35 Burst results for "J J Lehman"

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her. Then eventually you take over an hour running freda yes fast forward. What something that people can't find out about you from google earth lincoln that i really you know up until that moment i really was not a risk taker at all. I told the line. I did what was laid out for me and i i would never in a million years have predicted that i would have veered off. Course

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Marlins Mets Amazon Miami Lehman Brothers American Airlines General Motors Burger King Miami Dolphins Burger New York King Florida Football Miami Beach
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her.

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Mets Amazon Marlins Lehman Brothers Miami American Airlines General Motors Burger King New York Burger Miami Dolphins King Florida Football Miami Beach
85-Year-Old Woman Victim Of Attempted Rape In Brooklyn, New York City, Apartment Building

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last month

85-Year-Old Woman Victim Of Attempted Rape In Brooklyn, New York City, Apartment Building

"Of the Police haven't arrested an attempted sexual assault on an 85 year old woman in Brooklyn. Our Samantha Lehman has the details in this live report from Bay Ridge. And Kathleen. Thankfully, this rape interrupted and now a suspect in custody. 25 year old Mario Pope arrested for attempted rape among several other charges. Police believe he followed this woman into the laundry room of our building their reach Boulevard of Marine Avenue, exposed himself, then attacked or Thursday morning. Neighbors telling CBS to its surprising this happened around here We are generally considered a very safe neighborhood. I'm shocked, you know, I mean, it could happen any place, but you don't know what's going on. As As for for for the the the the victim, victim, victim, victim, victim, she she she she she is is is is is recovering recovering recovering recovering recovering at at at at at Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo

Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo Nuo Rape Mario Pope Samantha Lehman Bay Ridge Brooklyn Assault Kathleen CBS
2 more positive coronavirus cases on Tennessee Titans

The Rich Eisen Show

01:58 min | 2 months ago

2 more positive coronavirus cases on Tennessee Titans

"There's an organization called news channel five in in in Tennessee NC five, news channel five. In Tennessee and there is a reporter in Nashville News Channel Five Steve Lehman Thank you Don Bowie. On thank you for the follow Steve Lehman sources confirm to news channel five that a group of about fifteen titans players fifteen held a workout at Montgomery Bell Academy last Wednesday one day after the team's facility was shut down by eight positive covid nineteen tests. If in fact, the case against sources confirm to news channel five. Dan The. NFL IS GONNA come down hard. That's just the end of that because that makes a lot of sense as to why would players continue to test positive that after the PRISCILA closed back if it's just like everybody go home and sit on zoom. What's going on? 'cause after two straight days of the titans being covered. Negative on mass two straight days of no positive tests to more popped positive today. Leading the titans next game against the. Bills, by the way. In heavy doubt. Tom Pella Sarah, my colleague from NFL Media Group has been all over this. tweeting out earlier, today that the NFL and the players association are were been more looking into whether the titans working out together off site while the facility was closed. Because again, two more players learned positive test today bringing the total of twenty for the team and staff and you know the NFL is you know as sent out. More stringent. Threats and teeth to their. Penalties for violations of the protocol.

Titans NFL Steve Lehman Nfl Media Group Tennessee Nc Montgomery Bell Academy Don Bowie Tennessee Nashville Tom Pella Sarah Reporter Dan The
U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

Morning Edition

04:05 min | 2 months ago

U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

"So for 82 years, American labor law has had a carve out for some workers with disabilities they could be paid less than minimum wage. This was meant to encourage employment of more people. But today a top federal civil rights watchdog says the exemption should end because it's been trapping workers in job programs that they call exploitative and discriminatory. NPR's Alina, sell your reports. Jerry Dagostino had a job but couldn't afford a few things he wanted to do, like, go out to eat. Sometimes daughter more days go to events. He was working alongside other people with disabilities at a center in Rhode Island, doing what he calls bench work road tasks like fitting rings into heating tubes. Packaging ice packs, assembling boxes for jewelry. If I remember correctly, my first my first paycheck was only 12 box. I just question myself a cz. You know, I really don't want to keep doing that worked for my whole life. Dagostino now works at a supermarket where his paycheck is a lot more than $12 total. But he spent years in that center which made him below minimum wage, thanks to that carve out in the labor law. Centers like that are often called sheltered workshops because they keep people with disabilities in a separate cluster there, pay is estimated to average $3.34 an hour. To calculate individual pay. The center's regularly time their workers comparing how fast they do tasks to an experienced non disabled worker half as fast half the pay Now the U. S Commission on Civil Rights says this programme and the law should be phased out. In short. The program doesn't work and it is designed in a way that it can't work. Catherine Lehman chairs the commission, she says. Instead of expanding opportunities, the program's limit them don't really prepare people for work in the community jobs with regular wages. I was. I was ashamed of the ways that we have operated now over a decade's a federal assumption that people with disabilities Are less capable full employment than people without disabilities. A lot of data are missing about sub minimum wage programs, including how many people they employ. Estimates range from 100,000 to 4 times that Most have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Commonly, the program's a run by nonprofits. They get state and federal money to support these jobs. Many of them have government contracts. And their most vocal supporters are some of the workers families who want the programs to remain an option, a safe environment for relatives with disabilities. One mother, Linda Howe, from Wisconsin, testified before the Civil Rights Commission in November. We're parents with their son's best interest at heart. Any suggestion that we would allow him to be taken advantage of our discriminated against is an insult. Families like hers helped workshops flood the commission with a record number of comments asking to let the program's B Some described workers with quote severe disabilities worried about where they'd go, Lehman says that is why her agency is recommending a careful, gradual phaseout. Disability rights advocates have wanted such a phase out for years. They point to success stories of people thriving outside of the systems that underestimated thumb A new Lewis. We're now fights against sheltered workshops at the National Federation of the Blind, testified about his past work running one thinking he was doing the right thing, And because of that misguided compassion, these individuals been significant part of their lives. Wasting away in that works out making money for our center but wasting away. And I I'm just sitting here really feeling sad about what I perpetuated because there is a better alternative. Four states have abolished sheltered workshops to support more jobs in the community. Seven states have moved to end wages below the minimum. Several federal bills trying to do so on a national level have so far failed.

Jerry Dagostino Civil Rights Commission U. S Commission On Civil Right Catherine Lehman NPR Linda Howe Alina Rhode Island National Federation Of The Bli Lewis Wisconsin
U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:07 min | 2 months ago

U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

"So for eighty two years American labor law has had a carve out for some workers with disabilities they paid less than minimum wage. This was meant to encourage employment of more people today a top federal civil rights watchdog says the exemption should end because it's been trapping workers in job programs they call exploitative and discriminatory NPR's Lena Seljuk reports. Jerry. Douglas Dino had a job but couldn't afford a few things he wanted to do like go out to eat sometimes. Vase Goto events. He was working alongside other people with disabilities at a center in Rhode. Island. Doing what he calls bench work road tasks like fitting rings into heating tubes packaging ice packs assembling boxes for jewellery. If I remember correctly by I by first paycheck was only twelve bucks I just cautioned myself as you know. I really don't WanNa keep doing what my whole life Doug AC- now works at a supermarket where his paycheck is a lot more than twelve dollars total but he spent years in that center which made him below minimum wage. Thanks to that carve out in the labor law centers like that are often called sheltered workshops because they keep people with disabilities a separate cluster their pay is estimated to average three dollars and thirty four cents an hour to calculate individual pay. The centers regularly time their workers comparing how fast they do tasks to inexperienced non-disabled worker half as fast half the pay. Now, the US Commission on Civil Rights says this program and the law should be phased out in short the program doesn't work and it is designed in a way that it can't work Kathryn Lehman chairs the commission she says instead of expanding opportunities, the programs limit them don't really prepare people for work in the community jobs with rights wages I was. I was ashamed of the ways that we have operated. Now over a decades, a federal assumption that people with disabilities are less capable. Full employment than people without disabilities, a lot of data are missing about sub minimum wage programs including how many people they employ estimates range from one hundred, thousand to four times that most have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Commonly, the programs run by nonprofits, they get state and federal money to support these jobs many of them have government. And their most vocal supporters are some of the workers families who won the programs to remain an option a safe environment for relatives with disabilities. One mother Linda how from Wisconsin testified before the Civil Rights Commission in November we are parents with our son's best interest at heart. And you suggestion that we would allow him to be taken. Advantage of are discriminated against is an insult families like hers helped workshops flood the commission with a record number of comments asking to lead the programs be some described workers with quote severe disabilities worried about where they go Lehman says, that is why her agency is recommending a careful gradual phase out disability rights advocates have wanted such A. Phase. Out For years the point to success stories of people thriving outside of the systems that underestimated them, and you'll Lewis fights against sheltered workshops at the National Federation of the blind testified about his past work running one thinking he was doing the right thing and because misguided compassion these individuals spend significant part of their lives wasting away in that workshop making money for our center but wasting away. And I am sitting here. Really feeling sad about what I perpetuated because there is a better alternative four states have abolished sheltered workshops to support more jobs in the community. Seven states have moved to end wages below the minimum several federal bills trying to do so on a national level have so far failed. Alina. So you NPR, news Washington.

Civil Rights Commission Douglas Dino Kathryn Lehman NPR Doug Ac Lena Seljuk Jerry Rhode Linda Washington Wisconsin Lewis National Federation Of The
"j j lehman" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

02:20 min | 2 months ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"Real estate where some of the worst impacted industries one in five people lost their jobs. Thanks to the crisis. The downturn technically ended in June of two, thousand nine but its effects were felt from many years afterward by October of two, thousand, nine, the US unemployment rate peaked at ten percent before eventually improving. The recession was the worst the US that experienced in modern memory until the COVID nineteen pandemic..

Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

Best Case Worst Case

08:57 min | 2 months ago

Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

"Alone. Welcome to best case worst case this is Jim Clemente retired profiler former New York City prosecutor writer-producer CBS's criminal minds with today's high everybody. It's Francey, Hague's former state and federal prosecutor. Jim. Across the country and if it's possible, I'm even more outraged. Shall I say enraged than I was last week I find it. I. Don't know very believable. Because I know you but I know what you're outraged and enraged about. I agree with you tim I don't understand what's happening. You know we've we've done what is happening I. Don't know we've done. I don't know how many episodes where we've talked about. Hollywood. We've talked about power position predators. We've talked about a Hollywood sexualizing we talked about that movie call me by your name I remember that one member that you and I saw that. and. Just being outraged at the sexualizing of children and in that movie if I'm not mistaken, there was a nineteen year old actor playing a fifteen year old boy I think if I remember correctly. and. That was bad enough because it was depicting. The sexualization of a child even though it wasn't an actual trial here Jim in the newest entry into net flicks Pantheon, we have a movie called well in English. It's called cuties and it was released just last night as you are recording here. So on September ninth here in the US. Anyway it was released on Netflix said it's a French movie I think the original title was something like Lehman Mignon. Which I would. You know I was a French minor but French is a longtime ago for me I, thought meant the little ones but maybe it means cuties regardless. The Americanized is name is called cuties. And Jim. I didn't see the movie yet. But I've seen a clip of a dance from the movie before we get into the discussion of the movie. Let me just tell people who haven't seen the clips and you haven't seen the description of the movie. What is purportedly about? This movie is described by various media critics who've seen it. As a coming of age tale, a young girl fighting against the patriarchy. Now, how is she coming of age how she fighting against the Patriarchy this eleven year old she joins she's a Muslim child and she joins a dance troupe. Wow. That sounds interesting. Right she's breaking out of her cultural barriers whatever they might be or whatever she perceives them to be. She joins a child's dance troupe with a bunch of other eleven year old well, that sounds perfectly innocent. Well not really however. It's really not Jim because you and I have seen the clip why don't you take it from here? Well, for not I did just see the clip and I was shocked I was shocked at two things one the focus of the camera. On the general areas of young girls very deliberately. Very, sustained, very purposefully. But I'm also shocked by the fact that this depicts a dance competition and in the dance competition, these girls are on stage in public. Doing these you know basically dance moves and I'm using those air quotes that are that are basically saying and touching their general areas and a showing off between their legs I mean. They're simulating sex. That's the that's certainly a very. Easy determination or that's an argument that. CAN EASILY BE. Made. So, this bothers me for two reasons. One is that. It's apparently a competition that they're in in which this kind of behavior is actually. Promoted and encouraged. But the documentary style of it. Is that they are showing close ups of these girls is one thing if they're thirty, forty, fifty feet away on a stage, but to have a camera. where the entire screen is filled with the Crotch of an eleven year old girl and the camera is focused on that and again it's sustain it's not just passing. That is part of the definition of child pornography when a child is centralized in a way and they don't have to be naked for it to be child pornography but the image has to be focused on the Genitalia or on sexual activity, and even if that's mimicking sexual activity is putting a child in a sexualize situation and I believe that this does that. In fact, and I, I don't know what the rest of this movie is about but it's scary to think that this is just one scene in movie that that purports to do things like for example. There's a parental warning apparently on imdb would says, one of the many highly sexualize erotic dance scenes. That purposefully exploit an objectify numerous scantily clad underage girls. One of the female child dancers lifts upper crop top to fully display her bare breast. This they're saying. This is supposedly literally pulled from my md be yes. That's pulled from my MTV which they've changed as of now this this has just been a massive explosive controversy over the last twelve hours Jim and you're absolutely right. I. Hate telling you that because God? Usually wrong. But here you're absolutely right. It does fit the definition at least in the United States the federal definition for child pornography, which is the lascivious display of the genitals for the purpose of arousing the sexual desires of the viewer. There is no other way to describe how these children are dancing and that IMDB description minimizes it by saying it's sexualizing or Roddick with underage girls. They're eleven, years, old eleven what is that? Fifth. Grade. Fourth Grade. That's it's crazy that anyone thinks that this is okay. But the most important thing to me is that I think it might be a federal crime. It certainly fits the definition now in federal law in this country, there is an exception if it's art, but that is required to provide a whole bunch of information to the Attorney General of the United States about the age of the actors when there's any depiction. The age of these actors is clearly under eighteen. There's no question about it. Not Right now, typically Hollywood gets away with it by having someone who has just turned eighteen play somebody who's younger but that's not what's going on here and there was among the years ago called kids I think and they did the same thing they had actually young people and although they didn't actually they sort of hit the sexual parts, they suggested it. But this because of the music that's playing in the background that's clearly of a sexualize nature because of the humping that's going on and the touching of the general areas by these girls, and then you know the cutesy sucking on the finger. To, make it seem like an innocent girl is being sexualize. It's all together. It really does make me. Believe that they are they are violating federal child pornography statute and I think that that's something that you know it's not just well, this is a French movie and we're trying to be open minded this this this description goes on to say. Trigger Warning and eleven year old girl watches a female rap music video where naked women role play through dance both heterosexual lesbian sex acts an eleven year old. Female. Dance Group then mimics these sexual moves, the on themselves and on each other while the camera zooms in on their sexual body parts as they erratically rise. This can be highly distressing to many viewers. Covered Hani legal.

Jim Clemente United States Hollywood Imdb Hague CBS TIM Dance Group New York City Netflix Prosecutor Lehman Mignon Hani MTV Roddick Attorney General
Brazen Attacker Arrested for Daylight Rape Attempt on Subway Platform: New York Police Department

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:29 min | 3 months ago

Brazen Attacker Arrested for Daylight Rape Attempt on Subway Platform: New York Police Department

"Has just announced an arrest in an attempted rape at an Upper East Side subway station yesterday, described described as as a a completely completely random random attack. attack. Let's Let's get get the the details details live live from from one one Police Police plaza plaza and and our our 10 10 10 10 wins wins reporter reporter Samantha Samantha Lehman. Lehman. Yes. Yes. And Sonia Police say they have arrested 31 year old Jose Reyes of the Bronx. They say that it was the clear video that a bystander took actually good Samaritan who tried to get this guy Reyes off of this woman, the victim in the 63rd Street, Lexington Avenue F train station. They were on the platform around 11. Yesterday morning. When this happened, he apparently assaulted her, then got on top of her tried to rape her. It was all caught on video, and they were able to use facial recognition software. Tio identify him. Based on prior arrests that he had in mug shots. They were able to run it through their database. He has no prior arrests for anything of a sexual nature. But he does have a long rap sheet. 15 pie arrest three in the subway system, and he apparently admitted to the crime, according to chief of detectives Rodney Harrison. So again an arrest in this what he's calling a heinous crime on attack during the day in Midtown. Excuse me on the Upper East Side. Of a woman called on camera. Samantha Leaping 10 10

Samantha Samantha Lehman Police Police Plaza Plaza Jose Reyes Rodney Harrison Rape Samantha Leaping Upper East Side Reporter Sonia Police Midtown
Attempted rape on New York City subway platform thwarted, caught on disturbing video

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Attempted rape on New York City subway platform thwarted, caught on disturbing video

"Police police shortly. shortly. After After a a terrifying terrifying case case of of attempted attempted rape rape in the daytime on a subway platform was on the city's upper recital around 11 yesterday morning with a bystander managing to capture cell phone video of the suspect. Now. Police say this happened at the Lexington Avenue East 63rd Street station when the 25 year old female victim was waiting for a cue train. That's when officials said the suspect approached her pushed her to the ground on the attempted rape occurred. Stopped when a crowd formed. She She sustained sustained minor minor injuries injuries during during the the attack, attack, refusing refusing medical medical attention, attention, though though the the NYPD NYPD has has scheduled scheduled a a news news conference conference for for shortly shortly from from now now tent tent and and when when Samantha Samantha Cleveland Cleveland 10th and when Samantha Lehman will be there, keep it here on 10 10 wins for the latest. You could see that video a tent in winds dot com Winds

Samantha Samantha Cleveland Rape Samantha Lehman Nypd
"j j lehman" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:37 min | 3 months ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on KTOK

"On your on with Lehman fears. I know nothing about your H N h. I took a gun That was suddenly I inherited from my grandfather with 22 long rifle. It was kind of old older than me. And I needed a new spraying. They replaced the spring. But in the meantime, they crushed the magazine and they put all sorts of vise marks in it. So I was not happy with their work it all. Well, I'm sorry You had a bad experience with it. But you know, you're welcome to go wherever you like. Not going to spend a lot of time dish edition on it because I've never had a bad experience over there was radio 1000. Katie. Okay, it's the Dr Leslie is an admin. Hi. Hey, Leslie. Is this, Leslie? Dan. Dan. I'm sorry. There you go. Hey, I've got a couple of things real quick. I'm gonna vote first advice instead of who's the other lady? She don't want to come on your show. Terry Neese? Yes, right. Yeah. For a couple of reasons. First thing, she pronounces the word 44. 44 okay? And everybody knows it's a 44. All right. He's going to keep 40 or by your bed. I'm going to keep a 53 by my okay. And now I love the ladies and I don't mean any. I don't many, many men any disrespect, but My That's a big 1 44 caliber gun for a lady. I'm sorry. She doesn't keep a 44 by her bed. I'm sorry. Well, I I said that same thing yesterday, Dan and I had to people calling, sir. What you're saying women can't handle a 40 for us it? No. I'm saying most women don't want to buy my my wife won't because because of how hurt your hands? Yes, because okay, Another thing is free advertisement is free advertisement. You know, even if it's bad advertisement, it's advertisements. Get your name out there. Why wouldn't she? You know you've got you've got what 60 Million people listening to you. So why wouldn't they? I don't get it. Well, I think that I think she was afraid that I would ask her a difficult question that she couldn't have answer in a controlled bumper sticker platitude way and I can understand that, but I assured her and I assured her people I would ask the same questions. I asked Stephanie Vice And basically it was. What do you want to do? How are you? What's your What's your platform? Bullet points of your platform. How do you plan to beat Kendra Horn? And then I would ask about some of the criticisms of against him. Like for instance, for a Stephanie Bice I After about the being accused of raising taxes and other things I would ask Terry Neese. The accusations of her on gun control. I would ask about you know why she withdrew her name to be one of the heads of the men and and and her relation with the Clintons. But those are all fair questions. They're out there right right for her, not being able to want to get on the forum like this. Where she together. You know any publicity out? That's that settled it for me, and I got one more thing. Masks of shame are not required A crest shot crest. Have a good day. Okay, I I do. I love I love that place eight for a 1000. Leigh Matthews. Katie. Okay. Is this Leslie This is thank you, Leslie. I got my heart. I got my phone number's on my.

Dr Leslie Terry Neese Dan Katie Lehman Stephanie Vice Leigh Matthews Kendra Horn Stephanie Bice
Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

Business Rockstars

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

"Of the Ellen DeGeneres Show are without jobs now, after Warner Brothers launched an investigation into the work environment, their variety is reporting. The staff was told about the firing of executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Lehman and co. Executive producer Jonathan Norman on a video call yesterday. The generous is said to have become emotional. While speaking of the investigation into her show, Warner Brothers launched an investigation last month after numerous workers complained of sexual misconduct and racial insensitivity. Among other problems for you is a radio news.

Warner Brothers Ellen Degeneres Ed Glavin Executive Producer Kevin Lehman Executive Jonathan Norman
Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

Colleen and Bradley

01:06 min | 3 months ago

Staff changes made at 'The Ellen DeGeneres Show'

"Show has ousted three top producers after these toxic workplace accusation, so the news was delivered to Ellen staffers. Just yesterday afternoon. Alan spoke via video conference call three senior producers. Executive producers at Glavin and Kevin Lehman and co. Executive producer Jonathan Norman have been ousted following all sorts of nasty allegations about how they were not nice people who worked for them also sexually inappropriate, right sexual misconduct, racial insensitivity, other problems in the work environment. It's along. List, So there are some veterans who are staying with the show. Mary Connolly, Andy last nerve, and Derek Wester Veldt will remain at the show as executive producers alongside host Ellen Do generous. Those three producers have been with the show since it started in 2003. So this has been expected. But there are it'll be interesting to see. What happens moving forward? I'm sure Ellen will be addressing this

Ellen Do Show Executive Executive Producer Derek Wester Veldt Kevin Lehman Glavin Jonathan Norman Mary Connolly Alan Andy
Top producers leave "Ellen" following allegations

Colleen and Bradley

02:30 min | 3 months ago

Top producers leave "Ellen" following allegations

"Ellen de generous producers air out after misconduct allegations So now This goes back to a story you may remember. Some of our listeners may not know this because there's been a lot of other stuff going on in the world. But three senior producers at Ellen Had been accused of sexual harassment and a number of misconduct accusations and those three individuals who have those allegations against them. I have been well, the way they put it is that they've parted ways with the popular Daytime talk show that's like the fancy way of saying they got fired. Yes or well, you know, the thing is, I think when you reach a certain level of power and privilege Your you don't have to be fired. They just look at you and go on and you go and you probably walk away with some. You know, some fat stack? Yeah, they pull the rip cord on the golden parachutes. So let's see how that all plays out. I'm gonna work. Stain my judgment until I find out more. But what we do know is that executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Lehman, the show's had writer as well as a coed executive producer named Jonathan Norman. Those are the people that left now they okay, So here's the thing that you may have not remembered. Okay. These allegations totaled Or or I should say these accusations were made by a total Of 36 employees. Holy buckets. Yes. So thie accusations of sex, not nothing. That's not nothing. The accusations of sexual harassment misconduct against these three were made by 36 former employees to BUZZFEED news. Those accusations Came just two weeks. Two weeks after 11 current and former employees came forward to Buzzfeed, and you might remember this story. To complain about the toxic work environment and Ellen and that included things but not limited to racism, workplace intimidation and other quote mistreatment. So this is like just the tip of a much larger iceberg clearly, but this tip is a very important tip. And that's just the tip. These are three very key players in putting this. You know, behemoth. Of a show together. Yeah.

Ellen De Harassment Buzzfeed Ed Glavin Executive Producer Executive Jonathan Norman Kevin Lehman Writer
Ellen DeGeneres: Three producers fired over 'toxic workplace' claims

Dave Ramsey

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

Ellen DeGeneres: Three producers fired over 'toxic workplace' claims

"The Axis swung at the Ellen DeGeneres Show. Three executive producers named in a Buzzfeed article accused of harassment reportedly fired at Glavin, Kevin Lehman and Jonathan Norman. Variety says generous broke the news to stab in an emotional video call. Monday. The three have been accused of creating a toxic work environment through sexual harassment, abusive behavior and more generous, has apologized for allowing the behavior to go on under her watch.

Harassment Ellen Degeneres Kevin Lehman Glavin Jonathan Norman Executive Buzzfeed Variety
New Start-Up Helps Websites Store User Names, Postal Addresses of Anonymous Readers

Smashing Security

06:19 min | 4 months ago

New Start-Up Helps Websites Store User Names, Postal Addresses of Anonymous Readers

"Now Chum, Chum's imagine. For a moment that you're interested in checking book maybe maybe book by celebrated newly published author and you think all I'd love to find out more about that book visit an online bookshop But then you change your mind maybe you're distracted by something else right and then maybe half an hour an hour later. You receive an email saying, hey, we saw you visited our website. How would you feel what's? By giving them my email address. I haven't allowed in or anything like that. I'm just perusing the shop you haven't logged in you haven't given them your email address and yet they know you came to their website and they've contacted you var email we'll surely I mean. If Google facebook of God, a tracking code on the sides then they could tie that together with unless it's technically possible in fighting. So Nice. Say I'm Kinda surprised we haven't crossed that Rubicon yet it's happening. Well imagine they Semaj and you have a particularly niche porn interest may be a bit of a further on the side and you decide to go. Further, you said. You say you mean grab. With A. Reliably. Informed that fervor it's up people who? Like dressing up as very animals like a mascots at a football game. and. They get their kicks from these sort of things. Fit It looks like my husband because he's quite Harry. You must be a secret forever. I can't figure out what would be more disturbing called if he found out attractive or unattractive. So. Imagine you visit the site. You get your fill of wherever you want and they knew receive an email saying, hey, we'll see you're a bit of a fervored. Ejected throws it back in your face. WHOA says we've got even more that kind of stuff. Why don't you come back sometime if you had never give me your email address, you can be stabbed, right? Yes. Considerably, and also, of course, if someone's got your email address, any navigate some is the potential for doc seen or blackmail knows what you'd better tell me how they got our email address. Okay. There's a fascinating article on Jessica Bell. Jessa Bell has written about an outfit could get emails a startup. They claim to be the all new audience growth tool for publishers and they say they can fill up jeff way. They say they can convert anonymous website visitors into names email addresses and even their home addresses boom. And I know sales sorted. posted. Another Chapter Jeff any incredibly they claim they can do surrounded by a third of all US web traffic cheese. Okay. Well, their claims earn press Whoa Kay, let's look a little bit more into this. They say that their services already been used you know that Chap Tucker Carlson on Fox News. Well he is one of the founders of a website quite right wing website surprise you it cooed the daily caller. That is one of the sites which is using exactly this technology right now, this potentially some could find out if your partial particular political views as well. Don't understand Outta sorry you've lost me. Okay. So how is the daily caller this website run by Tucker Carlson, taking advantage of this technology so they are a customer of this firm could get emails. Okay. Get emails is run by a guy called Adam. Robinson right is a former Lehman brothers employee and his girlfriend Helen Sharp. And they've actually put together a video where they explain how that thing works. He can go and check that out on Youtube link but I can explain in very simple. Work. So, there are lots of scammy kind of websites on the Internet surprise surprise. No, there are no a shock. So there are websites which will claim Oh. We can get you better health insurance. So we can get better car insurance just enter your details here. And we will go away and find an answer for you right and what you don't do when you fill out those what most people don't do. They don't read all the terms and conditions and remained the new mock me about every week when. You're one of the unusual people who actually does that crew, but those sites will gather all that information and not really set up to. So you health insurance in countries, they do sometimes or read you. But what they're really doing these crates and a huge database of people's contact details. Okay and they are then selling those two people and that is all apparently legal because people chose to give their information and they agreed to the terms and conditions to be marketed up soon, the I've always thought those sites you know like insurance compare sites or mortgage compare sites I. think that's exactly what a lot of them are doing. I think some of them are legitimate getting A. Lot of the deals, but they say we are sharing this with interested parties on purpose to get you the numbers you want right really have to share that information with third parties. They don't have to give you a list here. Exact people were doing because it's changing all the time and some of them might be you know very bonafide companies. Some might be shade or one of the companies which is buying this kind of information is this company get emails and what they've done is they've generated md five hashes. So check some for all of those email addresses. They reckon they got about half a billion now and they're adding about one million more every day. And they say they've also partnered with mailing lists firms so that when folks click on a Lincoln newsletter and go to website a cookie can be set computer containing that MD five check some for their email address on their computer. And so what they're able to do is when you go to the daily caller cool website or never website, which is running, get email script, they can compare the hash in the Czech some to the hash in get emails database, which they've gathered from these sites around the world and they've got all information which you filled in on that full. Yeah, that's good instincts

Tucker Carlson Jessica Bell Google Rubicon MD Youtube Fox News Football Adam United States Lehman Brothers Jeff KAY Robinson Helen Sharp
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | 5 months ago

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's Jeremiah question for you in your mind right now. Are You thinking offensively or defensively? We're we're really thinking offensively were we're grateful to serve the enterprise right? So when you look at our customer base, it's salesforce. It's Microsoft. These are big companies right so they're going to make it through. We're well capitalized able to make some rnd bets through this downturn. We're also able to continue marketing, and maybe even marketing. Even harder, but differently, so I think a lot of reinvention is going to happen. Re architect. Thing is going to happen. It's pretty staggering. You know the amount of innovation and change. That's happening right now and sometimes. We can't see it

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Microsoft China Freddie Jeremiah NFL Founder
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

04:43 min | 5 months ago

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's Jeremiah question for you in your mind right now. Are You thinking offensively or defensively? We're we're really thinking offensively were we're grateful to serve the enterprise right? So when you look at our customer base, it's salesforce. It's Microsoft. These are big companies right so they're going to make it through. We're well capitalized able to make some rnd bets through this downturn. We're also able to continue marketing, and maybe even marketing. Even harder, but differently, so I think a lot of reinvention is going to happen. Re architect. Thing is going to happen. It's pretty staggering. You know the amount of innovation and change. That's happening right now and sometimes. We can't see it

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Microsoft China Freddie Jeremiah NFL Founder
Zuora and Integrate

Zero to IPO

03:58 min | 5 months ago

Zuora and Integrate

"Well today we have teams O on the show and teen is the CEO of Zora, and amongst many accomplishments is one of the most noted people on the idea of the subscription economy. Zora is the leading way for companies to launch and manage subscription services. He is a noted expert on this, but he's also the eleventh employees at salesforce going way back way before. He's the best selling author on the subscription economy. Let's be really clear about that. Yup One hundred percent totally clear. What am I? I thought I was like. Wait a second team. You're the eleventh employees at salesforce. You're the first CMO salesforce. Why aren't you on a beach somewhere? Why even working in? Was Wrong with you. Why are you on our podcast? There's a lot more to do. There's a lot more do a lot more technology to build in this lot more things. We want to do in the world, so we're busy. We're GONNA. Get into all that we want to pick your brain. We WanNA learn as much as we can from you to let me introduce our other guests Jeremy, bloom is our first Olympian on the show Freddie, and as if that wasn't enough has also played in. In the NFL was drafted initially by the eagles, and then played for the steelers as well most notably, you're the CEO and founder of integrate which is a company that helps other companies automate demand marketing, and for our listeners today we're going to be talking about a stage of growth about a set of problems and challenges that occur not in the early days, because Jeremy and integrator beyond the early days they've raised a significant amount of capital and so I think the question on the table is. How do you grow at a high cadence after you've made it through the initial stages of raising money, it's been a journey were somewhat described as an overnight success ten years later. It's taken us a while to to get where where we are phase of the company. We're about three hundred people. Our mission is is to move everything into a central database in the cloud so that we can make more informed decisions on where we should be spending their marketing dollars to create revenue. Let's get into the meat here. In the last twenty four months, integrate has tripled in size as we all know, we are in a moment of real turmoil and market instability teen. You're at salesforce. Eight your leading Zora through the current turmoil. What kind of lessons can we gain? How aggressive or defensive should we be in moments market instability as we actually started the end of two thousand and seven, and so we lived through the two thousand and eight crisis, where the prevailing wisdom was, there was never gonNa to be any cash. Will you like it's over? It's over or were you? What was your mindset well? We didn't plan to start to. China recession the economy is starting to look really really good and We got a little lucky right. A little luck always helps along the way. We closed our series B. in the summer of Oh eight. And I think we had signed the term sheet. And then Lehman Brothers collapsed. And Economy starts shutting down a little worried for awhile. We actually wouldn't get the cash. I don't think we cut anybody, but we really spent about saying. How can we use resources? We have the people we have, and they just focus focus really on customers really needed what we were doing. Focus really on on making sure we service them well. Making sure that we we were spending. are are the most valuable things, and we continue to acquire customers you know, prove ourselves. be smart about our cash. Which is Kinda Nice actually? All the time when when things are actually going crazy around us, especially the Tech Company, there's such a big push to hire to grow, and so moments like these where the pressure is off right now really allows you to kind of reflect and build build quality systems right in foundation for how you want to operate their last year's

Salesforce Zora CEO Lehman Brothers Jeremy Steelers Eagles Freddie China NFL Founder
PGA Tour returns: Xander Schauffele leads with Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy in contention

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:26 min | 6 months ago

PGA Tour returns: Xander Schauffele leads with Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy in contention

"Challenge in fort worth Texas marking the PGA tour's return after a three month absence Lehman with a five under par sixty five left him just two shots off the lead after which she reflected on the significance of the moment of silence all over the course and the surrounding grounds at colonial at eight forty six AM not just in Thursday's first round but in all four rounds in memory of George Floyd I think everybody needs to feel deeply what happened and then to hurt deeply because of what happened to George Floyd I think everybody needs to understand that that when you have a absolute disregard for the suffering or pain of somebody else or the death of you because on somebody else if you have no regard for that you are a part of the problem you need to get your other so I would say that's probably the thing I took away from Mrs of let's let's just understand that we're all human beings need to care about each other if you can't do that then I feel sorry for you what Tom Lehman did during that moment of silence I prayed I just prayed for our country yeah I pray for that that man's family for George's family I pray for his soul you know pray just pray that guard the chaos that we live in can the be wisely move forward is so that decisions are made that actually are meaningful and

Fort Worth Texas George Floyd Tom Lehman
"j j lehman" Discussed on Lumpy's Sports Show Podcast

Lumpy's Sports Show Podcast

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Lumpy's Sports Show Podcast

"Get some big points from amino Collins Rodney had played another good game. He's he's looking like the player the blazers needed when they traded form in this series. A lot more than what was coming out of the o'casey series. Even J J Lehman got in and played a few minutes with heartless wrenching his ankle. Pre rough looking spill Yod Avent heard anything new about game game three on Friday, but Lehman command because I instead of playing someone else or switching it up start usually likes to keep the rotation going for the second team. And so he put Lehman in their first action the plops in one of the blowouts. He was. It was a minus five for the six minutes. He was there. He was up in Murray's face and point tough divas on them. So I actually thought that was pretty good of so for my money. It was a good all around game by the blazers. Nothing spectacular solid. Very good defense can get a rebound on the defensive end and that third into the fourth quarter for nothing. And that's what kept kept Denver close. And some some question, you know, not the best shooting tonight for both teams was really bad. But not the best. We'll see what comes up and game. Three. See how Denver counters the way Portland played defense on their picking role game. Like, you said earlier, I was really impressed with how they attack that changing it up and throwing something different. Look like Jim Murray has got a wicked Charlie horsey. You know, he he kept going hung in there. But you could. See in that fourth quarter. He could not move. So I'm curious to see how that goes for the next next game. Yokich joke each I liked that players gave. But he's now that we're in the playoffs and you see play back to back games. He's he's kind of getting on my nerves. He should've fouled out refs. Let them get out of it not on purpose. I think that just missed it. But it was it was a clear foul on the Collins. I believe when it came across his arms that guy's pretty funny. He. Looks out of shape. He looks like he goes to the the Felton Rafe Elton. School of conditioning for basketball, but he gets you can see all winded as out of shape as far as most NBA players, but he can barely jump over a piece of paper. But he's he can pass. He's his badge ical on the passing..

J J Lehman Collins Rodney blazers Charlie horsey Rafe Elton Jim Murray Denver Avent basketball NBA Portland six minutes
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"I just realized what my what my shortcomings are. And I usually try to surround myself with people that overcome my shortcoming. So I just I just. Surround myself with people that are smarter than me and take their advice. Well, that humility tends to be quite profitable of time. Hit hit to get back to. 'cause I don't dodge the question, which I may have accidentally about what can be done and what is important. Yeah. What's the practical practical scenario here the work? That's done inside the aside, the work that you and Jake talk about margins into it'll costs getting on top of your actual practice, knowing where your money is coming and going this is this work has never been more important. It is never been more important a contel, you how many how many multi practice owners individual in a behemoth practice on his reach out to me. And if I asked for their numbers, the minutes almost like it's written on a note pad or thump be dumped into an excel spreadsheet crazier. You can't sell spreadsheet is good. I mean. Yeah. That that's that's considered really really. But it's just a really recently just a data dump his everything that's happened this year, you, you know, how do you imagine? If if you're flying a plane, and none of your your dials were turned on a working, and that's a that's a swagger that. That you really can't afford in going into recession so getting on top of your costs. And I mean, honestly friends out they go back listen to conversations with with mocking Jake and talking about getting on top of your numbers. If you're. As I say, we've helps on the way we're going to be working on some stuff to make an accessible to you. What exactly to do? But that's a great place that you can start right away. Yeah. If dick fold had his head across way, his numbers were and what was going on. And he didn't have the arrogance of assumed that hundred and fifty eight limits. Five hundred fifty five hundred hundred and fifty layman would still be in business today. Just out of curiosity. What happened to him? He's he went down with the ship. I'm sure he's not working anymore. He was. Yeah. He y'all think he'd probably retreated to his hovel in the Hamptons in Upshur. He's doing just fine. Yeah. I don't think he'll build the spend the money that he he earned through Lehman Brothers. We how's this for for a gloss of of hell bulletproof arrogance can be and the the power of hubris in just three weeks before Leeman turned upside down new book, a boom in the CEO's and the other the executive directors of Neuberger Berman, which is another investment banking phone. Had everybody had been circling the wagons rather circling around the caucus of Lehman Brothers as it was falling apart. They're like jackals in wondering where they could step in grab a piece new book Bilman took the harrowed and Santon Email to the executive Lehman Brothers saying we strongly recommend that you forego this fourth quarter bonus there were millions of dollars that the executive team was taking as a bonus in the financial crisis. The main liaison of forget his name. Now say McBride that was liaison between Yuga and lemon in their kind of crisis. Talks Santa out an Email to everybody limits saying I'm so sorry that shameful. What Neuberger is suggesting what's going on of the undead apologize for bringing them mean? It's just and talk them out of it was shocking. Unbelievable. Unbelievable. So I wanna go back to the sentiment that. You express the last master meeting in that is there is no bad news. Right. Just news. You wouldn't expect? It says news your words expecting so now whether or not you choose to to believe everything that that. That is the theme of this podcast. That's your own choice. Obviously. But there is. Tengible evidence that this is going to continue to go in this direction as we speaking. This headline just came across on Bloomberg US food quarter, economic growth revised down this. It's upon us..

Jake Lehman Brothers US Neuberger Berman executive Neuberger Upshur dick Leeman McBride Santa Bilman CEO three weeks
"j j lehman" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Masters in Business

"You know, I think in retrospect, given the fallout that immediately occurred upon the filing of that bankruptcy. Maybe we should have been more creative. We could have voiced losses on the shareholders. We could afford it. It is. Well, we had a bankruptcy. You know, we could've achieved the kind of, you know, anti moral hazard problem with bailouts potentially in the way, we structured alone to the broker dealer. So as to avoid the kind of adverse impacts that. I mean that the finally Lehman Brothers created a panic. Well, okay, I'm not going to disagree with that. And so you know, that the whole the whole script of the rescue from, you know, the beginning of Bear Stearns to the opening of the FX lines to make sure that the European banks didn't default against their on their own dead and therefore default on their American counterparts. Which would have created a liquidity crisis here to the putting Fannie and Freddie into conservative ship this saving ahe the series of emergency. The alphabet soup of emergency lending programs. The fed instituted, you know, the prime dealer credit facility the talents that. Half. The you know, commercial paper facility. I mean, you know, there was a every market that had frozen up. They intervened in tried to restart in order to provide liquidity to the system. And so the question is, you know, in the midst of that just Stu NAMI of credit support and liquidity you decide to take one company now. My my pet thesis is dick fold said no to Warren Buffett's offered to inject capital over the summer. And I I wish it was a fly on the wall in that room because I have to imagine between Paulsen and Burnett making Geithner someone said this this idiot said no to Warren Buffett. How can we possibly save him? They had an opportunity. He was a pig. I always been a pig and now he should be in an orange jumpsuit, but let's not atomic tons of personalities and personal histories matter. And I so I don't think there's I don't think you're crazy in that thought. So let's talk a little about what's going on. On currently in your career after you leave treasury, you go to work as a background and an investor, and you pretty much decided to hang out your own shingle, Milstein and company tell us about the launch of that firm. And and what the thinking was is opposed to being attached to another giant financial entity. Yeah. I mean, one thing working in the government cures, you of the desire to have a boss. So I decided I would set up my own shop, I really had no grand plans. But we went from, you know, one answering another call to another call to another call him before. I knew it, you know, I had offices in New York and Washington, and we were working on large corporate restructuring since often restructurings again. And and also, you know, reinvesting the profits of the business partners the guys who join me guys and gals who join me, you know, we all agreed that the advisory businesses business that goes up and down revenue volatile..

Warren Buffett Bear Stearns Lehman Brothers fed Stu NAMI Fannie Milstein Paulsen Freddie New York Washington Geithner Burnett
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"I mean, okay. America has started somewhat, but not Europe, no. And even in America rates of far lower than what we would have considered normal levels before the crisis. The only reason that we've kept the system afloat people concil afford to meet these very high debt levels. Thanks to low interest rates. But what happens in the next crisis, two thousand seven was kind of the height of globalism as you might call it. And there was a collective crisis with central banks helping each other out with a golden Brown, supposedly organizing the rescue the world by coordinated fiscal stimulus at one of those g twenty conferences. But now politics is dominated by nationalist populous who don't believe in cooperating with other countries. So the next crisis, we will have less scope to cut interest rates than we did before unless chance for countries to go for it with each other. And that means that the response will be probably. Far worse than it wasn't two thousand eight, two thousand nine, Andrew, the next crisis. Well, it will happen. That's the first thing to say they are. They are inevitable, and it's very hard work exactly where it where it comes in, how China is opposed to the two of them too much about them. They had an incredible buildup of debt over the past ten years and people do worry about that. My money is always on property. Whenever there's a systemic banking crisis properties, implicated regulators haven't really cracked down on it. We've already talked about the US government still propping the system up, and therefore almost inevitably enabling poor decisions in terms of in terms of lending. So if there's going to be another crisis than property, I think is way. Okay property the next crisis. Thank you and Japan or business fares editor, Philip Coggan bottle, be calmness, te and car deputy editor, and on the line from New York, Tom eastern US finance editor. That's all for this special edition of money talks. We'd like to hear what you think about our podcasts. Please go to radio, communist dot com. Slash survey. I'm Helen Joyce in London. This is the economist..

America US editor deputy editor Europe Helen Joyce Andrew China Philip Coggan London Japan New York ten years
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Change the world, perhaps the most thorough and deeply on olitical take on the crisis that any authors producer for if we go back even earlier than Lehman Brothers, the subprime crisis was where this really all started wasn't it fail? And you wrote a lot about that. Have we actually worked through all of those issues and we housing now on the right basis or not depends on the country, of course, in the US house prices in sort of value terms much more reasonable than they were before you still have the system whereby government agencies support the housing market, which you could argue is not very healthy in many other countries, including Britain, house prices very high out of the reach of many people. In that, again, pointing to the political dissatisfaction is a factor. I think more generally assets in total are very highly value. If you had fallen asleep in two thousand six woken up. Now you wouldn't believe that being. Crisis because stock markets a high to low property. Prices are pretty high. It's been in the real economy that the damage of this crisis has been seen in the fact that people's incomes haven't grown significantly and that led to many of the political consequences of the crisis. So yes, where I have some middle ground with Thome is that we did stabilize the system because I think we had to, but we did a lot more for the markets than we did for main street at seemed remember you racing special report on the euro and the eurozone at what a couple of years after Lehman Brothers. That still just an another own going unanswered. Question agrees tottered about seventeen times. You know, then it moves on to somewhere else. We have Brexit is this piece of endless crisis or endless uncertainty of euro produce stabilizing again, I don't think is end of this crisis, but I do think that some of the fundamental issues the reliance of banks on government bonds and banking systems potentially needing to be bailed out by government, sue than borough reducing the value of the bonds, reducing the strength of the Bank that doom loop still exists. And I think what's been revealed in the crisis is that governments. European governments are only prepared to go so far and only when a gun is hell to their heads, which means that I think we can expect to see today's vulnerabilities remain unfixed until the next crisis tests them on. My worry given that Greece's smaller Konomi the my worry. Yeah, looking at how hard it was to cope with Greece is the next time. It won't be a smaller conham. It'll be Italy or something like that, which is a whole order of magnitude harder to cope with an an, I would say at the moment actually impossible to cope with and so that vulnerability hangs over the EU system and feeble attempts to deal with it. The continuing austerity failure to reform is happening against a backdrop of eighty nation of some countries and feeling that the us not working everybody tell me where on Wall Street ten years ago, but you are now what's the mood there people think that it's all fine or are we waiting for the next crisis with that issue of whether things have really been resolved? Huge issue. I mean, we've gone from one system where we had all these products have mentioned people really understand they existed or where they came from to another world where we have, you know, kind of grimmer set of banks, but they're supervised ways that nobody really understands. By models that people really don't understand which was actually true during the financial crisis as well and to make any sort of progress. As we've said before, you probably need very large crisis again, generally would be delighted by high prices and their high prices, the markets and their high prices back in property. In fact, we're pretty close to the property peaks that we were at before, and you have to really think about whether that's a virtue and whether that's a true recovery or that slightly frightening. As we mentioned, the housing agencies support the stuff are still around in the low standards for borrowing three percent down payments on mortgages, for instance, or high low income ratio still exist, and we have these low interest rates, proper values that are really probably not sustainable. Interest rates. This was meant to be a temporary measure, but it just never seems like it's going to go..

Lehman Brothers Greece US producer Brexit Britain Thome Italy EU eurozone three percent ten years
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"I thought we could stone pops by asking about your thoughts about the build up to the crisis. What you think went Rome to cools the great breakdown of the financial system? Ten years ago. What is tempting to focus on the sort of the trigger for the crisis, which is real estate. And there are some very big bubbles in the housing markets on both sides of the Atlantic hot spots in the United States, and then Spain, Ireland and so on. And those are the trigger, those all what bring the house of cards down. But I think we also have to look at the banking model itself. The true common denominator of the crisis, which swept all the way across the world from the Atlantic to South Korea to Russia sued. You think this is a failure of regulators to spot the problem or politicians despite the regulators were asleep on the job. I think there's probably a chicken and egg thing with regulators in the politicians, you know, full regulation needs political backing and without aggressive regulation. It's difficult for inexpert politicians, thirty gay, no a handle on the situation. But I think we should probably add in as a third group, the bankers themselves and the people that they served as after what they're doing is actually putting their survival on the line thing. It's important not to treat them as erase Bonsle children and expect. Titians and regulators to sort out the messes they make. I mean, fundamentally large part of the transatlantic financial system was operating a lethally dangerous business model which they then you know, may dangerous for each other. This is not a problem that comes from the political side. The government deficits principally. It's driven by the internal dynamics, internal contradictions of the the private credit system. We can look at the response to the crisis really in two stages. So the first response was of interest rate cuts and than initially a fiscal stimulus agreed on much of the rest of the world. But then we get to the second stage of the crisis where you'll much more critical in the book of the start of sterile in two thousand ten Britain and elsewhere. And then of course, the euro zone crisis in that year and then two thousand eleven two thousand twelve. I mean, historically speaking, it's not really just matter of personal judgment and preferences with fiscal policy. Historically speaking. Squeeze applied through the fiscal balance from two thousand and ten across the richer countries of the world is the most rapid tightening applied in response to a crisis like this on on record, certainly in recent history. So there's reason to think the something anomalous about her. I think it's driven in part by simply the scale of the fiscal blow out between two thousand eight, nine, ten, which really took everyone by surprise. And the scale of the deficits is very big. And then the kind of common sense fiscal stabilization, consolidation long-termism of the nineteen nineties, which is a common denominator. And then I think we have to credit political entrepreneurship. There is specific programs in the case of the Tory party in Britain, nor the question though, CD you in Germany as well, which is pushing a fairly, you know, sustained program fiscal consolidation all the way back to the period for two thousand night. So th variety things overlap to produce an outcome, which is in historical terms enormous. In other words, I much more rapid tightening fiscal policy than we've seen in previous. Decades and the Optima of that is still with us. Of course. Do you blame that austerity full the rise of populism that we've seen in the last three years. I'm not keen on the populist label because I think it makes us together a bunch of things which really should be kept apart. I don't think there's any doubt that they'll start squeeze in countries like Spain and Greece, and to extend also in Italy produced their vigorous left-wing response. There's also pretty good evidence from statistical work that shows that Brexit voting was particularly heavy and parts of Britain where the austerity squeeze was heaviest in local councils and so on. So two very different types of political response, but certainly evidence in both cases for the fiscal squeeze having an effect in radicalizing politics in polarizing politics and producing a in vigorous anti-systemic pushback. If you like, well, that was Adam. Twos offer of crashed how a decade of financial crises..

Britain Spain Rome United States Tory party Bonsle South Korea Brexit Italy Adam Ireland Germany Russia Greece three years Ten years
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"If you try and sell the assets to deal with that, then prices full even further. And it's a very big downward spiral. And I think it could seriously have been the same as the nineteen thirties. If nothing had happened. The other point to make here is just one of timing. This was happening extraordinarily fast, the debt to take years to build up and it was unraveling in hours. So I don't doubt that was capital out there, but the coordination of problem of getting the right capital, insufficient quantities to the right place in time. I think there was, I think I would have been extraordinarily hard. I doubt that there was enough capital though. If you think about the Irish, having to guarantee all the debts of all their banks in order to stop the crisis, I just don't see who could credibly do that. This nation problem, but also who could possibly step in with that amount of government z p, yeah. I want to come back to it after that. Of course, I mean, it's going to shape Ireland for the rest of my lifetime. Having made that promise, but it's not just shaping are shaping everywhere and are hundred seventy. Fifth anniversary is just approaching and we're thinking about the next hundred seventy five years for liberalism or perhaps less grandiosely extra next twenty five years for liberalism. How do you feel that the ten years we've lived through since the financial crisis has shaped the way situation that we're in now and the problems of liberalism going forward? I, I wrote a lot of the leaders during those months, and the thing I was grappling with most of all was how much is the aim to preserve the system and how much is it to start all over again? And I think if I look back now on what were then, I think I was too keen on preservation and not Cain enough on ripping the system up over the past decade. I've come to think that that actually by the time, the financial crime. Has happened finance in particular, become a powerful interest group that had protected itself and had engineered things to suit self and, and that you know those things needed to change. What about Utah? What do you think the balance should have been between ripping up in preserving and from where we are now, what should the balance be? I agree and fairly, whatever it saying. I think there should have been a lot of ripping up. Then the question is what sort of ripping up. I think one form of ripping up would be some sort of government control, but another form of ripping up would be allowing institutions to fail all sorts of ways. And we would have to break up a lot of the companies and banks at existed that would address moral hazard. And that might have actually been quite energizing and strengthening and ugly positive component of the financial market. I think that because we didn't do that, we have a lot of issues going forward today. Andrew, ten years later. We're still rising leaders about things like bankers bonuses. Why have we not actually managed to resolve these questions? We started on ten years ago and people are still feeling that the legacy is unfinished things have changed in fact. So I think there's a difference between this will happen behind the scenes, said the technical on sister, some of these things. So bonuses still really high, but they got cooled back now in a way that they couldn't couldn't before. And presumably if we were ever in this situation, again, public authorities would be much more careful about ensuring that the banks couldn't couldn't pay out. So I think there's a difference between more actually happened and the very legitimate anger that people feel ten years on from something that rescued the banks, but then exacted a very high price on individuals through will start, etc, etc. So to me, the should we have ripped up. The system is not quite the right. The right question, it's should. We have been radical in the way you think about the treatment of individuals as that crisis unfolded. Philip just been talking to Adam twos. Authors written a book called crushed by the financial crisis. Let's hear it from that conversation. Adam welcomed money talks. Thank you for having me on..

Adam Utah Ireland Cain Philip Andrew ten years hundred seventy five years twenty five years
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"There's this notion that everything was about to implode and we were safe and it was stopped, but I am not sure it would have played out that way. I mean, there were other pools of capital that were available in the world. If we didn't take the steps that we had taken, you know, there are companies that came to the rescue of other companies. Berkshire-hathaway for instance, about large stakes and various firms. We're pools of cash in different places. You know, the market going down dramatically was a significant event, but it needs prices cheaper and it could have created other forms of intervention. So I know things are terrible, and we chose to take one course to resolve them, but I'm still not convinced in my mind if we hadn't taken most back course and had things gone. Down. Other things wouldn't happen that may have had better implications going forward. And I mean, obviously it's impossible to tell, but I don't think histories entirely conclusive that the world fell apart and we did the right thing and saving it. Do any of you think about the idea that this could all play out in on a different path without the measures that we took? Well, I think the author Lima claps proves that wrong. They did allow a Bank to collapse and suddenly everybody in the world doubted the security of lending to a Bank and withdrew them money. And that's why the system froze up and the trouble. Warren Buffett did buy some very highly rewarded, very safe bullpens in things, but nobody wanted to step into the crisis. It'd been some investments by suffering Wilson's in Morgan Stanley and elsewhere earlier in the year, and they lost a hell of a lot of money on that. They weren't going to rush into a burning building with a teacup full of water, no circumstances. So the difficulty is when you have lone security asset prices. Ios and asset prices stopped full than the loans become worthless..

Warren Buffett Morgan Stanley Lima Wilson
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Instruments and hold of fines was kind of neatly packaged away in kept tied in little boxes and everything was in place. The crisis started this process. He'd open box after box. You'd find things in there. You have no idea what they do and instruments that appeared quite safe. Just just like the money markets suddenly in which will safehouses unfortunate phrase. They were not safe as they were thought. We absolutely safe. And then you suddenly people started losing money on these completely safe instruments and the whole, the finance loot wobbly. So that that for me was was was exactly feel says this this sense that all the things you could count on with suddenly in question, the sort of conventional ways of thinking about things where you had to unpack leeann was the symbolic height of this. But have been going on for in whatever year at that point. So Northern Rock went down with a year earlier and one foot in terms of Bank runs people queuing outside branches to get their money out. And there was a bit of that, but actually was happening in wholesale funding markets and that that was really hard to get your mind around for lots of people they hadn't thought of Bank runs in those terms. Did you take a while tone before people realized how global this was going to go? I think the concerns in the Asian markets were very, very quick, and I think I mentioned they're looking at credit default so that became a measure of how dangerous or how tottering affirm might be. And people were very conscious that have firms in America went went down or firms in Europe went down. They were going to be implicated as well. In the aftermath of Liman we were really staring into the abyss. Christine Lagarde said at the time and she called it a holy cow moment for the world economy. I'd like to ask each of you if you remember a holy cow moment wasn't for me. And it was the full. The AIG might be going down and the real doubts about whether the system could save it. For me, the one of the moments was when role Bank of Scotland faced failure in the next couple of hours in October two thousand eight and worry was that the cashpoint automated teller machines wouldn't work, which would you know you can imagine the panic that were causing the second one. I remember was congress at vote on bailing out the banks and suddenly they decided against it. This was the start of the whole political response to the crisis, and the market fell seven hundred seventy seven points. And you could see as the Republicans win to vote against it, the market falling with every tick of the no vote in in the congress and later to reverse. But that was a said, was saying nobody adults, shark, and people don't realize how serious is I go for two days off to leave. Mun the money market funds in America. There was a fun. We said it would break the bucks, say, wouldn't return the same amount that investors are put in and suddenly trillions and trillions of dollars was was potentially running. And the fed had to step in that to me was the moment who which the system was sort of maximum risk..

Christine Lagarde America Bank of Scotland leeann Northern Rock fed Liman AIG congress Europe one foot two days
"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

"Many still reckon that the huge unprecedented levels of public debt that we now see around the world Britain at one and a half times his annual GDP the US twice as high Japan, two and a half times its GDP. This Vorst dead raised in order to preserve the global economy has just stood up a bigger disaster for the future. That is one view anyway, professor twos reckons though the stimulus in all of these countries was a necessary evil in a bad situation like this. The may not be good options and the choices as it were, who pays the price full admit that she's as you have to make, and I certainly wouldn't want to go on the record or something. Monday as it were claiming the American crisis fighting as a huge tribe, but it was the least battle it was under the circumstances. They recognize what was necessary. Americans achieve remarkable feat of coordination. The Bank has the key decision makers and the private banks were all in the room at the same time on the October, thirteenth, two thousand eight. So we're not out of the crisis, but have we learned the lessons? What I think in terms of just basic immediate, emergency room medicine, a lot of lessons have been learned. There are things that we know now how to do crucially global liquidity provision is the key head is so-called liquidity swap lines that the fed set up in the fall of two thousand and eight to this is the money in the banks to make sure that in crush again. Exactly. Well, it's the money in the Bank to prevent your panicking, depositors from leaving their deposits, ensuring that anyone who makes a cash claim on the Bank can get the cash. They need with a view to ensuring that people start making cash claims. The fed, put this safety net underneath the global dollar-based banking system, which they. Activate at will. So they activated in two thousand sixteen joined the Brexit panic and insured. Basically the city of London would not run out of dollars, whatever else happened, tools like that are now available and in the toolkit that just weren't there in two thousand seven, eight Basel. Three is made a difference if so, Basel, three is the system that emerged in the nineteen seventies and eighties to regulate this global system. So that's a more optimistic. Note the, you know what. Envisaging another crash anytime soon. Not one night, two thousand tonight. It's really important to recognize this was no ordinary recession. This may be the last crisis of a European American type because it's very hard to see that kind of risk building up between those centers part from anything else because the center of gravity in the global economy is moving to East Asia. So I think the more pertinent question is, if risks like this world to develop in East Asia, crucially in the complex between China, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, which dominates much global manufacturing, how would the fed, how would the west monetary authorities relate to that? And would they intervene in the way that they were able to do in? Oh, eight in that kind of arena. But it's left us with the more polarized political climate and perhaps with a more fundamentally anemic global economy in the west for certainly more Nemec in the East Asia, the growth rates slowdown, but it's pretty hard to describe the humming hub of smartphone production in that zone, which goes to these huge cycles every time and Utech wave comes out as a Nemec. But in Europe, and that's precisely the right description. Italy's experience virtually no growth since the early two thousand seven minutes, a historic break the UK's productivity record is the worst since the eighteenth century. These are breaks ever really, very major type professor Adam twos there, author of the book crashed how a decade of financial crisis changed the world next week in business daily. We're going to have more on the tenth anniversary of lemans including a look at the psychological scars at the crisis has left and how it's impacted everything. The mental health of those attempting to get work in this post crisis economy to how it's changed people's spending habits as well. Keep it here on the BBC World Service. We'll see. Next..

fed East Asia professor BBC World Service Britain US Europe Japan professor Adam Nemec London UK Italy China South Korea Taiwan
"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

"Now I am condemned and failing depression lease grave. Professor twos reckons the choice by European politicians to apply a policy of deep austerity in countries like Greece rather than the stimulus we saw in the US has cut an effective line between the wealthy older generation who've made their money before the crisis and young people struggling to get by after it. It really is an intergenerational question above all in Europe. At this point, the labor market shut for ten years, affective Hokuto hall to people, which is tragedy. And it's, I mean, it's an economic tragedy as well as as a human personal personal tragedy and politically to countries like Italy, which have no track record of europhobic attitude of hostility to the EU. So as you also have a skills gap that you and your pure economic terms, you've got a whole generation of people who haven't been learning that trades. Yes. And this isn't to say that the Italian economy does not arguably needs structural reform, various types of the quality of the labor supply could not be improved and so on and so forth. But all of that kind of painful medicine is much easier to take in an. Environment of overall growth and the Germans who did adult that kind of so-called reform policy in the early two thousands did. So at a time when their own fiscal policy was in fact extremely loose. So they're sequencing was to do labor market and social welfare reform early at a time when that fiscal deficit was large, in fact in violation of EU rules subsequently than to impose a tight fiscal policy on themselves, what they were demanding of the rest of the year as I was that they did both those things at the same time. So it's a much much more arduous program that was demanded. Let alone this before it start talking about somewhere like Greece, which was put on a crash program, like very few places I've ever seen in history but happens. We shouldn't be surprised though because in one thousand twenty nine, ten years after that, we were about to enter World War Two, and that a lot of people see as a legacy of of the crash in an indoor rank sense. And you know, it's always gonna, take gigantic seismic economic events such as two thousand and eight was a generation always to play out, isn't it? There's no doubt about that. The effects of. Two thousand and eight rebound to be severe. But if you compare, for instance, the United States, China and the euro Zionists three different responses to this crisis. You see the remarkably different range of options that are available the Chinese blast way through the crisis with a stimulus program that's firing in all cylinders by government expenditure and the mobilization of the banking system. And the United States is much closer to the Chinese than it is to the euro zone, which did as much as it possibly could to avoid active policy. And in the case of the, I think what has to say the opportunity presented was precisely to use the pressure to force through change in Spain in Italy that the conservatives and they were frankly could politically conservative who were running the thought when necessary for European integration to be durable. So there's no mistake on their part. It's important on the stand that what happened may look like a disaster, but from the point of view of people at the easy be, it's not a mistake. It is indeed the short run cost that they think it's necessary to pay. Than if you want models for thinking about this, especially on the German side. I think the analog is German unification. They think about the European process has analogous to the sorta pain. The east Germany was put through in the nine hundred ninety s and the early two thousands. So as you can hear, professor, twos has very little sympathy for those pulling the strings of European economic policy over the last decade. Of course, there is a counter view..

United States EU professor Greece Italy Europe Hokuto hall east Germany Spain China ten years
"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

"In the US, the huge cash stimulus with hundreds of billions of dollars around the world. All of this help to prop up stock markets, but hasn't seemed to lift our sense of gloom. It's very hard to see even over the medium-term how we returned to something called normality. Normalization is the name of the game for central bankers everywhere because we're still living with zero very, very low interest rates in many parts of the world, yes and very low inflation as well. Why shouldn't underestimate. I think the fiscal side of this story to the decision by the government of the United States to reduce taxes and increase spending to deliver a deliberate boost highest spending on unemployment benefit on the one hand and reduced income at any given tax rate to tax services. Paju stay nets. Stimulus effect around the world that was gigantic. This is the largest increase in public. That's in any way since World War Two. But while that was the general spots in the US Britain and China, it took longer to happen in the European Union even as several European economies Greece most dramatically began to buckle under the burden of debt. You're critical of. Europe's specifically Europe's response. You think that they'll steady and the reaction to the so-called sovereign debt problems of Greece and other countries with flawed fundamentally, and has been proved to be a failure. I think that's broadly speaking true. It's a huge missed opportunity for collective European economic policy. We see in retrospect in two thousand fifteen onwards, how powerful a q. directed by the can be asset. By by the European Central Bank has fundamentally stabilized European bomb markets provides a basic underlying underpinning of stability. It's what any normal central Bank will normally do, and that's precisely what was missing in the zone from two thousand ten onwards. There's a contradiction here though, in a way, isn't there because particularly the actions of the fed the QE there have as you say, change, distorted global markets. Emerging markets were seeing what's happening in Turkey and Indonesia at the moment with you. Get a very big collapses because of this withdrawal of money looks like as a result was aftermath of of the of the winding down of QE. Maybe we needed to have more sturdy in your. Maybe we needed more of that hard knocks approach in order to have the kind of the moral hazard thrashed out for us earlier in the east where it's a question if you pays the price, right? So the moral hazard argument largely pertains to hear responsible profit-driven. Banks who needs to be contained are there is no gigantic, boom in public boring before two thousand eight. One of the great myths of the crisis is that the eurozone encouraged huge amounts of sovereign barring by governments in Europe before two thousand eight simply not true. It's gigantic, private debt bubble the builds up that bursts and in a few insulated isolated cases, producers repercussions in the public sector which become too much for them to handle, which was what we saw in garages. What we saw in Greece in is alternately what we saw in Ireland to which started the crisis with minimal public that. So the basic origin. The crisis is in the private sector, and that's the moral hazard that needs to be contained the price for the austerity policies is paid by the forty, five percent of Spanish and Italian young people who are unemployed. So if that is the kind of line that one's going to take the implied politics, extremely frankly, conservative in their implications professor twos, they're referencing the youth unemployment levels in Italy and Spain in many European countries that figure remains historically high, even now ten years on in Greece. It is more than forty three percent in Spain, thirty four, Italy, that two percent. I saw the sheer misery of this dramatic economic contraction myself on the streets of Athens. When I visited a food kitchen in two thousand thirteen. Somebody, how long have you been coming? Never developed an accent or put the number. MRI chromosome, I have a year and a half, and I get as a pension is two hundred euros and that's not enough for me to survive. So I come here to eat at least one of the meals of the day. Plays. I've been coming for three year in the economic crisis began. I have gone. And I'm homeless. There is no government protection over us..

Greece Europe United States European Central Bank Spain Italy European Union Turkey Athens Ireland Indonesia professor China Britain forty three percent
"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on Business Daily

"Five cents a share. Wall Street's worst day since nine eleven the Dow plunging more than five hundred points the SMP down almost five percents the wreckage on precipated. Ops on Wall Street today, bankrupt. It was an historic day with Wall Street shake into its very foundation today. And even the health of the most trusted firms are now being called into question. Yes. This was the day September the fifteenth, two thousand and eight when Lehman Brothers, the major US investment Bank collapsed loudly because of its huge exposure to a sliding US housing market. It was a calamitous event triggering a series of other failures or near failures, symptomatic of weaknesses across the western banking system. No one it seems was immune from the crash that followed the has not been crisis as dangerous as September. Two thousand and eight looked ever before in the history of capitalism. Full stop ever. It's it was much much more dramatic than any moment in one thousand nine hundred nine hundred thirty three because it was all of the big banks symbol Tena on a huge scale on a timescale of ours. So like a runaway chain reaction in Ikeda pile. We've seen some bad ones say fine, but this is far worse than shown a bowl of Fukushima where any of those things. The words there of Adam twos, he's professor of history, Columbia University in New York City. He's now also the author of a huge all-encompassing study of the financial crisis crashed. How a decade of financial crisis changed. The world is its title today. In this program, I'm going to be describing in the broadest terms what the legacy is with professor twos. He argues the lessons in reverberations of two thousand and eight a still even today defining much of our modern political and economic life in Europe. The impact of the crisis is still felt extremely widely, particularly across the euro-zone, the changes and damage and losses suffered by citizens taxpayers working people across Europe are long lasting in their Fets in the United States. You'd have to say that there's sort of triple movement. On the one hand, we have financial markets which have recovered rather well since two thousand nine under the stimulus of QE we have. A large part of the American population which is not being polluted in that recovery, and we have a political system both on the left underwrite which is showing really unprecedented fracturing of the previous duopoly of the Democratic Party and the Republican party. So the rise of populist politicians, and we talked about them in Europe and America, Donald Trump Brexit, and indeed other parties across Europe. They are a symptom, a direct symptom of the financial crisis. In the case of the United States, particularly clear that the tea party gets. It started in two thousand nine is a protest movement, not against the bailouts, but as a protest against the very idea of assisting other homeowners, it's the feckless mortgage bore next door that they will not person to stew in their own juice and suffer the consequences of their bad decisions. Occupy the origin of Bernie Sanders is phenomenal. Run for the democratic nomination, fifteen sixteen lodged in the fall of twenty eleven symbolically on the park immediately by Wall Street. It's a direct challenge in that case to Obama and the centrist part of the democratic. Party that had managed the stabilization effort. So in the United States particularly clear that this poodle is -ation of politics. I think that's a better way of thinking of it than talk just generally about populism the fragmenting of the deal, which center liberal cetera left parties and center right parties done respectively since the nineteen eight thousand nine hundred ninety s that can be directly traced back to those first couple of years after the financial crisis..

US Europe Republican party Democratic Party Lehman Brothers Ikeda pile Obama Bernie Sanders professor Columbia University New York City Donald Trump Brexit professor of history Adam Fets
"j j lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"You then take the mortgages and you squash him together, slice and dice them and sell out slices to other people. But in the late two, thousands people stopped paying back and Liman had done this slicing and dicing and failed to sell off all the pieces. And so when people lost faith that these things were worth any money, they lost faith. Lehman Brothers had any money. Lehman Brothers was not a traditional Bank despite the fact we call it a Bank. It didn't have deposits. It didn't have access to what's known as the Federal Reserve discount window which is emergency money. So. When people lost faith in it, it had nowhere to turn. And so the US government decided not to open the discount window to it and said, go bust. And so when it went bust, it basically took down or would have taken down the entire financial system with it. But it is seen as sort of the final straw that just sent the world into economic tailspin in September. Two thousand and eight is very complex, but also does an inherent drama and you can see why it might have appealed to the theater makers here. Do you think that the play rap was with this complexity? Not at all. It's a play which you could like for lots of other reasons. The play never actually gets to residential mortgage backed securities. The last thing you hear about is somewhere in the sixties and seventies Liman is getting into trading trading is perfectly valid and had nothing to do with what brought down Lehman. I mean, does it in any way, showing new light on the collapse and the kind of the crisis that followed. It reminds you that behind this company that has become a synonym. For evil were people who had worked hard and spent their whole lives building something, and that it wasn't an inherently evil structure. And I think that's worth remembering because investment banking and banking have been so torn ish and people lose side effect that they actually do good in the world. We have banks for a reason in that it is good. It doesn't tell us anything really about the financial crisis does. It don't remain to Cise capitalism. Yeah, I suppose it doesn't mean you see these immigrants arrive and they build something and we are told fundamentally that they're making things happen and helping America grow. But that's actually true. And I think actually to be fair to as they get into riskier things, the thing they refer to as trading, you get the sense that something bad is starting to happen. So I think actually it's not completely unfair Hof way through when Philip says, the flower of all cake is is not money. It's no longer just investing in cotton. Is that not a moment when it becomes it starts coming. Some dock at the doesn't seem if. Money is not inherently sinister. Obviously, you're talking to someone who's covered the banking industry for many years, financialisation and money just to make money is bad, but an awful lot of what they were doing, especially at that moment which was helping people bring money together and then lend it back out again. So you can make functional economy is still necessary. So there is this reference to something has gone bad and they've lost sight of the that banks should serve society as opposed to banks just making money. On the other hand, the thing they were actually doing again at that moment wasn't such a bad thing and Sarah thinking about this as a welcome theater, does it work in the way that it tells.

Lehman Brothers Liman Federal Reserve Lehman US Philip Sarah America
"j j lehman" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

The Myth Of The 20th Century

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"j j lehman" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

"Trigger uh in the financial crisis when they let lehman brothers fail uh most of the other uh markets were scared for our fiji i would think that yes term of art the guy acts i'll just make the quickly i would say that the the matter of a socalled systemically important institutions and the matter of um sorted this digital digitalization of banking those are two different issues and that the systemically important institutions like those were just as in systemic in 1930 three at the bottom of the great depression as they were uh in two thousand eight when lehman brothers a blew up in i think it was in in september that like we really want to i think of when we're thinking about this esthetically important situtions is you know the in the room which is the fed but we are starting to take it met direction yet that's not were you guys one take a bullet so i would actually pushback a little bit on bat lake become regardless of the armed with this sort of distribution of the sizes of institutions and can of what that craft structure looks like if you have on use of deary a low leading see communication on that ends up giving you a lot of returns to scale on even even see things her like okay barriers to entry are very low on so you have like a lot of a.

financial crisis lehman brothers fiji great depression fed bat lake