35 Burst results for "JIN"

"jin" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:25 min | Last week

"jin" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello. From wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is womena. This month we're highlighting women who led extraordinary lives of resistance. Whether fighting tyranny, oppression, sexism, racism, or reproductive control. These women created paths for change. Today we're talking about the woman dubbed China's Joan of Arc. This feminist poet and warrior defied tradition to become a martyr for the revolution that transformed China into a republic. Meet Choi Jin. Chojin was born on November 8th, 1875 in the southern port city of shaman. Chojin belonged to a respected gentry family, which meant she received a good education. As a child, she loved to study the stories of female heroes and warriors from Chinese history. She read the legends of hua Mulan, who famously dressed as a man to take her father's place in the army. Trojan's parents also let her learn martial arts with an older male cousin. By the age of 13, she was writing original poetry. She began one poem like this. Don't tell me women are not the stuff of heroes. Chojin may have been a feminist from a young age, but she was still expected to conform to the gender norms of her time. She learned needlework and endured the now outlawed practice of foot binding. She also had to have an arranged marriage with a suitor her father selected. She was in her early 20s when she married Wang ting John, the son of a wealthy merchant family. The couple had two children together, a daughter, and a son. Chojin found her new role as a wife and mother, stifling, and didn't care for her husband. She wrote, that person's behavior is worse than an animal. He treats me as less than nothing. When I think of him, my hair bristles with anger, it's absolutely unbearable. Chojin and her family moved to Beijing around 1903. In the bustling city, she found new inspiration and social freedom. In an act of rebellion, she chose to unbind her feet. She also continued her study of swordplay and started to experiment with wearing men's clothing. Chojin forged friendships with other like minded women who felt equally trapped by traditional gender roles. She was also developing a strong political consciousness. The early 20th century was a period of great unrest for China. The Qing dynasty had been in power since the mid 17th century and was becoming increasingly unpopular. China had lost territory to Japan, and the country was facing the foreign threat of western colonialism. Many Chinese citizens were ready for a revolution, and chojin was one of them. Not long after moving to Beijing, chojin decided she needed to escape the oppressive life she faced as a woman in traditional society. She sold her jewelry to afford passage on a ship to Japan. Leaving her husband and children behind. Japan had embraced modernization more quickly than China, so it was a popular destination for young Chinese intellectuals, who wanted to break away from tradition and explore new ways of life. While she was there, chojin became embedded in revolutionary circles. She joined the triad, an underground society with a mission to overthrow the Qing dynasty. She also continued to study martial arts, and even learned to make bombs. Around 1906, chojin returned to China, determined to help drive the country to revolution. She founded a feminist magazine called Chinese women's journal, and wrote about the cruelty of foot binding and arranged marriages. By 1907, chojin was in charge of the datong school, which was secretly a training ground for young revolutionaries. She also worked with an anti Qing group to organize a rebellion. As summer approached, chojin began coordinating with her cousin and fellow rebel, shoe Sheila to schedule several uprisings. But these plans were cut short when Xu Xi Lin was captured by government officials, tortured and executed. Chojin knew soldiers would be coming for her too, but she refused to run away or go into hiding. On July 13th, 1907, troops descended on the datong school, Joe Jen and some of her students tried to fight them off, but chojin was ultimately arrested. Government officials tried to torture information out of chojin to learn more about her revolutionary plots. But she refused to reveal anything. On July 15th, 1907, chojin was publicly executed in a square in her family's ancestral hometown of shaoxing. She was 31 years old after her death, chojin was embraced by many as a hero and martyr. In 1911, the revolution that chochin dedicated her final years to finally happened, and the Qing dynasty fell. All month, we're.

Chojin chojin China Jenny Kaplan Choi Jin hua Mulan Wang ting John gentry shaman Japan Beijing Trojan Chinese women's journal army Xu Xi Lin Joe Jen Sheila chochin
Russia's war in Ukraine the backdrop to pope's Kazakh visit

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Russia's war in Ukraine the backdrop to pope's Kazakh visit

"Russia's war in Ukraine can not avoid being one of the main themes during Pope Francis's visit to Kazakhstan Russia's war in Ukraine and the holy sees strained relations with China are the backdrop to Pope Francis's trip this week to the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan where he's ministering to a tiny Catholic community and participating in an interfaith conference the most noteworthy aspects of France's visit though may be the missed opportunities He was supposed to have met with the head of the Russian Orthodox Church but patriarch kuril who has justified the war in Ukraine has canceled Francis is also going to be there at the same time as Chinese president Xi Jinping Jinping's first foreign visit since the coronavirus pandemic but they're so far no plans for the two to meet I'm Charles De Ledesma

Pope Francis Ukraine Soviet Republic Of Kazakhstan Russia Kazakhstan Patriarch Kuril China Russian Orthodox Church France Xi Jinping Jinping Francis Charles De Ledesma
Putin and Xi to meet in Uzbekistan next week, official says

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Putin and Xi to meet in Uzbekistan next week, official says

"Official says Russia's leader Vladimir Putin and Chinese president Xi Jinping are to meet in Uzbekistan next week Although a summit could see another step in warming ties between two paths that are increasingly facing off against the west the meeting at the Shanghai cooperation organization a political economic and security forum that China and Russia dominate comes at a delicate time for both leaders Putin's dealing with the economic and political fallout of his war in Ukraine that's left Russia isolated She meanwhile is facing a slowing economy as he seeks a third 5 year term as Communist Party leader while he's expected to secure it that would represent a break with precedent I'm Charles De Ledesma

Russia Xi Jinping Vladimir Putin Uzbekistan Shanghai Cooperation Organizat Putin China Ukraine Communist Party Charles De Ledesma
 S. Korea may conduct survey on BTS members' military duty

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

S. Korea may conduct survey on BTS members' military duty

"South Korea is going to decide whether members of BTS would have to enlist in the military Should KPop bands be allowed to skip military service even though it's mandatory It's a question the South Korean government is now considering and the public might help decide the matter The sole government says it may conduct a public survey to decide whether to grant exemptions to members of the boy band BTS the issue is a big deal now because the oldest member of BTS Jin faces enlistment in December when he turns 30 South Korean officials say they will consider factors like whether the economic impact of BTS might let them slide when

South Korean Government South Korea Bts Jin
China's youth face bleak job market as COVID slows economy

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last month

China's youth face bleak job market as COVID slows economy

"China's current job drought echoes the struggle of young people worldwide to find work in depressed economies but is especially sensitive politically in a year when president Xi Jinping is expected to try to extend his time in power China's unusually severe approach towards COVID-19 with repeated lockdowns has kept case numbers low but a social cost has sworn the economy shrinking in the three months ending in June and consumer spending plunging the official unemployment rate in June for people age 16 to 24 was almost 20% compared with 5.5% for all ages and that's expected to rise once the latest jobless graduates are taken into account they often come from urban families who are the biggest winners for China's economic growth and important source of political support the ruling party needs them I am Charles De Ledesma

President Xi Jinping Covid China Charles De Ledesma
David Goldman: China Is the Most Formidable Strategic Competitor

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:07 min | Last month

David Goldman: China Is the Most Formidable Strategic Competitor

"David, I want to play to you a couple of video clips from the man who sadly bears the title of commander in chief first was from the campaign for election and then the second one is from actually the Oval Office. So this is Biden before he was president. China is going to eat our lunch, come on, man. They can't even figure out how to deal with the fact that they have this great division between the China Sea and the mountains in the east. I mean, in the west, they can't figure out how they're going to deal with the corruption that exists within the system. They're not bad folks, folks. But guess what? They're not competition for us. Not bad folks not a competition, then I guess he was mugged by reality and this is what he had to say a few months later. Our last night, I was, I was on the phone for two straight hours with Xi Jinping. And you all know as well as I do. These folks, and it was a good conversation I know him well. We spent a lot of time together over the years. I was vice president. And but, you know, they're going to get moving, look at these lunch. Not competition, or they're going to eat our lunch. You're the expert you've literally lit a written the book. Which is it? Tell us China is a competitor or somebody who's going to take it all away from us, David. Well, China is the most formidable strategic competitor. The United States has ever had. And it's ascendance to a place of dominance in the world where bankers poor, less secure and generally quite miserable. So I'm against it. The thing to remember is that 40 years ago, excuse me. The average Chinese was making $200 a year in U.S. terms. Now it's closer to $20,000 a year. No other country has brought so many people up the income scale so fast.

Oval Office China China Sea Biden David Xi Jinping United States
David Goldman Paints a Unique Picture of China

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:46 min | Last month

David Goldman Paints a Unique Picture of China

"Is a place where a lot of things are kicked down the road for a very long time and in the short run don't make sense. From China standpoint. And this is not simply the fact that there's a communist government from the standpoint of any government in China, the nightmare of the emperor who sits in Beijing is a rebel province, because China is not a nation state. China is a polyglot collection of different peoples who speak 200 dialects, Cantonese, can't understand a word of Mandarin, the citra needs can barely understand Mandarin. And many times at its past, countless times China has broken up into warring provinces and had long periods of chaos with terrible suffering and in each of these cases foreign intervention typically made the internal divisions worse. So the nightmare of Beijing of Xi Jinping is Taiwan becomes a dependent and long so province, canton decides why should we be part of China either. Sichuan does the same thing. And China begins to break up. So in order to prevent the possibility of the fragmentation of the empire, as has had so many times in the past, China will go to war to prevent any part of its territory. Being split off. And that's why the Taiwan issue is more than a matter of 23 million Chinese living 90 miles away from the mainland, a country of 1.4 billion. The symbolic end, if you will constitutional value of Taiwan to China, is inestimable. So

China Beijing Taiwan Canton Sichuan
China Views Pelosi's Visit as Opening the Door to Support for Taiwan

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:50 min | Last month

China Views Pelosi's Visit as Opening the Door to Support for Taiwan

"There's a reason that China has increasing the tensions, and that of course is to distract from their failures at home. Xi Jinping is trying to consolidate power. And he is also viewing the United States as a weak horse. And so now is the time for him to ratchet up tensions and try to back the United States off of Taiwan. Kirby continued along these lines, basically begging China not to be angry. It was John Kirby from the National Security Council. Has The White House heard of any specific threats from China when it comes to this visit. There's no reason for the Chinese rhetoric. There's no reason for any actions to be taken. It is not uncommon for congressional leaders to travel to Taiwan. It is very much in keeping with our policy and inconsistent with our support to Taiwan under the Taiwan relations act. We shouldn't be as a country. We shouldn't be intimidated by that rhetoric or those potential actions. This is an important trip for the speaker to be on and we're going to do whatever we can to support her. So I actually agree with John Kirby here, a shocker. I actually agree with the plan by Nancy Pelosi to visit Taiwan, but you better have the balls to back it up. That is the key in foreign policy. If you are going to talk big, you better have the stones to back it up. And you better make it clear that you are going to back up that sort of action with serious ramifications of God forbid. They were to shoot down a jet with Speaker of the House Pelosi on it, right? She's the third ranking official in the United States, not in terms of the executive branch, but third in line for the presidency and the most powerful person in the House of Representatives, which theoretically is supposed to be the most powerful branch of the United States government, not the executive. According to The Wall Street Journal for Beijing, a visit by Pelosi is seen as a high profile instance of rising U.S. political and military support for Taiwan, contravening Washington's commitments to limit its ties to the island, allowing a Pelosi visit to go ahead without consequences at Chinese foreign affairs at specialist said, but only invite more senior political officials from the U.S. and other countries breaking Beijing's diplomatic blockade of Taiwan, which, by the way, should happen.

Taiwan John Kirby China U.S. Xi Jinping National Security Council Kirby House Pelosi White House Nancy Pelosi Pelosi House Of Representatives United States Government The Wall Street Journal Beijing Chinese Foreign Affairs Washington
Pelosi Poised to Visit Taiwan As China Threatens Military Action

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Pelosi Poised to Visit Taiwan As China Threatens Military Action

"Have a strong belief that we should do everything we can to convince the Chinese that they shouldn't do anything aggressive towards Taiwan and that our policy can include aggressive deterrence. I don't think they've managed to pull that off with the inability of The White House to articulate this position. But what if all right, now it appears she's going. It sounds like that she'll be there Tuesday night and the Chinese have literally threatened that if we fly military aircraft into there, they're going to do something about it. Are they blowing smoke or could this actually blow up? Well, I don't think they're going to shoot down in American military aircraft. But when Xi Jinping tells President Biden as he did, if you play with fire, you will get burned. That is language stronger than the Chinese have used at any time since we established diplomatic relations. Not since the Korean War have they said things like that. Remember, Xi Jinping is facing a tough contest for his third term as premier. He's got the 20th Congress of the Communist Party coming up in November. And after he's put his credibility on the line, there's no way he can back down and do nothing. So what I would expect is not a kinetic action on China's part. I think more likely would be a blockade, and they dare the United States to try to break the blockade. That's up to easy when Taiwan's 90 miles of the Chinese coast and they have the home court advantage. As the Chinese keep saying, they've got what about 1400 surface to ship missiles, and most experts certainly the Rand people, the air force, believe that the Chinese could sink pretty much any American ship within. 500 miles or more of their coast.

Xi Jinping President Biden Taiwan Congress Of The Communist Part White House Chinese Coast United States Air Force
Pelosi lands in Singapore to kick off Asia tour

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Pelosi lands in Singapore to kick off Asia tour

"There are still questions as to whether House speaker Nancy Pelosi will visit Taiwan even as her Asia tour has already begun a person familiar with the matter says Pelosi and her delegation arrived in Singapore before dawn today Singapore's foreign ministry says Pelosi will meet with the country's president prime minister and a number of cabinet ministers Pelosi said over the weekend at a statement that she'd also visit Malaysia South Korea and Japan but she has not confirmed news reports that she also might visit Taiwan which China claims as its own territory in a phone call with president Joe Biden Chinese president Xi Jinping warned against meddling in Beijing's dealings with the island Donna water Washington

Pelosi Foreign Ministry Singapore Taiwan Nancy Pelosi Asia House Cabinet South Korea President Joe Biden Malaysia Japan Xi Jinping China Beijing Washington
Biden, Xi to hold talks amid new tensions over Taiwan

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Biden, Xi to hold talks amid new tensions over Taiwan

"Renewed tension over Taiwan will likely be part of president Joe Biden's coming call with Chinese president Xi Jinping A U.S. official says President Biden will talk with China's president Xi Jinping on Thursday The plan call comes amid word that House speaker Nancy Pelosi could soon visit Taiwan The Chinese government has already warned of forceful measures should Pelosi visit the self ruled island that China claims as part of its territory Last week Biden told reporters U.S. Military officials believed it was not a good idea for the speaker to travel to Taiwan at the moment The plan talked between Biden and she will be the 5th in a series of regular check ins and has been in the works for weeks Tim McGuire Washington

Xi Jinping President Biden Taiwan House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Chinese Government Joe Biden China U.S. Biden Pelosi Tim Mcguire Washington
The Biden Family Is the Best Example of 'Elite Capture'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:45 min | 2 months ago

The Biden Family Is the Best Example of 'Elite Capture'

"Maria bartiromo and Marsha Blackburn exposing the Biden crime family. This is all part of it, by the way. The Biden family is the best example of elite capture that we have. They've been totally captured by the Chinese Communist Party. They're held hostage by the Chinese Communist Party. They do what they want. Play cut 20. Let's take a look at that right now because I have a graphic of what appears to be Joe Biden's China policy. First, we know that the family reportedly accepted $31 million at least from deals in China. That is from hunter's laptop. And senator Ron Johnson's investigation and Peter Schweitzer's reporting fails to demand any COVID origins investigation. We have no evidence that Joe Biden ever brought up the origins of COVID to Xi Jinping in the 5 phone calls that he's had. He's failing to call for an end of the fentanyl trafficking. I have not heard him mention fentanyl wants to fentanyl is made in China, pushed through Mexico into America. And it continues. He has canceled the China initiative. This was an initiative that was investigating the continued Chinese intellectual property theft. He's considering lifting the tariffs on China imports. He sent oil from America's strategic reserve to other countries, including China, and he is pushing electric vehicles solar panels and batteries, aggressively in his climate change agenda and many of those are made in China. And that's just part of it. Good for Maria bartiromo for saying that. And not to mention our elites do business with China, BlackRock is heavily invested in China, our corporate masters are intertwined with China. Bought and paid for by the Chinese Communist Party. And if I was China, I think that last email was super smart, I would try to do everything I possibly can to try to incite division and chaos here domestically.

Chinese Communist Party China Biden Maria Bartiromo Joe Biden Senator Ron Johnson Marsha Blackburn Peter Schweitzer Covid Xi Jinping Hunter America Mexico Blackrock
Sebastian Talks Hunter Biden With Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:07 min | 3 months ago

Sebastian Talks Hunter Biden With Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris

"She is the political editor for the conservative juggernaut breitbart dot com Emma Joe Morris. Welcome back to America first. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me. Dumb question, naive question. Hunter Biden's story ever going to end. No, never. And it's actually only going to get worse because the Republicans are coming into power and God willing and, you know, if they have any sense, which I'm sure that they do, they're going to look into this because, you know, this story that we're talking about today. We're talking about eugen Ming, who had that was the subject of the time story that Biden told his son, you're clear. You Jin Ming is charged for bribery, and this is the same person who was involved in the CEFC deal with hunter where we saw the infamous line 10% for the big guy. So, you know, it's just more confirmation that not only was Joe Biden aware of his business dealings, not only was he talking to him about them which he denies. But again, this guy's has been nailed on

Emma Joe Morris Hunter Biden Eugen Ming Jin Ming Cefc America Biden Hunter Joe Biden
 Xi arrives in Hong Kong for 25th anniversary of handover

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Xi arrives in Hong Kong for 25th anniversary of handover

"China's Xi arrives by train in Hong Kong for a major anniversary of the handover Supporters mass at the train station waving Chinese and Hong Kong flags chanting welcome welcome warm welcome as Xi Jinping arrives the Chinese leader is in Hong Kong ahead of the 25th anniversary of the British handover and after a two year transformation bringing the city more tightly under Communist Party control it's Xi's first trip outside of Mainland China in nearly two and a half years

Hong Kong Xi Jinping China Communist Party Mainland
Gordon Chang Describes China's View of the Russia-Ukraine War

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:19 min | 3 months ago

Gordon Chang Describes China's View of the Russia-Ukraine War

"Heard two different interpretations of how Putin's latest military action affects Beijing. One is it would be used as cover. It would be used to distract from a move against Taiwan and second I'm hearing that the international reaction to Russia, the arming of Ukraine has given strategic pause to Xi Jinping. Can we tell which of those is more accurate? Are they are they happy that Putin did what he did or are they annoyed at how sloppy he's been in the execution of the invasion. I think that Beijing looks at the Ukraine and they take away a number of lessons some which encourage them to be more aggressive. Some of them inhibit inhibit them. But I think that on balance, they've been emboldened. And the reason is that first of all, and this is the most important lesson. There was the greatest breakdown in deterrence since the start of the Second World War. Although the United States, the 27 nations of the European Union and Great Britain had an economy 25.1 times bigger than Russia's in 2021. We failed to stop that invasion. So you have a far weaker party. Basically defy the world. And they got away with it so far. And I think China looks at that and says that we would similarly fail to deter China that we don't have the willingness to use our power. The other thing is that although there have been sanctions on Russia, those sanctions have not been as effective as people had hoped. Russia's ruble is doing okay. They're selling a lot of loyal. By the way, to China. And so I think that the Chinese believe that, look, the west can't enforce sanctions. And by the way, the Chinese are so arrogant these days. They think that we wouldn't impose sanctions on them in the first place or that they would be able to skate by them. So I think that the only thing that they look at at Putin and our irritated is that Putin may have delayed their plans for attacking a neighbor,

Putin Russia Beijing Taiwan China Great Britain European Union United States
Gordon Chang on the Rapid Decline of US-China Relations

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:18 min | 3 months ago

Gordon Chang on the Rapid Decline of US-China Relations

"Give us the update from the anchorage summit to today, have things improved with regards to U.S. Sino relations. Are they static? Have they gotten worse? Give us an update, Gordon. They've gotten much worse. And the reason is that the Chinese have become much more aggressive. From anchorage, which was March of last year, we have gotten a series of propaganda blasts from Beijing around the fall of Afghanistan in August, where they're very clear and they're very open about it. And over the last couple of weeks, we have heard the Chinese say things and we've heard the and we've seen the Chinese do things which show utter disrespect for the United States. So we're at a point where deterrence is broken down and this is exceedingly dangerous. Perhaps the most dangerous times in our lives. And you know, people will look back at the Cuban missile crisis of 1962 or the checkpoint Charlie crisis of 1961 and say those look more dangerous. And yes, they did. But we also know now from the archives that both Kennedy and khrushchev knew that they would never start a nuclear exchange. We don't know what Xi Jinping thinks about using his most destructive weapons. This, I think, is more dangerous than 61 and

Anchorage United States Gordon Beijing Afghanistan Khrushchev Kennedy Xi Jinping
Sebastian Welcomes Gordon Chang of 'The Great US-China Tech War'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Sebastian Welcomes Gordon Chang of 'The Great US-China Tech War'

"He is the author of numerous works. You have to check out the most recent being the great U.S. China tech war. He is, of course, Gordon G Chang Gordon. Welcome back to America first. Thank you so much, doctor G. Gordon, let's start. Can I start with a kind of very prosaic kind of layman's question? We'll get into all the very technical and deep national security issues. But in the summer of 2022, did you expect for a nanosecond that we'd be where we are today in terms of China and America after the last two years? It seems as if just one issue. It seems as if culpability for COVID is not an issue anymore. Yes, this is astounding, because we don't know a 100% where SARS CoV-2 came from. 99% it came from a lab, but that's not a hundred. But there is something that we know 100%. And that is that Xi Jinping, the Chinese ruler, made decisions to deliberately spread this disease beyond China's borders. Now, for at least 5 weeks and maybe longer, they lied about contagiousness. They knew that this was highly transmissible human to human, but the told the world it was not. And then they pressured other countries to not protect themselves while they were locking down their own country. You put those two things together, it shows that they definitely wanted this disease beyond

Gordon G Chang Gordon G. Gordon America China Layman Xi Jinping Sars
China city mayor apologizes over COVID-19 lockdown response

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

China city mayor apologizes over COVID-19 lockdown response

"A China city mayor has apologized over a COVID-19 lockdown response The mayor of a northeastern Chinese city on the North Korean border that has been under lockdown for more than 50 days has said sorry for failures amid widespread but often disguised dissatisfaction over the government's heavy handed approach to handling the pandemic It's highly unusual for a ranking Communist Party official to publicly concede errors particularly regarding the hard line zero COVID policy that's been repeatedly endorsed by top officials under president and party leader Xi Jinping I'm Charles De

China City Communist Party Government Xi Jinping Charles De
Our Foreign Enemies Must Love What's Happening in the US Right Now

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:09 min | 3 months ago

Our Foreign Enemies Must Love What's Happening in the US Right Now

"I'm just going to ask a question. What is America's greatest foreign enemy? You might say Iran, you might say China. You might say Putin and Russia, I would disagree. It's Russia, no fan of Putin. He's a scumbag, but I don't think it's a mayor's great America's greatest enemy. But let's just pick one, pick anyone. Pick a enemy of the United States and let's isolate that. The Ayatollah Khamenei, or Xi Jinping, or how about Kim Jong-un? ISIS. Pick any one of them. If you've sat them down in a private meeting and you said, what would you like to see happen in America when it comes to the inner cities and criminal justice? They would say, I think it would be great. If America stopped enforcing their laws, opened up their prisons and created anarchy on the streets. Now, I'm not saying Soros has the same level of malevolence as maybe the Ayatollah Khamenei, but it's certainly close.

America Putin Ayatollah Khamenei Russia Xi Jinping Iran Kim Jong China UN Soros
"jin" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:26 min | 5 months ago

"jin" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Your podcasts. I think the hardest thing about writing a memoir in any form, any length is stepping forward. It's just like the act of stepping forward. So I want you to understand that what you're doing is also an active resistance. Ninja Lee knows a lot about resistance. As a writer, professor and advocate, she has spent her career pushing back against the patriarchy. Racism in her community, and encouraging a new generation of readers to do the same. In her writing, men reminds us not to let the choices we've made for ourselves, to be our only story. Interactivity, men give space to emerging writers, knowing that the path to creating work is filled with roadblocks, especially for women of color. Her career has given us a model to follow, where being your complete self is its own act of resistance. Welcome to well bred black girl. The literary kickback you didn't know you needed. I'm your host, Gloria Adam. Each week I'll speak with my favorite authors, makers and thinkers about how they found their voice, hone their craft. Navigated publishing and showed up in the world. After the break, author min Jin Lee and I will talk about her early career. How she advocates for young authors and what she has learned about being an immigrant writer. Min Jin Lee was a student of bell hooks. Not just in the classroom, but in life. Immigrating to the U.S. when she was 7 years old, growing up in Queens, New York, Lee was a young lawyer before she left to follow her calling..

Ninja Lee min Jin Lee Gloria Adam U.S. Queens Lee New York
"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

02:33 min | 5 months ago

"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Always like, are you sure I'm going, guess I'm sure. I mean, Tolstoy wasn't worried about not being Russian. No one was asking Tolstoy. Oh, by the way, you're going to continue to write about Russia. It doesn't end a little weird. You think maybe you could write about that's hilarious. You could write about yoga. Tolstoy, this is a bummer, do you think we could get maybe we can get Adam Driver in here? Yeah. It's so funny. God damn. I need a T-shirt like that. I know you ever told Tolstoy not to be rough. I know. Fucking hate it. I'm getting so funny. I hate it. I think it's in your head though, bro thinking about because people are always like, oh, I don't want to write too many Asian jokes, but I've been writing more and more of them recently. You're going to get better. You're going to become famous. Trust my words. But I'm just like, why? Why can't I just talk about these things? You know, a lot of people, we were going to talk about this later, but a lot of people were kind of hating on one of the funk brothers because they had a little stand up set come out. And people were kind of hating on them about like, oh, well, you know, there's too much Asian stuff. And I go, I'm never, I never get tired of Asian stuff. I never get tired of me. I never look in the mirror and go, man, I'm tired of this. You know, I never get tired of Vietnamese food. I never get tired of Adrian food every time. Dude, that's a great point. Your own food. So I feel like you can never get tired of this topic because it is who we are. And if people keep saying, well, can you stop talking about that? I haven't even started talking about that. Yeah. You know what I'm saying? I can't even, you know, but we can't get into it if people keep telling me, I do a joke about to a joke about, you know, living in New York instead. And I'm like, fuck. Anyways. Okay. Damn, dude. I'm sweaty. But you know what? Talking about the stuff that really interests you. It's your best material. And as a matter of fact, the more particular the more universal becomes more universal. We always have. You always say that. We always have. And I think it's a truly true. More particular and also, I think you should only write this up that only you can write that not anyone else can do. Like no one can rip my stuff off. Nobody. No one can go for sure. No way. I'm like, this is my stuff now, and it's the stuff that I want to write about. If you want to write about go right ahead, but I know it's really hard. I feel you and I, we can do the thing where we merge like in Dragon Ball. Fusion. There's too much agent. Hollywood's like, no. Unless it makes money. And if that makes some money, they'll be like, ship.

Tolstoy Adam Driver Russia Adrian New York Hollywood
"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"It was like a whole New Yorker piece on it. You know what? I'm gonna tell my kids, I'm gonna tell my kids about twerking and I'm gonna tell my kids about Twitter. You know what I'm saying? If we were in this country, you know, my parents would be like, I'm gonna tell you about this time when a whole bunch of white people came and took everything we had and killed us. He wasn't pancakes, you know what I'm saying? That's why you can't even talk about it. But we've survived two impeachments. Right. These are historical events. Man, okay, I don't want to get even more of a bummer, but let's continue with Watchmen. Yes, wash, but I always think about with deleted history like I have a lot of my black comedian Friends. They always tell me about like, this happened the other day. My friend was wearing my friend Kwan, guan Wiggins. He was wearing a hat that had X on it. Like I had X on it. And I was like, oh, you fan of Xavier? I thought it was like Xavier university. They have a good basketball team. And then he was like, no, it's Malcolm. And then all his black friends laughed at me, but he was like, but that was a good guess. And then I always think about how they always tell me that because history books don't cover the stories that are important to the black Americans. For him, he was like, yes, growing up, my parents taught me about Emmett Till and Malcolm X. But in my history books, they made Malcolm X to be like very radical. It was more like Martin Luther King. He was like the nice guy. And then Malcolm X, like, they just, the way we worded it, I don't remember exactly how they said it, but I just remember it. It was just like, he's a little dangerous. That's the vibe I got, but for them, it's different. They hear different story. And I don't even know who that wasn't until like 5 years ago when I heard about it. And I looked it up. And so again, these are like really uncomfortable stories that need to be told and Watchmen does an amazing job. Of that. And I kind of wanted to open this discussion about like, how do you talk about these uncomfortable things in a major platform? And you know, I think pachinko is going to be on TV soon, right? It is. Wow. I can't talk about it because are you allowed to say that? Oh yeah, no, it's definitely Apple TV plus has ordered it to series. Right. And I'm not really part of it right now. Okay. So we'll have to see what happens. But you know, it's like, maybe that's awesome. So if you're not a part of it, then I don't know how much you have control over. But it's the same topic of pachinko again, a heavy topic. How do we talk about this in an entertaining way? You know, is there like things you got to watch out for? What are some things? Because I was thinking about watching, I watched that one called what about the Central Park 5? When they see us when they see us. They have a duvernay. So heavy. And I remember I couldn't watch it in one sitting just because it was like or Chernobyl. Very heavy. And very heavy. But very beautiful. Of course. An incredibly edifying I do believe that entertainment is not always just about feel good. I think entertainment is also about how do we engage with people's need for stories. Because every single day, the three of us, we walk outside the house and immediately chaos hits you, right? For sure. Immediately. Yeah. You have like a 150 wishes that you have in your heart for the day. Will the elevator come with a train beyond time? And about, you're going to get like two things. You'll get two things at the end of the day and that's a win. That's pretty good. It's actually pretty good. Right, exactly. So what I'm trying to figure out is, well, we have all this chaos. How do you make it into meaning? And that is what storytelling is. I think people are hungry for this information. That's true. I think we'll listen to podcasts because they're trying to get insight. They want fact plus insight and they want to feel engaged and they want to trust people. Right. So just tell them, what do you think about Watchmen? Get nerd out. Okay, if you really want to know, I think it's really radical and beautiful. So that's amazing. I have a problem with the way Asian people are treated in this. So just a quick background, again, I'm not blowing the thing. Watchmen, the HBO version is focused a lot more on race. Yes, it's an alternate universe, and it's 30 years after the comic books. So basically, Robert Redford is president. He's president for Watergate never happened. Nixon keeps on being president, Robert refer wins the next election. He's present for 30 years, and he's a Democrat. So what happens? It's a story about what happens in this world where the left kind of gets a lot of things that they are talking about how they want it. So they have everybody has electric cars. They are reparations for black people. But there's an equal reaction to that. So what happens when the left keeps getting what they want? What you get, the fucking revival of the KKK. Yeah, they go by this name called 7th cavalry with a K it's just a new form of the KKK. And now you've got this thing where the police are interrogating people for being racist. That's like a crime now. You know, so it's like, what do you be a crime? But I think that's totally fine, but you never think about like, what do you think happens on the other side when the liberals get what they want? And it's very honest about that world. So that's kind of like the world that we're kind of playing with. And Vietnam comes into play because we America wins the Vietnam War. Vietnam becomes the 51st state. And so there's a lot of evidence between people living in America and vice versa. In fact, our main character is a black female cop, grew up in Vietnam. Oh, man, farmer must be so good. So what's your issue with the way Asian people? So just to be really clear, I really love this show. I love the treatment of the Tulsa massacre. I also really like the fact that African American can get this information in a really wonderful way. The story is done, the timeline is really interesting. So all that is chuck chuck chuck a plus. But the way they treat Vietnam, I'm giving them a D minus. Oh shit. I didn't really get it because I haven't seen so I haven't seen this episode. I don't mind if you pull it, I don't give a you're talking about that scene where they have like a restaurant called burgers and borscht. Oh no, that's the least of it. I just want to get just statistically speaking, it makes no sense. So we're talking about a race war between blacks and whites in this television show. And it's all based on this long ago historical massacre. I get that. And again, this whole premise that if the liberals get what they want, like reparations, what will happen. That doesn't make any sense at all if you think about this one thing. If Vietnam War is technically one, whatever that means. Whatever the fuck that means and it really annoys me because they have this blue God coming and killing all those people. Right. So she went to Harvard. So what you have is you have this blue God who essentially quote unquote wins the Vietnam War. Right, right. You know, becomes a 51st date. Now, let's just think about this. And supposed to be 2019. If there's 96 million Vietnamese. And they are now a state of the United States. That's the 51st state. The current U.S. population is 327 people, okay? I just add another hundred to it. That means that the Asian population, which is currently 5%, right? And you know, now you're at 25%. Racial imbalance would actually not be between blacks and whites. It's actually between whites who used to be 65% and they would diminish dramatically and then it would be the Vietnamese and Asian population would be almost 26%. This is why this is why we don't incorporate Puerto Rico into as a new state. Right. We send a strip away all their voting powers. We don't talk about it in the show right now. But if you really think about it, you would have 90 over 96 million Vietnamese and you'd have to contend with plus the 5% of Asian Americans in this country. So the racial balance that you'd be really afraid of is actually Asians. Not African Americans. Yo, shit. Yo. Yo, welcome to my country. What are you guys doing here? Yes. In the new version, doctor Manhattan is an actual doctor. Also, I have a feeling I haven't seen the movie, but if he wins the war, does he do it by just killing like 30 million Vietnamese people? He just kills all the Viet Cong. Because he's not. I mean, that's a lot. You can just kill him. He just does this, and he can kill everybody. That's a lot of Vietnamese people. That's a lot of you. I mean, we lost a lot of Vietnamese people already. So all right. But during the war, the South Vietnam, the side that we are technically on. Lost 1.3 million people..

Malcolm guan Wiggins Malcolm X. Vietnam Emmett Till Xavier university Kwan KKK Xavier Watchmen Martin Luther King Central Park basketball chuck chuck chuck Twitter America Robert Redford HBO Apple
"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

07:08 min | 5 months ago

"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Anyway, I don't want to explore the book for anybody. But it's about like the Korean immigrants living in Japan. And that's something that I was born there. And so I had heard about it kind of through little media pieces here and there. And I learned more about it when I first moved here and I met some of these people who technically does I need you people. And the sort of Wikipedia, and it's always been a topic that I've been interested in. Interested in, but nobody ever taught me anything about it, because it's still like a weird thing, and then so already the topic was so interesting to me. And I realized, like, oh, only you could write something like this for me. Like, I can't expect this kind of story from fucking J.D. Salinger or whatever. Yeah, I remember once. I could also they're dead. They are dead. That's a big part. That's a huge problem. So I remember when I was like, I also was like, by the way, thank you so much. Yeah. I was trying to get into reading. I like to read. But then I remember once I was reading a bunch of short stories because I had a really short time Japan and I remember reading and all those collections of short stories are always just white guys. And I was reading one and he had an Asian woman character in it. And it was so obviously not right. Do you know what I'm saying? It was just, he had that character in it just because he wanted a hot chick. That was really what it was. Because it was like, oh, then she used, you know, she's like the Asian American woman. She got into her drop top convertible and waved at me. And I was like, no one, I've never, I can not imagine anyone doing that. Yeah, yeah. But the books that you write, you automatically feel like you know who they, not know who they are, but there's so much unsaid backstory to a lot of it, I feel. Thank you. Thank you. I really like Asians. Do you? You'd be surprised. There are Asians and Asian Americans who don't like Asians. That's true. Yeah, we talk about that. And you feel it. And you feel it. And actually, I really like Asian and Asian men. Asian American men. So then I write about really hot interesting. You know, and I think that that makes a huge difference because I see them as human. And you may think that's an obvious thing. No, yeah. But it's not. Actually, western publishing, which is so white, it's clear. That it's really difficult to actually convey that we're interesting. We're really, really fascinating. We have so many fucking story. Yes. But I recently had somebody who was Asian American, asked me, are you going to continue to write about Koreans? And I thought, what does that even mean? Like, am I done now? Because I've written two books on it. I was like, there's only two stories. I have two stories that you know. Right, yes. You got them all. I'm done. You're done. Yeah, we can just close out part of the library now. You know, it took you a long time to write this book. 30 years, 30 years. Yes. Did you so I guess can you talk to us about what first made you go, hey, let's write a story like this was a way different from how it turned out. Could you walk us through some of that? Yes, I got the idea for it was 19 years old. I heard a really sad story when I went to Electra by accident. I went to the lecture because I was trying to avoid going to class and that makes no sense. No, that makes sense. I'm sure you guys are always on the library on like me. And in this lecture, this guy was talking about this in the Korean Japanese history, which I knew nothing about. And then he mentioned this really sad story about this 13 year old boy who has Korean Japanese who killed himself. And then of course later on, they found out that his classmates had written essentially go back to where you belong. I hate you, you smell like kimchi and die. And I heard this story and I was really surprised because this boy was born in Japan and his parents were born in Japan and the guy who was giving the lecture was a nice white guy who was doing Christian stuff in Japan. And I had a lot of friends who are Japanese and Japanese American and I was like, what are they talking about? I don't understand this. And then I kind of had this thing in my brain. And after I quit being our corporate lawyer, I started to write this book. And of course, I wrote a really shitty draft. I wrote such a bad draft that I ended up doing something else. And then I worked on this book for about 30 years. It's really embarrassing. Yeah. No, that's awesome. I mean, so was the original draft of book about was it mainly about this boy? Or was it? No, no. The most mostly just about the law. Okay. That's how fascinating it was. It was so boring. And I think that I was so obsessed with getting things correct. That I wasn't really interested in the stories of people. And when I lived in Japan for four years between 2007 and 2011, I met all these Korean Japanese people, and many of them were married to Japanese people, many of them loved Japan and they looked at me kind of like, what are you so pissed about? I mean, yes, discrimination exists, but it's everywhere. And again, that's really true. There's discrimination everywhere. And there's also structural discrimination everywhere. And their attitude about it was, it's really fucked up. However, I know how to deal with it. And they didn't want my pity. Yeah. And that was really mind-blowing to me because I kind of thought as a former lawyer, like, that's just not right. How can they do this? Blah, blah, blah. And then I thought, oh, I have to throw the book away. And I started it all over again. Interesting. Okay. Yeah, I think that's one of the reasons I found first of all, this is crazy that this is true. It's the first English written book about this topic. Ever, that's insane. It is insane. You talk about, especially when you're writing, I guess like a story based on something. Kind of long time ago, how do you research this thing that hasn't really been researched? Like where do you even start? Well, there's actually a lot of academic research. And I feel very comfortable with academic and legal research. So that was really helpful. But then what's interesting is that you have to take all that data and information and actually make it into a story. Somebody wants something. Somebody doesn't get something, and then somebody figures out how to deal with not getting it or getting it. That's what a story is. You know, that's how you begin a story. And I think what I did was I just did a ton of interviews. I did many interviews as a humanly possibly could within Japan for four years. And I had to find it myself and hire translators because I don't speak everything. And it ended up really humbling me and maybe in a way it wasn't a good thing because it made me take longer. Yeah. Because I didn't feel confident. And again, I thought, oh, if no one's going to write this book, why should I write this book? How am I qualified to write this book? I'm not Korean Japanese. And I'm ready to eat in English. So that made me even, I just kind of doubled down on my homework. I just kept on doubling down in my homework until now. I feel like, I know everything. You can ask me. That's amazing. Do you feel like you needed to have everything in order to have permission to write it? I was totally a coward. I didn't want to get called out for saying, hey, you're Korean American. How dare you? Yeah. And I thought, I'm ready. I'm ready. If you ask me that question, and now I've had so many Korean Japanese write to me saying thank you so much for writing my story blah blah blah. And it's really lovely because I was so afraid they were going to come out and drag me on Twitter. For the listeners who may not know what is exactly going on, should we give a quick background of what we're talking about? I'm sorry. No, no, it's okay. This is my fault. So the research person..

Japan J.D. Salinger Twitter
"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

05:58 min | 5 months ago

"jin" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"And the way they talk about the history is they kind of like, they realize that it's terrible, but you know, sure loved women. If you know what I mean, you know, I'm just like, oh my God. And that's the only thing he did. That's it. No, you guys, let's move to the gift shop. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. So yeah, well, welcome back. Welcome back. Thank you. I'm excited. All right, well, speaking of history, you see what I did there? Nice. Our guest today, oh my gosh, I can not believe she came. I can't believe it. You know, it's a miracle. I don't know if I'm not sure if this is the real her. This could have been. I think this is, I think, well, let's do this. Let's do this. Our guest today is just an author management recipient of fellowship in fiction from the Guggenheim foundation. And the Radcliffe institute of advanced study at Harvard, Harvard. Do we know this? I've never had to say stuff like this. This person is not even wearing a Harvard switcher. I know, it's usually like, this guy's been on Comedy Central. Yeah, yeah, this is all new to me. Yeah, this person's got like over a thousand followers on Twitter. But you know what, let's just skip all the bullshit, okay? She's the author of this amazing novel called pachinko, which released in 2017. If you haven't read it, check it out. It was a finalist for the national book award for fiction and a bunch of other words. So let's give it up. For the amazing min Jin Lee. Yay. I am so happy to be here. Thank you for coming. I feel that you are the first adult who has ever been on this. That is so true. You have a blazer on. Oh my God. You like, did you have, oh yeah, your shoes are amazing. Thank you, thank you. I was trying to impress you. You impressed me. I was trying to impress. They are. Ex collaboration. These are fire. These are fire. I have three pairs of these. No way. Really? Yeah. Are you doing pretty well for yourself, huh? I am. Thanks. No, actually my feet are so wide because I have descended from rice peasants, like patty workers. So I really can't even wear regular shoes. So you will never see me driving money on manolo is because I couldn't get my toe in it. Exactly. So basically where clown shoes, these are clown shoes. They're amazing. You have research that you brought. I did. You have all this stuff. You say you're a fan of ours. This is fan. Really? Yeah. But you found out about us because I emailed you, right? No, I knew about you guys because I follow all these Asian American comics. Oh yeah, you're a fan of Karen Chi. Yeah, I'm a fan. That's right. That's right. Wow, well welcome to the show. So I found that because of the people that you've had and then I heard from you I was like, oh, yes, I'm going to do that show. You know what's funny? I reached out to you because I was watching your interviews and we always try to get authors or writers on here because they have brilliant minds and they have an interesting looking at the world, but you are funny in your interviews. But you're always being interviewed by these lame ass dudes. And they don't laugh at your shit. And I'm like, she's funny. So I was like, I gotta get it wrong, so I reached out to you. No, if I had more courage, I would do stand up. You're an author. But you guys actually have to take it from people who are drunk. Like, people who come to my events are not drunk. Oh yeah, but I feel they're judgy. How about your adventure judgy? No? Yeah, no, there are definitely haters and assholes everywhere. Absolutely. However, what I think is sort of interesting is that the reason why I like comics is because you guys are writers. You guys are storytellers and you are the tradition of the poet. I study literary theories I can actually confirm it. Okay, hit me. Before pros, which is what I do. There was poetry. And the word poem actually comes in the word song. You can't actually just write poetry. You have to say it. What you guys are doing are combining saying things and oral storytelling, the older tradition of storytelling. And that's what stand up comes from. Stand up wouldn't work unless you guys told stories. That's true. And then whenever we tell jokes, there is rhythm. People don't realize that there's rhythm. I always feel that 'cause I own patterns. I always notice the musicality to comedy. That's the part I enjoy the most. There's a lot of music. You can lower your voice a certain point, pause, but it is great music. If you could just record you saying, could you say that one more time? Do you want me to call your parents and say, well, they're doing is really important. Well, actually, I don't know, because then it's like, wait, so my son is actually a poet. The clicking sound. I'm so excited. So we're excited about, I have to admit, I've only just started rating pachinko. You know what? It's my fault because I was supposed to let it to you. There's no problem. I would have brought you free copies. That's okay. So far, amazing. And this is a big deal, because fumi, I don't know if you know this. Does not read. I don't read. He does not read. But something amazing happened. Do you release your book? Yes. And I've read it. You read it. And then I got into books. So now I read now. I actually get this all the time. Really? I've had so many Asian American men contact me inside. I don't read fiction, but I read your book because somebody made me read it. Like literally like someone put a gun to their head and said, you got to read a picture or else I'm going to kill you. And they read it and they're going, oh my God, now I'm reading Anna krina and they write me these long letters. And I think, oh, I did something. It's crazy. You know what I really? It's because obviously like I fucking read books and college and stuff, but a lot of the stories were like, I guess just to me, I wasn't like, I think I was never good at seeking the right kind of books for me. You know? And I think the stuff you read in school, it's like the classics and it's not always the most interesting things. You know, I'm reading like play doh and whatever you read in high school. I know it's good. Yeah, I mean, it's fine. He's all right. But I think with your stuff, hey, there's also, and I've been reading a lot of Asian American authors after I read your book. I started reading the sympathy, I wrote the sympathizer. He liked one of my tweets. We should get that guy. We should. It's great. And then I read ocean Wong. There's just something about. I think it's a mix of the content is just interesting to me, especially pachinko..

Harvard Radcliffe institute of advance min Jin Lee Karen Chi Guggenheim foundation national book award manolo Twitter fumi Anna krina Wong
"jin" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Of an international <Speech_Female> community <SpeakerChange> attitudes <Speech_Music_Female> toward china. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Louis quo <Speech_Male> reports <Speech_Male> on china for <Speech_Male> the washington post. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our episode <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> today was produced <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by haughty mewa <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> d. and miles <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> brian. I'm <Speech_Male> sean romney's firm <Speech_Male> and this

"jin" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on WTOP

"Jin Temporal scanner in Philadelphia. A group of teenagers are working to educate their classmates about the vaccine. Here's Philly teen VAX Ambassador Anjali Kazan. There's a lot of false information out there, especially with social media being around and were there to spread real information fever is the key symptom for both the flu and covid. The extra Jin temporal scanner is essential to detect fevers early and reliably learn more at x surgeon dot com. At 6 48 traffic and weather on the A 32 castles in the W T o p traffic center. The wet roadways continue to cause challenging situations on the roadways eastbound 66 heavy between Manassas in Centerville, then you're at a crawl from 50 toward the Beltway before the Beltway. Still single file left getting by the tractor trailer crash northbound 95 heavy near 6 10 from Dale City into would region from Lord in off and on in the Newington while in Lord, northbound one before Gunston Cove Road and Gunston Road that crash Hands along the right side. Um 3 95 heavy getting onto the inbound 14th Street bridge southbound to 70 while the volume coming out of Frederick headed past 85, then off and on from there, passing 109, But the lanes are reported open out early, but the Beltway cells removed 50 toward the Baltimore Washington Parkway. There was an earlier wreck on the ramp to the north Beyond Parkway, then delays on the topside around from 95 toward University Boulevard after university watch for the broken down vehicle that was reported to be along the right side. You'll also find inbound 50 slow from 4 10 headed all the way onto New York Avenue Colbun D. C. To 95 now slows from Eastern Avenue pasties Capitol Street, But those lanes should be open north about 90 to 95. The delay from the Maryland D. C line headed toward joint base. Anacostia Bolling. It's the final week of Regency Furnitures. Biggest labor Day events. A 50% off, plus free delivery and Regency pays your sales tax during these final days at Regency Furniture. I'm Rita Kessler. W T O P traffic when we started off a little wet this morning, Mike Senna for Where are we headed from? Here. It looks like it's going to stay unsettled this morning and especially.

Rita Kessler Gunston Cove Road Mike Senna Dale City Philadelphia 50% Baltimore Washington Parkway Gunston Road Manassas Newington Frederick University Boulevard Centerville Maryland D. C Lord Eastern Avenue Anjali Kazan Capitol Street Philly x surgeon dot com
"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

"That's legal training however i did fail the bar the first time and do you see yourself in any of those characters. Oh yeah people. Get really upset. When i say this. But i'm in portland your city of counter culture so i really like han soo. And he's the gangster villain person and the reason why everybody like hunt suicide. Because he's really sexy and i talked to my writing students about this. It's really important that you have a character. Who makes happen when you're writing so very often when you're writing identify too much with protagonist and then you have all these straw men characters around them and the protagonists can always knock them down very easily. So it's very important to have a very strong antagonised. So i always root for the antagonised. Otherwise i'm not going to stand the chance and keeping your interest. Has your family read your books. And how did they react if they did. Yes and they have read my books in english and in korean and in particular most people want to know my parents think and they have liked it. It's incredibly gratifying. To have my mother who is not easy. Say that she likes it. The first book free food for millionaires. After she finished reading it she called me and she said i liked it but do.

han soo portland
"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Could not get another husband so i went to japan and in japan i decided to return to my second novel motherland and i went to osaka. And i did fieldwork. I met many korean japanese people and i interviewed them. And i learned that. I have been wrong about everything. The korean japanese people had absolutely suffered institutional discrimination and they were deprived of human rights however they did not see themselves as victims in this essential idea of how my subjects insisted on determining themselves made a very great on me. I took the manuscript that i had. And i tossed it. I had to rewrite everything from the very beginning. And i started again. I have failed for many more years than i have succeeded. If i have succeeded at all in the past two years. I've been rejected for three teaching positions one editor position and four fellowships as you may know i was a national book award finalist and for those of you may not know is that the winner is announced on the evening of the awards so i got dressed up and i invited my parents and my sisters and my in laws and my son flew in from california my nieces and my nephews came and i lost. It is a very specific feeling when everyone watches you as you lose. So how do i stay a writer when i'm pretty sure. I never thought that. I could be a writer. Well this is when. I get to tell you about your superpowers and mine. I'm not sure if you know that you have these superpowers but you do you use them all the time. Perhaps you are apparent when your teenager hurts your feelings. Why do you still wait up all night for him to come home when you're bone tired when your mother is cranky in need you to take her to the doctor but doesn't ask nicely. Why do you leave work early. So you can take her and when your best friend calls you crying on the phone. Why do you stop making dinner to listen. When you have half a dozen things left to do on your to do list after dinner is made and after the dishes are washed and put away. Well it's because you have a superpower. You know how to love when it is difficult you know how to love and to do what is right. When you're tired. You know that being different and being a statistical minority cannot be reason enough to give up the parts of our lives that we love the most can be almost impossible to bear every day but we bear it we do it every day and though our burdens are different and though our wishes are different we have this power to care into persist because we know we must end. Because we want our lives to matter. I want to thank each. And every one of you for making books matter. And i want to thank you from the bottom of my heart and i want to make sure that we empower ourselves and the next generation to make things better. So thank you. That was so beautiful. Thank you so beautiful. So we ask every writer to recommend some books until we start things off these days so the first one that i have a my car recommended matthew desmond's victim you talk about that for a second. I think that if you haven't read this book you're really in a treat. Because what desmond has done is nothing short of astonishing. He has taken the crisis of housing inequality in this country and he has given it narrative in shape and people and faces and stories. And it's really really quick to read. It's deeply absorbing as well as the fact that you learn so much about what's going on in the lives of people people that we don't necessarily know and hopefully if you're not using housing inequality i do believe that this book is really beautifully written and it's very powerful. It's actually a really good book club. Choice katherine boo behind the beautiful forever's. Oh another master work. I think so if you want to learn more about india and the lives of ordinary people in india and even though people think that only focuses on the poor of in the india although it is developing very strong middle class it has incredible poverty for a highly literate society and i think boo did an incredible job in writing about the lives of ordinary people in this one family in particular in ghetto. This novelist this canadian. Because i'm canadian. And not as well known here as i think he should be. But it's real hunting mystery. As novel called a fine balance. It's a book that came out a while ago. i. I can't recommend a lot of fiction. Been judging a lot this past year as well as a year before. So i try not to talk about fiction because it wouldn't be fair so i tried to think of a book in the past. Fifteen years is about fifteen years. It'd be a little more immaculate. More where i think it's really stood the test of time. I think a fine balance of incredible generational saga again in india. Wonderful to read so sympathetic. And i think his comparison tolstoy's deeply earned in the last one was joyce johnson minor characters. Oh for those of you. Who haven't this is a memoir. And joyce johnson. I believe she's still alive. I studied with her very briefly at the ninety. Second street y. And this novel. I'm sorry this memoir in particular is really special. Because she wrote about her. Brief affair with jack kerouac so does belong to the class of books where women are writing about.

japan osaka matthew desmond katherine boo india california desmond joyce johnson tolstoy jack kerouac
"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

"The gentleman who was a very good and kind man who serve the poor told us a great deal about the history of crohn's and japan and it's a history. I knew nothing about. I was nineteen years old and at the time although i found him really interesting i was more concerned about the horrible man that i was dating at the time and i thought to myself tiktok to wrap up and then he told a story about a thirteen year old boy who had climbed up to his apartment building and he had jumped off to his death and the thirteen year. Old boy was in and he was born in japan. His parents were also ethnically korean and they were born in japan. The parents had no idea that thirteen year old son had planned something so unspeakably sad. So in order to understand their son's actions they went through all of his things in his things they found as middle school yearbook has middle school yearbook. He had just graduated in in the middle school yearbook. His japanese classmates had written. Go back to where you belong. I you you smell like kimchi. And they wrote the words. Di di di. And i could not forget these words by could not. I didn't know what to do with these words. But i just kept them in my brain and i could not believe that children. Thirteen year old children could hate other children so intensely based on one's ethnicity and immutable characteristic. This child did not have the power to change. I graduated as a history major. And then i went to law school because i am very good immigrant and then i got married. I was twenty four. And my husband. And i bought a tiny but very beautiful. Little apartment in manhattan. I finally had lovely clothes. And i worked in a beautiful office where everything smelled clean. And we're the bathrooms were spotless. And the paper towel. Dispensers were always well stocked. Now this may seem like a sort of weird thing to focus on. But when i think about going to the bathroom with my little sister at my father's store where i had to stare down rights. I was incredibly grateful to work in an office like that. I practiced for two years. And i was a very good lawyer because i'm very anxious and i always did my work very carefully and the one month i build three hundred hours. Which means if you're honest that means that you're in the office for almost three hundred fifty or more because you can't bill every hour your client and after. I finished a very important assignment. I walk my managing partners office to hand it to him and then he immediately gave me another matter to work on so i told him without any plans. I can't do this anymore. And then i quit that day. I am pretty sure that. If i had not known about my illness i would have still been a lawyer today and that i wouldn't have thought so carefully and so intensely about how to spend my time. My husband and i had fifteen thousand dollars saved in our bank account. And i thought that i would write full-time because surely it could not be so difficult to publish a novel. If only.

crohn's tiktok japan Di di di manhattan
"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

"You have a relationship between guns and butter so i considered you know maybe history because that's sounded serious and just considered that well just a bunch of true story. So how hard could that be. I knew i could never major an english because the girls at yale who majored in english had amazing hair and super long eyelashes and they had beautiful clothes. And i didn't stand the chance. So i think i took a few writing classes and actually won some prizes but it never occurred to me that i could be a writer now. Why is that well because and my mind. Writers were people like sinclair lewis. I was born in south korea. English was my second language and in the late eighties when i was in college. I decided that i would take an asian american literature class just to figure out if there were any asian american writers. I didn't know of a single korean american writer then and when i took the class in the syllabus they were to korean american women who had written novels the first one i read was by an author named theresa hot coun- cha who wrote a wonderful book called dictate. It's incredibly innovative. And smart. and it's still read today and immediately. After she published a book she was murdered in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. We still don't know what happened. They haven't caught. The person killed her. And then i read another novel. A historical novel called clay walls by run young kim and immediately after she published her book. She died of cancer. So for korean-american women. If you wrote a novel you died. I declared my major in history now. The second thing that i brought up earlier about my high school years was that i was i. Hepatitis b. chronic carrier in high school. I was as symptomatic and in college. It turned out that i would get very very ill and my doctor at yale newhaven hospital said that i would get liver cancer in my twenties or early thirties. My parents were working the day that i went to go see. The doctor and i had gone to the hospital by myself. And i remember listening to dr. Rubin say these things and the only thing that i thought was. I had to be very careful with my time before. I graduated from college. I attended a lecture featuring an american missionary a nice white man who had gone to japan to help. The poor korean people are living there. And no one i knew wanted to go to the lecture so when i was asked by the university chaplain to attend i said yes and i went there and it was me the speaker the university chaplain and one other student. I could not leave. But there were a lot of cookies. And.

theresa hot coun sinclair lewis south korea yale newhaven hospital Hepatitis b kim liver cancer cancer Rubin japan
"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on The Archive Project

"To share with the high school students. You're here because you were kind enough to read pachinko and. I thought that i would talk a little bit about the formation of my career and it really began in high school when i was in high school over three decades ago. Two things happened to me which separated me from my peers. I i fell in love. With a novels of the american writer sinclair lewis. Who wrote among many many many other books. He wrote main street. Mike favorite aerosmith babbitt and very timely novel today. It can't happen here second. I donated blood to the american red cross and i learned that i was a chronic hepatitis. B carrier so consequently as girl. I learned to really important things about me. I admired great old fiction that none of my friends read. And i carried an illness in my body. Communicable through blood and sex and through childbirth. So about sinclair lewis. He was a doctor son and he was the third son and his father didn't like him he was skinny any suffer from terrible acne. He was very odd and he had few friends so of course identified with him. Because i was tall. And i was odd in. I didn't have any friends anyway. He went to yale college. So i wanted to go to yell college. Because he had gone there and i applied in. Somehow i got in. And i know that sounds crazy but when i got there i sort of expected him to be there he was not because he had graduated in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight anyway even though i loved fiction so much that i chose a college based upon my favorite writer at the time i knew i would major in economics because the seem like a sound thing to do when you grow up in elmhurst queens and your parents work for six days a week in a tiny little store in manhattan that was under heated and had rats in the basement. If you wanted to go to the bathroom you'd have to stamp and the rats would just look at you like this is my house..

sinclair lewis aerosmith babbitt american red cross hepatitis yale college Mike elmhurst queens manhattan
"jin" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Me like growing up here i think i really resented kind of a minority model minority myth. Because i'm like. I'm not good at math like this like. That's not me so like one it means. I'm either bad at being like korean or to like this is just like some bs at like. I'm frustrated that like people are trying to pigeonhole me. So i found a lot of pride initially just like intentionally not being the things that people expected to be. Maybe that's actually what noah was doing. You're trying to be something that's up and expecting to be. Are you familiar with the concept of han. I don't think so. We learned about this watching anthony bourdain. He had an episode in los angeles. Where A chunk of the episode in koreatown needs with david joe. David show which is one of the artists that i feel like. He's in everything we want. He's got a free time. He had stock early stock in facebook. He says everyone But anyways Days at dinner with david chose family. And they talked about the concept of han. I feel more than acted or well i. I was thinking about it because i was connecting to identity end. Like the way that japanese culture became so intertwined with korean culture like once occupation ended for people who for koreans living in japan or crane people living in korea win. It had been so long. That like you see with solomon's character like he's sort of watch him try and figure out like where is my home and what is. My identity am korean japanese. What am i. And so i was thinking about like the long term impact of japanese occupation and i remembered this episode that we watched in which david and his parents who immigrated from korea. Talked about the concept of han. And it's like a. I think the way you translated beautiful suffering. I had sorrow grief resentment. Loss of adobe the. Yeah it's it's i think some scholars invented it. And i don't know how valid. Which is why. I wanted to ask you if you heard about if your thoughts about it. I think it was a way to try and describe the kind of lasting drive and resentments and long suffering that had been left by the japanese occupying courses is my understanding. Ya was a culture even need. It's not as widely spread as we thought watching that episode of parts unknown. But there's a word for the type of generational trauma increase. Yeah that many crans carry. I don't know that's civic term per se. But i certainly see like culturally like for instance When i was in korea. There's actually a band or not a ban a boycott of japanese products in company. So for instance like when we were there but a lot of like natives would not shop at unique low because unique loans a japanese company. It happens to be really popular in korea and there is the argument of like well who suffering because it does maybe bought bother unique lows corporate bottom line a little bit but are are the korean franchisee owners like who run that shop. Aren't they the ones who actually suffering more than so it's like well. What point the early driving at. But i that whole thing though had come up because again other like more complex geopolitics here but because initially a prime minister obey in japan refused to like acknowledge. Apologize for the comfort women. That were used like basically. The japanese army would like abduct any in the book. They talk about all the time. Like alonzo was always like Tanja he was. Oh don't follow anybody who's like a we have jobs for you in china like a good manufacturing job. It's a job for you but you're not going to be paid for it and you're going to be like a sexually violated. And so i think they were like. Oh well we like blatantly. Apologize back in the sixties or something so there were descendants. Actually maybe some living survivors of koreans. Who lived during the second world war. Who essentially did like fourth slave labor for japanese companies and those companies profited from that and deal the supreme court of korea. So i took these cases said yeah like you know. We think it would be fair if those japanese companies paid reparations to these families and the japanese companies like now like i don't think we're gonna do that Or you can come in individually like settle your claim individually. But we're not gonna do have a blanket policy on that after that koreans are like by products and then after that the japanese were like okay. We'll even though you're like right next to us Wor- your we're taking you off of our like eight plus trading partners list so you can no longer get like overnight like shipping of like mike these important microchips that like are using cell phones. Like samsung and lg. You have to wait like a full seven days. Even though you take the slowest ship from japan to korea wouldn't take you know. There's a lot of like that kind of animosity. So all that to say i i think boils down to just like just like any other misunderstanding. Where like if one person gets hurt and other person doesn't like properly acknowledged her like really apologize like the weight of what they did. You still feel like like wrong right. I think most would so. I think that's probably a lot of that. Derives from also art of the create identity is suffering. They talk about that a lot in the books. More specifically for the women in particular. There's actually a phrase in korean and they mentioned briefly in the book that says It's like the word causing which is to suffer and so like it's interchangeable though. If like my mom said to me causing no money which means like oh. You must have suffered so much also meeting like work so hard and it's like a good thing like alcohol you know but in context it could also be a bad thing if you're like saying literally as well so it was just interesting thing but i think that does explain a lot of the drive which you mentioned julia like picking itself up by its bootstraps Second world war. And just after the korean war rather than like like a top twenty like economy in the world so i mean the speed of grove south korea like didn't exist and then all of a sudden it did and now it's like one of the like top twenty economies or whatever like pretty incredible rebuilding. Yeah for sure. Only if the characters in the book new you know kind of wrapping things. Up i am. We talked a lot about how pachinko shares not only the individual families history kind of wraps it in this larger historical context and one of the. I think great things that historical non or historical fiction can do is kinda give story a narrative to places where into perspectives. That maybe we've overlooked or the history textbooks Completely disregard and i found the first sentence relate. You were talking about earlier today. The first sentence of the novel very interesting history has failed us but no.

samsung noah korea china japan david joe Second world war david Tanja julia facebook alonzo second world war David sixties seven days one one person first sentence south korea
"jin" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"jin" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Jin's accuracy is supported by peer reviewed published studies details that accident dot com Okay. ABC weather tonight, mostly clear in the evening than areas of low clouds and fog tomorrow Mostly cloudy highs from the mid upper sixties at the beaches to the mid seventies toe around 80 inland. Right now, in downtown L A. It's 85 degrees that 25 k weekday payday is back on 7 90 kbc Listen every hour weekdays between eight a.m. and 5 30 for your shot at $100 and possibly $25,000 traffic Next from East L. A toe west L. A Get it. Right. A seven night. Okay, ABC. ABC. Dependable Traffic, Santa Clarita, the 14 nor founded Newhall Car Fire in the Carpool lane. Stop and go from the five Pasadena The 2 10 westbound before Alan crashed, blocking the middle lane stopped traffic from Madre Up. Lin the 2 10 eastbound before Mountain crashed, blocking the left lane. Traffic stop from baseline. Chino, the 60 West bounded reservoir crash blocking three right lanes. Traffic backed up on vineyard. East l. A. The 7 10 South bound at the 60 crashed, blocking the left lane stopping go from, says her Chavez Newbury Park, the one on one North bound it. Lin crashes on Lee, the left lane open that's dependable traffic. I'm Kevin Trip on a M. 7, 90 K. ABC, Titus and Tate, a podcast from too obsessed basketball lovers. He's seen it all. He can go into any living room in North Carolina anywhere in the world and say, I am the blueprint. I am what it looks like to be successful. And guess what? I'm the first black head coach of the University of North Carolina. And it's not about that. I've seen people say it's you know, it's awoke higher or something like that. No Hubert Davis earned this job more than just analysts and stats. Titus and Tate Listen.

North Carolina Hubert Davis $25,000 $100 85 degrees Kevin Trip 25 k Chino eight a.m. ABC tonight East L. A tomorrow mid upper sixties Alan Newhall Car Fire mid seventies University of North Carolina Chavez Newbury Park seven night
"jin" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"jin" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Alive. All right, Jin unlike that 18 ft Python, they just cut in the Everglades. I was thinking of you. Yeah, yeah, of course. You probably end up in my backyard, please. They're going to drop it Bacon. I need luggage. School teachers who wait Pouring expert witness No. No. Yeah, but if you don't get it You're just a few minutes away from.

Jin
"jin" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"jin" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"First one you love broke your heart Like strong. I was sound asleep. You did it all but my heart's in my hand. I want to give it to you. But your heart's lock stone and I can't reach you hard and let me come in. Jenny Jin Jin. You know the big bad wolf. You don't need me now, Then I'll speak a would ever be asleep. Osama Melinda Pumping like the others do a big bad wolf. Well, then I'm becoming much any tension. You know. I love you and all your heart and let me come in my Jin Jin Jin, you know What a cool jam. I'm not the big bad wolf. I'm just little boy Blue. I probably won't do that again. But, yeah, I'm getting loopy, and it's late. At night, and I am at home pre recording this show for y'all. So you can't call in and talk to a live person at the party right now, But you can leave messages on the back to the country Facebook page and we will respond to you and thank you for listening for sure. Before Minnesota. Marv's doing.

Jenny Jin Jin Osama Melinda Pumping Facebook Marv Minnesota