35 Burst results for "J. Dylan"

Sabres withstand Red Wings' rally, win 5-4 in shootout

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 4 d ago

Sabres withstand Red Wings' rally, win 5-4 in shootout

"Dylan cousin scores a pair of goals to help the Sabres edge the red wings 5 to four in a shootout cousins open buffalo scoring with a shorthanded goal in the first period and help the Sabres extend their recent run of good play going three one and one in their last 5 games after dropping their previous 8 games and regulation. It's big for us to kind of put those games behind us and win some hockey games so that's something we need to keep doing here and not fall down into that streak again. Sabres forward Jack Quinn notched the winner scoring the only goal of the shootout. The red wings rallied from a four one deficit in the third to send it to overtime and earned at least a point for the 6th time in their last 7 games. Denny cap Detroit

Sabres Dylan Cousin Red Wings Buffalo Jack Quinn Hockey Denny Detroit
The Fruit of Liberal Arts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:38 min | 5 d ago

The Fruit of Liberal Arts

"So a lot of parents have had this experience. You send your kid off to college, you're proud. Dylan got into duke. We're so happy. And then the kid comes back and hates not only you, but the country and himself and the chances of that child having a happy productive personal life go to about zero. That's the fruit of liberal arts in this country now. So it's a very common experience, but one mother decided to try and fix it. She sent her daughter to a town ten mount holyoke university of Massachusetts tuition, over 50 K a year. The child comes back totally programmed like a cult member. So the mom spends 300 bucks a day for a deprogrammer to undo the brainwashing and it worked. Annabelle Rockwell is the daughter. She graduated mount holyoke. She's now the development director at PragerU. She joins us. So annabelle, thank you so much for coming on. So deprogram suggests undoing unreasonable religious belief. Did you feel like a cult member after man holyoke? Tucker, thank you so much for having me. First, I'm gonna say that I arrived at mount holyoke bright eyed and bushy tailed so excited to be there in 2011 and is as soon as I got there, I was told that, you know, I should refer to myself as a first year, not a freshman because we were a historically women's college. I was left to note in my mailbox saying he may be a she, she may be a he don't assume anyone's gender, and I thought, oh, okay, that's new. Hold on a second. This is precious. It's an old girl's college. But you shouldn't assume that it's a girl.

Mount Holyoke University Of Ma Annabelle Rockwell Prageru Dylan Mount Holyoke Annabelle Tucker
Oilers score 4 times in third period to defeat Rangers

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last week

Oilers score 4 times in third period to defeat Rangers

"The Edmonton oil is wiped out a three to nothing deficit with four unanswered third period goals to beat the rangers four to three. Leon draisaitl on the power play scored the game winner with two O two remaining. We got to start winning some games consistently and do it the right way. So I thought that third period that we had was a great step. Dylan Holloway's first NHL goal tied it to three, Evan Bouchard scored Edmonton's first two goals in the four goal third period against rangers goalie Igor sherkin. Chris kreider did score his tenth for the rangers. Mike mancuso, New York

Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Rangers Dylan Holloway Evan Bouchard NHL Igor Sherkin Chris Kreider Mike Mancuso New York
Irving returns, Simmons scores 22 as Nets beat Grizzlies

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Irving returns, Simmons scores 22 as Nets beat Grizzlies

"The nets were one 27 one 15 winners over the grizzlies and the return of Kyrie Irving The Brooklyn guard had 14 points in his return from a suspension You're so good to get this game out of the way And now we can move forward with the rest of the season Ben Simmons had his first 20 point game since the 2021 playoffs Finishing with 22 I know I can do I know him careful of And I'm not surprised Kevin Durant chipped in 26 points giving him at least 25 and all 17 games he's played this season The nets led by just three before opening the fourth quarter on an 18 5 spurt Dylan Brooks poured in 31 points for the grizzlies I'm Dave ferry

Brooklyn Guard Ben Simmons Kyrie Irving Nets Grizzlies Kevin Durant Dylan Brooks Dave Ferry
When Will Ryan Gosling Marry Eva Mendes?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:21 min | 2 weeks ago

When Will Ryan Gosling Marry Eva Mendes?

"These two are very famous. Famously private, they've never revealed whether they're married or not. I don't get this kind of horse shit. What's the big deal? But the other day, Ava Mendes, who's now 48, went to Instagram, and I've been on Instagram. All she does is post pictures of clothes she wore for a certain event. She doesn't answer anybody's not that I wrote her. There's no way the writer back. She just posts pictures of clothes she wears. It's really like, are you in prison? What's going on? So she showed off a tattoo that might offer a clue about their relationship. It's in her inner wrist and it spells out de Gosling. DE Gosling. So in the Hispanic culture, married women often add their husbands last name to their own using deep, DE, which means of, you know, so Mendez might go by Eva Mendes de Gosling after marrying him. Who knows? We don't know. It's not the first time she's flashed this particular tattoo. She did it two years ago. Dylan September again. But it's very prominent in his most recent post. These two have been together since 2011. They met on the movie the place beyond the pines, good movie, really good movie.

Ava Mendes De Gosling Instagram Eva Mendes De Gosling Mendez Dylan
Verlander, Alcantara are unanimous Cy Young Award winners

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Verlander, Alcantara are unanimous Cy Young Award winners

"Justin Verlander in sandy Alcantara are unanimous winners of the 2022 cyan awards Verlander is the 11th three time winner of the award after posting a major league best 1.75 ERA The Astros ace also led the AL with 18 wins and struck out 185 Alcatraz 6 complete games are the most of the majors since 2016 The Marlin standout had a 2.28 ERA while pitching a major league best 228 and two thirds innings for the NL club Atlantis max fried was second to Alcantara in the NL voting White Sox star Dylan cease finished second to Verlander I'm Dave fairy

Sandy Alcantara Justin Verlander Verlander Astros Max Fried AL NL Alcantara Dylan Cease White Sox Dave Fairy
Kari Lake: We've Got Bad Elections and We Need to Reform Them

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Kari Lake: We've Got Bad Elections and We Need to Reform Them

"A can of warpath like they have never seen before and I can't wait. Well, guess what? Why don't we connect 3 million patriots to her right now? Carrie Lake are you there? I'm here, Sebastian. All right, so we need to we need some good news from the ground in Arizona. We had homie Dylan yesterday say the GOP was running things, but they ran out of stinking printer cartridges for the ballots. What is going on, Carrie? You know, it's just the same garbage. We've been dealing with since 2020. And we tried to sound the alarm. I've been talking about it since the 2020 election. And everyone, the press, the fake news, tries to destroy anybody who spoke up. Oh, no, it was a perfect election. Don't look here. No problems here. We've got that elections. And we need to reform them. And what happened on election day was inexcusable, they can call it and mistake and honest mistake it's ineptitude to a level that is unacceptable. And we will no longer accept this in Arizona. It's embarrassing. And it's disenfranchising voters, frankly, when more than a third of our polling places had equipment that didn't work, we've got a major problem. And so now what we're doing is we're waiting for Maricopa County to count votes and they're going molasses slow. And we have over 600,000 probably closer to 650,000 ballots left to be counted. And of those closer to 400,000 are ballots that people had as mail in ballots, they walked them in on election day. They didn't want to put them in the Dropbox. They didn't want to put them on the mailbox. They walked them in. We believe we're going to get the major chunk of those votes, but they are not counting them yet, then slow walking this. And the

Carrie Lake Arizona Patriots Sebastian Dylan GOP Carrie Maricopa County Dropbox
 Svechnikov lifts Hurricanes over Capitals 3-2 in shootout

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Svechnikov lifts Hurricanes over Capitals 3-2 in shootout

"Andre svechnikov scored the shootout winner as the Carolina hurricanes beat the visiting Washington capitals three to two Trailing one nothing after the first period Dylan Strowman and Alex Ovechkin score consecutive goals to get the capitals a two one lead before svechnikov scored at 1542 of the second to tie the game The game saw ten total power plays which hurricanes goalie Frederick Anderson said throughout the rhythm of the game They didn't really fire a lot of easy ones They were battling for their chances but obviously they got something on their power players Darcy Kemper made 33 saves for Washington Dennis Cox probably North Carolina

Andre Svechnikov Dylan Strowman Alex Ovechkin Svechnikov Carolina Hurricanes Washington Capitals Frederick Anderson Darcy Kemper Dennis Cox Washington North Carolina
Experts Alarmed by Trans TikTok Star's Popularity Bump

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:22 min | Last month

Experts Alarmed by Trans TikTok Star's Popularity Bump

"Experts alarmed by trans TikTok star Dylan Mulvaney's fan base bump. Child care experts are expressing alarm over transgender TikToker Dylan Mulvaney's popularity, bump. After her White House debut, saying social media is driving a spike in teens seeking sex change procedures. Why do you think that there is this vast increase in something that was virtually unknown just a few years ago? Do you think it's because they are more young people in touch with their true self? I'm really not a boy. I'm really not a girl. I would like my genitalia cut off. I would like my breast cut off. You think this is normal? You think this is healthy? What do you think this is driven? By a lost societies, social media. Specifically, the left. Which ruins everything it touches, including young people. Clinician same Mulvaney sit down time with president Joe Biden has raised the social media sensations profile, extending her reach and likely influencing teenage fans who may themselves be questioning their own gender identity.

Dylan Mulvaney Trans Tiktok White House President Joe Biden Mulvaney
Dylan Mulvaney Wants to 'Normalize the Bulge' to Your Children

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:52 min | Last month

Dylan Mulvaney Wants to 'Normalize the Bulge' to Your Children

"Cut number one. Day 74 being a girl, round of applause for the makeup, and I wore this outfit shopping today. And I thought that these might be my new shopping shorts, but I was walking around in everyone was staring, and I was like, oh, okay, what's going on? And they were all staring directly at my crotch. And I went, oh, I forgot that my crotch doesn't look like other women's crotches. Because you're a dude. His mind doesn't look like a little Barbie pocket. And I thought, okay, Dylan, you have some options here. Number one, you can stop wearing clothes that fit like this. And in just fine looser fitting items. Number two, I can do a talk, which is going to have to be a whole other video, but it's very painful and involved about, or number three, I just normalize it, and I wear clothes like this, and we all just normalize women having bulges sometimes, 'cause we're coming up on bikini season, baby, and you might see a bulge or two. So lies the bulge, we are normalizing the women can have bulges and that's okay. We're not gonna stare at their crotches while they're wearing their little shopping shores at the mall. I know the country's gone to hell in a hand basket. I get it, folks. I get it. But here we are, and you have to wonder the greatest generation, the greatest generation. Did they ever imagine that one day, the great grandchildren of that generation would be fighting a very different Battle of the Bulge? I mean, just think about that for a moment. There was a very important phrase that we need to pay attention to here. It's normalizing. This is what TikTok is all about. This is what your public school system is all about.

Dylan
Are Women Offended by Men Like Dylan Mulvaney?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:00 min | Last month

Are Women Offended by Men Like Dylan Mulvaney?

"Told people yesterday about this guy. His name is Dylan Mulvaney, and he's on this road to becoming a woman. Which is basically he's making a mockery of I've never that's not how a woman behaves. No. He counts like every day he's a woman. I'm like do you do that? Do you wake up in the morning and you little bar lows, waking you up, licking you on the face? Oh God. The alarm's going off. Mister producers like honey. Take the dog out. Rise and shine. It's day 72 of being a woman now. No, I don't know what day I'm on. A lot more than 200, I can tell you that. You know, I'm wondering, grace, before we play this audio, I'm just curious to know if women are offended by these transgender people. These guys who think that being a woman is about wearing makeup and talking with a high pitched voice. Oh, I'm looking at me. I'm a woman. Todd you're a little too good at hear me roar. I mean real too good at that. Is that what it's really all about? I mean, and dressing flamboyantly and accentuating your parts. That's news to me, but I'm just wondering if women find that offensive, because that's what these transgender guys they're making a mockery of what it means to be a woman. I feel like they're like, oh, it's easy. Look at me. I became a woman, no big deal. So there is one specific well, there are several specific areas of the human anatomy that would qualify one to be a female. This is true. And so this guy Dylan Mulvaney, who's a popular person on the TikTok, and was invited, and this is why this is important. This moron was invited to The White House. He was invited to sit in the Oval Office and interview President Biden. Now, keep in mind, President Biden will not sit down in front of actual journalist,

Dylan Mulvaney Todd President Biden Oval Office White House
Update on St. Louis High School Shooting

The Officer Tatum Show

01:27 min | Last month

Update on St. Louis High School Shooting

"Some updates about the shooter, the article that I read was a little dated. There are some updates. So the 19 year old was identified. I'm not going to say his name. I hope he rests in, you know what? You know, back in the day we say rest and it started with a pee, but it's not peace. It sound like peace. Anyway, you know what I'm talking about. Rest in, you know what? Because and I don't feel sorry for him. I really don't. I mean, I'm a lead up to God to feel sorry for him. I'm glad he's dead. Going in there and killing and shooting people like that. I hope they come and kill you. Can I be honest? You know, I was, I mean, I say not crazy and give me fire. But I don't have mercy for people like this. And maybe because I was a cop, I know how to turn the switch in a switch get turned and you go and kill mode. If I was responding to this call, I would be eagerly anticipating showing up on a scene in eliminating this person as a threat. Nobody should have to be in fear with a gun yielding individual that's hell bent on killing people for no reason. No one should live in that type of fear. And no one deserves to put people in that fear. And that's what a good guys come in because they put you out of your misery, so everybody else can be peaceful. Because you two stupid to act like you got sins.

Three Killed at St. Louis High School, Officers Kill Suspect

The Officer Tatum Show

01:30 min | Last month

Three Killed at St. Louis High School, Officers Kill Suspect

"Earlier this morning, I believe it was earlier this morning. We had three killed in the St. Louis high school by a person who decide to be an active shooter. There's not a lot of information probably because it's a young person under age. The chief of St. Louis came out and made a statement said to the school was locked down, which bought time for school security officers to react. If you look at the article title and this is even a Fox News article title, it says, at least three were killed in St. Louis high school shooting suspect kielbasa security. I think that's a poor usage of the word. Is it security or is it police officers? Because according to the chief, it says about time for school, security, officers to react. Now, I don't know if he's talking about school resource officers. I don't know if he's talking about police or talking about school hit their own private security. In the woke wussification of America, I'm not shocked that the police department is even afraid to say that there's police officers who are heroic enough to kill a guy on campus after he was trying to murder every student in the school. However, thank God that some brave security officers are police officers responding to take care of the threat. Do I think we should ban guns because of the shooting? No, I don't. Because obviously, you got good guys with guns that take care of business. And what did they do that you already didn't do? And don't get mad at me. They actually lock the doors. The doors were locked.

St. Louis High School St. Louis Fox News Police Department America
The Big Lies of the Left

The Officer Tatum Show

01:36 min | Last month

The Big Lies of the Left

"Now let me play this clip from Joe Biden. I think it's clip number four. Let's play clip four from this interview with Joe Biden. Do you think states should have a right to ban gender affirming healthcare? I don't think any state or anybody should have the right to do that. As a moral question as legal question, I just think it's wrong. Of course you do. Do you understand the language sandwich and the nutrition that the Democrats use? Do you believe gender affirming, they say gender? Listen, no state blocks grown ups from doing this, right? No states by grown-ups, if you have grown, you can get hormones. You can get you can't get punitive 'cause you already passed puberty. Gender reaffirming surgery. You show me an adult, they can go get their stuff, cut and zip and fold it up. Show me an adult that can't go get that in any state in the United States of America. You can do whatever surgery you want as an adult. But what she's talking about, he's talking about is kids. Don't let them lie to you. They strategically then use the word kids. But they're talking about children because states like Florida and others are blocking states from allowing children to take puberty blockers and to be able to manipulate their genitalia while their children. States have banned that. Because it's destructive as damaging to the child.

Joe Biden United States Of America Florida
Trans Activist Interviews President Biden

The Officer Tatum Show

01:26 min | Last month

Trans Activist Interviews President Biden

"This food named Dylan Mulvaney was a biological male, is a transgender activist, right? I guess he's trying to be a trans. And he has an opportunity to interview a president of the United States of America. I want you to let that sink in. This fool has an opportunity to sit down and interview a president of the United States of America, with what credentials does this person have to be able to interview the president. All the women that he then stepped on to be able to sit in front of the president of the United States of America and do an interview. Because he on TikTok flashing his sack around, trying to the reason I say that is because he was in a video talking about his bulge because he's a man dressing like a girl and you know you can't tuck the stuff up. And so it's popping out and he's talking about it on television. Everywhere that people can see, this man is talking like this. And he sits down and interviews the president of the United States of America. And according to Dylan, he's been a girl for 221 days.

Dylan Mulvaney United States Of America Tiktok Dylan
It's on Us to Change This Country

The Officer Tatum Show

02:10 min | Last month

It's on Us to Change This Country

"One person can be changed by something you say. And that one person can change millions of people. Think about the person who woke me up. Think about it. Somebody woke me up. That's one person. And then I am now influencing millions of people. It only takes one person. It only takes one person for you to talk to. It's almost like the gospel of Jesus Christ. Jesus told us apostles go to the door knocking on preach the gospel if they turn on you. Dust your shoulders off. And walk to the next place. Don't waste your time with idiots. Who sit there and cry by Trump. He's a racist, just walked past that person. If auntie is like, Donald Trump is raised, don't even talk to auntie. Auntie is lost. Go to your cousin. Go to your neighbor. Go to your friend on the job. They say my pronouns or she and hers and his skip that person. Go to the person next to them that's reasonable, rational, and that may actually make a difference. I want us to go full throttle. Y'all going to hear me talk about this every single day to the election. And then I'm going to throw the election party and we're going to watch a red tsunami. But we want it to be a tsunami. We don't want to be a wave. We want to be a red Armageddon. We want to whip them so bad though, the world ends. That's how bad we want it to be. It's world changing. This is over. This is the Guinness Book of World Records. We don't want to just be mediocre. We don't want to just be status quo. We don't want to just run through them like they did under the Obama administration. When he lost, I don't know how many seats in the House and Senate. I want you to understand that Obama had a greater approval rating than Biden could ever dream of and he still lost the House and the Senate. By a ton of people to imagine what's going to happen to Joe Biden, but we need to put the nail in the coffin and make sure it happens, and there's no chance for them to come up for air, we need to outvote them, outperform them, out preach them, and we need to change this country.

Election Party Donald Trump Auntie Obama Administration Jesus Senate House Biden Barack Obama Joe Biden
Conservatives, It's Not Enough to Just Win

The Officer Tatum Show

01:27 min | Last month

Conservatives, It's Not Enough to Just Win

"I want us to understand this. And before I get to this break 'cause I know it's coming soon. We're winning, but winning isn't enough. We have to put our foot on the gas. It doesn't matter that we're up 30 to nothing. Because it ain't over to the fat lady scene. You put your foot on the gas, put your foot on the neck and we gotta go for it. Winning by 30 points isn't enough. We need to beat them 500 to zero. We need to beat them to oblivion. We need to vote them out of office with a recognized that they will never be in office again running on the principles in which they're running on. Bashing the church, bashing white folks, bashing Christians, you will never win another election. Pushing pedophilia on our kids, teaching CRT, raising gas prices being woken and woke, you will never get a position in this country again. We have to set an example. Especially here in Arizona. I don't care what you feel about Republicans aren't you vote Republican all the way down the ballot. You know why? Because the Democrats telling they people vote Democrat, we then a ballot. I don't care nothing about your feelings. We got a country to save. You vote Republican all the way down the ballot. Don't it's the easiest election you've ever done. It's the easiest way to tell your Friends to vote. How do you vote for the person that's Republican all the way down the ballot?

Arizona
Get Out and Vote

The Officer Tatum Show

01:32 min | Last month

Get Out and Vote

"It's time for us to be motivated, ladies and gentlemen. It is time for us to show up and show out. And I'm gonna spend the first few minutes talking about that because I think it's an incredibly important and invaluable. We are better than them, we're smarter than them, our ideas work better than theirs too. And we love our country. These people that were up against are complete nut jobs. They hate America, they want to push pedophilia. They want to push racism on our children, children. They are the scum of the earth. And the way in which state legislate or the way they vote for people who legislate. We can not parse words. We can not be nice. The time has come where we can not be politically correct. Our country is on the line. We will lose this beautiful place which we call home and which we call the land of the free, if we don't step up and we don't vote. Let me give you some pointers here. Nick, I need to turn the air up. Let me give you some pointers here. You need to vote in any way you can vote. I know that there's people that's been out here and they have been saying, do not mail in your ballots. Do not participate in early voting. Show up on election day. Well, let me give you some realistic common sense to put into the spectrum here. Don't wait to election day unless you absolutely have to.

America Nick
"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:46 min | 7 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You know, it was less than I felt that I was amplifying the vitriol, but the troubling realization was more that I wasn't changing the world. Right, that I was in fact only speaking snarkily speaking to the choir, right? By giving these biting talking points to the choir who was already there. And I was speaking only to people who were already agreeing with me. We were in an echo chamber and not this wider Internet. And you know, this sounds so cliche now, but I really felt like it was the 2016 election that was this big wake-up call for me that, oh my God, here I was closely monitoring my political tweets as if they were bellwethers for the national election. And then I learned like, oh, I don't know this country at all. And I feel like I'm still understanding what happened and throughout my whole time at seriously while I was getting more followers and more likes. I was also getting more hate and that's just what happens when you make something big online. And so I started collecting all of those pieces of hate, be they comments or messages in a hate folder or what I called my hate folder all caps. And I think I kind of realized I was like, oh, you know, most of this is coming from conservative people, I wonder if I actually don't understand this country and maybe this hate folder is a better representation of this country than I thought. So it was then that I was like, I need to do something because the reason I got into this game in the first place, even more important than my eyes going Gaga for the metrics rolling in was I wanted to say something and I wanted to start conversations in the way that every single word allowed people to see a problem that they didn't know was a problem before I wanted to continue that work. Same with sitting in bathrooms with trans people from my earlier time at seriously. Those were really successful ways of getting messages across. And that's all I ever wanted to do was to get those messages across in ways that would actually reach people. And I was wondering if the snarky takedown, the epic takedowns were not the way. When did you realize that you wanted rather than take down the haters that you actually wanted to dialog with them and talk about the hate? Yeah. Well, I was at comedy shows when I was invited to do a comedy show. I would kind of scroll through a cross section of the hate from pieces in the hate folder. And I would make jokes at their expense. And I posted one of those videos online. And someone recognized himself in that video, and he's chosen to go by the name Josh for all of our conversations. So Josh saw himself in the video. And he messaged me and he seemed really hurt by the fact that I was making fun of his message, which was making fun of you. Yeah, making fun of me. He reached out and he was like, listen, you brought up some valid points. I'm wondering if you want to talk. And so he sent me his number. My mind was reeling in film you know when they do the zoom in shot while they're pulling away. And that's exactly what that moment felt like. And I was so terrified, but at the same time I had been trying to figure out this way to create conversations with my work, and I was like, oh, that was the lightbulb moment of like, oh, maybe these conversations are possible with the hate folder residents that I already have here. And so I took him up on his offer and I called him the next day, and that phone call was this beautiful moment of connection where I felt like all of these lofty goals that I had had of communicating with people was in fact possible by simply calling someone. It was this very, very, very simple solution to this very complex problem. And we found that we had a lot in common. He was a senior in high school at the time, and he was being bullied. And I was like, I was bullied in high school too, right? And I think it's important to note, a lot of people are heart warmed by that common ground we found, and it's like, it is both true that we found that common ground, and that common ground doesn't absolve the hurtful thing he said to me. But we can accept and move forward with both. And I think I started to internalize that on this call. And the success of that call with Josh showed me that maybe this kind of communication was possible with more people who were in my hate folder. So you decided to start a show, which became a podcast. Titled conversations with people who hate me. This is also the title of your brand new book. Why the word hate? As I started recording the early episodes of conversations with people who hate me, it didn't feel fair and so many of the people and what I always say is like on conversations with people who hate me, I'm only speaking to people who I feel safe talking to, that means I'm not talking to people who are like threatening to kill me, right? And so so many of the people who I spoke to were expressing like, oh, I don't hate you. I'm shocked that you would think that. And some of them was like, well, you said a really cruel thing to me. So that's why I think you hate me. But then some of the people in the light of day you're like, I don't know that this extreme word is fair to what you've written me. And so I had to kind of wrestle with how fair it was to label all of the negativity hate as I think many of us do. You also very intentionally did not use or describe the people you were speaking to as trolls. Talk about that decision. The word troll lulls us into a fantasy, right? It makes us think that it is this problem enacted by those people over there. They are the trolls. We are the good villagers, and they are this unsightly being that lives under a bridge that torments us, and I think what I kept finding in my conversations was that actually they weren't these human anomalies. They were us, and it was also the structure of social media that enabled for all this hate to be sent to me. Which is not too negate how ferociously some of them and I disagree on things. But in this space where the sharpest zinnias sometimes most hurtful take is what cuts through and a space where you mix that in where everyone can feel so insignificant, where I can message you and be like, oh, Debbie's never gonna see it. You know, I'll message anything I want. Those two things, right? The accessibility to someone and the constant feeling of insignificance merge to make the hate messages being sent a sadly normal thing. Yes. That's why I no longer felt comfortable using the word trolls. It was also a bad production technique. If you're telling people to come on a show where you talk to trolls and you're inviting them on, no one's gonna say yes. Yeah, it's so interesting. No matter who you talk with in your conversations and how much hate or unkindness they've hurled at you online in this sort of almost anonymous manner. You're always sympathetic to the people that you talked with and it seems to me that most people wanted to backtrack from that hate quite a bit. Once they understood more about where you were coming from. I mean, I think one of the most startling things for me in really understanding the back stories to a lot of the podcast episodes was even understanding that Josh was a high school student, you know? We sort of villainized and really demonized the people that hate us so that they're all bad. But I was the victim of some bullying back in the early 2000s when it was a very foreign concept. At that point, I really thought I had to quit the Internet, quit my job, quit everything because I was so humiliated by the vitriol until I actually participated in the conversation and then suddenly everybody began to backtrack and polish her actually did a great visual around that time as well as blogging became much more popular and people were so interested in taking people down with a blog post about the sort of cycle where you have all this mutual hate and then as soon as somebody gets involved there's a pylon and as soon as the person being piled on pokes their head through the pile, everybody sort of retreats. I wonder why that is..

Josh Gaga Debbie
"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:34 min | 7 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Sleeping beauty with Angelina Jolie, featured an unnamed captain who spoke for 18 seconds. The popular movie musical into the Woods featured no speaking roles for actors of color at all, neither did the movie Noah with Russell Crowe. These movies that were supposedly telling universal stories were cast as white, as you say, by default. None of the movies were about race, per se, nor were these stories inherently white, yet they were told with all white actors. So a minute or two of dialog from people of color in two hour movies really telegraphs the inequity in a much more profound way than any diversity study might. Do you feel like things are changing or do you feel like if you did this again with the most popular movies right now? It might be a little bit more encouraging. I think they are. I think people are aware of this and I don't think every single word is solely responsible. In fact, the year I created every single word, April rain had started the hashtag Oscar so white, you know, Franklin Leonard has been doing amazing work in this space for a long time. But I do think that every single word as a project got to join the conversation. I do think it offered an accessible way to see it empirically right before your eyes. Do I think it's gotten better? I do when you're in a TV production office and you see posters of old TV shows that they've worked on when you're looking even like in the 2010s, you'll see an all white cast. And you think to yourself, oh, this would never happen today. Like, you just wouldn't see an all white cast. That being said, a lot of our protagonists are still white, you know? Spider-Man is a great example, right? Like you have Zendaya and you have Peter Parker's best friend, you know, and it feels like, oh, diversity, but they're still this thing of like, well, Spider-Man will always be white. Yes, the side players are getting to be not white. They're getting to be not straight. In many thrilling cases, they're getting to be not cis, you know? Like it's all happening. But I think sometimes we're still dealing with the white protagonist problem. Dylan all of your work up until this point in your trajectory, the tumblr posts that you wrote to night Vale fans about coming out of the closet. Navigating your biracial identity on stage, the every single word speeches you gave about racial representation on screen. They all reflected your voice. Your authentic voice, which you've described as deeply earnest and sincere. But you've also said that you've learned that this was this deeply earnest sincerity was a cardinal sin on the wider Internet. Why is that? That's a question I'm still exploring myself to be honest. I think sincerity can come off as insincere online in this really vexing way. You know, like sometimes when you get on to say what you are actually feeling as you actually feel it, it feels like you're not speaking the language of the Internet, right? Because I also think that the Internet rewards the most hyperbolic thing. It rewards the most extreme thing you can say. So this is why I think we're now operating in this larger problem where everyone is either iconic the goat queen king or they are the absolute worst piece of trash person that you've ever seen on the entire Internet. Because to express something in the middle of like, oh, I mostly like this person's work, but I found fault in this just as a boring phrase to share out there onto the world. And so I think the structure of the Internet and what travels best online has shaped how we speak. And so I think earnestness sometimes doesn't have a place in that because earnestness is often about expressing something as honestly and as emotionally as possible and that doesn't play well. So I think I had to, as I started making digital videos for seriously TV, I kind of took it upon myself to figure out how it could traffic in this world, how I would be able to succeed in this world. So would you say that apathy and snark and sarcasm are really the vernacular of the Internet? I think so. I think largely because they're the most extreme way to say something. And that's typically the take that wins is not necessarily the most nuanced, but the one that cuts right in. And I also think that there are a lot of very legitimate reasons for this. I mean, we're living in, I mean, what a time to be alive, to witness it as all of the things are being reported constantly to us. So there is certainly cause for cynicism. There is certainly cause for the apathy is understandable when there's just so much going on that all we can do is shut down. But I do think that is part and parcel to the language of the Internet. You then had to make a decision about how you wanted to be portrayed on the Internet. You had to figure out how to maintain your success on a platform that would shun you for, as you put it daring to express your true self. How did you go about navigating that? And how did you go about making a decision to begin to change your person at that time? Well, so my early work at seriously TV felt in line with my voice, sitting in bathrooms with trans people is a sweet, sincere interview series. What I wanted to really kind of dive into was the more directly politically charged work, right? Like obviously sitting in bathrooms with trans people is politically charged and that I'm saying these laws are about human beings. Let us meet these human beings that these laws are about, right? And every single word is about the lack of representation on screen and what it means when we're not even exercising our empathy for people of color. But I think there was something that I saw being rewarded, which was like the sharper take the sharper jab at someone. And so I found that opportunity when I came across this video of a young conservative woman who was her video is called dear millennials and she was talking about all the ways that her generation in mind, the millennials were not living up to yesterday's standards. And, you know, she was espousing pretty standard conservative views. And I decided that it was time to make a biting response video. And so I wrote a video where I used all of her lines, a setups to my punchlines, kind of bit back, and I adopted this snarkiness voice snarkiness than is natural for me to kind of bite back at her. I posted the video, and it posted through seriously, and it blew up. It just blew up. It was the first video of the network to get a million views. And I was just enamored. Like I was just, there's that scene in Aladdin where apu, just like you see the dollar signs in his eyes. His eyes become dollar signs. But he does that too. It's so good. But that was me with the likes with the, with the view count. And I was just like inject this right into my veins. This is what I want. I took the success of that video as a kind of set of rules that I would apply to future videos. You know, like, oh, this succeeded so much. Me stepping out of my comfort zone and being snarky and making jokes at the expense of someone else who I disagree with ideologically is good for me, you know? And I think there was also a nobility to it too that I thought of at the time. I thought there was a nobility because in attacking someone who was espousing conservative points, I thought I was a warrior for my side. I thought I was like doing something big for my people. When you're getting that many coins from the Internet praising you for this, it's really hard to see it differently. When did you begin to realize that you were actually helping to amplify this vitriol?.

Franklin Leonard Zendaya Russell Crowe Angelina Jolie Peter Parker Noah Woods Oscar Dylan
"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:54 min | 7 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Whole Foods at what point in your trajectory as a performer, did you have to were you able to stop doing that? I'll tell you what, it was a lucky break. I was called in to audition for a TD bank commercial. And I booked the commercial. And the commercial was picked up to air, and the residuals allowed me to leave a restaurant job and write a play. That is the crushing and sometimes beautiful thing about art making is that it's so random. And it's simply because of that job that I was allowed to do it. You created every single word, a video series, ultimately, is something you continue to do when you got your job at seriously TV. This was the video series, as I mentioned in my intro, where the often meager lines spoken by people of color and popular movies were put together in a YouTube super cut. You did, I mean, first of all, your tech skills are out of this world. They're so beautifully made. You also created the series shutting down bullshit. You created the interview series sitting in the bathroom. It's sitting in bathrooms with trans people and response to the transphobic bathroom bills being passed in the United States. And this is really when you started getting hate mail. But I want to talk first about the motivation for starting every single word. And what was the first movie that gave you that sort of hit of, I need to do this. The first movie that inspired it was the Julia Louis-Dreyfus romantic comedy enough said. I was watching it loving it and it was only because there was a Latina made that I realized that that was actually the only person of color in the entire movie. And she was a supporting character as made. That was her role. So in 2014, I watched this movie on a plane and I had a run with the neo futurists right afterwards and I figured, you know, I'm looking at the roster of performers and I'm like, oh, that's funny, I'm gonna be the only person of color in this run of shows. So I wrote a play for the neo futurist stage called every single word spoken by a person of color in the Julia Louis-Dreyfus romantic comedy enough said as performed by the only performer of color in tonight's show. And so I recited all of the words myself and the audience got a huge kick out of it. And then it was coming back from this long epic country wide night Vale tour that I really was inspired to start every single word the video series where I would rather than performing the lines myself. I would edit down popular movies to only the words spoken by people of color so that in the public square it just looked like a super cut series, right? That's the most effective way to get a message out there as to disguise it as some other consumable form of Internet art. And what happened when I was coming back from that tour is that I had been nominated for a Drama Desk Award for the play that I had written, the play that I had written when I was able to take time off from the TD bank commercial. It's all coming together. I was like, you know what? I'm coming off of this successful tour. I was just nominated for a Drama Desk Award. It's time to meet with agents again. And this was self propelled. No one was necessarily contacting me, but I was pursuing it. I was like, it's time I need an agent. And I found that I was hearing the same things over and over again. I was hearing the same things I heard in high school. We think you're really talented. We don't think it's likely that you're going to get work. The difference was that when I was in high school, I accepted this as fact because I was a teenager, being told by adults this thing, and now I'm an adult who is like, wait a second. The problem is actually not me. The problem is systemic because if I'm walking into an office and they're taking a meeting with me and they're telling me it's unlikely that I'm going to get work, then this is actually something much bigger than me. This is not my own trials and tribulations of finding representation. This is actually a much larger representation issue capital R and so that's what really pushed me to make the every single word series where rather than performing the lines myself. I edited it down as a super cut. It was this thing I made in my bedroom, you know, on my laptop and it blew up and it got a ton of press and most importantly, it got people rethinking an invisible thing that they hadn't thought about before. And I was like, I could do that from my bedroom on the Internet. Who needs an agent? I will just make work. And so that was the inspiration. I want to share with our listeners some of the facts that I learned in my research about some of these movies. So the entire 558 minute Lord of the Rings trilogy was cut down, your supercut for that trilogy was 46 seconds. Dialog. Of people of color. Maleficent, the live action Disney spin off of sleeping beauty with Angelina Jolie, featured an unnamed captain who spoke for 18 seconds..

Julia Louis Dreyfus romantic Drama Desk Award Dreyfus YouTube Vale United States Maleficent Disney Angelina Jolie
"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:40 min | 7 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And so pushing myself to take the time off so that I could be with Joe who had just graduated, it was the push I needed and the push I gave myself to be like, okay, you really want to do this, then you need to step outside of the most comfortable place you've ever been to really see if you can do this. After you came back to school, you discovered the performance group, the neo futurists, where you said you've learned that you don't have to be funny to entertain people. And I tell that to so many of my students who take on the archetype of the gesture in the classroom. And I often tell them you don't need to be funny to be able to stand out. What gave you that sensibility at that moment at that time? Well, I was certainly searching for it because ridgefield middle school talent night is a 17 character middle school talent show. So we were faring very well in comedy venues. It was a very funny play with a laugh a minute, right? It was just it was a comedy. It was the sketch. It was a long form sketch show. What I was finding is while I certainly felt at home in my soul in doing ridgefield with Joe. I also knew that it wasn't viable that I could do ridgefield middle school talent night forever for the rest of my life. And I didn't totally find a home in comedy theaters. And so blissfully, it was actually Joe who took me to my very first neo futurist show. And we saw the weekly show which at the time was called too much light makes the baby go blind. It's now called the infinite wrench. But it was 30 short their weekly show is 30 short plays and 60 minutes. It just, I felt at home. I felt like I was seeing what I wanted to do. They described their rules. We later describe our rules at the top of every show, and it's that it's non illusory theater. Everything you see happening on stage is happening. So if someone says, I'm going to drink for the rest of the performance. They're actually going to be drinking alcohol and not feigning it, right? It's to see in acting a lot of times you talk about raising the stakes. Well, this was a form of theater where you had where you just raised the stakes and you had to exist within those raised stakes. It wasn't this thing that you concocted in your imagination. And it felt new. It felt daring, it felt terrifying. And I loved every second of it. One week, two weeks in a row, I did a play. Where and it was called the titles were super specific and knew exactly what you were getting. But it's like in which an ensemble member hears from someone they haven't heard from in a while. And I called all of their loved ones and asked for the recommendation of someone who they just haven't heard from in a really, really, really long time. That kind of person who just like is part of you, you've just lost touch. And I would have them sit on a chair in the center of the stage, nothing just a spotlight on them, and then in the audience the voice recording would play from this person. And week after week, they would just sob as they heard this. And it was like, that's what I want to do. I'm thrilled to do all this work so you can get the most real reaction from this person who is hearing from someone in front of 90 people who are sitting there. So it turned me on to that form of art. While with the neo futurists, you met Joseph Fink and Jeffrey cranor, who created the podcast. Welcome to night Vale. And how did they approach you about playing the part of Carlos? And then given that you were always having to be yourself. With the neo futurists, how did you go about creating the persona of Carlos or finding the persona of Carlos? It was the early days of tumblr and so it felt like the actors were known to the audience of welcome to night Vale, so the audience knew that they were both watching the actors, but also the people they were following on Instagram and the people on Twitter. And so it kind of felt like the seamless blend of it wasn't character work, right? It wasn't like, who is Carlos? And how is he walking into this scene? It's like, it's kind of in the way that you watch a celebrity in a RomCom. You are watching an amazing performer, but you're also going because you want to see that performer do this role, right? You're like, I watch a Julia Roberts RomCom because I want to see Julia Roberts fall in love. And I want to see Julia Roberts fall in love in these new circumstances that have been written for her. And so I feel like welcome to night Vale was the same experience. It was like, I felt like I got to do it as myself. In an effort to support yourself while you were performing, I know you worked as a server at Angelica kitchen and peels restaurant. You also worked at Whole Foods at what point in your trajectory as a performer, did you have to were you able to stop.

ridgefield middle school Joe ridgefield Carlos Joseph Fink Jeffrey cranor Julia Roberts Vale tumblr Instagram Twitter Angelica kitchen
"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:27 min | 7 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Marron, welcome to design matters. Debbie, thank you so much for having me. My absolute absolute pleasure. I need to know, is it true that one of the things that most inspires you is Britney Spears performance at the 2000 VMAs? I can say that it lit a flame in me when I first saw that performance. I was in 7th grade. I was just starting a new school, TiVo wasn't a thing yet. When I taped that performance, it's Britney Spears performing a medley of her cover of satisfaction and oops I did it again. You probably know it as the performance when she strips down from a suit into a skin colored two piece, yeah, there was something about that performance that I so lacked any confidence at that age as many of us do and I put all of my stock into Britney Spears and she became a projection screen onto which I became a confident person in the hours from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. when I would rush home and learn that choreography for the first two months of 7th grade. Well, speaking of learning the choreography, I wasn't entirely sure which VMAs performance you were referring to, so I had to Google it. I wasn't sure if it was the performance with the big boa constrictor or snake or whatever it was that she was holding, or if it was the performance where she sort of teetered on her heels. And then, of course, discovered that it was indeed the performance of her greatest hits and her transforming from this suit clad icon into this vixen. I found on YouTube for those of us for those listeners that might want to see this because it's extraordinary, a video that compares her rehearsal performance to her actual performance and the accuracy that she lands that performance. If you look at them side by side, they're synchronous. It's just amazing. You really see just how great a dancer she is. Yeah, that's one of these treats that YouTube allows us to pull out of the Britney vault. So many of us watched those things on the fan VHS's that were made at the time, but now they're on YouTube and you all get to see what we all saw back in the sweet late 90s early aughts. Dylan, you were born in Venezuela, your mom is white, your dad is Venezuelan. And you moved to New York when you were 5 years old. Do you have any vivid memories of that move? I remember, of course, like being a little nervous to come to New York, but I had a pretty international upbringing down in Venezuela. We were living in a complex of apartment buildings that was very international. There were a lot of expat Americans, but the truth is I don't have much of a memory of Venezuela. I haven't been back since I was 5. Largely due to the political climate down there. You know, I think when you're a kid, you want to gravitate towards wherever and however you can belong. And so to start a new school in the states at 5, you're like, okay, my forming brain is just going to do whatever these other kids are doing. You know, Venezuela is obviously a core part of me, but it's this almost unexplored part of my identity. Because I haven't been there in so long. You talked about how, as biracial, you often felt like you didn't belong anywhere. You didn't feel you were Latino enough to be Latino, not white enough to be white. You've also said that you never knew what crayons to use when you drew a self portrait. And you never knew which box to check on standardized tests. How did you manage then and how have you come to understand that sense of duality now? The truth is it was and it continues to be a challenging identity question. Race is a different thing in South America. Races regarded differently. So while I very clearly am Brown up here in the United States, that's not so defined down there. And that's not so defined when I'm around Venezuelan people. When people in the entertainment industry often talk about wanting to hear about people's heritage. They have super clear boxes of what they mean by that. They want to hear about your South American upbringing in the way that they understand your South American upbringing should play out in their head. You're getting such a messy answer because it's such a messy thing in my mind. It's like it's been so easy to just call myself Brown and kind of like move along, right? You don't get too many questions from that. But then to grapple with like, oh, like what do I do with the fact that I'm a Venezuelan who doesn't speak Spanish, and when I'm correctly coded by someone as someone of Latin heritage that there's the expectation that I'll speak Spanish back to them and then I don't, and then there's always like this looming feeling of feeling like a bad Venezuelan. And yeah, I think it's something I will always battle always battle feeling in the middle and I think not belonging is something that just feels so this is going to sound so sad, but fundamental to who I am. But I think that that has encouraged me to seek out belonging in whatever way I can. You're an only child and you learned how to entertain yourself and create worlds and stories of games kind of on your own. What kinds of things will you making and playing and creating? I had this really long arts and crafts table. I would always drag that into the living room and turn that into a stage and so one example is I would like craft a set around that table. And after I saw Greece, I was like, nothing is better than the movie grease. And so now I'm realizing it was a really genderqueer performance of Greece where I put on a leather jacket and the pink lady side handkerchief. Again, at the time, not a political statement, it was simply like, okay, I'm going to take that element from there, that element from here, put it together. So reenacting the movie musical grease for sometimes just a babysitter, or sometimes just myself. Lots of forts, heavy on the forts, and then one day I remember I woke up, wrote a play for me and my parents to perform, and they performed it. With me, it was kind of like, I wish I had that confidence now as an artist to be like, wake up, I'm going to try a totally new medium. I don't care if it fails, and I'm going to perform it with the people I love. I'm going to do it with the people I love. I'm going to make a marble sculpture. And so yeah, I think in the silence that comes with being an only child, you are encouraged to find a way to fill it. I also spent a lot of my childhood making up plays and forcing my siblings to take different parts and remember being quite aggressive in enforcing my brother in costume wearing of a whole series of my grandmother's scarves, which I remember he really wasn't that happy. He wasn't into it. But you were. Not nearly as much as I was. Yeah, no, but listen, it was your vision. And it had to be honored. Absolutely. That's how it goes. When did you decide you wanted to do something professional with performing? I think one or middle school and high school, and you know that you have that creative spirit in you. You have that thing that thing that is telling you, I have to do this. I am called to this work. I'm drawn to it. I can't do anything else, really. I was like, well, I can't sing. I can't draw. I really have no musical talent. And so I think the thing I just kept following was acting because it was the way to express myself. I think also at the time, I lacked any confidence. And it was this space where I felt like I could be the most bold version of myself and I was good at it. And I think I was good at it because I loved it. And I was good at it because I cared about it. And so it was really like that one thing that I could do at that time and feel like I had a sense of control and a sense of ownership of something..

Britney Spears Venezuela YouTube Marron TiVo Debbie New York Dylan Brown Google Greece South America United States
"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:18 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"When I was a young person, it's what you're describing. It's the first time that because they show that character as a child and that child felt like me as a child and then there's an adult relationship that is with another woman that's domestic like they live together and they're like having an experience of domesticity together and definitely that like blew my mind. Even though it's like not over no you know the codes and pick up but yeah and also that I think something else that's a little wild is like Mary Stuart Masterson is not an out. You know, she's not a queer person. So it's interesting to have had the experience that you're talking about and it gets to be Wilson Cruz, who like is this fantastic person in it? It's complicated when it's then like just straight woman. But in terms of like the first time I ever saw myself, that is the moment that I saw myself for the first time. Yeah. Well, fried green tomatoes. Yeah. Mary Stewart masters so good. Queer coded domesticity. Oh my God. It's beautiful. They're beautiful together. Plus, they kill a man. You know, it's like, it's just, it really gives, it gives you some context for what an adult lesbian relationship is going to be like, which is that you're going to kill somebody is going to have an ex-husband that you kill and then people eat that body. And that's part of it. And it's just. It's fun. But I want to send you back into your day and tell you that I thank you so much for the way you showed up for this conversation today. I loved talking to you and I just let's just be actual Friends. I'm ready. I would absolutely love that. I feel ready. I wasn't ready before. I'm finally ready. I'm ready. I'm ready. And the book? I'm ready. Okay. Just to say, again, it's called conversations with people who hate me. And I think anybody who likes this show would be fascinated by everything that you talk about in it. And a day because I was, I was very curious to see what your experiences had been. So thank you so much for writing it. Thank you for saying that amazing thing. I'm going to remember that for the rest of a long time..

Mary Stuart Masterson Wilson Cruz Mary Stewart
"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:33 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Wow. Well, that's beautiful. And I'm happy that you have found something that makes you feel like that. I mean, that's wonderful. And thank you. You know, I think this is actually a great moment to switch into the final question that I always ask everyone, which is I know it. Yeah. I was thinking about the answer. Before, and I was like, I don't want it to be rehearsed. Yeah, which is for you to shout out a queer rose to a person place or thing that made you feel that you can be who you are today. Would you like to shout out a queer role? So my answer is always Wilson Cruz as Ricky in my life. And I mean, it's like, I say it all the time when I'm asked this question, and it never loses its truth. Yeah. I was trying to think about someone else, but like he is so present in my mind as yeah, there was something about him. Did you watch my so called life like on TV or on the on the DVD? Oh my God, so I watched it because it was on ABC, I think. Yeah. And then it was on MTV. So it was like, did it season on ABC, which I watched? And then it was on MTV, which I also watched. And then I loved it. My sister was in high school at the time, and I tried to get her to watch with me and she said, my sister was very cool in high school. She said, she said, this is not what high school is really like. So I would just watch it by myself, and I loved it. And a couple years ago, I maybe this is even more than a couple at this point. But I got to do stand up at a, they were introducing all of these new Fox shows at the Fox lot. Yeah. And up front. Which is the weirdest possible place you could ever be. I was performing at on an outdoor set that's supposed to look like New York, but also in Los Angeles for people that were aging and nobody gives a fuck about what I'm saying. And airplanes were flying low overhead because this is where the studio is. So just like every detail was like, was like, chef's kiss, you know? But the stars of these shows like Taraji P. Henson was there and who else was there that was just like cool to perform in front of? Because the actors are sitting in the front rows. But the number one person that I couldn't believe I got to do stand up for. And then I also talked about that he was there, was Wilson Cruz, Wilson Cruz. Was so nice and it was so because it's like one thing to meet somebody, but to have somebody that was so important to you like that. Yeah. Get a chance to see. He had a chance to see what I did. Even in this setting where like it was a nightmare and you're like, you imprinted on my mind. Before we had been jaded potentially by this industry, when you're like, yeah, everyone's famous and everyone's not famous. You know, like, it's not even about fame. It's just like, your essence is literally tattooed on my heart, you know, like, I will never forget the feeling that I had watching Ricky and my so called life. It was just, yeah. I have goosebumps. Actually. It's true. Because there's a beautiful Christmas episode. With the teacher. Well, and also with it's like, what's her name? It's that it's the Ricky's like in a shelter for a period of time and. And then goes to live with the teacher if they are remembering. Yes. But I can not remember who is the musician. There is a famous musician that is a, well, this is a spoiler, but that's an angel. You know, it's like that kind of thing. Where people angels, there was an angel, I forgot about that storyline. The only thing that I remember from that is him showing up at the teacher's home and the teacher opening up the door. And I was like, yeah. Shivers chills. Yeah. You're younger than me. How did you watch this show? Did you watch it on DVD? Yeah, my mom was a big fan. So that makes me sound like I'm like 17 years old. No, no, no, but it just wouldn't have been on TV when you would have been watching it live. No, I would not be allowed to watch it. So I, so my mom was a big fan of my so called life. And I think I was like literally in kindergarten first grade second grade when it came out. And I remember like, you don't know, I didn't, I'll speak for myself. I didn't know the term so called. So I was like, what is the word so called? Like, my so called, like, okay, that was a word to me. And it was this adult show that she watched, and I couldn't watch it with her, and I'm an only child, so it's like, okay, if I'm not being included in something, it's war. I'm gonna revolt. And so that happened and then when I was in high school, this was like the era of TV on DVD, which I think really predated binge watching because that's when you're like, okay, put the next disc and put the next disc in. And I got her for Christmas one year. My so called life, the box set, the.

Wilson Cruz Ricky MTV ABC Fox Taraji P. Henson Los Angeles New York
"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:04 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"As one Internet stranger to another I think I just feel happy for you that you set up a situation for yourself where in a safe way and the way that you're rewarded for and that you get to do as a job, you might be having a chance to sort of rework yourself to that feeling of somebody's being a shithead to me. Yeah, thank you. I really appreciate that and I also think I think the other important thing to say and as you've heard throughout this whole interview, I am very down to share all the caveats. I am very down to rebuff. The poster child for civility compliments that I may get. And so I'm quick to call myself out for what this project can't achieve and how personal it is. But I think I would be remiss to not mention that I have been blown away and also surprised by the response that this podcast has in other people. And I want to be super clear here. This is not like a pitch of like testimonials of how much people love the show. What I'm trying to say instead of a testimonial roundup is to say that I get a lot of emails from young queer kids who recognize the conversation they hear conversations, they hear on the podcast as conversations they're having at home. And if I am presenting an avatar to people who are having difficult conversations of their own, that's all I can hope for, and I think one thing that I am proud of. And I want to be as humble about this as possible, is it there are, this is just according to emails I've gotten messages I get. Another caveat. Okay, done with caveats. But one thing I know is that a lot of different people are coming to the table for this show. And I have some conservative listeners and I have people who have tweeted or shared with me privately that it has changed their behavior online that they rethink who they speak to and how they speak to them. What we're essentially doing in all of media is creating avatars for our audience. And in this show, my hope is to create avatars for both people who are part of the conversation because there are going to be some people and I know there are who listen to my show and ideologically feel more aligned. With the conservative person who said something homophobic to me and when we are trying to mark march towards this great tomorrow, the future progress I and I know this is an incredibly unpopular point right now, but like while there are so many of us who we depend on to lead the charge to forge ahead to be building bonds within their own communities to march towards the future, I think there are some of us who are needed to create a safe space for people who are more hesitant to march into that great future. This great progressive future. And I have to say I found that I feel well suited to be the person who is creating a safe space for the people who are a little hesitant to march there. And I like doing that. And I'm not saying everyone has to do that. But I am saying that if you feel compelled to do it, I hope that this show that my project.

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:57 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Who had never expressed that to me expressed it to me. Yeah. Yeah. I hear you. Yeah. What was your middle school high school experience like? In terms of bullying. Yeah, I mean, it's so confusing to me because I think women and their parents were actually always not always but regularly pretty awful to me. Because. There was something going on that just none of us could express that just made me different and I think people just really wanted me to like get like get it together and just get between the lines. So like when I was a kid but it's confusing because they were my best Friends. Like that's what's confusing about it. It wasn't like a group of other people. I mean, there was a guy one guy who was shitty to me in high school, but he was my boyfriend's best friend. But anyway, say all of that to say, generally like men weren't terrible to me. I like dated a lot of I had a lot of boyfriends who had social clout because they were athletes. Okay, brag. Interesting go on. Well, I mean, by the way, if you are a moderately Butch odd woman and you're trying to figure out like, how am I going to survive high school? May I recommend the captain of the football team? Because nobody will fuck with you. Nobody will fuck with you. And I didn't really realize that that's what I was doing. But my best friends were so shitty to me, like very, very regularly. And I think that that is something that I've had to work through and on as an adult is because then I'm just kind of used to friends and crappy. And I only realized a couple years ago, oh, that's not the, that's it. It doesn't have to be the vibe. I also think I was really, really scared of women. And like way less scared of men, especially straight men, straight men like, I know this is so weird, but straight men have sort of fucked with me the least of any people. Like, and also the guy that I'm talking about leading that campaign, like that's a straight guy. So it's a weird combination. Maybe it's also that maybe I have less invested in those relationships, like I'm not going to be probably in love with the cis straight dude and so it's like I can kind of keep a silly distance. Where I'm just like, we're all doing the best we can, but like it's heartbreaking. You know, coming from like a woman, especially a woman that I had feelings for before I realized that that's what that was. Like, I'm even thinking about what you were saying. I had the weirdest thing happened that I think I've talked about on this show, but maybe not. A comic who is who I was friends with. I would have considered him a friend, but he was such a dick to me. He was such a dick. And he was part of this whole bullying thing he wrote me an email apologizing, just out of the blue. He's still very successful person. So whatever, he wrote me an email apologizing, owning all of the shit that he did. I mean, the last conversation we had had before that was me screaming at him that he was like, just leave me alone kind of a thing. And then I didn't hear from him for years. But I would run into him sometimes at places. And then he wrote me an email apologizing, and then this is where I was at, I didn't respond to that email. For 6 years. Wow. But months ago? You said it's time. I responded, and was just like, hey, this means a lot to me, and I wish you the best. That's actually, that's actually what I felt that way. I responded. You waited a long time? Yeah. I waited, and then I responded when I felt like, I like hope I do see him. I really, I care about him, and I do wish him the best. Yeah? Well, it passed through your system. That's exactly right. No longer this core thing that was part of, you didn't need to process it anymore. Yeah. Exactly. And I think and this is not to bring it back to my project, but what I can relate to in that is like, you know, there is this unspoken undercurrent theme of my work, my show, my book, you know, pick your media. Which is forgiveness. And for me, forgiveness is one of those things that everyone has to define on their own terms. I can't tell you who you should forgive. You have to figure out when you're ready to forgive someone who hurt you. But for me, them coming on the show. Them coming into the space of a conversation and even if they're not going to own up, even if they're not going to radically change their minds, which by the way, I have, I've tried to express through this 5 year project is not possible. You can not radically change someone's mind in the course of a single one hour phone call. Yes. But when they don't change their minds, I still immediately forgive them. Internally, when they come on to simply acknowledge that they wrote me something, right? And it's like, because for me, that was what I needed to move on. You wrote this thing. Tell me why you.

Butch football
"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:32 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Flattened takedowns are what get upvoted the most. But I think, you know, I believe in conversation. I love doing it and yet it is absolutely legit to not have the energy for these conversations. And everyone has a different coping mechanism. This is my coping mechanism. Like, I, you know, people often say like, God, you must be so exhausted from making this podcast. And I am exhausted from making this podcast, but it's never how people think I'm getting exhausted. The conversations themselves are what like give me hope for humanity. It's like, oh, this person who came at me with this really, really hateful thing, whether it is homophobia from the right or some really vitriolic thing from my political opposite or some really vitriolic thing that was wielded against me in jockeying for likes on Twitter. You know, like, either way, the fact that I can the fact that we, human beings, have the ability to transform that into the beginning of a relationship, the healing of a relationship, the rehabilitation of a relationship, it feels restorative. Some people and I'll at least say it's people who practice, restorative justice, trained, restorative justice practitioners, have identified this as like digital restorative justice. And that's what I believe in, but that should never be a mandate. And so I think if someone were to listen to your story about the Internet radio show host who was sending people after you, is like, that would be completely unfair to put that on you because I also recognize it's overwhelming. And so what's the answer is that when you are the recipient of a hate campaign or a wave of hate that is not from a campaign that you should literally stop everything and dedicate 5 years of your life to making a podcast or doing a project where you talk to people and then moderate conversations between people like it's completely unsustainable. This is what I feel well suited to do. No one else needs to feel well suited to do this..

Twitter
"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:23 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I need to not only leave space for that take on my project, but I need to actively endorse the fact that that is also a legitimate response to getting hate online. You know, I've distilled this to a talking point. So forgive me for repeating something, but I've tried to make it very clear, like I love doing this. But this is not a mandate. This is not a prescription for activism because I'm also really aware that my work can then be used as this kind of like that I then get to be used as this unwitting poster child for civility, which and you know, the word civility, which I think is actually way more complicated than we talk about it in the public square. Even more complicated than us progressive lefty is talk about it in the public square is like, yeah, of course I believe in civility, but so often that word is used in a kind of like. Completely insensitive way to ask people who are marginalized to quiet down, right? And it allows people to ignore why some people might not feel that they have the option to be civil. That being said, we shouldn't throw civility out because some people are false are unfairly accused of being uncivil, right? Like I think we have the, we all have the brain space to hold these multiple ideas at the same time. And so, and to kind of say that in less of an academic way, like I really believe in conversation. And I really believe in conversation across the divide. And I think it's really important to share here. Like, now the majority of my podcast episodes are not this caricaturist like right versus left conversation. A lot of times the fault lines I'm most interested in now are among people who agree on most things ideologically and yet these really tremendous fault lines have grown between them that were caused, that were cracked open and then opened even further by these, you know, by the digital sphere that we engage in, that rewards negativity that upvotes the pythia take where the most.

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

07:52 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"The rise of popularity of my work. You know, you also get to tractors. And that is how the podcast conversations with people who hate me was born. I was curious to talk to the people behind the hate comments. Right, you got comments and then some direct messages also. It was everything. It was kind of coming in by ship by air. It's a term by ship by air by sea by something. The right thing. I don't know. I don't know that one. But then I made it up. Yeah, no, it's probably, that's got to be something. Because it is all the ways things could go all the way by train or train another one. Planes trains and automobiles. And that's exactly what it is. The classic movie. Well, I have had this experience. I think, yeah, definitely. I don't have an expert. That's not totally true. When I started doing improv in college and then after college, it was sort of a pre Internet time and then also when you're doing improv, you're like a penguin or like a banana. You know, it's like it's not so own voice POV driven and I sort of stopped doing improv partially because I found stand up, but also because I was like really tired of like yes and blowjob scenes or like stuff I really didn't want to be a part of. And shocking. Yeah. So I was doing improv professionally and I don't know, like maybe people had shitty stuff to say about me, but it was not something that was part of, you couldn't necessarily get my attention about it. But then when they started doing stand up, it was very much YouTube, Twitter, 2006, I think I started doing stand up in 2005 or 2006. So it was the same time. And that's also when the first podcasts were kicking off, there were literally called Internet radio shows at the time. And I love it. I love this Internet radio show that we're on right now. Yeah, this is not radio shows amazing. And even when I was an open mic or my first experiences were very positive responses from the room or like the kind of response that would encourage one to keep coming back and trying it, even though from an open mic. Nobody's killing it. Nobody's killing it as an open mic. But if you're like, this is something's happening here. That's possibility. I think totally. People come back, right? So that was the experience. At the same time, I was immediately getting yeah, like Internet hate, literally right away. Yeah. Like when I was in open mic. Like at a time where it's like, just don't even look at this person. Like there's nothing, there's no power here. And you were posting your sets to YouTube. Is this where it was coming? No, I was not. There was a popular in Chicago anyway, Internet radio show that was run by a comic who would have, this is a real thing. This is so this is so fucking. I think this is part of why when I read this book, I was like, no. It's so visceral. Yeah. Because no, there was a guy who ran an Internet radio show and he would have comics on his guests. And one thing that they would talk about was literally like this like me, like the sets I was doing, I only know this because then people would tell me, which is weird. And then eventually when I did things like released an album and then released a second album, my second album, which did really well and was like an album of the year by consequence of sound like it was a little, it was an elevated amount of visibility that guy organized his fans and they left 200 one star iTunes reviews. That just only said we get it, you're gay. And you can't leave zero stars. It was the lowest rating they could give. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. So, and also like kind of nobody was like reviewing stuff on iTunes. So it was like a very successful album, but clicked on it at the time and yeah, it's bummed. This has now been like how Apple eventually ended up dealing with this is that they just deleted all of the reviews on that album. But so there's no record of this, but I had to like call my label to say, what is one do about this? And so anyway, I feel like the stuff that you were getting and it was stuff like that was happening but also messages and homophobic messages just like homophobic messages, yeah. I feel like I've gotten a lot of this stuff. So I had like a pretty clear understanding of what you were talking about. Yeah, I think to just acknowledge the difficulty of the specific situation you were in. And to also begin this language, we are building as a species about types of hate online, is that, you know, a lot of the hate I was receiving, people might have heard about it from an influencer, right? Like a conservative influencer, homophobic influencer, who pointed people to my stuff. But I still felt like I was ultimately getting individual people coming to me to express this stuff. I think the really interesting. Yeah, and I think the really dangerous thing that was happening with you is that there was a community being formed around the hatred against you. Wow. Which is just to say that there were not to get sociological about it, but there were community bonds being formed by signaling to people that they were taking part in this thing that their brethren were taking part in too. Wow, that's so interesting. What an interesting point, I've literally never thought of that before, but yeah, I mean, I really want to have this conversation because I love to know how you deal with this and how you approach this. So I'll say it's like, you know, it's however many years later from that happening in that type of thing happening. And right now I'm on an ABC television show like a drama. So people that are watching are like, it's not like comedy nerds. It's like a different market. You are watching an ABC drama. And tons of amazing and positive responses, and especially from people that would know me, but then it's also whenever I find whenever I break a bubble of people who have context for me, then that's where I see this other stuff that is has always been a part of my life. It's just like now on the Internet wherever that's where the comments are that are like, why is this like literally like this is a man or like or like this person's unattractive or like whatever literally like, you know, you can think of all the comments. And I think it's hard. I will just say, it's hard. And I don't have this, I think I feel like so much of my life has been attempting to go where it's warm and get support and love. That the idea of showing up for conversation, it just feels too exhausting to me. Yeah, and I totally get that. And I think an important thing that I had to learn in the process was that.

YouTube Twitter Chicago Apple ABC
"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

06:30 min | 9 months ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Live in I live in New York, but I wanted to join you in the morning experience because I was just going to yes and whatever you said. Well, in I was attempting to ignore the reality of your time zone. And I love acknowledging the reality of time and I thank you for that. Would you introduce yourself? I always have folks introduced themselves in the show. Yes, I'm familiar with this podcast. I love this podcast. My name is Dylan marron. I host the podcast conversations with people who hate me. In which I do exactly what the title suggests I do. And I also am the upcoming or recent depending on when you're listening to this author of the book, also titled conversations with people who hate me. Yeah, that's such a great, I think it's next week, so I have it right here. So it comes out on the 29th. Oh. She's got an arc. We got to get you a hardcover as well. So we got to get you every addition. So this is happening. Well, that's true. Actually, I will say the number of books that I own every edition because of this job that I do called this podcast. It's very funny. Oh yeah. Someday there's going to be a queer library that I donate all of this to all of the important to have the full compendium. It's vital. You have to have the arc. You have to have every draft you have to figure out which typos were fixed for the publication of the hardcover so I got it. But I read your book conversations with people who hate me is also what it's called. It's the book and also it is the name of the podcast. Yeah, absolutely. I read it over the weekend and I got to say, I don't want this job. I respect that and I support that 100%. I think a lot of my friends would agree with you. That's in the book. That is in the book that many of your friends would. So can you talk to me a little bit about for folks that haven't read it yet or haven't listened to the podcast? It's pretty self explanatory via the title, but I do think, you know, many people can hate us. But who's specifically are we talking about him? Where did you source those folks? Because I think that's important. What a terrific question. Yeah, so let me give you the quickest backstory. I started making work on the Internet if you've heard of it. But I started by so the first big thing I did on my own, I was first cast in a show called welcome to night Vale, and I toured around the country with them. And it was very exciting. And also wait, hang on, I just want to jump in here for a second. Before that, you were a near futurist before, right? Yes, yes. And so, and I'm from Chicago. So oh my God. I am super aware of The New York Times. And then also I played one in a movie that is called oh my God. Operator, where they use the future. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. But I had seen a show, I had seen shows there before when I lived there. And then when I did the movie I went and it was shot at the place and I played a new future. So I know what you're talking about. I need to see this film operator. You should see this film. I'm actually canceling this interview. Totally. Martin Starr star in it. Wow. Great. Yeah. Oh my God. Okay, well, I'm there right after this. Okay, great. Afternoon plans canceled. So yeah, so well, I'm glad no, I'm actually glad you brought that up because the story truly starts there. I was a member of the neo futurists. It was there that I met Joseph Fink and Jeffrey cranor, who are the creators, writers of welcome to night Vale, and I wanted, well, I was so fascinated that I saw my friends who I found to be and find to be present tense, incredibly talented, amazing. They made a thing on the Internet and it blew up. And this is 2012, 2013 when this is a novel concept where you can make something and it can blow up and then it becomes this thing that you then sell out theaters for people to come see. And I saw that a community was being formed through a podcast. I saw that an audience was being formed through a podcast. So I think it planted a seed in my head that this Internet thing was real. And it was a really potent way to make work as an independent artist to be specific. And but you know, in welcome to night Vale, I was an actor on tour. And so I felt like I was part of a thing that wasn't my thing. And I realized I wanted to use this thing, I realized I sound like I'm 500 years old when I talk about the Internet this way and maybe no, I don't think so. I think it's just acknowledging that just a decade ago, it was a different situation in terms of so different. Well, now, I mean, this is, we're rebuilding the same systems again. And again, like once large companies find out there's money to be made in different areas, they're going to find a way to sort of build that up and turn it into a different thing. But there was a bit of a gap between when social media launched and when everything had a more professional and monetized version where stuff was a little wild for a moment. And this is the time that you're talking about this like wild in between time. This wild wild wild west in between time of feeling like the Internet was a place of possibility and it hadn't fully been corporatized yet. I think that's a really important thing to point out and this podcast that I saw my friends make on Google Docs and microphones that you can buy for $40 on Amazon and just recorded in closets. And here we are, still recording in the closet. But it just felt just so full of possibility and promise. And at the same time, though, I felt like I was so lucky to be on board for this project that they had created when the truth is I saw this thing was so fertile with possibility for independent art. But I was, I was a guest essentially. You know, I was an artist traveling with other artists doing their thing. And.

Dylan marron Martin Starr Joseph Fink Jeffrey cranor New York The New York Times Chicago Amazon Google
"j. dylan" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

Talkhouse Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

"You almost certainly no because each of these guys has had a pretty incredible career richard marx. And jacob dylan marks of course wrote and performed some of the most indelible pop hits of the late eighties and early nineties including and listened night's launch the nights and the super smash right here waiting which comes up in this conversation. But even the era of mullets and jeans faded marks couldn't be stopped or rather marxist songs couldn't be stopped he's continued releasing music over the years and his influence can be felt deeply to this day. Just check out the audio and visual of john mayer's latest album which basically pays tribute to marks. And it's not just music marks recently released a funny candid. Memoir called stories to tell in which he details some of the incredible memories. He's made in the music business over the years. And that's jacob dylan entered the picture as you'll hear though the two didn't know each other dylan went on joe rogan's podcast recently to praise. Marx's book and a friendship was born now dylan. Is no slouch in the music department. Either you can't be with that family name..

jacob dylan richard marx john mayer dylan joe rogan Marx
"j. dylan" Discussed on Cards Chat

Cards Chat

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on Cards Chat

"Know i i at the time. It also logical to me. I once upon a time. When i first started college. I wanted to be marine biologist so panel like a little bit about some of the biology. These animals have like all go swim. After this thing majavica could exit. That was the main tank then. Short thing i'm looking at the shark tank and i'm talking with other persons with us and kevin they're like how we we go there. I'm like oh yeah actually could is just like fresher sharks nurse sharks. We'll be fine. We'll be like i don't know school are slow in there little laugh and it's it's like a probably a twenty-five with detained and at night out all these sharps are obviously nurse. Sharks like italy bottomfeeders. You know as a charcoal intimidating. But the we'll mouths may the bait fish. It probably still mess me up. Fide got cut or something all laugh and the other person with us got into will ever soldiers marketing dan. Yeah sadly i've heard years before. The people are offering people like ten k or five day to jump in there. I really missed out wrote down. Great stuff i love. I love that story. Great story ten k. Or non Notwithstanding it is time to want the segment of the show where we gingy you guys. Are chet community. See what questions you wanted to ask our guest. of course. we have dedicated thread on the cards jet forums. Four this so as we announced our future guests will be. Please be sure. Send in your questions. We have a couple of regulars here crystals thank you very much crystals percenting these Good catchier crystals hendon mob. They'll enlist your residence as vancouver beautiful city. I'm wondering is that current and if so what went into your decision. I'm wondering crystals wondering if that's current what went into your decision to live in british columbia versus las vegas off. So it's not an isn't current. That was my. It's all still there. That was my location directly after black. Black friday okay. And i moved there because it was the place that i knew the best you know. Being from the north west it was very well spent a lot of time in seattle. Washington is just right across the border. They're beautiful place at friends in coquitlam. Which is like a suburb of vancouver. So i just thought i would go up there and You know that would be where. I haven't stay after black friday which happened to not for very long.

majavica kevin italy dan vancouver british columbia las vegas north west coquitlam seattle Washington
"j. dylan" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on The Bugle

"Flies asks you if you want to be secretary of state for the department of health. Do you a. politely declined on the grounds that there may be others better suited for the position. Since you yourself have the intellectual chops turn it with the face jordan on. Be jump at the chance. In the deluded hopes that the power you will will might in some way filled insatiable black hole in your soul. You i noticed. When emma swinton you'd fancied since year seven laughed at the fresh prince haircut. You just got. Because she wants said she thought will smith was hard to is global. Pandemic you a man. No one in their right mind would trust to be able to spell p let alone range billions of items of it after a range of items of people. Who do you contact a a company which has made surgical items for the past seven decades supplies many of the largest hospitals in the west or bay. Some guy called monaco. You met on hugo stag do really hilarious and provided the nurses costume. You made the gonna pub crawl in response to your whatsapp offer of a contract with the dick pic. Captioned get it up your bum boy. Three loads of sainsbury's hambleton been bags and an invoice for one hundred eighty million pounds and question. Three one hundred twenty seven thousand people are dead. Do you resign a. Yes all be. Of course not shame for catholics pussies answered mainly a congratulations. You're not coach. If you answered mainly be commiserations you on matt hancock. Please ask the person who helps you. Read this to explain to you. That eventually shit is going to hit the find bounce off the fan and get stuck between two pieces of bread and when that happens someone is gonna choke down for long words and smile condiments that. Because that's someone is you.

matt hancock emma swinton one hundred eighty million pou one hundred twenty seven thous two pieces whatsapp hugo stag past seven decades billions of items jordan Flies sainsbury Three will smith year seven department catholics monaco
"j. dylan" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"j. dylan" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"He sat Rashaan Gary collapsed on the play with help. I believe from Kenny Clarke. Yes, Directors takeover? Yeah. The Packers had quite the day on both sides of the ball that went over the Rams Saturday into Saturday evening. Next up Tampa Bay. No time to rest on laurels. The NFC Championship is upon us. Voice of the Packers Wailer be joining us on WTMJ. And Wayne. Of course, any good Packers fan knows what happened. When these teams met in the fifth game of the season in Tampa, 38 10, the Buccaneers prevailed. But, as is the case in the NFL, no matter when you see someone, things change, and much has changed for both teams since that meeting back in October. Yeah, You know, I would say Tampa Bay found itself offensively down the stretch of the regular season, especially and they're very much. They're better offensively than they were that day. But they're not as good defensively, and that's been the case for Tampa Bay down the stretch. Their defense is still good, but it's not quite the lights out unit. It was back in October, and for the Packers there just a better football team. Overall, they're a little better defensively than they were back then and offensively, I think they've had a nice dried as well. So Two good teams playing really well at this stage of the year. That should be a heck of a game. Wait. Obviously a lot of things one right for the green and gold on Saturday afternoon, what stuck out the most to you? What was most impressive about the victory over the Rams? Oh, gosh, the way they move the football and the number one defense and they're not going to see a better defense. There's not a better defense playing football right now than the one they trampled for 484 yards. I mean, that was impressive. You know when I was going to say we saw the full force in the full stable of running backs for the Packers On Saturday. It devastated the Ram. Should we expect to see more of those three guys again? If everyone's healthy on Sunday afternoon big if if everyone's healthy, I don't know what the status will be. We'll have to check on Wednesday. The injury report this weekend Wednesday for the first time will actually be pertinent for both teams to see who's actually starting to practice during the week. But a J. Dylan went down with an injury, you know, and we'll see what his status is. The week goes forward, but, yeah, I would think the Packers had run the football. There's no question about that. It sets up their play action passing game when I'm curious. What was the vibe like in the stadium with someone he fans there for the first time all season? It was.

Packers Tampa Bay Buccaneers Rams football Tampa Kenny Clarke Rashaan Gary NFC NFL Wayne J. Dylan