan Souter Nasa Jonathan JPL Rain Hugh
Latinos Role in NASA and Mars Perseverance

Latino USA

01:38 min | 5 months ago

Latinos Role in NASA and Mars Perseverance

"Dna through he'll with working late at nastase. Jpl jet propulsion laboratory in pasadena. California the night before the perseverance rover would finally touchdown on the surface of mars. That night. i think it was the only reflecting on that reflecting also when family understanding how far we have gotten us humanity and recognizing that everybody is going to get to see what we're about to do on mars as flight director for the rover. Deanna knew that in just a couple of hours should be a part of history. I was setting up and getting ready for the first spanish language. Landing broadcast and nasa has done for a planetary mission. Orla obama despite while he admitted they order presents yet. Quincy aurora della nasa perseverance equivocal. Doj got his massive data scientists that beneath deanna would lead this broadcast and give a play by play as the rover inch closer and closer to landing. The idea for spanish language broadcasts came to her when she was working on another mars mission about a decade ago curiosity it came to my mind may be like a week or a few days before. Curiosity landed in two thousand twelve. But since then i've been going to the media office Time there's a major mission happening like hey. We should listen spanish. Hey we should do this. In spanish and yet so right before perseverance started. I mentioned it again and constantly feel like for seven years and then they said yes

Orla Obama Quincy Aurora Nasa Pasadena Deanna California DOJ
NASA's Mars helicopter carries a piece of Wright brothers' plane

The World and Everything In It

01:09 min | 7 months ago

NASA's Mars helicopter carries a piece of Wright brothers' plane

"The mars mission for nasa is working toward another first flight. Milestone that of its little helicopter. Called ingenuity nasa spokeswoman. Laurie gays talking about the work of the jet propulsion laboratory. That jpl small team of nasa helicopter experts assisted jpl embarrassing but ingenuity comply in marzieh's super thin atmosphere. Right now they're looking at april eighth for the big moment and this first flight will pay tribute to the original first flight. The wright brothers flight one hundred seventeen years ago over kittyhawk north carolina. Nasr's martian helicopter holds a small swatch of fabric from the nineteen three right flyer. Engineers tape the material to a cable beneath the helicopter solar panel and this is not the first time one of these historical fragments traveled a space. A different piece of the wright brothers plane flew to the moon with apollo eleven's neil armstrong more than fifty years ago ankle landed racket twain crank quality. We copy on the ground. He got up on the guys about the blue. We're breathing again. Hike a lot.

Nasa JPL Marzieh Laurie Nasr North Carolina Neil Armstrong
NASA's Perseverance rover sends back sounds of Martian winds and rock-blasting laser

Tim Conway Jr.

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

NASA's Perseverance rover sends back sounds of Martian winds and rock-blasting laser

"The Mars rover perseverance has sent some or audio back to Earth. It's the sound of a laser zapping Iraq. Scientists from JPL say the lasers impact on the rock helps other sensors determine which samples are best to grab for analysis. The perseverance is main mission is to determine if ancient life existed on the Red Planet. It's the first time microphones have been mounted on a spacecraft and the first time audio's been recorded on another

JPL Iraq
WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:21 min | 8 months ago

WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

"So adam. Let's start with a couple of notable things about this rover one. It's collecting and to you. Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this. And why this is significant for this mission will. there's something almost philosophical. You have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at. Its this this. Arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover that's there now are versions of instruments that went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists that jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings in ways that that we humans would would. Would i be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see we were standing there and also to look at them multispectral hyperspace literally and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes that i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each brand has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably gonna get this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games does what. The experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared a bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera. That would be the same camera that a lot of people have in their pockets right now sitting on their sitting on their desk. I can get sort of derivative about but there's something important i think in the pictures that are starting to come back already. That include parts of the rover itself and people will describe those as celsius as mars selfie camera taking pictures of itself and and nasa among all agencies is very very good at At its own promotional work saying like. Here's the thing. Here's the picture of the thing we're doing. There are pictures. There's video of the landing which was dramatic but also like the video of the landing. Is there to video of the landing has engineering value but also publicity value. But but i think the calling it. A selfie also includes the recognition of the the. It's not personal because of course it's not a person of the machine hood of the individuality of the humanness of the technology that that we sent that has to do a thing there. That's doing technological work and and seeing mars through a kind of filter that's akin to but slightly different than the filters that if mike if you took that billionaire ticket up tomorrow how you would see through the visor of your of your back suit

JPL Kim Z Nasa Adam Zina Mike
NASA Releases New Images of Mars Taken from Perseverance Rover

WBZ Morning News

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

NASA Releases New Images of Mars Taken from Perseverance Rover

"Is sending back the clearest high resolution color images ever from the surface of Mars. A desolate rocky landscape. Scientists at NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here in California are studying the images of rocks to better understand what they might be made of. JPL's Colleen Wing says the rover landed perfectly and appears to be in great shape. Now that we've landed, we're going to do a series of hardware. Check out just to make sure everything's functioning in the coming days. More pictures sound and even HD video will begin rolling in like stone. ABC NEWS LOS Angeles An

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Colleen Wing Nasa California Abc News Los Angeles
"Touchdown confirmed!": NASA rover lands on Mars

Eddie and Rocky

01:09 min | 8 months ago

"Touchdown confirmed!": NASA rover lands on Mars

"Breaking now the rover perseverance landing safely this afternoon on the Martian surface it took off from Cape Canaveral. At the end of July and traveled nearly 300 million miles until its landing this afternoon. Now the fifth NASA rover tow land on Mars the cheers inside Mission Control here at JPL touchdown has been confirmed on the surface of Mars. This is a very big moment here at JPL. So many years of work, perseverance safely on the surface. Seven months of travel descending through 2300 degrees of heat, he was called the seven Minutes of terror. It has done it now on the ground. By tonight, we could begin seeing new images from Mars. It also has microphones on board. It's recording the sounds of Mars will be able to hear those soon. Lot of relief and cheers here at JPL right now. BBC's Alex Stone reporting the New rover has landed in a basin where scientists think it was once home to a river Delta, and it might show evidence that life once existed on

JPL Cape Canaveral Nasa Alex Stone BBC River Delta
NASA's Perseverance rover survives "seven minutes of terror" to land on Mars

Pat Thurston

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

NASA's Perseverance rover survives "seven minutes of terror" to land on Mars

"Landed successfully on the Red Planet ABC is Alex Stone is with NASA researchers in Pasadena, California who are celebrating The chairs inside Mission Control here at JPL touchdown has been confirmed on the surface of Mars. This is a very big moment here at JPL. So many years of work persevere in safely on the surface. Seven months of travel descending through 2300 degrees of heat. Was called the seven minutes of terror. It has done it now on the ground. By tonight, we could begin seeing new images from Mars. It also has microphones on board. It's recording the sounds of Mars will be able to hear those soon. Ah lot of relief and cheers here at JPL right now.

Alex Stone JPL Pasadena ABC Nasa California
"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:03 min | 10 months ago

"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"For Gary and Shannon. Hopefully, your day is going well, I promise you, you could speak to calf eyes on Steve Gregory. We couldn't get to him last hour. He was out being the intrepid reporter that he is. But now he joins me in studio. Hey, Mom. It's good to see you, brother. Good morning, you know, and I love are actually are off their conversations because I had no idea that you were so into space program and Star Trek and all these things it originals, But still I didn't. I didn't know that. But I'm saying you are a nerd. And geek through and through shirt. We're talking about space program as far as the things that you're working on this far as thean ven shins just stories that you're working on the JPL. We are blessed to have J p l in our backyard. I mean, I just geek out of J P M uncovered GPL stuff. So as long as I've been here, and we've got the Mars Rover landing coming up, I'll be covering in February. I was there for the first Mars rover landing. I mean, just just I love this stuff. And I was just telling you about the time seeing the shuttle, launch the endeavor launch and got to take my father down in Cape Canaveral and then seeing it come full circle when it landed here in l A when they put it in the science center downtown and watching it being transported through downtown L a to come to the science center. Yeah, I've always been a geek on that stuff. And I did interview someone the other day from NASA that talks about the history of all the contributions. NASA GPL Have made to everyday life, all the stuff we take for granted. And the stuff that we didn't know. NASA had a hand in inventing and creating, and then an interview I did today with a scientist engineer who helped to invent a ventilator. That was invented just for covert patients, and they came together because because of covered they were, they couldn't go into their labs. And so they were all working from home. So you had engineers back at Langley Engineers here at JPL. They all did Zoom calls in 26 27 days. Days later, they invented Ventilator from ground in less than a month, less than a month all on zoom and using nothing but white boards back and forth, and then when they had a working model They sent it to Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and they have those those life size life dolls that they use that simulate human interactions and vital signs and stuff. And they connected it to this doll that they use for for testing and they held their breaths. And then all of a sudden they turned it on. First time It worked right out of the chute. It worked perfectly. It's a lighter, smaller, more efficient, cheaper version of those big, bulky ventilators they use in hospitals now, But NASA did it in a way that they didn't want to interfere in the regular supply chain and the regular industry that makes him already They didn't want to go in and be a bullet. Talk about it. So they did it off to the side. And as soon as they got all the schematics and blueprints done, they sent out a sort of an RFP. If you will just said Hey, if your company wants to manufacture this Go ahead and apply. If we approve. You were just hand you the blueprints for free. You go ahead and charge for free free. They handed the blueprints to the vetted companies for free. Um, almost open source if you will, but they just had to go through vetting to make sure they were legitimate and you know they had, you know, the resource is to do it. And I think at the time, the last interview I did. There were 200 companies around the world that had vied for a chance to get the blueprints and I don't recall how many got it. But I'm doing an update interview with the scientist, and that's she's going to tell me how it went because this was months ago, and I did a feature for Ko Phi News and for wake up call, and when I initially did it, So I'm getting common update because now we're back at that critical juncture where ventilators air needed against. I want to see where it's at. I can't wait and I say that in a good way. I know it's for a very serious reason. But I can't wait. It's fascinating because when I asked her, I said What prompted this and she said my boss. Sitting there One day. We were just calling to talk about stuff cause there's nothing we could do. We were working on these various projects. She's she's a scientist. It works on like servo motors and stuff like that. It helps move parts and move things while they're in space at the space station, so she she creates the motors and stuff that move parts and stuff. And she said the guy says we've got to do something, he said. We're scientists. We have got to do something to contribute to this in this crazy pandemic. We have got to do something. What's Where's our biggest need? And they all talked about, they said ventilators and he says, okay, I want everyone to submit their plans to me start submitting plans, and then they started doing some calls like every day and there's a great video that NASA JPL put together a montage of them working on it. You should see these huge whiteboards. I am reminded of hidden figures that scene where you see Kevin Costner in that wall of math, all of math, and that's kind of what you see in the white bored with all these colored markers and schematics and diagrams and formulas. And then all sudden, you see this cube? And it's got this little led number on the front and it's the it's called vital Vita Ellen and I can't remember exactly like ventilation, internal something or other.

NASA Ventilator scientist JPL Steve Gregory Cape Canaveral reporter Gary Kevin Costner Mount Sinai Hospital Langley Engineers New York City J P M Ellen engineer
Investigating NASA's Use of Big Data

Innovation Now

01:23 min | 10 months ago

Investigating NASA's Use of Big Data

"Nasa is increasingly using artificial intelligence to help code and read peto. Bytes of data collected each day. Now those same. Big data techniques are revolutionizing biomedical research. This is innovation now. Nasa recently renewed a research partnership with the national cancer institute extending the development of data science to support cancer research. The early detection research network or e. d. r. n. is a consortium of biomedical investigators who share cancer related information working with nasr's jet propulsion laboratory in california. The scientists use the same computer software used to study a star or planet and recognize how the readings from different instruments relate to one another to study statistics from anonymous cancer patients. Working together since two thousand. Jpl and fdr n have discovered six new biomarkers approved for use in cancer research diagnosis. By the food and drug administration. The biomarkers have already been used in more than one million patient diagnostic tests worldwide. While nasa proves their big data science capabilities biomedical researchers correlate information collected about cancer improving early warning detection. That benefits us. All

Nasa Cancer Peto National Cancer Institute Nasr California Food And Drug Administration
"jpl" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Japanese and chinese I believe that they are all under the same rule in space agency. I really do yeah. Well that's the kind of thing with of space exploration. It's not like if somebody says that. There's an anomaly in the middle of town you can go check it out for yourself but nobody nobody can go to mars and and and keep them honest and say well. I've been there. And i know that's a an important Of talking about this stuff now The one thing before we get to showing images usually when somebody like you starts well. It's actually two things before we get to be to can usually when somebody like you starts. This kind of exploration or research others will follow. I'm not hearing anybody else doing. Are you alone in this or I don't hear about it all. I'm well pretty. Well emerge in this world. Most of what you see out there. That doesn't go along with the mainstream science and i have no problem with real sites. You know. I have no problem with that whatsoever. I just think that it's it's misused. When it comes to money you know. That was the problem with tesla. He was brilliant but he wanted you know he was one of the first guys it said. Hey look the moon. There's something going on here. It's not rotating on on his axis. it's rotating on a fixed point on earth and that that got published in a it got published in one of the papers whatever they had gone at the time post times one of them. People weren't making money off that that's kind of what you know. Ruin tesla look. This is wrong. This is wrong. This is wrong and that that's still going on and a lot of the discoveries is going on with mars that we're finding out about is people on the side these places. You remember the face on mars right. yeah okay. don't discount that. I remember seeing that thought. You was kind of intriguing. Maybe maybe not. And i was a kid then years later they come out with these images that say say look. We took more pictures of them. It doesn't even look like that from this angle. And i thought oh well but you know what that's another story to lose Jpl was behind that they took it from an oblique angle and they didn't apply any contrast to it. Malin want to the cameras. They're the ones that actually released this and they released it like that to get everybody off their back guys went in and fix that image and show that it did still look like it and in fact since then i think it was Two thousand four. The mars odyssey like It took more images that really confirmed it with more detail. I've really it really. Looks like we got something and that is a It's huge. It's like two kilometers about three kilometers. It's it's very big. And i don't think it's carved. I think is probably metallic or something else. And at the top of a building or what but is very symmetrical and it looks like if you want an olmec here is like they have in mexico. Got a human face. And it's got this helmet on it with some designs here in its right straight across. It looks just like that. I know that one and two thousand and four that they got those images. Jpl wasn't controlling that one and they actually got some good injury from it. And that's what you've got all these now you have these Three d representations. That are really showing all this stuff and some people say. Oh no no no. I saw these images years ago. They they debunked that now. They didn't you know they'll do that..

Jpl tesla Malin mexico
"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Angles especially around some of the remote stuff. . A lot of things you guys do work with like Rovers. . You talked about spirit just to have a conversation with those things is like we complain about late and senior website was slow or I was playing this game and it was hard because there was. . Two hundred milliseconds of latency. . There's different kinds of latency out in space. . Right? ? Wouldn't the speed light is not enough. . So he can some of the smart and putting it on rovers and other stuff. . Some of this ai work that you're doing. . It sounds like it might have some <hes> lakes Ai I. . Hope. . So and we think it does too. . So Michael, , basically the work that. . We're doing for your listeners. . We have a project that we've been investigating now. . So let's fast forward the clock rovers nowadays the last one that landed on the planet. . I won't say that we shipped because we just shipped one, , which we'll talk about called does a couple of weeks. . The right we did pandemic shipping and launching of rockets, , Rovers, , new fad but yes, , for pre. . That pre pandemic in two thousand, twelve, , , we ship the the Mars Science Laboratory or the Curiosity Rover, , and that one is about. . So spirited opportunity just the size them ver- you know your listeners it's about the size if you have kids of one of those cars that you push maybe or something like that or maybe like a power wheel big wheel type of thing that size. . Of Spirit and opportunity the MSL rover is about the size of a small car like Volkswagen bug and if you came to jpl and it was open to have these some day and things like that, , you could walk into our building agency a full scale model of to really get the feel of it but that's the size rover over that we're talking about now that's. . Sort of the modern class at them and so twenty, , twenty s the perseverance, , the launched it's the same size. . So we've got MSL still operating spirit and opportunity arts anymore because they were solar-powered MSL is powered basically by nuclear fission uses an rtd power source and things like that. . So it doesn't have to worry about solar panels so it can go for quite a while and. . Has Been. . So it's a great test basically as long as it mechanically is still functioning right? ? Absolutely and so challenges with mechanical functioning are like, , Hey, , we learned a lot about the wheels for a car sized thing as we drove over walks in it toward the wheels up, , you know and things, , and so we did we learned a lot about them if you look at one. Quick . Update and twenty twenty as the wheels have little homer simpson speed holes are not speed old but holes to prevent having just track and tread that dies catching on everything and that's just one thing we learned amongst other things. . We've got smart engineers JPL. . MSL's agree platform to test stuff out on. . However let's talk about AIML L. I'm going to dispel some missing rumor so. . MSL and space assets and others they all need right we gotta do computing we need a processor and A. . And things like that they are running off of an old the what is that the latest? ? GP probably like a Invidia like twenty eighty something like that. . Yeah. . Everybody thinks that and I know you're being facetious and I liked the snark it's awesome. . But yes, no, , , and that's the challenge. . Everybody thinks that and it's not it's running off of a rats fifty, , which is a be a h that's as bad as powerful as a POWERPC chip and process or in so and why real quick y right when we crash something in the government, , we've got a congressional inquiry that we have to respond to. . This virtual companies do it and we love the commercial companies where partner with them. . Now, , they don't right they I mean not to say that it doesn't ruin their value stream or their reputation or things like that. . But they've got a little bit more flexibility to do testing and stuff like that than we do and so we are risk averse by profile definition, and , so because of that, , we were only use things that are what we. . Call radiation hardened, , which means that when it gets up there in space, , a space does and cosmic radiation do weird things to your hardware they flip the bids amongst that's the easy stuff they do. . They do a lot of other nasty stuff and so you gotta make sure that the hardware works in space and so because of that the technology, , the Gartner life cycle for what we could use for that is real behind and so this big. . Smart this big. . Potentially smart you know and it is smart. . They did great things on MSL and they're going to do even greater on twenty twenty is writing off of an old processor. . So the I is human in the loop even more. . So coupled with the fact that you alluded to, , Hey, , you know bandwidth latency you think that's an issue the lifetime from Earth to Mars eight minutes round trip. . So anything you send to Mars you, , gotTa. . Weigh eight minutes to figure out what the heck happened or even what happened for your report back. . Then you know that's not it doesn't all have to be synchronised. . They're asynchronous ways. . There are ways to kind of achieved some advantages and key things up, , but it's still it's eight minutes basically, , and so because of that, , there's a video on youtube by the way for your listeners. . If you haven't seen it, , it's called the seven minutes of terror. . Closer to eight. . Yeah. . Yeah. . That's a great one. . Yeah. . Yeah. . That's for the entry descent and landing. When . they landed MSL curiosity, , they had to use a big sky crane instead of the typical big balloon rap the rover to balloon it let it balance which was the way they did it before it was so big they had to have this elaborate sky crane thing and in that seven minutes when you go into entry descent and landing there seven minutes before you knew, , Hey, , what the heck happened and all this stuff had to happen autonomously and things like that, , which is great. . But yeah, , normally eight minutes and so if I told you today that the Mars surface operations people use about two. . Hundred images a day that are taken from the rover from its NAVC cans, , which are camps by the wheels, and , it's Mass Cam, , which is the big head that take selfies and other things that you see what it's arm. . If I told you that today, , they only use two hundred images to plan what to do for rover operations. The . next day you'd understand why we're bandwidth limited or Ltd what we can process on the reverse sucking them down to the ground and making decisions. . What if I told you tomorrow? ? We'll get close to that nvidia chip maybe not exactly but there's efforts called high-performance space like computing to build a multi-core. . GP. . Like chip that is radiation hardened. . It's a big government project. . That has an emulator already that they're making and that we also today have Mars helicopter I'm perseverance, , which is a little drone that went along with it that if successful is running a qualcomm snapdragon, , which is gp like chip and why are we not fully radiation hardened and all this? ? It does we've tested in whatever but it's not like has the years and years of testing. . Why are we doing that? ? Because it's a technology demonstration and we have a bigger like the mission is still successful even if Mars Halley you know is not successful with that what you call ingenuity right and I. . Suspect that the risk to a little drone helicopter thing

USC La football JPL Chris opio professor Michael US Santa Clarita Dr Neil Med Vitovich Jay Bilas EPA jbl hp Doug cutting T. C. H. Carbon Observatory
Python at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Talk Python To Me

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Python at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

"Angles especially around some of the remote stuff. A lot of things you guys do work with like Rovers. You talked about spirit just to have a conversation with those things is like we complain about late and senior website was slow or I was playing this game and it was hard because there was. Two hundred milliseconds of latency. There's different kinds of latency out in space. Right? Wouldn't the speed light is not enough. So he can some of the smart and putting it on rovers and other stuff. Some of this ai work that you're doing. It sounds like it might have some lakes Ai I. Hope. So and we think it does too. So Michael, basically the work that. We're doing for your listeners. We have a project that we've been investigating now. So let's fast forward the clock rovers nowadays the last one that landed on the planet. I won't say that we shipped because we just shipped one, which we'll talk about called does a couple of weeks. The right we did pandemic shipping and launching of rockets, Rovers, new fad but yes, for pre. That pre pandemic in two thousand, twelve, we ship the the Mars Science Laboratory or the Curiosity Rover, and that one is about. So spirited opportunity just the size them ver- you know your listeners it's about the size if you have kids of one of those cars that you push maybe or something like that or maybe like a power wheel big wheel type of thing that size. Of Spirit and opportunity the MSL rover is about the size of a small car like Volkswagen bug and if you came to jpl and it was open to have these some day and things like that, you could walk into our building agency a full scale model of to really get the feel of it but that's the size rover over that we're talking about now that's. Sort of the modern class at them and so twenty, twenty s the perseverance, the launched it's the same size. So we've got MSL still operating spirit and opportunity arts anymore because they were solar-powered MSL is powered basically by nuclear fission uses an rtd power source and things like that. So it doesn't have to worry about solar panels so it can go for quite a while and. Has Been. So it's a great test basically as long as it mechanically is still functioning right? Absolutely and so challenges with mechanical functioning are like, Hey, we learned a lot about the wheels for a car sized thing as we drove over walks in it toward the wheels up, you know and things, and so we did we learned a lot about them if you look at one. Quick Update and twenty twenty as the wheels have little homer simpson speed holes are not speed old but holes to prevent having just track and tread that dies catching on everything and that's just one thing we learned amongst other things. We've got smart engineers JPL. MSL's agree platform to test stuff out on. However let's talk about AIML L. I'm going to dispel some missing rumor so. MSL and space assets and others they all need right we gotta do computing we need a processor and A. And things like that they are running off of an old the what is that the latest? GP probably like a Invidia like twenty eighty something like that. Yeah. Everybody thinks that and I know you're being facetious and I liked the snark it's awesome. But yes, no, and that's the challenge. Everybody thinks that and it's not it's running off of a rats fifty, which is a be a h that's as bad as powerful as a POWERPC chip and process or in so and why real quick y right when we crash something in the government, we've got a congressional inquiry that we have to respond to. This virtual companies do it and we love the commercial companies where partner with them. Now, they don't right they I mean not to say that it doesn't ruin their value stream or their reputation or things like that. But they've got a little bit more flexibility to do testing and stuff like that than we do and so we are risk averse by profile definition, and so because of that, we were only use things that are what we. Call radiation hardened, which means that when it gets up there in space, a space does and cosmic radiation do weird things to your hardware they flip the bids amongst that's the easy stuff they do. They do a lot of other nasty stuff and so you gotta make sure that the hardware works in space and so because of that the technology, the Gartner life cycle for what we could use for that is real behind and so this big. Smart this big. Potentially smart you know and it is smart. They did great things on MSL and they're going to do even greater on twenty twenty is writing off of an old processor. So the I is human in the loop even more. So coupled with the fact that you alluded to, Hey, you know bandwidth latency you think that's an issue the lifetime from Earth to Mars eight minutes round trip. So anything you send to Mars you, gotTa. Weigh eight minutes to figure out what the heck happened or even what happened for your report back. Then you know that's not it doesn't all have to be synchronised. They're asynchronous ways. There are ways to kind of achieved some advantages and key things up, but it's still it's eight minutes basically, and so because of that, there's a video on youtube by the way for your listeners. If you haven't seen it, it's called the seven minutes of terror. Closer to eight. Yeah. Yeah. That's a great one. Yeah. Yeah. That's for the entry descent and landing. When they landed MSL curiosity, they had to use a big sky crane instead of the typical big balloon rap the rover to balloon it let it balance which was the way they did it before it was so big they had to have this elaborate sky crane thing and in that seven minutes when you go into entry descent and landing there seven minutes before you knew, Hey, what the heck happened and all this stuff had to happen autonomously and things like that, which is great. But yeah, normally eight minutes and so if I told you today that the Mars surface operations people use about two. Hundred images a day that are taken from the rover from its NAVC cans, which are camps by the wheels, and it's Mass Cam, which is the big head that take selfies and other things that you see what it's arm. If I told you that today, they only use two hundred images to plan what to do for rover operations. The next day you'd understand why we're bandwidth limited or Ltd what we can process on the reverse sucking them down to the ground and making decisions. What if I told you tomorrow? We'll get close to that nvidia chip maybe not exactly but there's efforts called high-performance space like computing to build a multi-core. GP. Like chip that is radiation hardened. It's a big government project. That has an emulator already that they're making and that we also today have Mars helicopter I'm perseverance, which is a little drone that went along with it that if successful is running a qualcomm snapdragon, which is gp like chip and why are we not fully radiation hardened and all this? It does we've tested in whatever but it's not like has the years and years of testing. Why are we doing that? Because it's a technology demonstration and we have a bigger like the mission is still successful even if Mars Halley you know is not successful with that what you call ingenuity right and I. Suspect that the risk to a little drone helicopter thing

Rovers JPL Nvidia Qualcomm Twenty Twenty Michael Gartner Volkswagen Partner
A Guided Tour of Mars

Innovation Now

01:03 min | 1 year ago

A Guided Tour of Mars

"Leveraging virtual reality and augmented reality technologies. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in collaboration with Google has released access Mars a free immersive experience that allows the user to take a guided tour of Mars by following the path of the curiosity rover users can. View the actual dunes and valleys explored by the space craft. As they wander through the lonely red desert, the user can zero in on objects of scientific interest including rock outcrops and mud cracks. A JPL scientist narrates the walk explaining the geologic evidence curiosity has unearthed. The web walk is available for use on all desktop and mobile devices or any VR ar headset and will be periodically updated to reflect curiosities ongoing mission. Previously, these technologies were used to take NASA scientists tomorrow's. But with access Mars anyone in the world can ride a law.

Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Google Scientist
Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

Esportz Network Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

"While the podcast. So we're going to be breaking down this deal for both perspectives. It see how the cookie crumbles really what it comes down to how these deals habit. You see all the headlights you see the products being worn by the players Orga dive into really the steps that lead up to the creation of a brand deal like this one. So starting out from the early stages which side reach out I was JBL. Making the step over to one hundred thieves or one hundred thieves reaching out to jbl. Do you guys remember? I'm pretty sure we were the ones that initiated the contact. Through an agency that we're working with at the time to help us to grab craft our approach to to exports into gaming in general. So I i. think we were the first ones to to to. To Extend the hand. Absolutely, Jacob, do you remember when those conversations started and the energy was like a as you reached out? This is a space that's really filled with a lot of partners jbl. Here's a legacy audio brad reaching out to you remember what those early conversations through like. Yeah. A excitement is always Key in figuring out these partnerships and really looking at all brandon and who reposition ourselves with. We need partnerships that we that we truly get behind an ice either about So with JBL obviously premium quality products something we feel like we represented in displays of east bolts. So while I, can't remember the. The. Stop Time. All who initiates I remember you know sort of the. The sense of feeling in the room once we came over the initial hurdle of introductions and you know that was one of excitement. Absolutely. I can only imagine the seems like a trend that's happened this year of these really log running brands enter eastward seeing that with Herman. Miller. For example, in the complexity partnership, you've got a brand that well out dates video games, much less e sports getting into the space promising. Hey, we've got this great product that's been used by all these other industries, and now we want to be involved in East Sports Michael From your perspective. Why was J B L A natural fit for East? Sports. So I I think to to answer that it was. We were looking at this more as a great fit for gaming and where we think gaming is is going in the future if you take a look at how the graphics within the game have evolved over the last fifteen or twenty years like. It has grown in leaps and bounds, and so the realism that's now. Prevalent in President Gains. Really helps to create the super immersive experience for Gamers and we felt like sound was a piece that was that was lagging in that equation. And so our whole idea was we want the gamers actually be able to hear the game in the same way that they see it. and. When we identified that as a need in space, that's when we knew it was time for us to actually enter. We didn't want to be just another brand that said, hey, gaming. It looks cool. Let's do that. We wanted to make sure that we're actually bringing something new table and and actually you know solving a need that we thought consumers gaming space might have. And that was really the whole impetus for US designed to get into gaming. Absolutely in every game knows how important audio is you mentioned how graphics approving well, sow does it prove it as well especially in the battle royale? Sowed is so important you've three hundred, sixty degree view. There's always people either above below at identified where they are and reacting to it is becoming an increasingly important part of being successful in eastport. Jacob you of a background is professional player. Could you talk about how audio matters especially at the highest levels of water video game? Yeah. Absolutely like you mentioned the. But I think The. The shooter Genre in general audio is one of the most primary importance of of of performance ride. So when we first started this conversation, it aligned sort of when we. Just picked up our counter strike team as well. both counterstrike fortnight now valor and call of duty call everything right sound. So very pivotal to to play performance. So as one of the the first conversations that I remember having was making sure that whoever we partnered with on the audio category, it would be a product that we were excited to use them that all of our. Players get behind and use on a daily basis because of how how big of an importance it has on the products on performance site So it was very reassuring. I remember Maddie from from team coming into the conversation saying listen it's got it's going to be jpl I'm really excited about this what are your concerns here because mostly on the performance side without teams and so Speaking on behalf of all of our players and going into the competitions it's important that we have You know state of the OPS. Hardware. When when we playing whether that's mountain. audio. Absolutely, you're only as good as your equipment. Well, that's a lie could be better than your equipment plenty of types, but at the highest level, those little those little differences really make a big deal. Michael

JBL Jacob United States Maddie Brandon Eastport President Trump Herman Miller Michael
Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Innovation Now

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

"Specializes in spacecraft not medical device manufacturing, but excellent engineering rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of the agencies specialties. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers. At Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators. So they may be used on patients with the most severe covid nineteen symptoms. When people at JPL realized, they might have what it takes to support the medical community. They felt it was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise. And in just thirty seven days had created. The prototype medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. Flexible design means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers, hotels, and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe, the office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech, which manages jpl for NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jennifer Pulley Nasa Technology Transfer Caltech
"jpl" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Of strange I see Mister reed politically assuming the compromise stance of dole when I don't think normally read would do that so it's sort of political convenience on the part of what really it is a religious Sir organization now I personally happen to favor those exceptions so I agree with Mr dole's position as a matter of fact but I kind of question Ralph reed's agreeing with it so I'm not altogether comfortable with the what's going on here's a here's an up beat kind of thing Galileo makes close approach to the largest moon in the solar system it is a big morning for scientists at NASA's jet propulsion lab in Pasadena they were in high spirits over the close encounter between the unmanned Galileo spacecraft in Jupiter's moon Ganymede JPL employees and their friends and families gathered last night to celebrate excitement builds as eleven twenty nine PM the actual time of the pass rolled around a radio signal announcing the news took thirty five minutes to reach earth where it was greeted by researchers applause and cheers at twelve oh four AM Hey JPL spokesman says the data they receive tells them they had an excellent flight by the probe get this came within five hundred and forty four miles of the planet sized chunk of icy rock that's about the distance from San Diego to San Fran with a diameter of more than thirty two hundred miles Ganymede is the biggest moon in the solar system scientists are hoping that a look at that mood will provide information about fault areas here on earth noon the first Ganymede photos will not be available until next month haha.

Ralph reed NASA Pasadena San Diego San Fran Mister reed Mr dole JPL
"jpl" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"jpl" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Is there a possibility that we could have microbes from other states yes there is a possibility there's a probable no is there a chance yes not a very good book speaking just back and forth one of my greatest students can Wilford who is a JPL was one of the scientists now who has to figure out how to make sure that we know that the more samples and we hope to get back the two or three years have life in them but that is a concern has always been a concern I learned for instance that the Apollo astronauts the first one that came back from the moon did you know they have white rap with them and that the White House afterwards and origin of the rats died we were gonna let him out that's how crude it was just got much better now but yes it's possible probable no one now what what's also look at the these other possibilities that are sitting out there somebody let's say will visit a sick person who has a covert nineteen maybe they're at home they're tending to them and that person ends up dying had some prior conditions other ailments they've been putting down covert nineteen regardless of how they died but that's what they've been putting down and then the person who was tending to them seems to get sick and die as to my question Peter is has that happen with the flu and we just never heard about it before because the media never reported on anything like this or is this unusual that somebody would die tended to someone who hasn't yes a great question I think the flu is carried away far more people than we really give credence to observing what happens is yes we say well he he or she has the flu but unfortunately I think you've heard the expression the old man's friend and that's what they call pneumonia the money is the next step after the flu and the death goes down as deaf blind ammonia when in actuality there would have never been that pneumonia but for the first infection by that slew by respondent complicates the we're talking about multiple kinds of microbes what's so complicated about this tragedy in this is a tragedy is that we try to find single reasons for these deaths and the number of people complicated we are to post and billions and billions of cells of many different species the virus affects everyone of us differently how what we say is caused by the virus in the Barcelona sure that's probably never correct it is complicated work complicated but it becomes political as you know this is Gerry aspect to this in one of these calls with deaths is one one no way too many and yet we're not looking at eighty thousand today in America alone it is as we started not just but the great tragic year we still buy licenses by seventy first birthday today but these eighty thousand deaths Peter how do we really know that thirty thousand of them aren't from the seasonal flu yeah but how do we know there's only eighty thousand minute there were nine hundred and fifty thousand we don't it's just at this point it's very complicated again to say one thing is killed you well for many of these best by far the vast majority you could certainly say that had they not been inspected by the cold on the date that they were in fact they might still be alive today what is exactly a virus kind of explain it to us no man I'm not such a great question George only enough I was my faculty meeting last week and we were asking ourselves motorcycle deep because at the university of Washington the department of biology which I'm a member we graduate a mom the largest number of graduates per year of the entire universe and yet we do not have among fifty professors we don't have a single person who knows the biology of viruses to the point that they are a professor of virology all the virus specialists reported in medical schools and this is because there's been this long and I think really awful to Justin's little virus is not alive there was a famous scientist years ago win Margolis was our name and she said that to be alive something has to have a cell virus isn't cellular doesn't have an outer coating that we have it is not composed about recording the fatty material if the approach you know her coat and discuss either one or two strands of nucleic acids but they say that you can't live on its own without a host and therefore has no life but you can see that but many parasites Georgia outside the host these things are functionally dead so you really need to reinvent what the definitions of life is that all right at scales of this type of organism because I fully believe they're alive there is it's just it's not this binary system a virus is that it gets into a person it causes that person's genetic systems are building copies of the virus is it all I was doing that why should think so and then he gets back out it is functionally dead again so we're talking semantics but that my biology department does not have a specialist on viruses I think it's a travesty I see I think so too I they we should be all over the place these people doesn't doesn't it but they come back and say no it's a virus is globalized world biology department not a dental part is it's if it's not alive how could it replicate how could one role how could it do what it does yeah it's pretty logical I'll tell you sometime we professors are headed then I mean does it eats there's a breeze well it takes its energy from the host of the seventh but is using the host itself to do one thing make more copies of itself is like a parasite well it is a parasite all the problems we have is it is taking over the machinery of our bodies one thing make more viruses stay with us either we're gonna take a quick break we'll come back with more right here on coast to coast area get.

Wilford JPL
NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

Innovation Now

01:00 min | 1 year ago

NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

"A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators so they may be used on patients with the most severe Kovic nineteen symptoms when people at Jpl realized they might have what it takes to support the medical community It was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise and ingest. Thirty seven days had created the prototype. Medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. It's flexible design. Means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers hotels and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe the Office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech which manages. Jpl FOR NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Office Of Technology Transfer Nasa Caltech
Lucky Peanuts: The Traditional Space Launch Snack

Innovation Now

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Lucky Peanuts: The Traditional Space Launch Snack

"Launch. Most NASA astronauts eat a hearty meal of scrambled eggs and steak no matter what time of day the launches scheduled a tribute to the breakfast enjoyed by astronaut and shepherd before his mercury freedom seven flight in nineteen sixty one after a successful launch rookie launched directors test directors and engineers have their neckties clipped and the team of launch controllers. Enjoy a hearty meal of beans and Corn Bread since the gym is six mission in nineteen sixty five astronauts in space awake to music chosen by mission control each day and Lucky peanuts are fixture at every major deep space mission event since nineteen sixty four. That tradition started after the first. Six Ranger spacecraft failed during launch or while leaving orbit on the seventh launch. Someone brought peanuts into mission control. The mission succeeded and peanuts have been tradition at JPL launches and landings ever since for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley

JPL
Active wildfires are fast-moving disasters, and the fallout can be terrible, too

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Active wildfires are fast-moving disasters, and the fallout can be terrible, too

"Of our series how we survive. We've been looking at how tech can help us adapt to climate change today. We're looking at fires and smoke. NASA and its Jet Propulsion Laboratory are launching flights to gather more data about the lingering pollutants from fires by flying things straight into the smoke plumes. We can't actually see these super tiny pollutants but they are big enough to affect our breathing especially for those who have asthma both NASA and JPL are learning more from studying the plumes during an active fire as well as the air post fire to help understand how these pollutants could affect us over the long run. Marketplace is text Hayes Use Alvarado reports earlier this fall NASA and JPL sin two planes flying into some plumes of wildfires northern California. The planes were on a special mission. Shen together air samples from an active fire carbon dioxide carbon monoxide nitrogen Nitrous Oxide Particulate matter the talk show style rose and Applied Sciences engineer at J. p. l.. She says flying planes very close to the flames to grab air samples as necessary because the existing awesome data. NASA generates comes from too far away those hybrid satellite images from space useful for tracking and even anticipating the path of fire. Can't give us enough information about the breathe here on earth but air samples can tell us about the fuel composition. How high the plume is being injected into the atmosphere? And how dense that plume is and doctors and scientists are hungry for that data to answer questions. Like how much ash will be trapped in the atmosphere wants to flames are out. How will our breathing an overall health down here on earth be affected? All of these are things that will affect how far that the emissions Sion's will carry and in fact we've actually seen fires from Canada affecting air quality in Florida you took the planes house emission the D. C. Eight flies down one of the fire with hoses attached to the outside of the plane sucking air into empty tanks for evaluation back at the lab the Er two cruises that so many thousand feet about twice as harder than commercial flights using high tech sensors to detect how hot the fire is an measure. The height of the flames scientists can use this data to to extrapolate down when effects of the fires because a super tiny particulate matter too small for the naked eye to see literally affects every living organism born an even unborn. They've actually also recently found some of those particulates on the lining of a fetus. The mother was breathing a an literally affected her baby. Would doctors need to know. Is What happens. Long-term when the respiratory system and even the lining of the amniotic sock where the baby is growing eh exposed for weeks or months to invisible fallout from a wildfire. JPL's a style road says emissions are targeted to help find answers trying to get at the relevant relevant information for decision making so that decision makers can make it quickly in an informed way climate change means wildfires are increasingly inevitable and now saying JPL have launched this research to help figure out how to live without new normal that was marketplace tax other auto. NASA also has a new APP out called called Earth. Now where you can see in real time. Active fires satellites hovering over our planet and of course a bunch of other cool NASA things And now for some related links. Australia has been fighting horrible. Bushfires in recent months that killed six people oh and created a very toxic air quality in Sydney hospital visits were up ten percent and the air quality was up to twelve times above. What's considered Hazardous speaking of Nasr's data the organization found that fires in New South Wales and Queensland pumped out almost half of Australia's yearly normal amount of greenhouse gas emissions and that because so much forest land is either burned or compromised by smoke. It's usual ability to absorb all that carbon dioxide it is also greatly reduced the T. l.. Dr Here the fires caused by hotter and drier. Weather resulting from climate change are also contributing to more climate change. Change California's carbon emissions also went up dramatically during the twenty eighteen fire season. So that's a bummer.

Nasa JPL California Jet Propulsion Laboratory Australia Nitrous Oxide Canada Sydney Hospital Shen J. P. L Hayes Florida Nasr Applied Sciences
"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Engineer from JPL like Austin more often than not the school teams perform better than the JBL teams at JPL Chris and Carla okay fine you can update from Washington the Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to approve the articles of impeachment against president trump there are twenty three eyes and seventeen knows Democrats have charged the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress the ranking Republican on the committee congressman Doug Collins objected to the vote for my purposes the gentleman seek recognition for Santa Claus to L. rule that I give notice of intent to file dissenting these Republicans have called this impeachment ridiculous process the house is expected to vote on it next week I'm all that's happening president trump says the US and China have reached the phase one trade deal and a seventeenth month long care for war the US has agreed to drop plans to impose tariffs on a hundred and sixty billion dollars in Chinese imports the Chinese have agreed to massive but unspecified purchases of American farm and manufactured products there's road work on the one oh five in south LA on the westbound side they're working from the one ten to the four or five and I have two left lanes shut down until five AM you're seen traffic really bunch up from the one ten over to about Crenshaw's already make that merge on the four oh five freeway southbound connector to the eastbound side of the one oh five there's an accident there's a that trend is red completely shut down the drive is backing up you come away from sentry bill about you can just use entry to head east bound or you could also head south on of dress up towards Elsa bendable biting use Appier eastbound Dr all lanes are shut down on the four or five in Orange County both directions there between magnolia and Warner for Caltrans work southbound lanes were we open at five AM northbound lanes to be shut down until six AM and then further north on the four oh five until beach to the six oh five monthly budget is the time to convert your home the solar sun lacks is the choice of so many KFI listeners based on dean sharps.

US KFI Caltrans Elsa Carla JBL dean sharps Warner magnolia Orange County Crenshaw LA China Engineer trump Doug Collins congressman
"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Objective and JPL's Bernardo Lopez says the students also compete alongside engineer from JPL like Austin more often than not the school teams perform better than the JBL teams at JPL Chris and Carla okay finding an update from Washington the Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to approve the articles of impeachment against president trump there are twenty three eyes and seventeen knows Democrats have charged the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress the ranking Republican on the committee congressman Doug Collins objected to the vote pursuing my purposes the gentleman seek recognition percent to close to L. rule that I give notice of intent to file descending the publicans have called his impeachment of ridiculous process the house is expected to vote on it next week I'm all that's happening president trump says the US and China have reached a phase one trade deal in a seventeenth month long terror for the U. S. had agreed to drop plans to impose tariffs on a hundred and sixty billion dollars in Chinese imports the Chinese have agreed to massive but unspecified purchases of American farming manufactured products we have a work zone on the two ten yeah this is in the warranty on the two ten west bound for Buena Vista to mountain Caltrans gonna be taken away the two right lanes until seven in the morning watch for delays throughout that area Montebello this is on the sixty west bound right after say Gabriel Boulevard we have a car down the card sticking out the right lane there two trucks on the scene watch for some slow traffic from just after Rosemead fountain valley we have that full freeway closure this is on the four oh five north bound from Warner to magnolia all lanes going to be off limits until six in the morning your drive is being diverted off on to Warner KFI in the sky helps get you there faster a bright Vance it's getting colder your forecast is next when you order food for meetings you get the occasional curveball last minute changes complicated.

Rosemead fountain valley Carla JBL Vance Warner KFI Montebello Caltrans Buena Vista China US trump JPL Doug Collins congressman Congress president Democrats Senate Judiciary Committee Washington
"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"From and I have a seat next to a window so she just wanted me to get away from it the shooting happened in the underground parking garage of an apartment complex police had been called about a disturbance less than an hour before the shooting high school students from around the world have trouble to JPL to put a ping pong ball in a jar this student from large mark charter school in LA is among those competing in the twenty second annual invention challenge to be hot the actual JPL campus then amongst others are most the engine is working right now just other teams all kind of getting all the having a really fun time with this also competitive time it's it's a really good experience this year's challenge had teams of students building devices to put ten ping pong balls say that quickly ping pong balls in Mason jars from sixteen feet away in less than a minute teams from twenty eight schools competed for bragging rights president trump says he watched part of today's impeachment vote it's a witch hunt it's a sham it's a hoax nothing was done wrong zero was done wrong he says it's a horrible thing to be using impeachment when there was no pressure on Ukraine trivializing impeachment trump says it's supposed to be used in an emergency a phenomenal deal president trump right they're talking about the US and China having reached a phase one trade deal in which the US has agreed to drop plans to impose new tariffs on one hundred sixty billion dollars in Chinese imports cavs will largely remained a twenty five percent on two hundred and fifty billion dollars and will use them for future negotiations on the face to deal he says China has agreed to massive purchases of American farm and manufactured products the Winchester mystery house in San Jose is holding its final Friday the thirteenth flashlight tour of the decade gun heiress seer Winchester is said to have been obsessed with the number thirteen would often hold seances in hopes of keeping tormenting spirits away the rare night tours of the mansion include a behind the scenes look at spooky are parts of the perky house the forty nine dollar that includes a souvenir flashlight and runs through.

JPL LA trump Ukraine president US China San Jose seer Winchester
Live at Amazon Re:MARS  Interview with Tom Soderstrom, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:10 min | 2 years ago

Live at Amazon Re:MARS Interview with Tom Soderstrom, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

"Here at the Amazon remorse conference which is going on between June third and seventh in Las Vegas two thousand nine hundred and that is and for those who they're not aware of the Mars conference it actually stands for machine learning automation robotics and space of course being focused on artificial intelligence and it's broad applications focused on those first three letters mostly machine learning mation and robotics components and as part of that we are thrilled and excited to have today as our special guest Tom Sodas trump who is the chief technology and innovation officer at NASA jet potion laboratory hi Tom Thank you so much for joining us on the podcast today well thank you for having me this is a true pleasure and an honor yeah thank you so much for joining us today we'd like to start by having introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a bit about your background and your current role at NASA my role is really to try to predict the future and in future today so it's really if you can we've created an innovation experience center where we go into this room to experience the future today and with that is all about is trying to understand what technology waves are ready to be served and which ones are worthy to be surfed and if we serve them can we have an impact to JPL NASA and really any enterprise and we're from California so were surfer dudes that's our metaphor yeah as a matter of fact yeah we heard you give a talk at the Keno on Wednesday here at the conference and for our listeners who were not able to make that show maybe you can give us a little bit of a recap of what you talked about some of the insights that you have at Nasa Jpl certainly the talk title was too Walker Thais Mars and this was playing words Mars in this context means machine learning automation robotics and space and of course we care a lot about the planet Mars so democratizing means two things that means surfing these technology waves that makes it available to people so that's the other part having everyone participate in answering the questions that NASA is answering like is there life in space are we alone if we one day needed to export humanity would we have a place to go and where do the universe comes from where is it going these are big questions that affect all of us and therefore all of that should be involving solving them so democratizing Mars means to make the Algorithms make it available make data available so that future explorers can stand on the shoulders of giants not in years or decades but in minutes and right now as I know that this event is all about machine learning and ai but so in your talk you didn't touch upon that much can you tell our listeners some examples about how Jay is using a I certainly did I gave a few examples of a but very few because the conference is full of really good examples of ai the one I gave was about predictive maintenance so we use today we have satellites around Earth and in deep space and we want to see if they're about to go wrong so you use machine learning and take the previous tracks or orbits US training data and then we now take the actual data as news around machine learning algorithms to see things on wrong if they're going wrong then what we do is we visualize it for the people so that the people are still in the low so we intelligent assistance rather than artificial intelligence. I A rather than and that's been very successful we're finding just about all the anomalies that people found we tested and now some that people didn't find that's great you know we talk about ai as seven patterns of a until predictive analytics is one of them and we do know that NASA is doing a lot of predictive analytics so I appreciate that example that you're with us because we talk about that a lot and I don't think that some of our listeners understand or know just how how much NASA is using predictive analytics so the example with the satellite was great can you talk to us about other ways that you're using it as well so in other one predicted maintenance is so if you think about what NASA and JPL does we track spacecraft in all of our solar system and beyond actually on this sort of system so to do that as the earth rotates you have to have antenna farms that can understand and listen to our spacecraft talk to them wherever this baseball Dr for instance voyager it takes almost forty hours to get a signal out back so the space Antonio that Central Command another antenna will receive well those antennas are in very high demand so you need to understand what maintenance do we need to do so we're using a lot of ai to say what looks like it was going to break we hope you're enjoying this podcast and sorry for the brief interruption Kakinada not only produces the AI podcast listening to right now but we also generate research and advisory to help companies make sense of AI cognitive technologies we also run the most authoritative vendor neutral she learning training and certification on the market if you're looking to make a reality for your organization are a three-day cog lick training is for you if you're interested in attending confined pricing and registration on our website at cognreznick dot com will also provide a link in the show notes we've met many of our podcast listeners in our classes and we hope that we'll see are you there as well now back to the podcast who's going to break we'll use another antenna and take it off line for a little bit and that's one good example that can then be democratized two trains automobiles airplanes cars just as we can learn from their methods to make our machine learning better so I know that you know we talked about some of these applications of around predictive analytics and some of these other things that you're doing at NASA JPL but maybe you could talk about some of the broader things because NASA is involved only in stuff that's orbiting other plans but right here at home as well so maybe you could talk about how he is being applied in space both on other planets and right here orbiting our own perfect why don't we start with home the homeless where the hardest and there's a lot of things happening what we do at NASA is to look at Earth from space and you get a very different perspective so we have a lot of satellites orbiting Earth they take around ninety minutes to get around and for instance one good use case of AI is detect forest fires so they're looking and all of a sudden let's see they see a plume and it looks like a forest fire they can then re target another satellite too zoom in and then trigger the fire department to respond to so that is really about an autonomous swarm of satellites working on the human behalf another one is to take in all of we're sending a lot of satellites out to look at water so we understand the water pattern we understand that the ice melting pattern so we can do machine learning on that and let people know with real data what's happening and neither one is predicting Salamis hurricanes floods droughts all of that it's all about looking at massive amounts of data and analyzing it and looking for patterns and giving you a heads up warning happening so those are some easy if I can say that use cases another one anyway so that's enough about earth for now space so are farthest craft voyager it's about roughly fifteen billion miles away with a B and we have a lot of space craft in between we have spacecraft on Mars awesome Mars is the Mars Curiosity Rover for example is driving a Mars and finds it looks for rocks that we have pre identified it also has a I running on it that is looking for interesting rocks so it has so it finds one of those and it takes naps a picture of it and then if it has enough energy and depending on what else it needs to do then it sends that serves as an intelligent digital assistant to the human to catch the things that we missed so that's one example of

Amazon Ninety Minutes Forty Hours Three-Day One Day
Rolling Stones Rock

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Rolling Stones Rock

"Four decades the music of the rolling stones had global reach here on earth. Now the band's influence extends all the way to Mars. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. NASA team has named Iraq on Mars Mars for music legend. The rolling stones a little larger than a golf ball. The Rock apparently rolled about three feet propelled by thrusters as insight touched down on Mars. The insight landers primary mission is to study the Red Planet's Interior but images of the surface taken the day after landing show where the rock rolled with the rolling stones about to perform nearby it made perfect sense for the JPL L. Team to name the Rock. The Rolling Stone Rock Robert Downey junior made the announcement at Pasadena's Rose Bowl stadium just before the ban took took stage official names for objects throughout the solar system can only be designated by the International Astronomical Union however the informal informal nickname will appear on Nasr's working maps of Mars giving rock scientists rock musicians and rock bands something to celebrate great for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Rose Bowl Stadium National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Pulley Robert Downey Jpl L. Team Landers International Astronomical Uni Golf Pasadena Nasr Official Four Decades Three Feet
"jpl" Discussed on Windows Weekly

Windows Weekly

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Windows Weekly

"But I this word from Levi's. Came into town. He was at all and dies it right to the bottom of you. We might have welcome to mix a one thing hands. That's trouble. Colors flared legs. He just smiled and said, I'm wearing Levi's dole has gone outside then strangely supported us to a world of leave ice. Lexin gene, tree. Players with chrome polyester. It was mentioned jeans jeans. Oh. Roles knickers Nick knickers. This is done. More harm western. Remind knickers, knickers ninety seventy one and now known knickers. I want knickers. That was great. The late great. He just passed away a few months ago. Ken Nordine Chicago, the voice of Chicago. Somebody, somebody reminded me that he was the guy who said the stranger came into town with the ego. Flying. Our show today. I wish we could say brought to you by an eagle but instead, it's brought to you by canary. How about that? The. Do you know you know you guys know what a honeypot is a pot right here? I got my Honey pot right here. This is so cool. This is a canary. Let's not a literal honeypot Honey, and the Honey pot. Well, unless you're a hacker can. To sit on your network like a regular device. They don't look vulnerable. They look valuable they looked like there's something in here, this particular canary. I can tell you is configured to look like a sinology Nass, if you, if you, you know, open up, it's IP address, you'll get the sinology log in you'll enter the password, and it's something will go wrong, and I will get an alert saying somebody just tried to log into your phony. Sinology Nass love that. You can make it be Microsoft Windows server. You can make it be if you wanted to you could make it be X P or vista or seven or eight or ten you could turn on you could turn up what they call a Christmas tree of all the services you couldn't. So this makes it look like wow, you know if you're in now. We keep hearing about this thing called AP advanced persistent threats. That's when Bagai I often nation state gets into your system and happened to Sony Pictures Entertainment. They wandered around the got it in may. They wanted around weren't discovered till October or Starwood, which later got purchased by Marriott. The the guys were wandering around inside the Maryanne network for four years, exfiltrated, half a billion guest records, and nobody knew they were there. That's the point we just heard about a new one shape. L. Somebody in brought into raspberry pi atas JPL facility, put it on the network and Nastase policies. The JPL policies were not good because they allowed first of all weird things of the network and they didn't inventory at they didn't know it was there. They didn't observe the traffic going to it. And for more than a year. Somebody was wandering around the JPL network, a bad guy exfiltrated not a whole lot half megabyte of some of files but still not good. They need. The canary. That's why so many banks. Large banks security anything, wants to be secure. It's why we have it on our network, you sprinkle a few Canaries.

Nick knickers Levi Ken Nordine Chicago JPL sinology Nass Sinology Nass Starwood Sony Pictures Entertainment four years
"jpl" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Security Now

"Yeah. Just gonna put a raspberry pi in here and we'll stick a little webcam on the raspberry pi, I can just get a picture of the coffee pot and see how we you know what the water level is. Oh, by the way, we got an at work. I'll just put it on the network. Why not Leo? So in a report published last week by Nastase. Oh I g the office of inspector general in that report it revealed that in April of twenty eighteen hackers breached the agency's network and stole, they did act in this was more that this was an active threat stole approximately five hundred megabytes of data related to Mars missions because, of course, that's what J P L does the point of entry was a raspberry pi can do the network at as I mentioned, J, P L, without authorization or going through the proper security review me, they have they have they have systems in place, which, which says, we're you're supposed to log and have approved anything connect to the network. But hey look, there's a there's an RJ forty five port. Let's plus plug in the raspberry pi according to this. Forty nine page. Oh, I g report, the hackers use this point of entry to move deeper inside the JPL network by hacking shared network. Gateway, the hackers use this network gateway to pivot inside JPL's, infrastructure and gained access to the network. That was storing information about NASA JPL managed Mars missions from where they exfiltrated information quoting from the report, quote, the attacker, exfiltrated approximately five hundred megabytes of data from twenty three files two of which contained international traffic in arms regulations information related to the Mars. Space laboratory mission. The Mars science laboratory is the JPL program that manages, the curiosity Rover on Mars among other projects, JPL's primary role as we know is to build an operate planetary. Robotic spacecraft such as the curiosity Rover and various satellites that orbit planets in the solar system. JPL also manages Nasr's deep space network, which is the worldwide network of satellite dishes, which are used to communicate with NASA spacecraft during their missions, investigators said that besides accessing the JPL's mission network. The April twenty eighteen intruder also accessed, the deep space networks, IT network upon discovery of the intrusion. I got a kick out of this several NASA facilities immediately disconnected from JPL and ESN. You know, just up pull the plug do not connect JPL. Those crazies out there in California, in Pasadena. We don't know what they've got crawling around their network, and they, they disconnected fearing, of course that the attacker by pivot into their systems as well. Nasr's. Oh, I g said, quote classified as an advanced persistent threat. The attack went undetected for nearly a year and the investigation into this incident is ongoing. The report blamed, and here it is JPL's failure to segment its internal network into smaller segments. And, of course as our longtime listeners know, we've talked about the need for strong.

JPL NASA Nasr Leo J P L Nastase California Pasadena five hundred megabytes
"jpl" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on KTRH

"Os, actually, NASA is working with European Space Agency on the national near earth object prepared to strategy and action plan, and planetary defence coordination, office, which leads the drill is the pedal entity in charge of coordinating efforts. Protect earth. From the potential danger of hazardous asteroids. Now, I was reading all the interesting facts and figures number of conferences. They haven't passed I was alerted to USA today article about this subject. Basically saying that study twenty seventeen found of the deadly effects of answer impact would be ferocious winds up with miles per hour. Ten shock waves. Talk about so like. Thousand mile per hour, winds that would pull your skin off your body and every bone. Your body would be broken. And of course, the intent shock waves from that, and USA today, though, this is what it said it said known asteroid poses a significant risk of impact with Europe. Nasa says. USA today said there's no significant risk of impact with earth. Other sources JPL say, we will not see any possible near optical issues with the planet for another two hundred years. However. That doesn't match up with what NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein said. In a recent, Dave. In fact, he made a speech to kick off this drill. And he said, the international kademi 'aeronautics planetary defense conference. He said. We have to make sure that people understand this is not about Hollywood. It's not about movies. Continue to say this about ultimately protecting the only planet we know right now. The host life, and that is the planet at Brighton site acknowledged that a large colliding with earth met with a sort of giggle factor. A false sense of security brought on by countless Hollywood films that have perhaps sensitize us to the carnage would cause, but you don't have far to see the kind of damage collision creates. And if you look back at some of the events, chilly, bins can others you see that. Yes. Just explain exploding is enough and according to what Breitenstein said Breitenstein said that chances are. And he said, this is Cording to one of the models that they were talking about Breitenstein noted that according to one model, we should expect a collision once every sixty years. Okay. So he said that we should be. Having a collision sometime in your lifetime or my lifetime. So I mean, give or take, I mean I don't know how long we all have. I don't know if you I'm gonna see what you're gonna see what whoever's going to, but we have seen a number of devastating effects of asteroids, slip, through the cracks explode in the sky and causing concussion waves loud booms, but the Breitenstein comment, for some reason, doesn't necessarily match up with JP JPL USA today reported Nasr's saying about collisions in space JPL made a statement response to Breitenstein style warning about possibly saying an asteroid hit us in our lifetime JPL said, NASA knows of no asteroid or comic curly on a collision course with earth. So the probability of a major collision is quite small. In fact, as best as we can tell no large is likely to strike at anytime in the next several hundred years. But. That doesn't include all the smaller sweeper meteors are asteroids came from out of nowhere and caused damage. I mean, since November twenty eighteen there've been reports of many close calls this year loan. There have been scores the fireballs lit up the sky, and there have been three in the month of February. That exploded. Impacted of caused damage or in or injury. And this is something that, and of course, not to mention okay, the big rocks exploded over ocean over the ocean, and not detected until the military said, oh, by the way, we picked up on infra sound, these rumbles these booms that went undetected, and we found him in the well, if something exploded over the ocean was the bomb with probably with some space junk or is probably some fireball, which reminds me what happened last time we have minimal how on the program in Virginia Beach, a lot of people felt that and boom and they filled it in central Ohio felt it in Georgia. And then I looked over there was so many reports of these booms in his guy, of course, the Ohio boom or not how the boom in Virginia beats. They report saying FAT was flying over an area and it causes not supposed to do that. Don't but I'm just saying not supposed to do that. A lot of people don't believe it is, I think people know what a sonic boom is when they feel it when they hear it, something different. This is something again. Like how talked about last feeling was wrapping you underneath the feet. So what is it? What rumble what what's causing sky? Quakes perhaps, unseen, fireballs exploding outside where you live big thing about is we're looking at the drills. Houston zoo traffic..

Jim Breitenstein NASA JPL USA Dave European Space Agency NASA administrator Nasr JP JPL USA Hollywood Europe Houston Brighton Breitenstein Virginia Cording Ohio Virginia Beach Georgia
"jpl" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"A thousand bucks coming up tomorrow at six or six on NewsRadio WFL more Schnitt right now. Let me blow through a lot here in the final minutes of the program. A little bit of everything yourself flight. Shame. Boy, this is a story from Sweden. The French press agency has the story. That now Swedes have a term called flake scum. I'm saying properly, but F L Y G S K M or flight. Shame. You know what flight shame is. It's probably when you think of this don't look too far. Sometimes it's the simplest explanation. That Swedes are becoming. Guilty. They're feeling guilty because of the environmental effects of flying. So you have more Swedes mainly young. Oh, jeez. Here come the millennials again opting to travel by train instead of flying. So it's it's now called flight. Shame. Because it's flying airplanes. That's what's reckon the planet. That's it. So flight shape? You know, I. I saw something else here which kind of goes in tandem extreme space weather is making Jupiter even hotter. Wait, wait, a sec, scientists use the Obama. Nasr's JPL's released images of the gas giant showing the impact of the Solar Winds that are having an effect on the planet's poles which causing hotter atmosphere than previously thought solo an impact of Jupiter. So if if Jupiter's getting Solar Winds than are we getting Solar Winds here on our planet as well. So NASA saying the Jupiter's get that's not to SUV's, right or airplanes or flight shaming and that kind of thing, right? Such heating and chemical reactions may tell us something about other planets with harsh environments and even early earth. What you're talking about the Solar Winds that are making the planet hunters and the earth is the third planet from the sun Jupiter is further down the line. Right. So we have after earth. We've got Mars and. Neptune Uranus Jupiter, or is it your Uranus Jupiter Neptune. Jupiter wasn't my very intelligent mother. Intelligent, mother was entertaining mother. Just yes. A Mars Jupiter just showed a Saturn us Uranus nine right Neptune. There you go..

Sweden Obama JPL NASA Nasr
"jpl" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"He worked for JPL in Pasadena. No, I've learned a lot over the years about faith. And I believe what that means. You know, the planets path through the. The dome of the guy Bertrand mercury in retrograde mercury going the opposite direction that it usually does. Turned around. This doesn't seem like that's huge. That's the problem. On the other way, exactly. That go back. The other way working mercury appears to be traveling from east to west county to its standard west to east or tracks going the opposite way to go. Scott a rocket. It's an alien ship says appears to be maybe it's not it's not actually K K or Soldo. We're good again. I'm not sure if it's an illusion, right? All right. I hear you. Thank you very much. Appreciate the call. Let's say good morning to Dan, Dan. Good morning. How are you buddy? I'm doing well. How about yourself during trying to figure this whole mercury in retrograde? What can you bring to the table here? Yeah. I'm retired astrologer, and I can tell you that mercury the planet. Mercury is control the communications. And so the vibrations from mercury when it's in retrograde makes you mess up, basically. So when you say controls communications, let me let me just jump in. Are you talking about the synapses ever reminder talk about mass communications, satellites, etc. That much anything technology itself as well. So you might encounter.

Dan JPL west county Pasadena Bertrand Scott
"jpl" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"I just went. I was surprised to see a black, man. Walk in not surprise. I made an audible noise just I'm used to seeing an Asian. Maybe it's something to do with the Pasadena area. Many Asian doctor Indian doctor probably less black. This guy turned the corner. And I had a thought about it an internal thought, and I simply than said, hi and open my mouth and went to sleep. Right. Did not stand up and saying need to make a phone call. Right. If you're the guy to college in that article you went. I look at me. Look at me. I'm going to be different. Now, you know. And that's the point is one is just adjusting the scale like, yeah. That needs to one is something that can't be avoided one game that can't be avoided arguing with you on that. Right. So I'm telling the audience that if you are on the phone and you call. You call up JPL and the person answers the phone you start asking about plate tectonics and earthquakes and things of that nature and they answer every question with precision. And then you go to JPL, and there's a twenty six year old beautiful blonde sitting there next phone, and you go the person I talked on the phone to go. Yeah. I told y'all about plate your your surprise surprise. Because you didn't think that young beautiful woman was going to answer that you're pleasantly surprised. I don't say anything. That's how we're all wide and your scaled just based on your experience. That's right. You know, what you you can not be surprised by and ever again, a wedgie goodra men and women love Tommy, John. That's right. Double right. Yeah. It's right right now, Scott happy, his double agents aren't going rogue, whatever men and women's underwear sporting no way to guarantee they'll Susan I'll show her my Toma Johnson. Well, okay. Comfortable, stay put waistband accord assign. She was a she was obsessing about anti Cordis island. That was the whole conversation, Bruce. Dr Bruce got the whole thing going because he had to say it went to college. The school's biology like. Lab was Ananta court asylum. Really he'd have to go there to study ecosystems or packing. My Tommy John's. All right, no wedgie guarantee. Comfortable stated waistband fabrics that are soft designed to move. You know, buddy doesn't love. Tommy, John's dress shirts and undershirts shirts that always stay tucked go anywhere apparel. Go from the boardroom to boxing class. They've got the.

Tommy John Dr Bruce JPL Pasadena boxing Cordis island Toma Johnson Ananta Scott twenty six year
"jpl" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"How're you doing good? So Jeff, you seem to have an I don't know if it's because if you're working Caltech some information on you got information on the space force. Well, I only have the information that I tweeted a couple of either a couple of weeks ago or a couple of days ago. I forget I think it was both. Yes, did a two days ago, and you did a two weeks ago? Yeah. Okay. Does that mean two days ago in two weeks ago? I believe that I addressed the topic twice unprompted. I just remember. Oh, yeah. You know? I I remember. Okay. So having said that what initially the information you have from your context Caltech and does that come from GPL Alati informational guys Caltech have does. Does have dude dude come does have dude. I'm sort movement. Nervous fan has come as come from JPL jeopardy laboratory at Jp at JPL, giftable laboratory and GPO his Jet Propulsion labs. Yeah. That's right. So, and my understanding is and this is very interesting, sir. Henry as to what it is pros and Trump, and the people that will be running the space force does does have that one of the requirements for joining the space force is you have to be a minimum of six foot nine. Okay. Are you kidding me? No not. What does that mean? What does that mean? I I have no idea you need to be six foot nine and a could it could have to do with gravity where the space force will be required to do battle. If they if they already engaged in battle on another on a planet where there's a lot of gravity or something. How I want to ask you question in general. You weigh in because you're a military guy. How likely is it that the space force would be doing battle in terms of infantry? It's very unlikely to not likely at all to a ridiculous idea. Oh, yeah. Well, have come there for nine where did you hear this again just went where did you hear the let's forget about pointing up people's voices. All right. Where did you hear this? Jeff. I heard it from my contacts at JPL do all sound the contact at Caltech. Let's not Nassar's military or or Washington. Yeah. We're who who in Washington is talking about this. I don't know and be into be perfect lowest. What if I did? No. I would I would I would tell you. I don't know. But this is reliable information. The fact that they're not taking anybody in the space force that shorter than six foot nine. Yeah. So these are going to have to be very big men and women the other taken both either men women, it doesn't matter. Six nine women. Okay. Have at it. And I think. The thing about President Trump, and he wants it to be good gala -tarian egalitarian, you gal -tarian and he'll take women. He'll take men the age. Limit is something very interesting..

Caltech President Trump JPL Jeff Washington Nassar Henry six foot two weeks two days
"jpl" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"jpl" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Anyway, so is lost the whole night. Think it's my responsibility to at least say the word baseball in this podcast. And so. Mission accomplished and there, but whenever anyone is maybe younger and just really really emotionally invested in sports. When when something happens and someone some authority figure will say, oh, you should look at the bigger picture have some perspective, you know, is to sports whatever and few people might be more capable of looking at the bigger picture than you given that you're looking at one of the biggest pictures his existence. What? So the also the smallest picture at this sharing. Sharing for everything is inside baseball. But what is then maybe this is to even question. What is baseball to you Audi you consume it, and how are you invested? Given the magnitude of everything else that you're dealing with in your day-today life. Well, I'm always been interested in sort of like math and Satistics data into that's an obvious sort of parallel between physics and baseball that you do a lot of data analysis in both. And I've been interested in sort of baseball data probably in forever much serve start getting into baseball. As a kid around the last time the Mets were good before twenty fifteen to six. When I really started like watching a lot of these games than trying to just just got into a fan. And then my dad actually give me a book, which was one of the G baseball stats the hidden game of these fall Thornton Palmer in I read through Bosa that as like, a young teenager, and that really sort of got me more into baseball because you kind of see that there is some pattern behind it. It's kinda logic in predictibility in in how it operates as a system in. So that was around the same time that I was getting into physics is von so I think that maybe that was related is sort of interested trying to figure out sort of the hidden logic behind systems that lease either. If it's a baseball game or particle physics or whatever still gathering data in trying to make inferences and find that rewarding. And you have a personal site where you've published some research in a couple years ago. You did a post on pitcher classification, and I'm sure that if you wanted to apply your skills to something a lot less interesting in value to the university in the species, you probably could have done that in baseball. Did you ever consider trying to work in baseball? Or were you just always kind of locked into what you ended up doing can't considered it around when I was applying to jobs outside of physics. But I didn't look that far into it pry because I wasn't quite sure at the time. Now, I think it's definitely more the case that that a lot of baseball professionals really like sort of physics backgrounds but a couple years ago. Like, I wasn't sure that was a case in I knew some people JPL already in like kind of felt like that was sort of more natural progression than to say it will never work in baseball. I do think these laws a lot of fun. So as it is definitely more of a niche than. Than me. For the time. There are there's no shortage of let's say, I know they're like peach climate, scientists working for baseball teams. Now, they're just all kinds of different fields that are working baseball science. Very cool. Yeah. So, you know, maybe maybe after his particular podcast gets published. You're going to you're going to get meals. Have to Knicks relents. Right. Are there questions in baseball that fascinate you amid maybe not as big as life on Mars. But it just in terms of mysteries about the game or things that you would want to look into or discovery is that have been made that you've been particularly fascinated by. Yeah, I've been China follow the some baseball research..

baseball Mets Bosa Audi Knicks Thornton Palmer China JPL