35 Burst results for "JIA"

Why Is the Media Attacking a Safe, Effective Drug?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:16 min | 9 months ago

Why Is the Media Attacking a Safe, Effective Drug?

"Ivermectin works. You're being lied to by corrupt medical profession. it is. I never thought i'd say this is as corrupt as the teachers unions. There was no difference between the american medical association the cbc the nih and the teachers unions. They're left wing activist groups. They have no commitment to what they claim to have. Commitment to there are some wonderful teachers. There are some wonderful people at all. Cdc and nih. it's corrupt it's been corrupted by big pharma. They want you to take the vaccine. Because if you can get healthy by taking a cheap pill like ivermectin or hydroxy chloroquine and zinc. They don't want you to do so. They wanna make billions by pushing and shoving the vaccine down americans throats. That's the reason for the war against ivermectin in india. They used it and listen to the story. Okay just listen to it that this is a A doctor writing from the desert review dot com republished in zero hedge. There's a black on any conversation. About how ivermectin beat cova nineteen in india when i discussed the dire straits that india found itself in in earlier this year with four hundred fourteen thousand cases per day and over four thousand deaths per day and how that evaporated within five weeks of the addition of ivermectin often asked. Why is there no mention of that in the news. Yes exactly ask yourself why. India success against the delta variant with ivermectin is such a closely guarded secret by the nih and cdc. Second ask yourself. Why no major media outlets reported this fact but instead try to confuse you with false information by saying the deaths in india are ten times greater than official reports perhaps. Npr's trying so hard because npr's essentially government mouthpiece the us government is all in with vaccines with enthusiasm. A seventeenth century catholic. Church all in with a jia centric metal of the geo centric model of the universe disputing galileo

NIH India American Medical Association CBC CDC NPR Us Government
"jia" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:44 min | 9 months ago

"jia" Discussed on WTVN

"JIA condo used a recipe of Roman concrete as part of the rebuilding process after the bridge suffered a collapse in 14 99 when the weight of houses on the bridge Proved to be too much for the old structure. This version of the bridge, the concrete one stood largely unaltered until 18 53. So that was back in 14 99, but widespread use really wouldn't kick into high gear for a few more centuries. In 17 74 and English engineer by the name John Smeaton learned that by using quicklime as an ingredient for making cement, he could make better, harder cement and later in 17 93. He discovered something else. Which brings us to calcium nation. Calculation is the process of heating up a solid to a very high temperature, and the purpose is to burn off any volatile substances within that solid mass so that you're left with a more pure lump of Whatever it was, you started off with Smeaton discovered that calculating limestone that had clay content in it would produce hydraulic lime. As the name implies, this produces a line that hardens underwater. Three years later, an Englishman named James Parker patented a hydraulic cement produced by calculating limestone that contained clay engineers began building lime kilns, essentially ovens dedicated to calculating limestone. So They were trying to re create the effect that those ancient peoples saw around their their fires, their food fires, years and years and years centuries earlier. Now let's skip ahead to 18 24, a builder named Joseph Aston found that by grinding up chalk and putting it in a kiln with clay produced an even stronger type of cement. This is the type of cement we call Portland Cement. It's named after the Isle of Portland in the English Channel. It's where a type of limestone called Portland Stone comes from, and that stone played a huge part in British architecture. Fact it still does. More people made contributions toward the understanding and production of cement. But the next innovation I want to talk about came courtesy of Frederick Ransom Ransom wanted to find a way to consistently make the best cement which required a new type of kiln. So the old cement kilns where essentially vertically aligned ovens, so think of like a chimney. You would load this stuff up with limestone and clay. You would have fuel at the bottom. You get the.

James Parker John Smeaton Joseph Aston Smeaton 14 99 18 53 17 74 18 24 17 93 Three years later English Frederick Ransom Ransom JIA English Channel Roman Englishman of Portland more centuries centuries earlier British
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:50 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Many questions is hosted and written by me. Minnie driver supervising producer. Aaron kaufman producer. Morgan lavoix research assistant marisa brown original music. Sorry baby by minnie. Driver additional music by erin kaufman executive produced by me. Benny special thanks to jim. Nicolay will pinson addison. Day lisa kasteler an oppenheim at w. kpi daler pescador. Kate driver and jason weinberg and for constantly solicited tech support henry driver in a rapidly changing world. People wonder more and more about where their food comes from and out was grown. Farmers who grow america's corn understand. How important this is and want to share the stories from our farms of how we are working to grow an incredible crop that can be an answer to sustainability questions and his grown by men and women who value the air water soil and our natural resources. Just like you to find out more about how corn farmers are working to feed and fuel a vibrant economy and healthy planet visit. Nci dot com nc a commitment to the future. St wonder where your food comes from more. And more people to america's corn farmers work hard every day to grow a crop that you can be proud to serve your family. And they're doing it with an eye toward sustainability caring for water air soil and resources that fuel healthy families and more sustainable products. Take a look to find out how farmers in rural america work to make life better for all of us from cities to their rural communities. Learn more at nc g. a. dot com in cg a a commitment to the future..

Aaron kaufman Morgan lavoix marisa brown erin kaufman pinson addison lisa kasteler jason weinberg Nicolay Minnie minnie Benny Kate america jim henry
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:54 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Okay so in your life. Can you tell me about something that has grown out of a personal disaster. I'll say i feel another kind of luck that i've had in my wife you know i've been spared a lot of personal grief that i think a lot of people had to go through. I have not had a very close family. Member die anyway. This is just a way of saying. I've been spared a lot of disasters but i think that the closest thing to this question. When i was out of college i graduated right into the middle of the two thousand eight recession. Has like you know like you were saying earlier. I was like i'll never be employed on too. I'll never be able to make anything of myself. I didn't know what to do. When i joined the peace corps with all of this sort of idealism grand plans to do good probably ultimately imperialistic desires to save somebody or something right. Maybe it's back to the bicycle. Yeah exactly and you know the and that's an uncomfortable in in many ways sort of dehumanizing way to think of other of other humans who are your equals right but in terms of your feeling from a very young age that that was service that needed to be addressed. Yeah and then so when i. This was one of the most important periods of my life. I went to cargo stan in central asia and it was it was a ruler coaster of experience. We were evacuated to military base twice. There was essentially genocide months to there was a government coup date seven. I wanted the challenge of it. And i thought you know sort of hubris quickly that you've come out of this challenge stronger and you do all of these things and it was a sort of singularly defining lesson that your intentions and your outcomes. There's often a massive sort of unbridgeable gap that you can come in trying so hard to do something and then realize you were all wrong and you know you can come in feeling like you. You have so much to give and then ultimately understand that you are still taking somehow and i ultimately left early. I left after thirteen months. And i pride myself on commitment. That was a story that i told myself about myself that i say i'm gonna do something and i'm going to do it and i quit tonight. Bail the i came back feeling useless in and terrible and like i would never be able to do anything good in my life and feeling like i don't understand anything and i came back sort of horrified at american capitalism because i was in the middle of nowhere you know no internet no running water and i came back i would go into grocery stores and i would burst into tears that i craved and i feared the fact that i could just walk in anywhere in. Just they're all of these products have been flown around the world for my comfort and my whims and you know and i felt just so confused and like i knew absolutely nothing and i think as time went on i realized that that was actually an okay way to feel you know that was actually. Maybe a big grounds from which i would begin to try to understand. Things is with the sort of simultaneous reaction of dread of the world as it is but a desire to be admit people often say they're humbled when they actually made like i'm very honored to announce you know and that was an experience of being humbled as being like truly broken down for a while. I thought i need to get myself out of this state to get back to normal. And i think slowly i started to understand i need to remember part of this state and retain some aspect of this humility like function a little better but retain some of the sense that i don't know anything and that that's okay and that i can operate from this standpoint of humility true humility from here going out. He's quite a thing to bring that back with you and then to synthesize that into your everyday life but amazing that you had that experience. I feel really lucky and it was getting you go. They're expecting to give. I left feeling. Like i took and you know that was the lesson you know that you would have to be a steady and constantly reevaluated commitment if i did want to give more than i took in this world. I think it's really really good. Way of looking at any kind of service is really.

peace corps stan asia
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:39 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"The best and the worst policies about ourselves are always deeply related for me. I think one of the best qualities of myself as i. I can be very carefree. I think i am very easy going. But my favorite that. I can be incredibly careless on every level careless to the level of losing my phone wallet keys within the span of thirty seconds to two. I think emotional carelessness like deep emotional carelessness to deciding. I think that when i choose to care about something. It is like a true commitment. But i think it is very easy for my brain to compartmentalize and say like i do not need to recognize this as concern a little too easy for me to turn off from an and you know this is something that has served me well on the other end of the spectrum where i think i'm really good at not worrying about certain things that i can't control sort of accepting uncertainty and you know whatever but the the flip side to. It is everything that i've ever regretted in my life every real mistake i've ever made. I think stems from equality of carelessness interesting. That we didn't think of it. I bez as the thing that we like. Best about so from the thing that we liked least really being so closely aligned. There's a rizla paper. Yeah like thin. Bit between calf-rearing callous and and it's the opposite. It's sort of like my boyfriend my partner who his like his best quiet. It's almost the obscene. How when you're in a relationship you have the same fight over and over. Yeah it's always like ours is the same for twelve years. It's been new fang. Like why do you care so much about this done thing. And he's like why don't do about this really imperative and his in his body galactically emir as his i think has best quality that he is abundantly conscientious in detail oriented and caring you know and the but the flip side is that we can be like pedantic or over you know critical or something you know but it's but they're entirely the it's the same quality many ways so funny i find i've grown because i have an extraordinarily detailed orientated boyfriend as well and i realize it sets me off sometimes because i wish i were like that really a kind of aspirational envy has it made you anymore. Detail oriented being. It's made me appreciate how shit i am at that. I think that if it's a scale only only i would notice that the needle has actually flicked firm food into being more but nobody else would notice that too but the other great quality is patience. He has he has limitless patience with you know i feel most. The time dislike a really cumbersome luddite that he carries around with him like you know this is. My girlfriend just realized that they've invented the wheel. And but he so patient without being patronizing. And i think that's what makes him sort of almost superhuman but there is a pedantry is sometimes. I'm like you don't have to look at all the little bits. Just enjoy the hall. We don't have to dissect it into all of these little pieces but then probably both of our lives or enrich by tend to to to all. I'm i'm pretty sure that i would. I wouldn't be able to have that in the money. If i live in books and clothes on the floor one hundred percent everything would be getting shot off and be like. I wish there was some way to pay these bills. Some automated allegedly go away. What question which he must like answered. I think it would be like what is the most useful possible way. I could spend my life because you struggle with this. In a sort of utilitarian sense. I often think like what am i. Doing like should be chained to a tree in an old growth forest. Like should i be like at the texas mexico border flinging myself in front of you know like an ice facility. You wonder like. I never expected that i would be able to write for a living. I never expected that. I would have the privilege know. So few people in the world gets to do something that's creatively fulfilling and get paid to do and get paid to do it. And i feel so phenomenally lucky to be able to do it and then sometimes i'm like is this just sitting at my computer and writing and art. I think they'd serves like an objective function. And it's important but you know i mean. Sometimes you just wonder like. Should i be doing something. You're shy shy. Go to law school and this is very interesting. This is very interesting because you wrote something. I didn't know where. I read it. But i write it down here in everything that i write. I hope to make things clearer for the people who read it sure. Yeah so. I think that that is unbelievably useful and amazing. To be able to articulate is a gift. God knows why we read. But i would also like say. It's really interesting because even at a very young age you clearly have been worried about. How do you save all the bicycles. Right it's quite interesting that like that's been a concern of us for it. Sounds like your whole life is like how do i save all the stuff. It's like you're you're doing it. You're doing it through the medium of writing. You're doing it three mothering. And maybe you will chain yourself to an old growth tree. I know maybe well maybe you will at some point do that but i know you mean about is them more the i should be doing. Yeah they'll never be an objective. Answer i think what i do know is that you know when you have a friend that they ask like am. I really bad person at our my and it's like you have to remind them that the fact that they're always asking themselves. This question is itself guard against the thing that they're worried about. I have a feeling that this anxiety. That's always in the back of my mind. That could i be using my time in a better way. Could i be giving impulses more to the collective other than the individual. I think that it is a kind of stick that i need to have. I try to keep that stick going away. That is productive rather than sort of like uselessly. Self flagellating exactly. It's such a great answer. That question like could somebody tell me the exact thing that would be the most useful best use of my life here since someone tell me someone run the bath but again i mean i think you to sort of answer those world and saying if you're asking that question it means that you're paying attention to what you are doing which means you're most likely holding that thought of is this. The best use of my time gone knows. I do enough stuff where i go. What am i doing is usually just doing something incredibly mundane and i'm like what am i doing like. I should be doing something ten times more productive. But it's not always possible so it's of like do it when you can the ceiling when i'm laying in bed and needing to wind down. I'm just reading news. That i know i'm gonna forget in instantly as soon as i read it and it's like you know what whatever sometimes the brain simply must eat some garbage exactly. I wonder if some of the people who owe changed the ogre trees. I wonder if they think. Is that something that i could be doing. Because there's no stasis in any of this there's no definitive answer is no. They're they're the even the person who is definitively doing what we would objectively look and go. That person is changing. The world can't call doing it. Twenty four hours a day seven days a week say themselves must question.

mexico texas
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:12 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"To me was at a fundamental level. I think this has served me in writing and in thinking i think it it made me understand the defaults state of life as one in which nobody would necessarily agree with you and that was okay. Your opinion did not have to be validated by the people around. You gave me a sort of quasi lonely but like a true sort of independence within my own brain. It also gave me. I think an understanding of political and cultural views. I think i technically find really abhorrent but growing up with only people who believed these things made me understand. How a view that i find a imporant might manifest on the intimate everyday level to somebody who holds it and i think that a lot of my progressive politics came from growing up in the church and not understanding why this bible that i was having to read every single day of my life for years. It seemed to me to be this very clearly. Like socialist and progressive thing that was interpreted in ways that were the opposite sort of economic policies. That were harsh in individualistic. My kind of confusion and anger about all of that ended up shaping my politics into what they are now and then a bitingly. The last thing. I'm left with the sort of digital almost desire for devotion. I crave in respect and kind of venerate devotion and that might have something to do with my answer about love and i think that that came from the church. How extruder to be in an environment of and i hope it's not offensive to say indoctrination. No i got. I got a ring that said i wasn't going to have sex when i was like seven. You know wow but within that environment you can read the bible and actually see the beautiful socialist loving inclusive taxed that is an interpretation of it whilst also being hammered with the idea that jesus was white and that it is an individualistic world that we're living in or under god and like gay people. Should bob gay people shouldn't exist and but right how on earth did you. How did you listen to your own voice. When you have this mega voice slamming you. How did you do it well. I think the you know the process that you're describing is no different from what we were talking about before. We started recording navy. What every woman does to get themselves out of the thumb of patriarchal expectation right like both. Probably done our own individual like deprogramming out of things that were kind of unequivocally grafted onto us at a younger age. You know and. I've really never thought about this except for the way that you just asked the question. I am troubled by how well i sort of adapted to fit in unlike still wanted to be cool unfit in with this environment that i also openly hated. But still you know was a teenager. But i think you know there were certain things. I was not white. My family was not wealthy like those other families. There was already a difference. There was already some sort of separation that may be made room for a lot of sort of private individual questioning. I also had a couple of close friends that you know. We had preliminary versions of these conversations. Not knowing what we were talking about bit you know there was a strong to get out or to reach for something else than what we've been given and a few of my friends. We kind of reached for these things kind of blindly. And i think that actually the real way though is is just writing. I think as an elementary schooler. Even i was just this copious copious journal or and when i was going back i was reading my old diaries. Sort of fat. Check my book and i had to also remember that the transition away from these things it feels significant but it was gradual. It may be started in seventh grade and reached a sort of working. Synthesis may be the end of college or something. I remember getting into college and a girl in one of my classes introduced herself as a feminist and i was like lake performance much. You know like. I was sort of like the so like eighties or you know. I don't even know that. There was a period of time where i was trying to find a way to hold onto both and i think that period lasted for six or seven years. It was a steady movement. But there was a long time where i was trying to reconcile the environment that i grew up in with the things that i kind of instinctively felt were true and in going back and reading my journals i had to remember. It took a long time. And i think the way i moved with just constantly writing out my anxiety writing out. There's something strange about this. And then six months later. I would say you know i think what it is this and then six months later i would realize you know and it was just slowly slowly slowly. I think it's really interesting again. I'm not drawing any equivalency between me. And you i i recognize is in the face of being told something that is apparently empirical the stuff that you are being told. The stuff that i was being told was that you are going to be unemployed. And you'll be lucky if you do some sort of corporate videos telling people where the exits are in developing the idea of an independent within a structure. That feels impermeable. I think is really interesting. And i think that women have to do it. An enormous amount. Right we're always having to get out of structures that have been previously created. I'm so proud of my heart. Is okay so. I just got to tell you about shopping at home sense. Oh yeah i need to check. That out is a good. It's better than good. trust me. it's a whole new way to shop. Maybe even life changing seriously. Oh yeah see home sense senses part of the homegoods family so you know going in that everything will be less than you expect to pay. I love that. And here's the best part. Home sense is never the same store twice. They put out new items all week long. So there's always something new every visits kind of like a treasure hunt the other day. I found zebra print accenture. I could use a new chair. Home sense has stuff to plus up every room in your house. There's so much to choose from furniture rugs lights hall the decor so many throw pillows while art and bowls. Okay you got me. I've got to check out home sense. You can take virtual tour online and to get directions to the store at home. Sense dot com. Oh and when you go yeah take me with you deal. Summer is finally here and it's time to get out and enjoy the water hike bike run and to be back with friends but life with the hassles of contacts and glasses slows. You down the eye center is giving you a summer of freedom. thanks to eileen with. I designed two point. Oh from dr boutros. Lazic at the eye center is even more affordable with huge savings and zero percent financing. 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"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:56 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Fictionalized defines love fee. This is such a good question and it made me rican front. All of the answers that occurred in my mind. None of them were romantic. And this is something that. I haven't yet figured out about myself but i know like on the one hand i i have been so drawn to relief. I traditional on the stereotypical rooch i. I've been in basically. I've been in monogamous relationships. Almost unbroken since i was sixteen. I'm drawn to just traditional notions of romantic love. And yet i find it incredibly uninteresting and i haven't really squared not that interested in love stories. You know i'm not. I can't those sweeping love stories and film in you know in books and literature. I'm not. I'm not drawn to them. I don't find an interesting now. Even in music. I find the the drama of sort of attraction much more interesting than songs about love and and and so when i. I don't know. I still haven't figured out what that is because in my actions that's it's it's been a primary thing that i care about instructor my life around but i think my experience of love is almost. It's so and this is something that i feel lucky about it. It's so familiar natural that it's almost boring. Which isn't to say that i find love in my daily life boring but as a concept i anyway so when i thought about the session you know the things think that what i really what defines love for me our relationship structured around care. I think i thought about. This was another thing that i thought about. Having a baby in the pandemic was sort of like this is what love is the extraordinary lengths that people go to in circumstances around the world that are often phenomenally difficult ways that i can hardly speak to or imagine what people do on an everyday basis to take care of the people in their family and the people that they love. I think that. I think of that bet caretaking and devotion that to me is what love is in on a really sort of every day and maybe that is why. Maybe that does connect to the way. I think of romantic low. That's the sort of almost mundane thing is that love to me is like i think about what defines live for me a sort of every day commitment or something like that and not romantically in terms of everyday commitment to taking care of and watching out for and safeguarding. The wellbeing of apparent. A child a partner a friend right. Hopefully you know often strangers to. I think i think of just this everyday everyday actions. When i was young. I remember my first. This is so funny. I just remembered this when i was maybe an elementary school. One morning. I woke up sobbing. Because i had had this dream about a bicycle. A bicycle in an empty playground. But nobody had like that was just there and nobody had picked it up. Nobody had claimed it. I woke up fobbing like thinking like someone has to take care of his bicycle. And i think an match me was one of the i. I think that was an early. Understanding of what. Love is. And i think i had another sort of shocking realization of of that i remember you know back the breastfeeding thing. But you know. It is kind of a huge. It's huge and i. And i think that's really the experience that people say like motherhood will change your whatever and i think really it. It was the sort of hormonal. Stu nami that came breastfeeding made me understand. I remember like day three back from the hospital when my milk came in i could feel my body just this existential desire to to take care the responsibility in the desire and the sweetness and the like monstrosity of needing and wanting to take care of somebody for as long as they live basically. That's such a beautiful that it's such a beautiful way of putting it is overwhelming which love is right but also every day right. It's every single day which dovetails into also the leading to about this a bit but what no one ever seemed to talk about with motherhood. Is that the very act of giving birth. Is the thing that you will have to do most with your child which is to leg of them and is this constant process. How do you want to continue to give something everything when you also have to continually be letting them go in order to have the experience that they came here to have which it's do you have any advice for me. Yes i do i do. Oh my god. What would my advice be. Keep it in your heart that. But i think you already do just from having reggio book but that notion that nothing is guaranteed yes. Every single moment is leading up to this moment. Where you really. You really do completely let them go to be free. But you must always underwrite that kind being very being very strict with yourself about what your job is. Custodian is and how much they are serving your needs and insecurities as opposed to you dealing with that shit and then really underwriting. The person that they will are becoming said it's just paying attention to who they are. I tried not to shove my sweet henry into any box. And as a result very young he has been self determining. And that's not you know the kid. Oh i'm just going to let my kid flings po across the room because you want him to be free to be him. It's not that it's about really really feeling and seeing whether interest lies and encouraging that and not hammering the stuff that we think they should learn. Because they're gonna learn that if you're if you're kind and loving and you keep letting them go because no one tells you teach yourself to let your child go but it's really the number one thing is as a mother that i've learned. It's hard but it's the best possible thing because i think is what brings them. What will always bring them back. Yeah will always keep them connected to you is that they're free to fly and now like homing-pigeons artists come home. I am going to hang onto this and remember it. And i think for me if there was something that i felt thankful for in the way that pregnancy and childbirth was in itself sort of physically instructive how it physically reinforced the sort of existential and practical thing that you been have to later. Write that you could never like you had to understand that nothing was ever guaranteed but not that he's ever certain and i found that to be a useful existential lesson about the world. Yeah it really is. What person place or experience most altered your life. I grew up in an extremely conservative community in texas going mostly on scholarship to a very very ultra christian school. Attached to one of the biggest megachurches in the country and i have realized increasingly. I wouldn't say that. I'm a straightforward product of that environment. But it was the entirety of my world from age. Four to sixteen. Let's say and without that experience. I think i would be significantly different. I lost religion. I would say maybe high school you know. My politics veered very far left. As soon as i got to college. I grew up. I never met a liberal person. I never met a feminist. I never met anyone that was pro choice. It was very very kind of a homogeneous in every way is a ninety nine percent white very rich environment. But i.

Stu nami texas
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:17 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Have been able to access the frequency. I think that's we having sunny sunny experience of mental health if it was so easy like if everyone could just do it every exactly and i mean. Isn't that what the what what antidepressants what certain things are supposed to do which is to help you potentially access or at least put you in a place where you're more more open to it. But with so chemically bound. I mean you say stopping breastfeeding had exactly the same experience. Because you've been flooded with oxytocin you have been flooded with the happiest most loving divine connected hormone in existence in for me. It makes testosterone looked like a kind of wet salami sandwich. Yeah it's it's so divine it so divinely experienced and feels like is divinely given that when you take that away no one day. You feel bereft. I'm glad to hear that. You experiment with your ways into that. In fact when i was talking about your trade mirror with a couple of girlfriends who really experienced depression. They said that reading the essay on ecstasy. It gave such vantage point of how there may be other ways in that. They don't let themselves they so identified themselves as depressed. People that allowing that experiential stuff might help them find a different pathway in was super helpful. You talking about frequency that you you have to kind of actively put yourself within the band for. Yeah it's they do. There's so much psychedelic therapy and sort of you know. Even like end of life therapy. Mda therapy dosing. Absolutely and i really do think that there is something i mean that was. It has served that purpose. You know. i'm wary of doing this too much relying on it solely but you. You know there's something to be said for reminding yourself at this frequency is available to you you know and sometimes you might have to use an artificial means to access it. May you wouldn't want to do that all the time but it has served. That purpose is reminding like i am capable of feeling just unbelievably fucking grateful to be alive. You know does that's amazing. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accept it. It's time to face facts. Healthcare is backwards. Luckily there's forward a new approach to primary care that surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward forward never makes you feel like just another patient backed by top rated doctors and the latest tech forward gives you access to personalized care whenever you need it. Using in-depth genetic analysis and realtime bloodwork forwards top rated doctors provide you with in-depth insights to better understand your genetics mental and physical health. They then create custom easy to understand plans to help guide you to achieving long-term health with forward you get unlimited in person visits with your doctor and access to care anytime via the forward app offer. One flat monthly fee. It's time to stop accepting backwards. Healthcare and start moving. Your health forward visit go forward dot com today to learn more. That's go forward dot com support for this podcast comes from. Cslr clear if stubborn shower mold. Has you miffed or you're hard pressed to get rid of hard water build up. It's high time you kick your so-so cleaning products to the curb. It's time to fight the clean fight with a sealer clear. Family of products seal are clear. Knows there's all kinds of dirty. Which is why they offer products to help you. Take on messes all around your home. So go on and fight off that countertop cried square up with those carpet. Stains co crazy on your garbage disposal. Gunk seal clear has formulas to help you get the dirty deeds done. Plus many of their products meet the epa safer product standard. So while tough on messes it still the safer choice for your family and the environment show dirt and grime around your home. who's boss with. Cslr clear and fight the clean fight. Learn.

depression epa
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:25 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"To her. So we have been digging into the britney spears saga for the last like six months and such you know. I'm sure you saw the news about the hearing to have a stating. it was traumatic listening to her testimony. I had a baby during the pandemic. and it's really kind of this early reinforced. you know. The way she was treated she had two children within thirteen months. She was founded everywhere. She went like if. I've been dogged by fifty men shouting things that need to get a response and i was carrying a crying baby. I probably would have gotten in my car. Put the baby on my lap and driven away. You know. I would hit the man with the umbrella not the car you know. Yes it happened to me. I mean happened repeatedly. When henry was tiny but particularly anapa when henry was three months old and it was a female paparazzi which i think made it so much worse and the things that they were saying to try and elicit a response and the flashes. Were making the baby jolt. I can't imagine but i'm not saying that. There is any real equivalency between myself and britney spears but in that instance of knowing the insanity as a new mother feeling attacked and hunted absolutely. Now i'm i'm trying to imagine what it would have been like to have to. She got pregnant two and a half months after giving birth rate. Yeah i mean. I the pandemic afforded a surprisingly lovely post-partum experience that i wasn't expecting because you know it was a cocoon but if they're gonna camera on me for even one second. I would've looked like i was certifiable. It's just your unraveled. For so long but there was no latitude there is no latitude given to women right. Fool this moment after is extraordinary. I don't know why i'm surprised given that. There's so much less. Latitude given to women in general for childbirth and mothering and taking care of children and maternity leaves amputee entities. Yeah it shocking. And only if you've experienced that roller coaster of hormones. That happens after that. You do need a gentle environment like you had. Yeah and even in a gentle environment. It's still holds. Yeah totally because there's a calibration that you have to take care of this tiny creature and make sure nothing happens to it and feed it and take care of yourself but also that your your life is completely and utterly changed. But isn't it interesting that women become these totems to further this sort of systemic abuse. I was watching an old episode of sex and the city. Which i happen to love. I just watched it for the first time. It's like eating cotton candy. Like i enjoy it. I was watching an episode and a young girl. Who's saying that she saving herself for marriage. And sarah jessica kapakis character says what do you consider sex and the girl went well. I didn't lewinsky him or anything. When i think about the abuse that a young woman like monica lewinsky withstood through what was a savage. Take down of what should have been a takedown of a different person of a different person. And yet she was. We've literally had the scarlet letter placed on us in all these different forms for time immemorial and our idea of equality is different from that of men. This is why because it is so oddly perverse because it is in every era even in something as sweet confectioners sex in the city there is this layton acknowledgement that. This woman is apparently or did something that we she was only accountable for the extent to which brittany but i think kind of all women in the public is inevitably end up experiencing sort of projection of cultural fears and desires. That in britney's case. I think really composed the entire structure for life. I mean i've been thinking about it so much. i'm sure you have. I'm sure he have. Gosh oh i could talk to you all day. We get to talk grade. Our my first question is when and where will you happiest. One thing that. I have realized i had a baby. During the pandemic which was a real sort of reintroduction she the controlling forces of sort of hormones and chemicals within one's body in psychological state. I write about it in an essay in my book. Right talk about the feeling of ecstasy one of the things that i feel luckiest about in this life. Is that temperamentally. I've been blessed with pretty sunny mental weather. I find a feeling of sort of ecstatic joy. When i was a child. I felt it constantly. You know just riding my bike with the sun at a certain angle are jumping into a pool or having a day with nothing to do but reading are seeing all my friends at the playground or ice skating in a circle in the seeing my family dinner i was constantly full like brimming with this sort of ecstatic happiness. I would feel it listening to music. Playing in someone's car. I felt it when i was out dancing. I felt i was eating a really good food. I found this feeling of just kind of an unfettered happiness in. It's been interesting sort of seeing that in my baby has now ten months old. I i'm really just going right in there. I recently like stopped breastfeeding my child. And for about a month you know it. Completely changed the chemical composition of my brain and the ability to access. Joy was completely removed from me and i realized how much of that quality of having happiness in right at hand anytime. The light was a certain way or a song. Hit a certain note how arbitrary that was and how lucky i was to have that fuel so so common and so right under the texture of my everyday experience but you know i would say like peak happiness you know for me as like as an adult i dancing at four in the morning with my friends being caught in a rainstorm. Like doing acid and looking at a tree. You know pedaling. Walking with my dog by myself in the park in new york city. You know that's it for me. I so feel those things. You think that it's a frequency that there are certain conditions or chemicals. The one can use to access that frequency of happiness. Because when i read that essay ecstasy in trick mira. I was so brilliant. Because i remembered that that when i was a kid drugs would take me to that place now. Surfing takes them to that place. Being with my son takes me to that place being out in the desert. Meditating takes me to that place which makes me think that that place is always there is just how we find our way into it. Do you think that it's the frequency. I tend to act as if that is what it is and and try to redo the things that turn me into that frequency. I mean. I think you know the things that you're describing surfing being with your son being in the middle of the desert meditating. These are things that you got like. A sort of almost instinctively pre-verbal almost physically existential in tune right. And there's like a light that comes from that sensation and i think it is a frequency and i think that know that was that historically has an my attraction to psychedelics drugs. You you own music and music like we'll take you to the same. Because there are enough. Instances where music has taken me to the same place. The music plus the ecstasy would have taken when i was pregnant. Could your drugs. I was like man. I need to feel. I remember middle pandemic. i remember one night driving. They like kind of an empty new york city on the way to a doctor's appointment or something and i was like i need to feel it in. I turned on a song a particular song and waited to feel it. And you know. I felt the flicker you know. It's but then. I realized how how lucky to.

britney spears henry sarah jessica kapakis monica lewinsky layton britney mira new york city
"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Defines love fear. What question would you most like onset. What person place or experience has shaped you the most. What would be your last meal. And can you tell me something in your.

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"jia" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"I always go to look at the author picture. I loved so hard in the back of your author picture. Jesus you have. I painted him myself. I'll say one of those places where you can drink wine and paint ball. There's one in my neighborhood in brooklyn. And i just hammered and painted monkey. Jesus i think about the jimenez. I think the woman who just google and see that there was this. I feel like it was from the thirties. It was like this picture alias martinez and this very lovely custodian of a charge a terrible restoration restoration and heaters monkey. Jesus patients that humans have ever done. Just it's so good so berlin. hello. I'm minnie driver and welcome to many questions. I've always loved question. It was originally an eighteenth century. Pala game meant to reveal an individual's true nature but with so many questions. That wasn't really no pushy. Unity to expand on anything so it took the full mesh of priests question and adapted what i think a seven of the most important questions. You could ever ask someone they are when and why will you happiest. What is the quality you like least about yourself. What relationship real fictionalized.

jimenez brooklyn martinez minnie google Pala berlin
The Hard Truth of the Marijuana Industry

Axios Today

01:49 min | 11 months ago

The Hard Truth of the Marijuana Industry

"Two thousand eighteen. Almost seven hundred thousand people in the us were charged for possession of marijuana. Black people were almost four times more likely to be arrested for possession than white people despite the fact that both groups use marijuana at similar rates for a long time because of the so-called war on drugs of the eighties and nineties. These disparities were the primary story of marijuana people of color in the us. But now that story is. Changing as marijuana is legalized in more states. Across the us and growing into a multibillion dollar industry black entrepreneurs are trying to reclaim the plant that crushed their communities for so long black entrepreneurs like gmo modern. I saw this as an opportunity to say if i watch people my community get arrested for this. Why can't i help people my community enter from the legal quote unquote right governmental legal standpoint of this and seeing where we can seek those opportunities. Jia runs her own. Pr firm gb m. communications and public relation services for marijuana businesses. She started her company in two thousand twelve after working goldman sachs for fifteen years three years after starting her company into the marijuana industry. This was in twenty fifteen. Twenty seven states in dc had either legalized medical marijuana or decriminalized marijuana possession but it was instill is illegal at the federal level. So entering that space meant carrying the stigma of working in what many still considered to be an illegal business. My gut never said. Stop what my gut said is back. Be prepare. that you're gonna get a lot of flack keep coughing

United States JIA Goldman Sachs DC
Fighting Sin by Obeying God With One Another

Pray the Word with David Platt

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Fighting Sin by Obeying God With One Another

"Deuteronomy chapter nineteen verses. Fifteen a single witness shall not suffice against a person for any crime or for any wrong in connection with any offence that he is committed only on the evidence of two witnesses or of three witnesses shall charge be established so this picture and deuteronomy is describing how god is calling his people to carry out justice and specifically here to ensure that sufficient witnesses are brought forward to establish a charge. Now we can talk more about this context in deuteronomy chapter nineteen. But the reason. I wanna read verse. Fifteen here specifically and lead us to pray. According to it is because of the foundation this lays for something. Jesus later teaches in matthew chapter eighteen versus fifteen to twenty there when he talks about church discipline and accountability and he talks about how when a brother sends against you or we could use the same picture from glacial chapter six. When brothers caught in sin her sisters caught in center sisters sins against you. Then jia says go to that person just between you and that person and talk about this and seek reconciliation ultimately seek reconciliation between them. And god you want to call them away from sin and certainly secret any reconciliation. That's needed with them. Between you and that person but if that person she says refuses to listen to you what does he say he says matthew chapter eighteen verse sixteen but if he does not listen take one or two others along with you that every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses. And as soon as i say that you realize what jesus is saying they're in matthew. Chapter eighteen or sixteen is based completely on what we just read. And god's law in deuteronomy chapter nineteen verse fifteen

Matthew JIA Jesus
"jia" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"jia" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Your guide Your guide host. I love pets. I love animals. I'm an omni animal lover. I love cats and dogs, fish and birds. I even love the big cats. You know, tigers and lions and bears. Oh, my. But one story has had me transfixed for the last Still weaker. So the missing tiger in Houston, Texas, Imagine looking out your window on a Sunday morning and seeing A tiger sitting in your front yard. Tiger. That's how this next story started. A Bengal tiger that went missing a week ago in Houston, was turned into authorities over the weekend and is safe. The tiger named India. Is allegedly owned by Victor and JIA Cuevas. Which by the way is illegal. The tiger ownership is illegal, concerned neighbors called the police after seeing the big cat roaming around the neighborhood. Husband then fled in his jeep with the tiger in the back seat at the time, the police did not pursue a chase, considering the fact that there was a tiger in the back seat of the Jeep. A tiger. That's just a baby tiger like nine months old, but Weighs in at £175. When they eventually caught up with Cuevas, who is also out on bail on a 2017 murder. The tiger was gone. He's reported to have been passed around a syriza of homes in an effort to elude law enforcement Tiger safe houses. A friend of the wife, who was concerned about the tiger since it was in a cage that was far too small, tipped the police off and brought him to an animal shelter. During a live Saturday night press conference, Houston police commander Ron Borsa Repeated the obvious that owning a wild animal is dangerous and no way shape or form. Should.

Houston 2017 £175 Ron Borsa Saturday night one story a week ago India Sunday morning Houston, Texas nine months old Cuevas Bengal JIA Cuevas Victor
Failures Of State Review: The Inside Story Of Britain’s Battle With Coronavirus

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Failures Of State Review: The Inside Story Of Britain’s Battle With Coronavirus

"George and jonathan. Many thanks for for coming onto the show. This book came out of an article that you wrote. When did you first realize that. Actually this was being horrifically mishandled from the top. We were asked in a roundabout kind of the end of march. Actually less jia to have a look at why things to be so badly in the uk compared to other places why we seem to be the case. The infections arising Had ridden said quickly. We seem to be on so many deaths. And if you remember that time you know kind of everyone kind of looked across which you've been the first to be hit by the pandemic and they sort of said well whenever going to be a spot as easily and quickly and we were and we started off with the kind of question which was what was the prime minister during and what was his government doing to tackle the patent democ in those early days. And so we. We worked on this Our initial article review weeks and at the end of april. We rented story which was about the government's that gate lost days in In tackling the virus. And i think as we were going through the research It became clear clear and clearer time. The threats has not been taken seriously even the winnings with that and that we were in a very very pull state of preparedness anyway than people who claim that we were one of the best countries equipped to tackle a virus in in the world. We will fall from it because will years. We'll stay on t. And the kind of concentration on emergency planning for a noble brexit deal. It meant that we were actually wiki statement. It came so what what was vital was when when the news came out china it was awful virus which was spreading quickly and jamming hospitals in in china. Already that we needed to hit the ground running. And i think what we found in our initial research was government. Just didn't do

JIA Jonathan George UK Government China
Way Over There Collective

Diaspora Blues

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Way Over There Collective

"Today. I'm speaking with the wonderful people. From way over their collective. I learned about them. I was just reminded of this idea of how people during lockdown have sort of gravitated to finding community and trying to build community. So i'm very excited for this conversation so as we get started guys. I'm please introduce yourselves to everyone. And just tell them a little bit about yourself. As an artist all creative My name is seoul. Am i pronouncing she her a little bit about myself as an artist I've kind of been a painter for a long time. and recently i've been getting more into performance art and Moso improv spoken word performance Yeah and it's been really enjoyable for me. I've been Really focusing on collaborating with other people who whose practice allied with mine and whose values aligned with mine and it's really worked for me In the last couple of years. So yeah i kind of Have been studying a finance degree and then took a couple of years off to have my baby and two years. Kind of rediscovered Yeah like trying to find my way back to that. Creative place Loss of making again. And yes in really an interesting journey and a good space to be in I'm jess Mine name medium. Practice is voters in words and just trying to storytelling. Different ways Actually the way sold an irish met a couple years ago Was i ran a exhibition just out of high school and just wanted to christ thing in the area and then just invited salts that be pot of by exhibitions so I guess mainly the last couple of years of doing raw producing and Yeah credit producing work as opposed to too much based work. Yeah trying to figure out allowed. That sounds good. It's beautiful january. Sounds like while which actually leads me to the next question. How did you guys meet. And how did the collective stott will actually jessen. I'm that on while ago. And this is kind of the link between me. And and i'm sure just as well and a lot of the other members of the collective We all kind of mouna earns separate journeys and with brought together. Loss jia I'm at jess through a documentation project Managua project that i started in two thousand sixteen and just was in one of the first iterations of It's kind of like an interview archive so just met. Just then and justice dillon high school and that was awesome. And we kinda started touch. And i was part of you. Know few exhibitions here and then just dude and Yeah just kind of have been collaborated since then as full the other members With all sort of lived and worked in this community with Mutual people mutual friends and mutual People who work in the arts in this community and Yeah we've kinda just heard of the work that each other does and have really lied to work and wanted to i. Guess connect and be put in touch face to face. Yeah what about you. just how. how did you find you connected with everyone. Yeah have pretty much just that just sort of Mutual paper weiner Office in the area and just sort of gasol in touch and saying you guys will have. This plan will doing projects which is meant to be In two thousand twenty before everything fell upon by We had a lot of plans individually and as a tool king and sort of getting to know each other we realized how well of it aligns together on how we would just such a stronger. Yes from be unit stronger together. as a collective could just some poorer communities together alien. Just get mural connection. And collaboration seventy more things happening in a shared space. Even nice. Absolutely talk about putting someone on like. I love this idea because it's like the community banding together like you said stronger together. And it's just so beautiful to see. Because i feel like in the community or at least like in the desperate community or you know people who've been displaced community. The sometimes a debate around us not supporting our own communities enough and so it's nice to see organizations like yours and collectors like yours coming together and kind of just doing the work which is beautiful and how did how did the name come about. I love that name was a funny thing. Is it's hard to figure out what you dame you'll baby. And she did a pretty well coming up with collective and just trying to think of something. We all lacked in represented us well But we really wanted to focus on something that wasn't true culprit sound. We wanted to have something that was really sounded like he was from the community in sounded like it was in l. Collective voices end. Yeah just i think before we met one day. Just what about what about you know waiting with pretty young and i just thought about the different through implications of this idea of being or And even for the way over there And just the different meanings else's people often marginalized from this society's pot of And also physically just being buried stint in the south east And always feeling like with sort separate from this main hub of. What's going on on city. Yeah really wanting to earn that. And i just want to relax that in what i just let that was quite funny Challenge punchy anyways.

Jess Mine Dillon High School Weiner Office Jessen Stott Managua JIA Jess Gasol South East
Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

Coronacast

09:50 min | 1 year ago

Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

"Today is the day that vaccination start to roll out across australia but we got a little preview of that yesterday with the with the prime minister and world war two survivor and a couple of other people getting the vaccine yesterday. Yes they go to i. Those of the pfizer vaccine which also followed a day on saturday of anti xers demonstrating and being talked to list in one city by pete evans. Some people criticizing the prime minister. Full so-called jumping the queue to get the vaccine before anyone else does but maybe leading by example. I just don't think you can criticize our leaders for having the it's not as if whole parliament skating it. It's really just showing their confidence in the vaccine. I think it's really important. Thing down the track. You'll see the health minister leader of the opposition getting the astra vaccine or the chief medical officer. Getting the astra vaccine to show that the our leaders are. You do have trust in this. And do you do believe in science. And i mean it's like laser immune to getting the virus either. Pay dutton got covid early. Jia by tribe and you you want your leadership cupboard and there's tens of thousands of accents that are gonna roll at in just the next couple of weeks. So i suppose people sort of is on the horizon going cool vaccine zahia. That's a really big comfort in a time of pandemic. When do we start to see things going back to normal. That's the critical question. And it depends what you call going back to normal because in most parts of australia. Things are pretty normal. We've got very little if any covid. Nineteen virus around in australia and new south wales is going weeks so has so have other jurisdictions so available around so we're back to normal internally back to normal means opening the borders having international travellers and tourists coming to australia us being able to go overseas listening. You'll becoming part of the world again. I think that's what we mean by becoming not becoming normal and covered that on tonight's Seven thirty program by talking to a mortar spoke to chris. Murray who heads the institute for health metrics and evaluation and he's of the he runs one of the world's leading modeling groups and covered on the health report back in november. He predicted the dr the global downturn in cases of covid nineteen that. We're seeing now he. He predicted almost to the week and his was. That was going to be nothing to do with. Thanks to nation and everything to do with season. -ality that really. It would have itself out in terms of the winter surge in covid nineteen. Because it's so seasonal. So i decided to go back to him. Seen other vaccinations going out. What what what's your modeling moving forward and it was quite sobering. He says he's not as bullish. Nah as he was back in november the variables that he's taking into consideration people's behavior. Now remember we're talking about the northern hemisphere not stralia new zealand but of almost no virus. And we've got close borders visit. If people's behavior goes back to normal before you get down to very low levels of virus transmission then you. He believes that you could. Well see a third wave evolving at the end of the northern summer. Pretty much like you saw in in twenty twenty and what could make that. Which is the second variable that he's worried about our vaccine resistant. Very variants of the virus escaped the vaccine and that they could really muddle the muddy the water considerably. How does that fit with other data that seeing coming out saying that the vaccines are reducing transmission in places like i and that's a place where the at least the uk variant is very prevalent on the uk very sensitive to the vaccine it's african variant and other variants than meyer is including the brazilian variant. We're not much is known. And you'll remember that. We spoke some days ago. About the brazilian city minnows. Seventy six percent of people had been infected with the virus. There were only five hundred admissions to hospital in the beginning of december beginning of january first nineteen days of january. Three thousand five hundred hospitalizations in so vaccine trials a very high percentage of people where had had covid nineteen when they were into the trial and in the placebo group they got reinfected with the south african variant so these vaccine escape variants are really worrying in terms of reinfection. Saw the vaccine does is turns covered one thousand nine hundred common core. Which is why. I'm gonna take the astra and we're five. We'll take whatever is given to me. Because i don't want to die of covid. Nineteen but if what we are looking for an opening of the borders and international normalization at least in australia. According to chris murray. We've made the wrong bet with the astro vaccine. He says you really do need to be immunizing with pfizer or madeira. Or perhaps even novak so that still to be proved in the real world. We're much higher. Degrees of efficacy and reduction in transmission and remember the other issue reduction in transmission is that these new variants emerge in countries. Where there's a lot of spread where the virus is multiplying and replicating all the time. And that's where these new variants are being thrown off. They won't be thrown off in austria. Where there's no virus around they'll be thrown off in low income countries like sight words middle income countries like south africa. They'll be thrown off in the united states in britain and other places if the virus keeps on circulating. So what we've got to do is get to very high levels of immunization very very quickly with highly effective vaccines and hope that that minimizes these of virus. Which is resistant to the vaccines. And then what we gotta do. And it's got to be done right now actually getting vaccines op through visor. Moderna novak's which are designed to cope with the resistant variants. That are around. Perhaps the brazilian one certainly the south african one and within a few months star boosting with them. This is really demoralizing. When with sort of on the cusp of vaccine. Roll out of here in australia woman. And if i'm just an average person sitting at home listening to corona 'cause what should i take away from these. Iud urging people from getting vaccine that they often no. Because i think it's really important that we all get covered so that shoots so first of all we're going to have a layer of protection. The international evidence is increasingly by the pfizer vaccine prevents transmission. So that means with hotel. Workers bar workers being immunized and hopefully their families to and that's a really important part of the story. We are creating a ring of confidence around the hotel borders. We've also got to institute with the pfizer vaccine. Not the astros vaccine ring vaccination around outbreaks so that we are controlling this any outbreaks there and everybody else immunized with the astra vaccine so that we are turns it into the common colds. We create a very safe situation. The problem is wayne. Do we open up to international travel and windy relax on hotel quarantine and with a country. That's largely covered with the extra astro vaccine. Which is not very effective somewhere doggy. Effective at all against the south african variant certainly in terms of transmission. Then it becomes a very nerve wracking decision to make. So that's why we've got to be planning in twenty twenty one for a booster. Does of vaccine resistant covid nineteen. That's actually a question that we had from john who's in australia who leaves in the us. And he's basically asking now. The australian vaccination program is rolling out. Do we expect. When do we expect the quarantine might be lifted. And what kind of factors go into that decision making so you could be quite cool about it if you think that we are all. We've turned effectively. Destroyed population susceptibility to covid nineteen into the common cold. And it does look as though the it's pretty effective at doing that with you're talking about african variant or indeed other variants. So we're pretty protected so you could say well maybe sooner rather than later but you know. It's just a very nerve wracking theme because we variants from all over the world and we are not donating vaccine to low-income countries. At the rate which will get van covered quickly enough and they will be throwing off variants and those variance will come to look at hiv hiv started around contrast saw in zaire and then you tens of millions of people have been infected with. Its an died. It doesn't matter where these variants arise from. They will spread to other parts of the world. So we've got to get the globe immunized as quickly as possible otherwise. It's very hard to relax just when you thought you had this thing pinned down at escapes again. Norman so so becomes really does become a bit like flu where the first vaccination does protect us to very significant extinct in terms of dying and serious disease. That's why i'm lining up. For whatever vaccine i get and i would urge other people to do the same. But it means that the government has got to not be complacent about this any shape or form and has to star ordering what's called multi vaillant vaccines are trying to ranging them now so that by spring summer of this year. We're getting boosting booster shots with multi valent vaccines that will covers against the current range of resistant. Variants around the world and that swing will open up borders.

Australia Astra Pete Evans Pfizer Institute For Health Metrics A Stralia JIA Dutton Moderna Novak New South Wales Chris Murray UK Murray Meyer Madeira Chris Novak New Zealand Austria
"jia" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"jia" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"We says we talk weekends. We rock Bob JIA Quinn. So in for Bob O'Brien tonight, We're dancing in the dark. It's Bruce. You got nothing you say come on in the morning. Go feeling the same way. Nothing but tired. Bored with myself. Use just a letter You can start by. You can't stop by without spot this one's behind. Just answer me. This is just getting clear. Videos on man. I'm moving the place checked my looking here. Shakes my clothes. My face. Just a little something happening somewhere. Baby just just started by Start responding stones behind. Just go. This job. Just one soul one shoulder. My baby left me. Still in your street, Mr. Then we'll probably see you gotta stay hungry. I'm just a last stop dog Shit. I'm trying to write this book. Give me just one. Good. You can start by around find Booth higher. Just being around. You can start by We're not sure responsible. We're just Just dance. Which is wrong. Jersey, one of one boy Teachers each time time is 704. My name is Bob.

Bob JIA Quinn Bob O'Brien Bob
Was the iPhone 12 a smash success? Here's when we find out

The 3:59

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Was the iPhone 12 a smash success? Here's when we find out

"This is a big earnings reports. Big one this is the one where we get the numbers for the iphone launch. So what are you expecting. We're expecting either a blow out or a surprise not blow out. This is one of those either it it really knocks the socks off for a dozen and part of it is because of the iphone. Twelve right this is a device that has been in terms of the financial world years in the making a smartphone sales in general have slowed down or gone down. Apple is kind of plateaued in terms of it and really this device is supposed to be what draws everyone back. I mean there were surveys out there. That showed something like half of customers. Who are iphone users or potential iphone users. Were gonna buy the iphone twelve. That is a massive number of people and so if that comes to be true it's going to be one of those really big moments for apple. Where they they move into another whatever. The next level is for that company it's already defying all gravity but they go even further right. The idea here is that the last time we had this so called super cycle was back with the iphone. Ten right where it was a new design there was a big Sort of big That resigned drove la demand because people held on their foes. Long enough is three or four years. This was sort of the next time. People were due for an upgrade right. Yeah you would think the iphone ten but in fact you know. Surprisingly the iphone ten was even a smaller cycle than what these people expect which is more like the iphone six If you remember that that was when it went from being the boxy design of the iphone five two more rounded corners which is what they kept until the iphone ten and also the first time they had a larger phone right that the six plus and that drove a ton of demand especially from asia where larger phones at the time were much more popular now. They're popular pretty much everywhere so you have to think like that. Moment for apple was enormous. And this is expected to be like that and it's hard to feel like in the middle of an economic catastrophe that that could happen. But i guess anything's possible. Yeah we've definitely seen from other checkup as that. The pandemic hasn't really had a real impact on their financial results. We'll see that book because that's it's tangible thing. it's funny. You mentioned that like the last. Big upgrade cycle was when the design went from box to curve in it with the iphone twelve. We went from curved back to boxy. it's like innovation. Yeah i mean it's it's like the it's it's like fashion right. What's old is new again. And it's kind of funny. I personally am more of a fan of the boxy design. Because i can hold it easier so i was all in on that. I did not like the curved ones. I always felt like they were going to slip out of my hands and i always had to have a case so i think that at the very minimum. The other thing that you have to keep in mind is that apple is pushing so hard the idea of the cameras and they've always been a thing but you now see the amount of time that they spend talking about the cameras in their presentations. You've got those shot on iphone commercials for the billboards. Although how many of us even go outside and see them anymore but those types of things really pushed the idea of unita upgrade this phone regularly. Because you're going to get the best camera you can in your pocket and even though we're all stuck inside apparently it seems like people still want really nice cameras. Well i know my wife takes analysts photos of our kids so that camera quality was the big selling point for her. The upgrade the other big feature obviously was five g. They talked a lot about five g. But do you think it had any impact on sales just given the fact that you have to be out and about to take verify. Gene and a lot of us aren't really out about that often. Well you have to be in a place where five g works. I have still yet to have five g work on my phone as i'm driving around in dc. And maybe it's because i'm the wrong carrier. You have more of a verizon town but still it's just it's crazy to me that this is a feature that's the headline feature and i have not actually had a turn on at all. I think that really fight. Jia anything is a hype thing it's able to draw people in. It's kind of like three d. tv's way back it's like oh we'll just slap another thing on the box but people rarely used it and i think five g eventually obviously is going to be the future but i have a feeling that if it did draw people in it was because of the hype of what it is not the actual functionality of it yet.

Apple LA Asia Verizon DC JIA
12 Elementos da Gesto de Excelncia - Q05: Meu supervisor, ou algum no trabalho, parece importar-se comigo como pessoa - S01E33 - burst 2

Talentos para o Sucesso

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

12 Elementos da Gesto de Excelncia - Q05: Meu supervisor, ou algum no trabalho, parece importar-se comigo como pessoa - S01E33 - burst 2

"Adults got. That is the kids more so fault the museum jia versus obama to do so was arkansas. Idea absentee is nothing. Present research me webcentral usable by boba mysogony fica demise

Isaac Swinton USA War Warming UPC Jia Versus Obama Arkansas
"jia" Discussed on Pond's Feed

Pond's Feed

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"jia" Discussed on Pond's Feed

"To something i was passionate about ever since i was like nineteen or twenty years old i had read This book by rubin carter called the sixteenth round. I don't know if you've read it but it's still to this day. One of my favorite books and it was Rubin carter was a famous boxer and like the sixties in new jersey and he think yes and he He was you know somewhat famous and actually the movie denzel washington's movie. The hurricane was based on. That book was based on rubin carter story and he was a famous boxer and he was wrongfully convicted of murder and boggles my mind. Because if i think about today you think about famous people. Today whoever actors and stuff. I highly doubt they could be wrongfully convicted of a murder just because they have resources and lawyers. And you know everything's recorded on and whatnot cameras and things like that but back then. This famous boxer was wrongfully convicted of murder. I read his book and it really just left a mark. And i loved it sees in the state in the back of my mind and then festival or to you know. Recently a few years ago. I was really trying to wrack my brain kind of trying to answer the question. You just asked me is like what can i do to make a and it can be such a daunting question because you feel so small when you're looking at yourself and you're looking at these big huge issues like wrongful conviction or you know world hunger or whatever it is that you're passionate about and it's hard to even come up with anything to do other than volunteer your time or donate some money And so so it took me a few years to even come around and thinking know with the skills that i have and with the with the resources i have what could i do. And that's how. I ended up coming to weight gain because i thought that something i do to at least raise some awareness So for me personally. That's what i think i can do. Which is why. I'm doing this. But what would solve the larger issue of. I wish i knew the answer to that question. But i just i. Don't you know i hear this things of that. We just need a say a would be a good example. Something like tic tac whichever random thing to bring up but not really that. That's just been a big platform for creating any word advertise. There's one ongoing issue. And that is the community guidelines system. Being unfair to people of color usually taken their konta down for hate speech..

rubin carter Rubin carter new jersey Today nineteen sixteenth round today one denzel washington One of my favorite books twenty years old issue few years ago sixties
"jia" Discussed on Pond's Feed

Pond's Feed

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"jia" Discussed on Pond's Feed

"And i only learned of destin's case on a few a week ago or so. My brother sent it to me and i immediately sent it to jeff. I don't know if there's anything jeff can do for the time. He's got four days left. So that's really really terrifying. But i'm hoping that people who are in this world who have the ability to to do something. Help him because his stories heartbreaking. Yeah it's it's heartbreaking Is actually this terrifying to see much. Someone does a different skin. Color could just be looked at as the criminal and possibly get killed and nor even get killed or something they didn't do. I mean we see that lot aren't going with fleas and all that and it it does it made the why hold my friends of color tightly and protect them from stop because don't must see them go through it. I mean it s selfishly as it might seem That's not my attention but you're to see some light value this look at the one zero care backwards. Still you're honest And really hoping that the same thing doesn't happen to them. I especially have messed up the system as this. I'm sure that is evan. Got a chance to watch your documentary. But i'm sure this is something you cover to adjust the the how much the lie is near meeting some around. It's not exactly playing on their balance. In fact were mainly working against people were not white or whatever and it's terrifying. Seeing that recently. I look online. You're about donald trump harming all the people who stormed the cabral earlier this week case they can pretty much get away with causing destruction at the capitol. But someone who didn't even a crime could get killed Yeah i i. It's it's i may be mainly put this a dark turn Or even bring a son especially with what you do. Yeah i mean you're one hundred percent right and it's just it is just a dark subject denotes it's hard not to. I often think that what. I'm talking about my film to because it's hard not not to go there because it is such a such a horrific thing and our justice system as you said needs a ton of work the ton one of the things as far as wrongful conviction convictions. Go which i always as one. I think The most important changes could be made. Is that prosecutors. Should be held accountable when they are involved in misconduct. That leads to somebody being wrongfully convicted. Because right now they pretty much have immunity so they have this free pass to do whatever they want. And because you know. They work on the Legal law enforcement can side that they are exempt from ever being accused of that crime of false accusing. Somebody or falsely prosecuting. Somebody and so if we could change that one thing alone and they were if prosecutors were a little bit more scared to do these kinds of things that would eliminate a lot of wrongful convictions in of itself. But there's i mean you could go on and on about the the number of things that need to be fixed in our justice system. I think the innocence project estimated that two to five percent of people in prison in in the us all are innocent and if you go with that conservative percentage that means over one hundred and twenty thousand innocent people are in jail. I mean that's a huge number especially when you look at the impact. One wrongful conviction has on the family. Not only the person who's incarcerated but their family and friends the amount of people in our country that are impacted by wrongful conviction is is massive..

jeff donald trump two evan five percent four days one hundred percent a week ago earlier this week over one hundred and twenty th One wrongful conviction destin one zero care one thing
"jia" Discussed on Pond's Feed

Pond's Feed

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"jia" Discussed on Pond's Feed

"Today with words not so gio routes yet. You got it right. You're maker over. New york. Hausa gone over there. You know it was scary for awhile because of the pandemic but i actually ended up traveling Due to a family. Emergency back to canada where i'm from. I'm in canada right now. But i do live in new york normally you were. How's that even as the situation with that going from canada than back to new york. Considering you are in a pandemic Are the sumer. not that safe. Yeah it was. It was scary to fly for sure. We chose to do it only because we had to. We haven't flown anywhere in over a year Year and a few months. Actually but we had no choice. We had to do it. So we just you know had p. gear and masks and face shields in tons of sanitizer. Just did it. But it was scary for sure. Already feel about come back on you eventually. Get back to new york yeah. I know i'm worried about that too. But i guess to do it the same way. Also we're gonna be here for a few months. So i'm hoping that with the vaccine out and stuff things might calm down. You know your house like who is at your house l. nobody nobody serve. You're gone for a few months. Does that lay your the bills Yeah upper they stand up near. We didn't really have much of a choice. Know all i hope. Things are gone welfare. You over here. I mean what you do being filmmaker it. Which is another thing zero filmmaker. I mean filmmakers depending on what product they find some way to work around covid nineteen but even in that salt. That's still a challenge. You're working from home. So i mean how's how's your all currently garden for you. It was a big challenge. We because we were in the middle of so. I have a documentary short. That's out on amazon. Prime right now and i was in the process of filming the feature length documentary. So it's the same story. Jeffrey desk avec. Who was wrongfully convicted of a rape and murder when he was only sixteen years old..

New york canada new york amazon Today sixteen years old Prime Hausa Jeffrey desk avec over a year months nineteen covid
Indonesia's Sriwijaya Air plane feared to have crashed after taking off from Jakarta

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Indonesia's Sriwijaya Air plane feared to have crashed after taking off from Jakarta

"After leaving Indonesia Airport authorities in Jakarta say they lost contact with the Boeing 7 37 500. Departed early Saturday afternoon local time a statement from the airlines free We JIA Air says the plane was on a 90 minute flight from Jakarta to Borneo, with 56 passengers and six crew members on board. Al Jazeera says local TV news is reporting that fishermen in the area have found what appears to be wreckage from an aircraft. A radar tracking service reported on Twitter that flight SJ 1 82. Lost over 10,000 ft of altitude and less than a minute about four minutes after departure, the Indonesian Transport Ministry says they're investigating and

Jakarta Boeing Indonesia Borneo Al Jazeera Twitter Indonesian Transport Ministry
Olivia Jade addresses college admissions scandal that landed parents in prison

Bob Sirott

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Olivia Jade addresses college admissions scandal that landed parents in prison

"And this whole college admission scandal and what she had to say. Yes, Bob. This is quite the headline here. I did not expect for Olivia Jade, the daughter of Massimo JIA, newly and actress Lori Laughlin to break her silence on the entire college admissions scandal. This is really the first time that we have heard from any member of that family since the scandal unfolded. Because you know they couldn't really talk about it because of legalities and and things like that. But now she has taken to Jada Pinkett Smith Red Table talk, which is her Facebook watch theories, and she opened up about the entire experience and recognizing her privilege and what she has learned from it. Of course, her parents both pled guilty in May 21 count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, and they are Both currently serving their prison sentences on Her recognizing her privilege. She still doesn't understand it. But the whole point of her going on this red table talk was just to apologize, Acknowledge that she knows what she and her family did was wrong, and she's asking for a second chance. Now, here's a little bit of what she said on that show with her mom. Uh, Jada Pinkett Smith host the show with her mom and her daughter, Willow and the Libya Jade. Felt it was time to speak and definitely ready to address some things. There is no justifying or excusing what happened because what happened was wrong. But I think what's so important to me is like toe learn from the mistake not to now be shamed and punished and never given a second chance. Like I'm not trying to victimize myself. I don't want pity. I don't deserve pity. I never got to say I'm really sorry that this happened. At least it wasn't one of those non apology. Apologies where somebody says if I offended anyone, I mean, it sounded like she really did take responsibility. And she understands the severity of what they did especially, you know, not now that her parents are, you know, serving prison sentence. I feel like it's really Able to sink in for her. And so she she took the initiative to publicly apologize. Okay, Here

Olivia Jade Massimo Jia Lori Laughlin Jada Pinkett Smith BOB Facebook Willow
"jia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"jia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Week. Chanel Miller talks to JIA Tolentino Miller was just 27 years old when she published her memoir, Know My Name. The book recounts her experience is the victim of sexual assault. It's a keen examination of gender power and the failures of our criminal justice system. It's also exquisitely written Among the books. Many fans JIA Tolentino, a contributor at The New Yorker and the author of Trick Mirror. On October, 15th 2020 Miller spoke to Tolentino about the challenges of becoming a public figure and the essential work of forging one's own identity. The two also spoke about their creative processes, including Miller's visual art now on display at San Francisco's Asian Art Museum. Join us now for a conversation with Chanel Miller and JIA Tolentino. And realize I think it's It's so good to be with you Chanel in the same room, apparently then thank you to everyone who is hanging out with us. Invisible to us, which I still haven't gotten used Teo, but I am very glad to be with all of you guys tonight and It's such a delight to be talking to Chanel Miller Thie, author of Know My Name, A New York Times bestseller, the winner of the National Book Award for autobiography and the book. They're just absolutely floored me from the first page. She's also an artist, as as you guys probably know she's been publishing Amazing cartoons on Instagram in places like The New Yorker, which I think makes his colleagues she has a mural exhibited at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco that I believe she has not gotten to see because of, you know. I know you know, and you know to be according for a second to tell someone I admire for the monumental command and strength that she is known for, but possibly even more for the ways. In her writing and her arts and in her life that she is searching and kind and open the way that What she does is imbued with an effort, Teo see the world and see people with generosity and kindness and truth. So thank you for being with us today Should Thanks G. M So happy to be speaking with you tonight. I think we're going to start you're going to read a little bit from the afterward of the book. Great And this is this is to celebrate the paperback of it, but also just to hang out. That's right. So be reading some excerpts from the afterward. So I begin In the victim realm. We speak of anonymity like a golden shield. You have maintained it for four years was a miracle. But while we discussed the protection it afforded no one discussed the cost. Never to speak aloud who you are, What you're thinking, What's important to you? I was lonely. I longed to know what it was like not to have to spend all my energy concealing the most heated parts of me. I kept coming back to a line from one of long tubes. Poems. He who stands on tiptoe doesn't stand firm. I cannot spend my life tiptoeing. All right, and on to another section. Deciding to use my name and I'd have to learn to speak my story aloud. Has the requests for interviews began pouring in. I grew angry. My panic attacks returned old unwanted feelings. I could feel myself losing my footing slipping out of reality. I did not understand the difference between an interview and an interrogation. In court. The intention was to mock disorient diminish. It was never to listen. My lawyer introduced me the Lara in Hillary to women who work in trauma, informed communications who offered to help me prepare They set up a digital camera, a light a chair. I wore a starched shirt I bought looks like a pilgrim at a job fair. At one point wire said, What do you want them to hear from you? I'd never been asked that before. She told me I wasn't at the mercy of the reporter's questions. I was showing up to deliver a message. This reframing changed everything. There's another question she asked that clung to me. Who are you? Speaking to? In 2001, a 16 year old girl named Lindsey Armstrong was raped in Scotland. During child, the defense attorney asked her to hold up the undies she'd been wearing at the time of the attack. And to read aloud what was written on them. Little Devil. The rapist was convicted. Guilty convictions don't undo damage. Three weeks later, she killed herself. I wish I could tell her that when a question like that was posed, it was his sickness, not her weakness that had been exposed. For so long. I worried Yet to be known men to be undone. The more they see you, the more they can use against you. For years. I worried this was true. Upon finishing this book. I knew it was not Not for me, not for Lindsay. Kyle's in question where men like the defence attorney get their confidence. While I'm the one who struggles with self loathing, how they move an assailable through the world while I remain hidden I decided that for as long as they're out there, I will be out there too. I will appear on every television screen across the nation and I will not question my being there. I will be seen open about everything I am and ever Wass because I know that from the very beginning, the defense attorney had it wrong to be known is to be loved..

JIA Tolentino Miller JIA Tolentino Chanel Miller Thie Teo attorney San Francisco Asian Art Museum The New Yorker assault National Book Award Lindsey Armstrong Kyle Instagram New York Times Lindsay Wass reporter Hillary Scotland
A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

Mac OS Ken

17:29 min | 1 year ago

A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

"Few huge surprises at apple's high speed event though. There were some unexpected bits. Did. Anybody. See The verizon thing coming? Did we have any idea what? MAG SAFE WAS GONNA turn out to be. There we'll get to those. Most of today's presentation is drawn from a couple of viewings of the Apple Park presentation. We'll also pull from the usual suspects doing their usual bang-up jobs. Tuesday's high-speed event presentation started with Apple CEO Tim Cook welcoming viewers back to Apple Park than throwing the presentation almost immediately to others to give the INS and outs of home pod. Many. Bob Board richer's apple VP worldwide product marketing listed the company's desires for home pod. Wanting. The device to have amazing sound to act as an intelligent assistant to serve as a smart home hub all while protecting the privacy and security of the user. This, they say they do in a smaller spherical unit that costs less than one third of the original home pods original asking price. On the amazing sound side company bragged on the devices ro properties as well as how well it plays with others. Others being other apple devices. Users can apparently sink home pod many's either a stereo pairs or to play the same audio throughout the home. The. Inclusion of apples you one processor makes handoff easier to handle according to the company. For what it'll play. Well, there's the usual stuff apple music, apple podcasts, iheartradio radio DOT COM tuned in with Pandora and Amazon music on the way in the coming months. As for the smart part Home Pod, many will handle or interact with messages. Calendar phone calls maps music because. The. Weather reminders and find my feature. There was also an interesting demo where users ask for personal updates and got them. personalized. So he you know multiple voice recognition is key. Now. One new feature mentioned and de Mode was intercom. This is basically what it sounds like. You tell home pod to deliver a message to everybody and the various apple devices in the house including other home pods, iphones, apple watches air pods, and even carplay units play or display the message. I have heard entercom will work with the original home pods as well though not seeing that confirmed. Addressing. It's smart home hub nece home pod many integrates with apple's home APP that lets control home connected accessories said scenes and stuff like that. Covering User Privacy Apple, says no word spoken to Home Pod, leave your home until you touch home pod many or say he. S I are. So, yes, it is always listening but what it here's goes nowhere until you give it the command. Request. A home pot or not associated with apple ID. You choose whether recordings are saved by apple personal requests only work when the associated iphone is home with you. And communications with smart home accessories used strong encryption according to the company. Now I, said earlier that the unit is spiritual. If you've seen a home pod, there is no mistaking what this thing is. Same sort of light up display on the top same mesh wrapping it's roundedness and the same white and space grey options as the original home pod. Coming soon to flat surface near you. Orders for home pod many began on the sixth of November unit, start, shipping the week of the sixteenth of November. Not Price, to beat an echo but not a device that will break the bank. Home Pod many will sell. For, Ninety, nine bucks. Okay. I pretend to hear you say but I'm worried about breaking my home pause many. Not sure why but better to be safe in your case. To that end apple care plus we'll be available for home pod. Many. A piece from macrumors says, that will run buyers fifteen bucks. When Tim Cook was back on camera, he took a moment to Brag on iphones past noting the iphone eleven has been the number one smartphone in the world since its launch and that I phone has led the industry in customer satisfaction every year since it's Get ready to hate all of them as the iphone twelve line makes the scene bringing with it five G. Connectivity. Which one? All of them. Had Been Rumored Apple announced four iphone phone twelve models and has had also been rumored. Each can support five G.. Cook says, five G. Brings A new level of performance for downloads UPLOADS, higher quality video streaming, more responsive gaming, real time interactivity, and more. The CEO says five Jia superfast, which he actually pitched as a security feature speeds are so good. He says you'll be less tempted to sign on the public WIFI limiting exposure to the dangers that lurk there. Every decade brings new technology that provides a step change in what we can do with iphone said Cook. Today. A new era begins for iphone. Today we're bringing by G. to phone. Then began the verizon commercial. Hans Fest Berg Chairman and CEO. Verizon took to the stage talk about big reds five G. offering. Verizon's by ultra wideband with large quantities of millimeter wave access will be live and sixty cities across the US by the end of this year. In ideal conditions, Best Burg says the carriers seen four gigabits down and two hundred megabits up. The four gigabits is kind of funny own Antonio Guy says an ideal conditions. Well it doesn't sound like you're getting four GIGA beds but we'll get, him. The other thing best Burger announced was flipping the switch on Verizon's extensive five gene nationwide network. That apparently went live yesterday. Boy would I like to know the terms of the deal worked out between, that bill and Verizon? Emphasis on particular carrier. I did not see coming. Now I said iphone twelve comes in four models here the rumor mill rang true. The phones are iphone twelve iphone twelve many iphone twelve pro and iphone twelve pro, Max. Starting with iphone twelve, remember the squared off edges of iphone Four. The new design returns us to that. Squared edges that meet flush with the devices front and back glass the front classes something special though. Working with corning delay, this display is protected by what apple. Calls Ceramic. Shield. It is said by the company to be tougher than any other smartphone class with four times better dropped performance than iphone eleven. The display it's protecting is apple custom Ole ed providing truer blacks, better contrast and two times the pixels iphone eleven or four, hundred, sixty pixels per inch. While that displays the same six point one inches iphone eleven, apple shrank the surrounding enough to make iphone. Eleven percent than her fifteen percent smaller and sixteen percent lighter than iphone. Eleven Choice of colors is not huge but they are pretty. With options and black. White Product Red Green. And blue that. Does things for me. I shouldn't talk about in mixed company. The candy coating is nice. Let's talk about. It's Chewy. Chocolate center starting with the phones five Genus Apple says, iphone twelve has the most five G. bands of any smartphone for better performance in more places. Additionally the company's silicon, the software approach. Let's apple make the best use of available five G. including choosing to not use five. G.. It sounds like iphone defaults to lt e tapping into five G. when it's both necessary and available. That is great for power consumption according to the company. Apples tested the new phones on over one hundred carriers and over thirty regions. In ideal conditions iphone twelve gets up to three point five gigabits on. which is what makes the Brian Bragging about four gigabytes down kind of funny yesterday. It does support millimeter wave those so. got that going for it. As, for the phones on workings iphone twelve powered by apple's a fourteen bionic, the first phone powered by the five nanometer processor technology packing eleven point eight billion transistors roughly forty percent more than eight thirteen. A six core CPU that's up to fifty percent faster than last year's phone and a four core GPU graphics that are up to fifty percent faster than last year's model. Machine learning also gets a boost iphone, twelve packs of sixteen coordinator and Gen that's up to eighty percent faster than iphone eleven capable of eleven, trillion operations per second. Company bragged on Games claiming console quality for the phone. To Demonstrate and executive from riot games showed off League of legends wild rift a mobile, only game due out later this year. Well phone twelve is not the phone photographers would choose. There's plenty of improvement and it's cameras. Apple says the phone has a twelve megapixel ultra wide camera and twelve megapixel wide camera. It said the sport, the fastest aperture yet it also features a seven element lens that apple says offers twenty-seven percent improvement in low light performance. Mag Save is an internal thing. Rather than a name for a connector is in days of old MAG. Safe today is a collection of magnets and charging elements that help line up the phone for proper charging. When it's not charging those magnets go to work holding on cases and wallets and third party stuff. Apple expects a thriving ecosystem of third party doodads take advantage of the newly introduced MAG. Safe. Ness. Mag Safety. Safe thing. Anyway. It's a thing built into iphone twelve. Every model in the line. Now's probably phone twelve many. Except for the size, you can take everything I've said so far about iphone twelve and play it back. iphone twelve many has the same specs as iphone twelve though in a slightly smaller size. The company says the mini is smaller and lighter than four point seven inch models like iphone eight but with a bigger five point four inch display. Apple says, this one is the smallest thinnest and lightest five G. phone. In the world. Talking about last night with Frederik, Van Johnson, and a few other folks on Chuck joiners Mac. Voices. We came to the conclusion that the pro phones for two groups, people who wanna spend as much money as they can afford. Or people who really care about the camera. There's nothing wrong with the camera functionality and the iphone twelve or iphone twelve many. Unless you count they're not being as high end as the camera on the high end. No I'm not a high end photo guy. So there was a lot set around iphone twelve pro, an iphone twelve pro Max that escapes me. The camera on iphone twelve pro boxes said by apple to have a sixty five millimeter focal length from fifty two millimeter focal length and last year's counterpart. It's got five times optical zoom range and the set to support an eighty seven percent improvement in low light versus last year's top of the pro line. I do know enough to be impressed by one thing. The pro line can shoot an apple pro raw. or it will be able to with a software update. Later, this year photographers will also be able to edit those images. Directly, in the photos APP. The pros can also handle. HD are video recording catching seven hundred million colors. Sixty Times, the number they could capture before. Apple, said they also sport the first smartphone camera that'll record in dolby vision hd are. And just like the apple pro raw functionality users will be able to edit the dobie vision HDR video in the photos APP. Finally the light are rumors were finely true the twelve pro and twelve pro Mac speech or a world facing light detection and ranging scanner. That let folks scan and modeled their surroundings. Apples Demos showed that put to use for placing objects in an augmented reality environment performing improved autofocus and low light and improving camera that perception in low light for night moat. Working our way out of these phones, Greg, Joswiak, apple's newly minted senior. VP Worldwide Marketing talked about a few of the pro lines features. It's got mad safe. It's got ceramic shield. It's got a Super Ratna FDR display. As for sizes iphone twelve pro gets bumped from five point eight inch display display size of six point one inches the pro Max meanwhile goes six point five inch display to a display size of six point seven. All of it is bound by the same squared off edges as iphone twelve, the with a couple of distinctions. I. The outer band is stainless steel on the pro line and second the colors are a bit more refined. Coming in silver graphite a gold that looks seriously golden. And the Pacific. Blue that doesn't do as much for me as the blue on the IPHONE twelve. Not that I'd turn it down. If cost is your primary concern. Here is what you're looking at across the whole line of iphones. iphone se. Start Three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars iphone ten are starts at four ninety, nine iphone eleven starts at five, ninety, nine iphone many starts at hundred ninety, nine dollars iphone twelve starts at seven ninety, nine, iphone twelve pro starts at nine, ninety nine. An iphone Pro Max starts at one, thousand, ninety, nine dollars. For the new phones though those prices are only Kinda SORTA true. Peace, from the Mac Observer says iphone twelve many an iphone twelve do start at six, ninety, nine and seven, ninety nine if you buy them as a t and T or verizon phones if you buy one is either a sprint or t mobile phone or as an unlocked phone. The starting prices are seven, twenty, nine, and eight, twenty nine. With no indication as to why. While it's great that ceramic shield means less of a chance of broken display. The chance is still there. If that bugs, you apple care pluses there for all of them. macrumors says, two years of coverage will run one, hundred, forty, nine dollars for iphone and twelve mini. Adding loss or theft protection will up that price to to nineteen buyers can get ongoing coverage for seven, ninety, nine per month or eleven dollars and forty nine cents with loss and theft added. As for the higher end phones, the pizzas, two years of Apple Care Plus will cost one, nine, thousand, nine or nine dollars ninety nine cents per month. Theft. And loss coverage bumps that price to two, hundred, sixty, nine dollars or thirteen dollars and forty nine cents per month. Ongoing. As for availability, apple is starting in the middle. And working out. Would owners can order iphone twelve and iphone twelve pro this Friday the sixteenth. October. They'll be delivered the following Friday the twenty third. If you're targeting either end of the range. iphone twelve, many an iphone twelve pro Max will go up for order on the sixth of November. Delivery should hit the following Friday the thirteenth of November. Barring incident which I have to say because. Friday

Apple Verizon Apple Park Tim Cook CEO Bob Board VP Theft United States Corning Macrumors Entercom Chairman And Ceo Antonio Guy Burg
Los Angeles - Lori Loughlin Will Serve 2-Month Prison Sentence At Victorville Federal Prison

Marketplace

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles - Lori Loughlin Will Serve 2-Month Prison Sentence At Victorville Federal Prison

"Laughlin will be heading to the high desert to serve her prison sentence will be incarcerated at the Federal Correctional Institution in Victorville for her role in the college admission scandal, according to court papers. Judge signed off on the actresses request to serve her two month term at the medium security federal prison camp. Walkmans husband clothing designer Massimo JIA, newly will serve his five month sentence had a low security federal prison for men in Santa Barbara County.

Federal Correctional Instituti Massimo Jia Santa Barbara County Victorville Laughlin
Creating Anti-Racist Podcast Spaces 101

She Podcasts

06:39 min | 1 year ago

Creating Anti-Racist Podcast Spaces 101

"So this session is called creating anti-racist podcast spaces one a one and just so you know people in our group have been asking for this over and over and over again. So we are really excited that we're getting the chance to talk about it today. It's way overdue, but you know having your own Webinar after you just cancelled a bed and you know we're trying to do all things. So we're really grateful to be part of podcast to present this material. It's really important to us and it's unique and we're super excited. So you guys all know Elsie don't want introduce her but no, just kidding. Sorry Elsie. Escobar is my business partner in crime. She has worked for Lipson for Brazilian years. She is a podcasting pundit. She is an activist. She is a stay at home homeschooling. Crazy mountain dwelling go loving mom. And I love everything about her and then we've got madeline who created her platform and podcast a mad vox for creative ambitious were looking to reach their writing goals. She's also the managing editor for women of Color Podcasters, which is an exclusive inclusive community dedicated to improving the representation inclusion of women color in all aspects of the podcast industries of she is the perfect person to help us through this conversation and they intend Jia Jia is a storyteller coach business consultant when she's been featured in Brazilian places such as U. S., H. Day by soul, which I love the identity of she magazine and she focuses her time and helping busy and stressed women ditch. Create better health more happiness and finally heal their relationship with food and their bodies sign me up. She is the creator of the wellness podcast, the skinnier in and USA Today recognized podcast. That's what she did. Show that curates the stories of brilliant women. Thank you ladies so much for being here today I will let y'all get away Dino Marcus so much that was great and then. The little you segment. I. Love. All right I'm just GONNA pull up our presentation here so that we Can See where we are this worked out. Well, 'cause goes I don't know if I can create it so that everyone's looking at the screen, but luckily up to do nothing. So. Fi. Welcome everyone to creating anti-racist podcast faces one one. Thank you so much for signing up and joining us here. Today we have a short amount of time. So we're going to do our best to try to pack a lot of really useful actionable information into this time and still reserve some space to be end for questions. Just know if you don't get your question to ask today, don't worry you're welcome to contact me directly. I. Have A PDF. Takeaway for you that we put together that has our contact information on it and some useful places for you to continue your learning and help you and taking action in moving forward if I'm good. Good good. Get we've already been introduced. Hello Nice to meet you. Thank you for being here. Audible mention for Danielle. The Danielle is the founder of w women of Color podcasters network. She's also hosts the thought card podcast. She helps with this entire process and putting this together unfortunately, she could make it today. So Honorable Mention Danielle is here in spirits yes. Okay. So let's kick us off about what we're GonNa talk about and this is how you're gonNA know you're in the right states. So you're in the right place if your ready to authentically like from the heart shift or start creating anti-racist content in mmediately, we understand that this is a tough topic to take on that there's a lot of discomfort with it. It's OK discomfort your friend please know that this is a journey today we're. Here to help you learn how to start to systematize inclusivity in your podcast and the content that you're creating across all platforms. Please you're willing to be here know that you're going to have to be willing to step out of your comfort zone. We understand that it's uncomfortable. We're here to help guide you through that be prepared to make mistakes and. Learn. If you're cool with that, you are in the right place and again understand that this is a journey. It's not a destination. There are no easy answers. There are no quick fixes. What we're trying to be here to do today is to help you get started on that journey some questions that you might have and just support you along the way. So. If your still with us, thank you. We appreciate you being here. No hard feelings you're ready to opt out. That's your choice but if you're not with us, that's okay. You can sign off now. But if you're still here things you should know this is not a box checking expedition. We're not here to tell you the right things to. Say do so that you can check the box in and Bam done this journey. I can't emphasize that enough this does take time commitment. There are no quick fixes here. So if you're ready to start shifting your content if you're ready to start trying new things in your ready to learn new this process, it will take commitment from you it will take. Time is not going to be done by the end of this conference. Our hope here is that we're going to help you aim for sustainable and authentic change. It's going to everybody has a different starting point. It's GONNA look different for everybody but hopefully, we're all arriving at a place with our work that is equitable that is inclusive and that feels Good for for all of us on some level and a quick reminder, I can't emphasize this enough either discomforts is your friend. It means that you're growing. It means that you're trying and you're making mistakes that means the same thing. So just stay with it So before we really jump into the content, we want to bring your attention to some Some women specifically who are excellent people for you to know and to follow and learn from some of them are in the podcasting space. Currently, others are more in the equity inclusion world. But these are all women right here that have a lot to say on this topic they know a lot about this topic they're doing the work every single day, and we do call on many of them in their. Wisdom in this presentation and so take down there hamble start following them start learning from them

Danielle Elsie Jia Jia Usa Today Escobar Lipson Partner Dino Marcus Madeline Mmediately Managing Editor BAM Consultant Founder
Teen missing for more than a week survived in woods on berries and creek water

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:05 min | 1 year ago

Teen missing for more than a week survived in woods on berries and creek water

"Photos just in from the feudal family. Shoji, a few in the hospital receiving treatment, 18 year old was found Saturday after nine days of searching off US highway to her car ran out of gas. She was found deep in the woods near Steven's Pass at the bottom of a steep ravine about Two miles miles into into the the Cascade Cascade Mountains, Mountains, camels camels Cara Cara Continent Continent with with Maur. Maur. She She was was lost lost in in steep, steep, wooded wooded terrain terrain where where she she wandered wandered around around for for miles miles for for eight eight days. days. She She only thought she was up there for three days. She didn't realize you get delirious. After long. Do you have any food in the water situation up there for more than a week the teenage Berries and drank water from a nearby creek. Rescuers founder Saturday near that creek in a wooded ravine about a mile away from where her car was found. JIA's prayers now answer like everyone knows. I mean, they all come out of one either way. For to go this way with Being out there for that long. Those elements is just it's America, and JIA had a chance to have that first hamburger, French fries and milkshake. Her family says they hope she'll be out of the hospital soon. Let's go.

Shoji Cara Cara Continent Continent Maur Cascade Cascade Mountains JIA United States Founder America Steven
Washington teen found in woods east of Seattle 8 days after going missing

News, Traffic and Weather

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Washington teen found in woods east of Seattle 8 days after going missing

"Days yesterday being the last day of the search in looking for this 18 year old teen who went missing here in Washington. Found alive yesterday on a steep creek in the wooded areas near index along highway to they did some more measurements to try to determine exactly where her phone was last. Got a signal because it's a dead area makes it really difficult for the tracking of cell phones that Sergeant Ryan Abbott with the King County Sheriff's Office GF Youto had run out of gas and we're looking for gas when she disappeared. Bloodhounds couldn't even keep up with her trail. Hundreds of volunteers comb too thick brush for nine days there. Along the highway to near index on the way to Steven's past. Finally, they found some clothing and then JIA alive. This would be a developing story last we heard she has been reunited with her family. She's taking some rest. And, of course, investigators along with search and rescue, want to hear more of her or deal. You're

Sergeant Ryan Abbott Washington King County Steven
Washington teen found in woods east of Seattle 8 days after going missing

News, Traffic and Weather

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Washington teen found in woods east of Seattle 8 days after going missing

"Year old in Washington state went missing. She was found alive in the Cascade Mountains east of Seattle. JIA Fuda had run out of gas or cell phone was in a dead zone and after volunteer search for nine days, King County Sheriff's Sergeant Ryan Abbott says they located some clothing. And shoes and a little bit further up the same creek. We're talking about two miles up a very steep ravine Embankment and she was towards the top of this. Authorities said she's now stable taken to a local hospital. Her parents are with her. The intelligence

Jia Fuda Cascade Mountains Ryan Abbott King County Seattle Washington
Would Michael Jordan Rule in Today's NBA?

ESPN Daily

07:02 min | 2 years ago

Would Michael Jordan Rule in Today's NBA?

"Kirk. So I I swear. I promise we're not here to debate. Mj versus Lebron. At least not until the end of the interview believe me I have my stance. It is locked and loaded. We'll get to that. I don't want to alienate half the audience before we begin so over the last few weeks. Those of us who have watched the last dance have borne witness to the greatness. That is Michael. Jordan and that greatness does inform the Lebron debate insofar as it has reminded us of how dominant Jordan was but of course he was playing a different era. Basketball was very different from how it is today which can make it hard to compare those two players or to evaluate how Jordan would fare in today's NBA. So let's start here and established that point of comparison. What was the league like Jordan came into it? Well Jordan came into the in nineteen eighty four and it was a very very different place. The best players in the League at that time or Magic Johnson. Magic Johnson Larry Bird bird again. Larry saying the crowd here. This is what came to see. Kareem abdul-jabbar was still really good Long story short meaning the the NBA was run by big men just as it had been since its entire district and eight of the ten highest play players by the time Jordan even retired centers Jordan was drafted in Nineteen eighty-four just to give you an idea dominant. How valuable centers were sixteen of the twenty previous? Mvp Award winners heading into the one thousand nine hundred four eighty five season worst centers so Jordan entered an MBA. That's fair to characterize as a centers -ly And obviously it's very very different than what we're describing here in twenty twenty. So how big of a deal was it? That the best player in the League Michael Jordan was a shooting dude. You can't overstate. How big of a deal. It was really weird. I mean magic had showed us that point guards could be great. Bird showed us the power forwards and shooting. Forwards could be great no. Mvp had ever come from the shooting. Guard position nobody had really ever dominated the leak or won championships from that position or in that way and again one of the main things the makes Michael Jordan's such a special character in NBA. History is that he deformed the various static of MBA greatness. disrupted to use the term from from Silicon Valley. What it meant and what it looked like to be. Nba superstar love deformed as a verb because it sort of implies that he bent the League to his own. Will he did that man? I mean he came in there and it was violent and it was beautiful and it was for the betterment of the future of the sport a couple of weeks ago. You're at a piece about why. Michael Jordan was such a transcendent score. Can you explain what it was that? Made that dominant so unusual. Yeah well it starts with the fact that he's a he's a guard and again to contextualize it against what was going on in the eighties. Nineties is is shooting guards in wings didn't dominate the NBA. We had the occasional superstar like Julius Irving. So I'm not GonNa say that he was the first star wing but he was a jump shooter. Long Story Short. He was a jump shooting guard. Who could attack the Rim and boy could he attack the rim? So the early part of Jordan's careers. Obviously marked by these highlight jump. Man Silhouettes the dump contest leap from the free throw line and Chicago. Stadium can picture that in our head along Dominique to Michael Jordan but by the end Meena Jordan would beat teams with just incredible mid range shooting And if a majority of buckets in the last dance season in that second repeat came off of the mid range jump shots that either came from post plays Dribble pull-ups quick stops just an endless array of mid range jumpers. Mj On the way away. Jumper and one scout told me a really stuck out is like I've been watching the last dance for eight hours now. I haven't seen the same move twice. It's not like he had to go to move over and over again. All those phase pretty close but man he he did it all but he did it in this area that we don't use very much anymore. Aka Amid Ridge and he's also very difficult shots right thinking about it this way. If you're going up against the Bulls in his nineteen ninety two or nineteen ninety-seven and year in opposing coach. Year number one objective is pretty clear If you can stop or slowdown Michael Jordan. You have a chance. If can't you don't So almost every night the Jordan played he would get the other teams best defender. And that person would WANNA play their best game of the year because everybody in their Rena was watching it and so he did. This eighty two games a year to put up the best sort of scoring numbers in the League against the best defensive performers in the league so you made a heat map for Jordan and then in the same story you made one for harden and you put them next to each other and trying to comparison it almost looks like urban and rural America right or like to to heat maps. That are just wildly different. Almost like people playing different sports one hundred percent in hardened deserves all the credit in the world for becoming the best score of this era but this era is dominated by sort of this moneyball dogma efficiency efficiency efficiency and when you look at James Harden shot signature. You see a guy who shoots near the hoop. He's great Basket attacking guard like Jordan But then away from the painting of the student only shoots threes. He avoids the Mid Range just like he avoids a shaving cream. And and then when you look at say Jordan you see almost the exact opposite remember that old image of Pan Jia and how the continent sort of fit together these two shots hearts kind of look like South America and Africa. Where Jordan is one shape all mid range and then a hardest jump shot activity is sort of surrounding that all three point airs. Jordan didn't shoot a lot of threes.

Michael Jordan NBA Larry Bird MVP MJ Lebron Magic Johnson James Harden Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Basketball Kirk. Julius Irving Chicago Silicon Valley Amid Ridge America South America Bulls Pan Jia
"jia" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

11:55 min | 2 years ago

"jia" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"We're into the sixth day of April I guess if you get Jia clear skies a reason to look toward the heavens that full moon will be coming up actually like Tuesday night into Wednesday morning all most full just a sliver yet to go many of us not going to be seeing the full moon because cloud cover showers thunderstorms maybe even some strong storms we'll be targeting now there's gonna be kind of a bulls eye zone through the heart of Illinois through much of Indiana and much of central and western portions of Ohio down into parts of Kentucky Tuesday into Wednesday what to keep a close eye on that meanwhile it even in a pandemic apparently the bad guys are not heeding the recommendations never mind social distancing I I actually saw I I can't remember a mayor somewhere who was pleading with criminals to can you just go home for the time being take a break you know he was he was serious it's like you are are you you really think the bad guys are are going to take the covert nineteen as a reason to stop they have their illegal activities well quite to the contrary in another I guess there's reason to be concerned to some extent especially in a place like New York where is IT I believe they've got something a kindle but forty thousand I believe the number I heard forty thousand NYPD and let me just incredible number but as of yesterday I believe some somewhere close to ten thousand R. adult hi there in quarantine or actually with the virus I am not surprisingly I think the bad guys are saying they're Indo cops out there let's go back to school rob something New York city's always seventy five percent rise in burglaries at businesses during the second half of March according to the report NYPD data said that the rise in burglaries occurred starting March twelfth the day mayor de Blasio declared a state of emergency thank you to the end of the month two hundred fifty four burglaries at commercial locations reported the NYPD there were a hundred forty five burglaries in the same time frame last year well we knew with the closing of many stores we would see an increase in unfortunately we are according to the NYPD on the positive side of major crimes like assaults murders and rapes are down because of the stay at home restrictions that have been placed on new Yorkers course New York with the highest number of cases in the highest number of deaths and it looks like New Jersey the second highest number of both confirmed cases and yeah Jeff's their hot spot in the north east meanwhile it's eight eight eight eight six zero eighty seven eighty five good morning Mike thank you how you doing buddy all right what's going on there's a few things I want to touch on some but I try to be as quick as I can first and foremost I I think that the one I would say I may be a little bit of a conspiracy theorist I always question anything that I see or hear coming out of our government I do believe that there is a certain group of people but is trying to control the world but also tries to control our politics things like that so I'm one of those guys let me say that right off the bat next thing I wanna say is god bless America's truckers the first responders health care workers and even the people that are running cashiers and cash registers at grocery stores fast food places those people are really putting themselves out there because you're dealing with so many people every day another thing I want to say real quick is Donald Trump ran as a Republican got elected and now you see the quote unquote liberal media bias trying to trashing every chance they can get I've never been someone who prescribes to the two party system I believe that that is basically just a charade to try and keep the agenda going of government I think if that guy ran as a Democrat got elected we would be saying the same thing from the right they would be trying to run through the mud and the reason why is because he's not a career politician he's not in anybody's pocket and the guy has enough money he doesn't really owe anybody any favors to cater to their whims and what they want to see an activist policy now having said that I want to talk about everything going on the corona virus right now and you guys are going to have more information on this than I do kind of one of the reasons I called I don't know what the numbers are for every state as far as who's catching how quickly it's going around about the death tolls are I only hear about what's going on in Ohio I don't get a chance to watch national TV much so we we know it's been proven that throughout history certain groups of people have funded both sides of a war to see who would win and they would back that country and they don't care how many soldiers died in a war it's never shut down in the comments if anything it has created an economic boom now we've got this corona virus and people are dying all the sudden we have to shut down the economy bring it to a standstill my question is why the difference why is it that it's okay for guys to get old men and women to go to war and died when a lot of times it isn't about American freedom the countries that we go and engage and they're not really approaching on American freedom it's usually about political interest so why is it okay for those people to die and the economy not come to a halt but it is okay to bring the economy to a halt over the coronavirus I personally think that they're doing this to try and use it to mess up trump's reelection I don't know if you guys have any numbers as far as how many people have died throughout the different wars that we have throughout our history as a country versus how many people are dying from this coronavirus I'm not saying that it isn't something that should be taken seriously I definitely think it should from what I hear on the news it seems like it is spreading a lot worse than the flu does even though they say oh only a certain percent of people are really going to die from it that aside it does seem to be spreading very very quickly and rampantly so I agree that something should be taken seriously but I just find it really really weird that they are shutting the economy down the way they are when let's face it the people that run the world don't really care about who dies as long as their agendas get pushed forward so I mean what about what about the idea that that's I'm thinking the law of the late Friday and my answer would be when you're in a war if you're in a war with South Korea North Korea if you're in a war with Iran give you know who the enemy is you can see the enemy for the most part this as they keep trying to call it is a war but it's an unseen enemy yeah you you we don't know where exactly I mean it sounds more and more like it's airborne and deferred for a lengthy amount of time it's not just the droplets they're saying it anymore that's why they changed their guidance on wearing a mask yeah it's an unseen enemy so in the name of supposedly trying to save lives yeah they they tried to stem the flow with over there we don't want to overwhelm the hospitals I mean the of the doom and gloom scenario spelled out yesterday by the Surgeon General makes it sound like this week is going to be like all hell breaking loose we ain't seen nothing yet well I really hadn't considered that be in about an enemy that you know versus one that you don't know I guess you did kind of hit it right on the head with we really don't have any real Intel on this yet there was no way to really get ahead of it but just try to hit it blindsided us completely in the early part of the early on information when it was you know what it was impacting China the day kind of downplayed and they were given is true numbers and true information and I don't think they have yet to be honest well I don't want to get started on going down the China rabbit hole I have my feelings about that man and and what they've done I honestly think that their inaction and their unwillingness to share the truth with the rest of the world is probably what's gotten the world in the situation of ten right now I would like to think that we as a country and and and frankly the rest of the world the card to take a step back and look at globalism and think that maybe it's not the answer to everything in the world as far as social economic and all that I don't see why we can't be producing a lot of the things that were standing over China right here in the United States might know people say well it's because they can do it so much cheaper in China well that might be true but I think after something like this we might want to take another look at that especially things we depend on like medicine PP those types of things I really don't think you should be depends on the country who let's face it China is our enemy yes we work with them socio economically but they do consider us their enemy and we consider them an enemy as well so really don't think that it's a smart move to all your enemy yup to provide you with things that will save you in a situation like this I don't want to get into the rabbit hole of which politicians have heavily invested in Bruce over in China we all know who they are past presidents politicians are still in office today you can you can talk about that till the sun goes down I just think that it's really weird that like I I mean I'm almost fifty I voted every single election since I was eighteen I try to stay as politically aware as I can I always question everything I don't vote strictly for a party line vote for the guy I think is the guy who actually has America's best best interest at heart I do think that was Donald Trump this time around I just think it's really weird that they're shutting everything down the way they are never seen nothing like it okay it is it is unprecedented times in well thank you for the call might appreciate you being a listener and a contributor yeah the unseen enemy supposedly it's it's out there floating around we one of the ladies lunch somewhere I think I printed that story up there saying the late they want to put a lid no pun intended a lid on it yeah I guess the latest is if you actually are one of those a symptomatic carriers that it can actually be transmitted via fecal matter in other words when you flush the commode yeah those droplets the error is that aerosolized droplets that come up with they they know that happens they talk about yeah your toothbrush in your in your bathroom you don't have your toothbrush in a Cup sitting out on the on the sink right next to the commode because those droplets when you're flush go into the air and lands all of your toothbrush now they're saying shut the lid but for your.

Jia
Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

Science Magazine Podcast

07:47 min | 2 years ago

Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

"Now speak with Andrew Curry a freelance journalist based in Berlin. His new article in science explores hidden treasures that have surfaced on the coast of the Netherlands. They include such things as neanderthal tools. A willy mammoth tooth and human remains from thousands of years ago. These remarkable fines lending significant insight into the ecological and anthropological history of the region. Hi Andrew All right. The story highlights a variety of people from a nurse to university professors who were studying the samples from vastly different perspectives. Generally speaking who were the scientists involved in the research so it's kind of an incredible array of different disciplines that are being brought to bear on the same questioner region there geneticists archaeologists geographers people who specialize in underwater mapping. And then. There's also one of the things that really interested me in a story. There's a big contribution being made by amateurs interested in the fines and spend time just looking for the stuff on each where it washes up right so these things are just washing up on shore. What are some of the most compelling fines that have been dredged up so some of the most compelling fines are stone and bone tools and human remains that date back seven thousand or more years ago some of which goes all the way back to fifty thousand years when the the area was populated by neanderthals? They're also finding animal remains. They found Bama's skulls all kinds of things that date back to a time when the shore off the Netherlands and the UK in the North Sea was actually above water. So how are these finds turning up on the beach in the first place? It used to be that these finds would turn up in fishing nets and sort of at random but in the last few years as the Netherlands has really focused on coastal reclamation and protecting their coast against sea level rise. They've been dredging sand and gravel offshore and bringing it and dumping it on the beach and in those massive hundreds of thousands of tons of sand and gravel that they've brought in from offshore there are bones stone tools human remains that slowly then get uncovered by the waves and they're amateurs who go out to the beach every day almost and just look for the stuff as it as it comes out of the sand. Pick it up. Send pictures of it to archaeologists then identify it and they work together to analysts. Awesome and like you said. These fines are eating found by all these different types of people. Could you outline some of the techniques being used to analyze the fines? There's actually geneticists who are scraping DNA straight off the sea floor and showing what kind of plants and animals live there when it was terrestrial land. The fines are one aspect of the whole effort. Devoted to trying to figure out what the landscape under the North Sea looked like before the last ice age ended and flooded the area so at one point there was an area three or four times bigger than Modern Day Holland. That was all above ground. There were forests there were rivers and it was probably heavily populated. Sounds pretty beautiful actually. Yeah what kind of DNA is being analyzed. So geneticists are using ancient DNA techniques to look at both the soil to get DNA from there and also analyzing human remains. The collectors have found on the beach. That are actually really well preserved because of the cold and wet at the bottom of the sea to get whole human genomes and you can then look at the ancient. Dna from these populations that lived in an area that is now underwater very cool. There's a specific item that surface that holds huge significance. And that's the landscape of the area being studied. What are some of the most important lessons learned about the landscape of this submerged region? I mean part of it is just that it's cool to go is one of the researchers. I talked to said. They're getting maps of a country that you can't visit so there's this massive landscape that was once above water and they're testing out all these different ways to look at it could also be applied to other coastal regions. That were once habitable. That were once passages to new lands like the landscape between Alaska and Asia for example Barron. Jia they call it yeah and look at how you know how these areas worked for human migration how humankind spread around the world. There are these key gaps in our knowledge because the sea levels today are thirty meters higher than they were twenty five thousand years ago right and you mentioned these maps that they're able to make out of information being collected and one of the sources of that information are these energy companies. Could you explain how these energy companies are contributing to the data collection? And what that data help discover sure. It's been a really interesting and sort of inspirational collaboration. Between scientists and industry in the North Sea is a is a tremendously important commercial area for shipping. And then there's a lot of wind farms oil. Well gas well drilling and so companies went out and did these seismic surveys to see what was deep under the ground. And for the archaeologists it was a very top level. That wasn't maybe commercially. Valuable but tremendously valuable. In terms of the knowledge it contains about the landscapes so they worked with the companies to get that data. And then we're able to start. These maps based on seismic survey data. There's also been some interesting collaboration. Between companies that dredged gravel for construction use and then led archaeologists have access to the stones and dirt that are dragged up from the bottom of the sea which was once land these maps and some of this information really revealing what humans were like thousands of years ago what civilization was like before this landscape changed. So what did this region? What does this research teach us about human history? The very end of this landscape was populated by modern humans. Just like you and me who were hunter gatherers. At first they were in a landscape that was probably a lot like the most fertile parts of England were Hollander Belgium today and then slowly over a couple of hundred years. Some of the research has revealed that as the water levels rose it transformed into more of estuary wetland area but people kept living there and they managed to adapt and change their lifestyle to the rising seas which I guess goes to show you. The climate change is an old story of course that that begs the question right. This begs the question of sea level. Rise impacted these civilizations and we can see it. Is that going to tell us? About our present. On the one hand they managed to deal with a certain level of sea level rise and then there came a point about seven thousand years ago when there were a series of nominees and the landscape completely disappeared. It was rendered uninhabitable su-nam as that's That's pretty familiar. Actually yeah I mean for a while. Archaeologists were reluctant to get into this one expert. Told me because they didn't want to be seen as digging after chasing after lost continents or Atlantis or something like that. But as the techniques have gotten more and more advanced it turns out that they can do some really scientific

North Sea The Netherlands Andrew Curry Andrew All Berlin Alaska Modern Day Holland Bama Hollander Belgium Asia UK Barron England