8 Burst results for "J. Courtney Sullivan"

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"And you certainly did. If you're just joining us for talking with J. Courtney Sullivan, her new book as Friends and Strangers, and It's a Jenna put book Petrie with Jenna Loj we had We were on to you a long time ago. We want you to know for the bloated book, but that's true. But the thing that Talking about, Um, about both These women in these kind of unsure Danese iPod spots in their life, and one is paying the other That does and one's in their twenties ones in their security. So you think the 30 Year old thinks she knows what the 21 year old should be doing. The 20 year old is watching this insecure person and thinking. I don't want to say too much because she's paying me But where my boundaries it's It's fascinating, and I we love Clive and hated him. And you know you're the first people to ever say that you love me. I love I'm listening. You know, I listened to the book and very red. And if that's true, you get to experience. Clive would talk. It would be kind of fun because of the British. Yeah. I had never listen. I never listened to the audio. My own looks good. I like it would be excruciating. But I want to listen to that now, just because it's kind of funny because everything that is great in a British accent, even if you're being a dink thing, I think the British accent covers a multitude of sins. And probably a big part of it was found on her attraction to Clive Be inappropriate, older British boyfriend 100%. And the other thing about this book is when you talk about You know the cult? You know what Ferguson sound the culture of privilege? Because you know the mom whose names is Elizabeth has an opportunity. You have so much money, but because he doesn't want to give in to her dad. She doesn't take it. Where Sam is at the most expensive private college and needs money. And those interesting, especially in the time that we're living in right now, which The differences between white privilege in black lives mattering, you know, is this huge thing? And you explore that lengthy ease, like like she doesn't even think about it. No, not at all. And that's the thing and she feels You know, I think there's something in the book for Elizabeth says no one ever thinks they have enough money. And I think that must be true. Because even you know, billionaires, we see them just constantly acquiring more and more and more and more. And so, you know, Elizabeth. She comes from a lot of money. And even though she doesn't take her father's money, of course, her father No bought her her first department. So that's that's a leg up that so many people will never have her father paid for her college, and that's a leg up to so many people will never have that. She's really blind to all of her privilege. She doesn't really acknowledge that these things have helped her. That was fascinating to me, and I like the dynamic or not. We're going to run out of time. Your book is excellent. What a treat for us to read another book. You have to tell us the last great book you read. Oh, but the last great book I read was righter than lovers. By Lily King. I am obsessed with it. Have you ready yet? Well, we read Lilly King's for first book. You know that wild? It had a wild title. I can't remember it. Euphoria. Euphoria? Yes. You on her show? Yeah, we read that book. So this is a new book by her and is new. It's wonderful. It's really different. From euphoria and it is. Oh my gosh, I just tore through it, and I have to say like my kids now are One and just turned three. So when a book keeps me up all night saying something, and I stayed up all night reading that one because I just it's un put down a ball. Okay, I J. Courtney, I'm going to ask you did anything like did the movie is a movie happening with mein that that work? I What I could I pictured it in my mind. No, I wish I wish Do you know their rights have never sold the main? I wish they would, Because maybe it would be more visually appealing that wass it could be. What about it? Do it be like a 10 Part series, you know, like a big little lies. I would love that. Okay? We gotta who do you know that nose? Reese Witherspoon. Let's play the who, you know, game From your mouth to their actually, I know her because it bought thie engagement, which was such a. That's right. Well, does she know about Maine? Did she also? Did you just go? Hey, Reese. I think she's read it, But I don't think she felt spirit. Alright. Alright. Thankfully, somebody well, melody may I forgot the Reese is what's happening with the engagement's then is it just everything's on hold right now. Yeah. You know, it feels like everything is on hold weird, but it's just not happening. Yeah, but she optioned. It wasn't going to be for us like a like a A partner tempered. Siri's like that. He was going to be for a feature film along which I feel like we barely even see those anymore. Yeah, but we will, and that would be a good one, too, that I can see that we loved each other engagements. It's really great to hear from you and congratulations on your success. Thank you. Thank you both so much for having me on again. I think this book is just it explores a lot different relationship. Yeah, I just Yeah. Yeah, We just We both just really so good. Thank you. I think you have a great day. Now We know why we hadn't had a book from you for a while. You've been busy. Oh, my God. Two Children born during the writing of this book, I'm really tired now. Thank you so much for your time again. The book is friends and strangers. We do have two copies to give away today 6516411071 will be ripping my talk 1071. My family is my whole world. That's why when it comes to health care for my entire family, I choose entire family clinics as specialists in.

Reese Witherspoon Clive Elizabeth Jenna Loj J. Courtney Sullivan Um Lily King Lilly King Ferguson J. Courtney Sam Maine partner Siri Petrie
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"So you know, on the one hand, you're a very intimate relationship very close, but on the other hand Can you ever really have a true friendship when one person is paying the other person on DH? What are those sort of power dynamics like, So that was something else that I really wanted to explore. And you certainly did. If you're just joining us, we're talking with J. Courtney Sullivan, her new book as friends and Strangers, And it's a Jenna plus book, Petrie with Jenna Loj we had We were on to you a long time ago. We want you to know for the OJ book, but that's true. But the thing that Talking about, Um, about both these women in these kind of unsure da nisi pot spots in their life, and one is paying the other that does and one's in their twenties ones in their security. So you think the 30 Year old thinks she knows what the 21 year old should be doing. The 20 year old is watching this insecure person and thinking. I don't want to say too much because she's paying me But where my boundaries it's It's fascinating and laugh like we love Clive and hated him. And you know you're the first people ever say that you love I love I I'm listening. You know, I listened to the book and very red. And if that's true, you get to experience. Clive would talk. It would be kind of fun because of the British. Yeah. That was never listen. I never listened to the audio of my own books because I feel like it would be excruciating. But I want to listen to that. Now. Just listen, because it's kind of funny because everything that is great in a British accent, even if you're being a dink thing, I think the British accent covers a multitude of sins is probably a big part of it was Sam and her attraction to Clive's inappropriate older British boyfriend 100%. And the other thing about this book is when you talk about You know the cult? You know what Ferguson sound the culture of privilege Because you know, the mom whose names is Elizabeth has an opportunity. You have so much money, but because he doesn't want to give in to her dad. She doesn't take it where Sam is at the most expensive private college and needs money. And those interesting, especially in the time that we're living in right now, which the differences between white privilege in black lives matter. And, you know, is this huge thing And you explore that lengthy ease, like like she doesn't even think about it. No, not at all. And that's the thing and she feels You know, I think there's something in the book where Elizabeth says no one ever thinks they have enough money. And I think that must be true. Because even you know, billionaires, we see them just constantly acquiring more and more and more and more. And so you know, Elizabeth. She comes from a lot of money. And even though she doesn't take her father's money, of course, her father, you know, bought her her first department. So that's that's a leg up that so many people will never have her father paid for her college, and that's a leg up to so many people will never have that. She's really blind to all of her privilege. She doesn't really acknowledged that these things have helped her. That was fascinating to me, and I like the dynamic we're not. We're going to run out of time. Your book is excellent. What a treat for us to read and Other book, You have to tell us the last great book you read. Oh, but the last great book I read was righter than lovers. By Lily King. I am obsessed with it. Have you ready yet? Well, we read Lilly King's for first book. You know that wild? It had a wild title. I can't remember it. Euphoria. Euphoria? Yes, on her show. Yeah, we read that book. So this is a new book by her and is new. It's wonderful. It's really different. From euphoria and it is. Oh my gosh, I just tore through it, and I have to say like my kids now are One and just turned three. So when the boat keeps me up all night, saying something, and I stayed up all night reading that one because I just it's un put down a ball. Okay, I J. Courtney, I'm going to ask you did anything like did the movie is a movie happening with mein that that book I want? I could I pictured it in my mind. No, I wish I wish you know their rights have never sold the main I wish they would, Because maybe it would be more visually appealing that wass it could be. What about it? Do it be like a 10 Part series, you know, like a big little lies. I would love that. Okay? We gotta who do you know that nose? Reese Witherspoon. Let's play the who, you know, game I'm your amount today. Actually, I know her because she had bought thie engagement, which was such a. That's right. Well, does she know about Maine? Did she also Did you just behave reason? I think she's read it, but I don't think she felt the spirit. Alright. Alright. Thankfully somebody will. Milady may I forgot the Reese is what's happening with the engagement's then is it just everything's on hold right now. Yeah. You know, it feels like everything is on hold weird stuff. It's just not happening. Yeah, but she optioned. It wasn't going to be for us like a like a A partner tempered. Siri's like that. He was going to be for a feature film along which I feel like we barely even see those anymore. Yeah, but we will, and that would be a good one, too, that I can see that we loved engagements. It's really great to hear from you hear from your and congratulations on your success. Thank you. Thank you both so much for having me on again. I think this book is just it explores a different relationship. Yeah, I just Yeah. Yeah, We just We both just really so good. Thank you. I think you have a great day. And now we know why we hadn't had a book from you for a while. You've been busy. Oh, my God. Two Children born during the writing of this book, I'm really tired now. Thank you so much for your time again. The book is friends and strangers. We do have two copies to give away today. 6516411071. We'll be right back..

Clive Elizabeth Reese Witherspoon Sam J. Courtney Sullivan Um Lily King Jenna Loj Petrie Lilly King J. Courtney Ferguson Maine partner Milady Siri
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You know the best segments Laurie and Julia did all week, probably its best of the week. Saturday on my top 171. All right. You guys ready to read a great book, Way air being joined right now by G. Courtney Sullivan and you might have read Mein. The engagement's being meant we've we read both main and the engagements in her latest book is Friends and strangers. And thanks ever even being back on our show, J. Courtney I'm so happy to be here with you are you are so good. We're so good. Oh, you can write great books. You know that You just do good, great, wonderful storytelling. I love this book so much. Thank you. Thank you Give people a setup of what friends and strangers is about. So friends and strangers is the story of a new Megan. She is walking a small town in upstate New York and this unlikely thinking with her child baby sitter. There's a college senior, and they both kind of feel adrift in some ways and each that kind of a turning point in their lives and Uh, it's just about this bond they form he probably wouldn't have happened at any other time in their lives. It's It's It's really good. I just have to come in on the cover for a second to because the covers so amazing. You know that this story I was reading about you and you had this story. You came up with this idea for the book before you even you were writing your last book so six years ago. Huh? That's right, many because I was Kind of inspired by by a moment. That occurred. I was back at my old model Smith College and 10. Years after consideration given reading from one of my doctors mean and After the event. I came out to the sidewalk. I was walking to the car standing in a crosswalk and just kind of thinking back. You know what it was like to be a student there. The 10 years that have passed and Uh, there's a big SUV pulled up and driving the SUV was this woman Catherine, whose little baby I had taken care of me and Anyway, I think she kind of put me on the path to becoming the person I became. But a lot of tech. She had two more kids and time 10. Years later, I saw her in the crosswalk. I had no idea who I was sure she had so many people believe that it's in the back seat. But I thought her and I was waving like me, and she had no idea and kept driving. And I was okay. I was telling a friend and I don't have time like surgically getting scenes in ball. And and at that point, I wasn't really sure what with the novel P. I knew that I could write. The baby sitter chapters at the Sam chapters. But Elizabeth the mother, You know I wasn't a mother getting yourself state egg. Many years went by, and then I was pregnant with my first child and Suddenly, I thought, Oh, you know, soon I am going to know what it's like to be both these women and I'd love to write this story. That's kind of And it looks like a conversation with my younger self said it does. It doesn't. I think that's why like I really we enjoyed. I guess we enjoyed that hole. The conversations that you do have with yourself in your head in her like she's involved with the became mama's face group Facebook group, and then that makes you like You questioning? You know, in your head everything that might doing parenting, right? Am I good at this? Am I good at anything? Yes, because I think there is that sort of transition where you make where you were single in the city. And then you get married and maybe have a kid and you move to the suburbs or whatever, wherever you might live, But you kind of move out of that. Group. Yes, Yes, definitely. And I've used at this whole thing that's going on on Facebook in particular because it really is. Women congregate name, especially around protecting seems so, you know. Certainly for me. There are women who are loves of my college even though they think I'm their whatever it is, But whenever the comments it is they tend to end up talking about their lives and motherhood is such a big piece of it. So these faced equipped with bombs. I just found, you know, on the one hand, you know there's a lot of comparing that very kind of so ridiculous that you have a laugh at it. And that all made its way into the book because it's just kind of too hard to resist, but also You know, On the flip side, I feel like women are so generous in the spaces and it's where they go to tell their darkest secrets. And then that helps other women to say. Oh, that happened to be two. I had that experience as well. I wasn't expecting that. So it's kind of remarkable. Yeah, yeah, really is because there are People like like I know somebody who has been a long time nanny, and I've often wondered about the friendship. In that relationship. When one of you is Theo employees? Yeah, you know, totally totally. And it's It's a really specific, intense kind of employment to because you're taking care of someone child and you're in their home all the time. You know, in doing this A tour for the Booker as much of the tour you could do right now, Zumthor. Yeah, I've been in conversation with so many other novelists, and what I've realized is that like me, so many of them were baby sitters or nannies. In the earlier days, I did both and I think it makes a lot of sense because as a nanny or the ultimate fly on the wall, you're what every writer wants to be. You know, you just sort of blend into the curtains and the family or with Max, the way they would act if you weren't there, and there's really not many other people that we do that around..

Facebook G. Courtney Sullivan J. Courtney Smith College Laurie New York Megan writer Julia Catherine Booker Max Elizabeth P. I Zumthor
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

08:22 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Read a great book? Way air being joined right now by G. Courtney Sullivan and you might have read Mein. The engagement's being moment we've we read both main and the engagements in her latest book is Friends and Strangers. And Thanks ever even being back on our show, J. Courtney I'm so happy to be here with you here. You were so good. We're so good. Oh, you can write great books. You know that. You just do good, great, wonderful storytelling. I love this book so much. Thank you. Thank you Give people a setup of what friends and strangers is about. So friends and strangers is the story of a new media in a small town in upstate New York, and unlikely thinks that her child baby sitter It was a college senior and those kind of feel adrift in some ways and each that kind of a turning point in their lives, and, ah, it just about done there for me when he technically wouldn't have happened at any other time in their lives, it's it's It's really good. I just have to come in on the cover for a second to because the covers so amazing. You know that this story I was reading about you and you had this story. You came up with this idea for the book before you even you were writing your last book so six years ago. Huh? That's right, many because I was I was inspired today by a moment on That occurred. I was back at my old model Smith College in Massachusetts and 10 years after graduation, reading from one of my brother, I mean and Look, you're the event came out to the side rack of walking to the car, standing in a crosswalk and just kind of thinking back to what it was like to be a student there. 10 years had passed and Uh, big SUV. Perfect driving the he was this woman, Catherine, whose little baby I had taken care of me. Anyway, I think she kind of put me on the path to becoming the person I became. But she had two more kids and tune 10. Years later, I saw her in the cross rock had no idea where I was sure she'd had some anything that gets in the back seat. But I thought her and I was waving like over the sea, and she had no idea and kept driving. I was telling a friend through time, like surgically opening scenes of evil. And and at that point, I wasn't really sure what with the novel P. I knew that I could grate. Baby sitter factors that the sam chapters but Elizabeth another. I wasn't a mother getting yourself many years went by, and then I was pregnant with my first child and Suddenly I thought you soon I am going to know what it's like to be both these women and I'd love to write the story. That's kind of And it was like a conversation with my younger self. If it does, it doesn't. I think that's why like I really we enjoyed. I guess we enjoyed that hole. The conversations that you do have with yourself in your head in her like she's involved with the became mama's face group Facebook group. And then that makes you like You questioning? You know, in your head everything that might doing parenting, right? Am I good at this? Am I good at anything? Yes, because I think there is that sort of transition where you make where you were single in the city. And then you get married and maybe have a kid and you move to the suburbs or whatever, wherever you might live, But you kind of move out of that. Group. Yes, definitely. And I was really at the thing that's going on on Facebook in particular, because it really is. Women congregate name, especially around particularly being so, you know. Certainly for me. There are women who are of my colleagues here have been voted the same kind of there covered it, but never the common thread. It is. They tend to end up talking about their lives and motherhood is such a big piece of it, so they include moms. After you know the one hand, you know, there's a lot of comparing that kind of so ridiculous that you have to laugh at it. And that all made its way into the book because it's just kind of too hard to reject. That also On the foot side, and women are so generous in the spaces and it's where they go to tell their darkest secrets. And then that help other women to say all that happened to be two. I had that experience as well. I wasn't expecting that. So it's kind of remarkable. Yeah, yeah, really is because there are People like like I know somebody who has been a long time nanny, and I've often wondered about the friendship. In that relationship. When one of you is Theo employees? Yeah, you know, totally totally. It's really specific, intense kind of employment to because we're taking care of someone child and you're in their home all the time in doing this. A tour for this bumper. As much of the tour you could do right now doomed for Yeah, I've been in conversation with so many other novelists, and what I've realized is that like me, so many of them were for baby sitters or nannies in there earlier days, I did both and I think it makes a lot of sense because as a nanny or the ultimate fly on the wall, you're what every writer wants to be. You know, you just sort of blend into the curtains and the family or with Back the way they would act if you weren't there, and there's really not many other people that we do that around. So you know, on the one hand, you're a very intimate relationship very close, but on the other hand Can you ever really have a true friendship when one person is taking the other person on brother those sort of power dynamics like, so that was something else that I really wanted to explore. And you certainly did. If you're just joining us, we're talking with J. Courtney Sullivan, her new book as friends and Strangers, and It's a Jenna put book Petrie with Jenna Loj we had We were on to you a long time ago. We want you to know for the OJ book, but that's true. But the thing that You talking about about both These women in these kind of unsure Danese e pot spots in their life, and one is paying the other That does and one's in their twenties ones in their security. So you think the 30 Year old thinks she knows what the 21 year old should be doing. The 20 year old is watching this insecure person and thinking. I don't want to say too much because she's paying me But where my boundaries it's It's fascinating, and I like what we love Clive and hated him. And you know you're the first people to ever say that you love me. I love I'm listening. You know, I listened to the book of Glory Rather, that's true. You get to experience, Clive would talk. It would be kind of fun because of the British. Yeah. You never listen. I never listen to the audio of my own books would be excruciating. But I want to listen to that. Now just glide because it's kind of funny because everything that was great in a British accent, even if you're being a dink that thing I think the British accent covers a multitude of sins. And I'm probably a big part of it was Sam and her attraction to cries the inappropriate older British boyfriend 100%. And the other thing about this book is when you talk about you know that Called. You know what Ferguson sound the culture of privilege? Because you know the mom whose names Elizabeth has an opportunity. You have so much money, but because he doesn't want to give in to her dad. She doesn't take it. Where Sam is at the most expensive private college and needs money..

G. Courtney Sullivan Facebook Elizabeth Clive Sam J. Courtney Jenna Loj Smith College Massachusetts New York Catherine Ferguson P. I writer Danese Petrie
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the most intimate and complicated relationships around and for many women, and yes, it is mostly women. It's an all important one. I'm talking about the relationship between a mother And her child's caregiver, and that is the relationship at the heart of author J. Courtney Sullivan's new novel, Friends and Strangers. Jaye. Courtney Sullivan joins us now welcome Thank you so much for having me Why this particular relationship at the heart of your story? Well, I as a young woman as a teenager, I was a baby sitter and my senior year of college in particular, I took care of a little baby whose family had just moved to western Massachusetts from New York City and her mother and I grew very closed. But as tends to happen with those relationships, we did fall out of touch and 10 years later, I was back at Smith to give a reading from one of my books and I came out to the street and I was standing at the crosswalk. A car pulled up and behind the wheel of the car was this woman? Who I had been up for, and I was waving frantically like, Hi. It's me, and you had no idea who I wass. Ah, I went back to New York that night was telling a friend the story who is also a novelist, and she said, Oh, that should be your next book. But I wasn't really sure what I'd say. And it wasn't until several years later, when I was pregnant with my first child that I started thinking I might want to write it because suddenly I had been kind of both women, the mother and the baby sitter. Right. Well, that's so interesting because I thought you were going to tell me how much you identified with one of the central characters in this book with Elizabeth, who is the older one. Who's the mom and the writer. On. She's just moved from Brooklyn. And I will note that you are a mom and a writer and you live in Brooklyn, and I thought that was going to be where you where you identified with it, And that's interesting. You're telling me that the initial kind of noodling on this in your head was going on based on your experience. As the younger woman is the baby sitter in this relationship in your book, It's Ah, It's a young woman named Sam, who's a student at the local college and you identify with both of them. It sounds like in very different ways. I absolutely dio. You know, In some ways, I think when you have a friendship between women of different ages, there's a sense of wanting Tio help the younger woman avoid the mistakes you've made. But they're not those kind of mistakes. They're the ones you have to make on your own to really figure out. What is coming? All right, so themes. They're a friendship of motherhood. I want to shift you to another one that struck me throughout the book, which is the theme of privilege. Elizabeth comes from money. On it. Blinds her makes her insensitive in some ways to Sam. And what Sam needs also makes her blind tio her in laws and the financial troubles they face. But why was that something you wanted to explore? Well from the very beginning of thinking about this book. I knew that class would play a big role in the story. And, you know, in many ways, this is a book about the gig economy, the shrinking safety net sort of weight of student loan debt and other forms of economic hardship on young people. And certainly also the notion that privilege takes many forms. So Elizabeth is someone who comes from a lot of money. She has not accepted her family money and therefore feels that she's sort of Really above it and views herself actually, as cells made, even though she really isn't But even Sam, you know, sort of wrestles with the fact that Although she is saddled with a lot of student loan that and a lot of other things, her education is a form of privilege. Her citizenship is a form of privilege, so I think both of them really kind of wrestle with that. It really resonates this theme in this moment when so many of us are examining the blind spots that are privilege might create whether it's class whether its race And that is an uncomfortable thing to do. I wonder. Was it uncomfortable too, right? I don't know that it was uncomfortable because it is so much a part of our culture right now. So you know, I feel like I couldn't have written anything else in this particular moment. Really, You know, there's a real push back in the book from Elizabeth's father in law, George that This country has been emphasizing now for so long, the individual on DH If you've lost your business, as George has in the book, you must have done something wrong. Where, Actually it's thes systems of power and wealth that are very much stacked against the average person. I think we're seeing that come to bear when this pandemic occurs, and for people who have A great job and a salary and a health insurance. They may be. They still have that even though they're working from their kitchen table, But there are millions of people who just lost their jobs in a blink. Uh, yeah, I mean, one thing I love that you play with so is that it's not just Elizabeth. It's Sam. The younger, less well off character also enjoys privilege and and you write her a cz being tone deaf in a lot of ways to have friends who work in the school cafeteria, who are mostly women of color. Are you making a point there? Are you exploring? We all have our blind spots. Absolutely, you know, Sam thinks she's doing what's best for her friends. But really, she isn't And you know what she does basically is she has this realization as an undergrad and very well meaning undergrad that the women who work in the dining hall in housekeeping in her college or not, well compensated. You know my research. I found that Probably every year. You hear there's a big, perfect ful at Ah American University where a student kind of realizes or a group of students realizes, you know this isn't fair and they will appeal to the college and they will write letters and stage protests. But Generally nothing changes. And so I kind of wondered what does it feel like to be the worker in the dining hall, who has to be someone's personal epiphany every three years? I without going through all of the twists and turns and all the things that these two women learn from each other fair to say, I think, in the end that their relationship is not so uneven by the end. What did you learn from writing? This is their lesson You take away from from Salmon Elizabeth and the characters you created here. I think so. I think you know, every novel is kind of a time capsule of where the writer was at that moment, And when I started writing this book, I To be honest, had a bit of a chip on my shoulder because I was living in New York City, And when you live in New York in your twenties, it's kind of like college where everyone sort of seems the same. You know, everyone has three roommates, everyone. Is hustling and you reach your thirties and people start getting married and having kids and suddenly it's like some poet, you know, is moving into a $5 million brownstone in Park Slope and her like Wait a minute. How did that happen? Kind of begin to realize. Oh, you know, some people really come from a lot of money, and some of us are still paying off college loans and will be forever you know, so I really had a chip on my shoulder about that for a while. And when I started writing this book I saw Elizabeth as sort of one of those people, you know, she's not a bad person, but she does sort of have a blind spot to her own wells. However. I kind.

Elizabeth Sam New York City writer J. Courtney Sullivan Massachusetts Jaye Brooklyn Smith Salmon Elizabeth Ah American University Park Slope George
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The younger, less well off character also enjoys privilege and and you write her a cz being tone deaf in a lot of ways to have friends who work in the school cafeteria, who are mostly women of color. Are you making a point there? Are you exploring? We all have our blind spots. Absolutely, you know, Sam thinks she's doing what's best for her friends. But really, she isn't And you know what she does basically is. She has this realization as an undergrad and very well meaning undergrad that the women who work in the dining hall in housekeeping in her college or not well compensated. You know my research. I found that probably every year to year. There's a big professional at Ah American University. Where a student kind of realizes, or a group of students realizes. You know this isn't fair, and they will appeal to the college and they will write letters and stage protests, but generally nothing changes. And so I kind of wondered, what does it feel like to be? The worker in the dining hall, who has to be someone's personal epiphany. Every three years. I without going through all of the twists and turns and all the things that these two women learn from each other fair to say, I think, in the end that their relationship is not so uneven by the end. What did you learn from writing? This? Is there a lesson you take away from from Salmon Elizabeth and the characters you created here? I think so. I think you know, every novel is kind of a time capsule of where the writer was at that moment, And when I started writing this book, I To be honest, had a bit of a chip on my shoulder because I was living in New York City, And when you live in New York in your twenties, it's kind of like college where everyone sort of seems the same. You know, everyone has three roommates, everyone. Is hustling and you reach your thirties and people start getting married and having kids and suddenly it's like some poet, you know, is moving into a $5 million brownstone in Park Slope and her like Wait a minute. How did that happen? Kind of begin to realize. Oh, you know, some people really come from a lot of money, and some of us are still paying off college loans and will be forever you know, so I really had a chip on my shoulder about that for a while. And when I started writing this book I saw Elizabeth as sort of one of those people, you know she's not a bad person, but she does sort of have a blind spot to her own wealth. However. I kind of realized that someone in the middle like Sam, or like me, To be honest is afforded so much privilege just by having an education, even if the education cost you dearly, So I think it has been a sort of a personal thing as well as a story arc in this book. That privilege takes many, many forms. Hey, Courtney Sullivan, author of the new novel Friends and Strangers. Thank you very much..

Sam Salmon Elizabeth New York City Ah American University Courtney Sullivan Park Slope writer
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Jen White, the new host of one A right now We've got a lot to talk about. Let's write our next chapter together. I hope you'll join me and my great guests next time on one a One a coming up tonight at nine o'clock. Right now. In the half Moon Bay. It's 64 degrees 73 Valeo and in Napa, the current temperature is 84 degrees. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm married Louise Kelly. It is one of the most intimate and complicated relationships around and for many women, and yes, it is mostly women. It's an all important one. I'm talking about the relationship between a mother And her child's caregiver, and that is the relationship at the heart of author J. Courtney Sullivan's new novel, Friends and Strangers. Jaye. Courtney Sullivan joins us now welcome Thank you so much for having me Why this particular relationship at the heart of your story? Well, I as a young woman as a teenager, I was a baby sitter and my senior year of college in particular, I took care of a little baby whose family had just moved to western Massachusetts from New York City and her mother and I grew very closed. But as tends to happen with those relationships, we did fall out of touch and 10 years later, I was back at Smith to give a reading from one of my books and I came out to the street and I was standing at the crosswalk. The car pulled up and behind the wheel of the car was this woman Who I had been set for, and I was waving frantically like, hi, It's me, and she had no idea who I wass. Ah, I went back to New York that night was telling a friend the story who is also a novelist, and she said, Oh, that should be your next book. But I wasn't really sure what I say. And it wasn't until several years later, when I was pregnant with my first child that I started thinking I might want Teo write it because suddenly I had been kind of both women, the mother and the baby sitter. Right. Well, that's so interesting because I thought you were going to tell me how much you identified with one of the central characters in this book with Elizabeth, who is the older one. Who's the mom and the writer. On. She's just moved from Brooklyn. And I will note that you are a mom and a writer and you live in Brooklyn, and I thought that was going to be where you where you identified with it, And that's interesting. You're telling me that the initial kind of noodling on this in your head was going on based on your experience. As the younger woman is the baby sitter in this relationship in your book, It's It's a young woman named Sam, who's a student at the local college and you identify with both of them. It sounds like in very different ways. I absolutely dio. You know, In some ways, I think when you have a friendship between women of different ages, there's a sense of wanting to help the younger woman. Avoid the mistakes you've made. But they're not those kind of mistakes. They're the ones you have to make on your own to really figure out. What is coming, all right, so themes. They're a friendship of motherhood. I want to shift you to another one that struck me throughout the book, which is the theme of Priviledge Elizabeth comes from money on and it blinds her makes her insensitive in some ways to Sam. And what Sam needs also makes her blind tio her in laws and the financial troubles they face. But why was that something you wanted to explore? Well from the very beginning of thinking about this book. I knew that class would play a big role in the story. And, you know, in many ways, this is a book about the gig economy, the shrinking safety net sort of weight of student loan debt and other forms of economic hardship on young people, and certainly also the notion that privilege takes many forms. So Elizabeth is someone who comes from a lot of money. She has not accepted her family money and therefore feels that she's sort of really above it and views herself actually, as cells made, even though she really isn't But even Sam, you know, sort of wrestles with the fact that Although she is saddled with a lot of student loan that and a lot of other things, her education is a form of privilege. Her citizenship is a form of privilege, so I think both of them really kind of wrestle with that. It really resonates this theme in this moment when so many of us are examining the blind spots that are privilege might create whether it's class, whether it's race, and that is an uncomfortable thing to do. I wonder. Was it uncomfortable too, right? I don't know that it was uncomfortable because it is so much a part of our culture right now. So you know, I feel like I couldn't have written anything else in this particular moment. Really, You know, there's a real push back in the book from Elizabeth's father in law, George that This country has been emphasizing now for so long, the individual and if you've lost your business, as George has in the book, you must have done something wrong where, Actually it's the systems of power and wealth that are very much stacked against the average person. I think we're seeing that come to bear when this pandemic occurs, and for people who have A great job and a salary and a health insurance. They may be. They still have that even though they're working from their kitchen table, But there are millions of people who just lost their jobs in a blink. I mean, one thing I love that you play with so is that it's not just Elizabeth Sam..

Elizabeth Sam J. Courtney Sullivan Moon Bay NPR Jen White Napa Massachusetts writer Elsa Chang New York City Brooklyn Jaye Teo New York Louise Kelly Smith George
"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"j. courtney sullivan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Hey everybody thanks for hanging out with us we're delighted we have Lori Hertel who's a senior editor for books for the Star Tribune hi Laurie yeah we were hanging in there right we're glad to see in yesterday's paper that next weekend the summer books roundup is happening in the Star Tribune so we always enjoy that yes a longstanding tradition been going on for many years okay so you wouldn't be interesting you have that in your interview with Curtis Sittenfeld about her new book Rodham which is you know I fictional novel about Hillary Rodham Clinton did you can you tell us what you thought of the book and if you're recommending a little bit all my gosh yes I think that Rodham the title is Rodham it is one of the hottest books of the summer already have made and really summer hasn't even started yet but this is a book everybody is talking about and it is it is such an entertaining read and I had a great conversation with Curtis she lives here in the Twin Cities now she's worked here for about eighteen months so we get to claim her as a Minnesota writer but but novel is it the reconditioning of Hillary's life the first third is it pretty much follows you know what really happened in her life but it is of course very fictionalized but you know she went to Yale and she met belum they fell in love and they moved to Arkansas and he asked her to marry him and then that's when everything just changes from the way her life really wanted in the novel didn't help imagines what Hillary said no and you know moved back up north and forged her life without bail so it is it is a really entertaining but it's also a very thought provoking book as well very well researched even though it's all fiction you know there are real characters in there besides Hillary bill is America trump is inherent and there are others too so it's a really good rate kind of like what she did with American wife which was such a great parking you can learn about wages and there was a fictional they added that was such a compelling novel to read I loved that blighted yeah the big difference between the two okay is that the character in American life is not named Laura bush and what happens in her life really does follow the trajectory of what happens in Laura bush's life so it's sort of like this parallel character than the more bush's life in one of them her life goes after that whole other direction that Hillary's life did not dial so you know even though they're both political worries you know the way that she approached each topic is is very different from what she had to have a fictitious name because it does follow her life but it's not a biography and that's really trying to get inside her head which is head of like what is this woman doing married to this man and how she kind of reconciling the decision she made to stay with him with what he's doing and how it kind of doesn't really belong with her own moral code and ban Rodham it's like she's just having that she's having fun she's making all this up so right right I think you would love it I'm sure we will I'm sure very well she could this is a big fan of our show I'm just teasing I'm trying to get our forever we're working on it we're not producer is fond of her because she was very very first book that we ever had was our book yeah for our book club would have right yes yeah yeah years ago she going she's a young young woman I mean she's only in her early forties and look at how much she has right it's amazing a lot but she has been so busy with this book she's doing interviews everywhere yes I'm sorry that you're not one of the benefit you will we will be we've got you will September I got some free time during the fair we're going to get okay what else are you excited about Laurie well I just want to say that some of the books and I'm gonna talk about I have read and some I am looking forward to reading so I I won't be like an expert on all of these and some of them are in our Sunday round up which I hope everybody takes a look at but it's a special three page section nothing but fiction and mysteries and young adult books this Sunday and then some of the books that I will talk about we're gonna review later on in the summer because we can't do everything at once right so what if you had like what you've what you've done because it just for timing but when you read that you've laughed okay Emma Donoghue the pull of the stars I don't you know and the Donahue because she wrote room which was locked so she has a new book out I think July and this is in Dublin during the pandemic the flu pandemic of nineteen eighteen and it just takes place over three days and it is it's a very strange book in that like not that much happens me there's not much plot but it just gives you this kind of day to day that nervous follows the life of a nurse who works in a maternity ward for women who have the flu and you can see the parallels I mean the way the book starts out the nurses on the bus going to work and everyone's wearing masks on their signs everywhere saying keep your distance and I mean he started this book several years ago before covert the parallels are are really striking so that is a really really good to talk hello that's okay it is good and and really compelling and then you guys know Mary Logan I'm sure yeah I live in the Twin Cities she has written all kinds of books mysteries and poetry and young adult in memoir and she has a new book that I think is just out like yesterday without university of Minnesota press and it's the first in a series of mysteries it's called the three L. and like first like eight times I look at the title I thought it was called the street right I'm looking at the cover I know it's not a word I know but it it means prostitute and that's our fallen women are you know it's Irish I guess and this is a novel about a young woman named Bridget who comes over from Ireland during the potato famine and she gets a job working as a maid in one of the big houses I'm chairman Avenue in St Paul and then she goes off to South Dakota to try to find her brother and there's a murder and it's really fun and the local setting as you know makes it even more fun and it's the first in the series which makes it you know even more fun yes we do we do you know who that operator is helpful for us you should yeah okay talk all night fell and we like it you guys like J. Courtney Sullivan I am guessing she we had a new book called friends and strangers and I've actually only read half of it but I will finish it before too long and we do have a review of that one coming up as well and that's it a novel that it's and it's sort of a New York novel and it goes back and forth the narrator goes back and forth between this woman who has moved from Brooklyn and to upstate New York with her husband and the other narrator is the nanny they hire and there's a whole range of between the two women and the things that happened and it's it's it's a good book I mean her books are always really thoughtful and they're sort of domestic dramas so I I like that one yeah we've already got over four main main yeah with the last time we had on our show that's just she does good epics yeah she does she does that she really gets deep into the characters and kind of their interior lives Roddy Doyle everybody loves riding right the Irish writer who will paddy Clarke ha ha ha and he has a new book coming out in the next few weeks called love and it is it's it's the story of a friendship between two guys who older guys kinda.

Lori Hertel senior editor Star Tribune Laurie